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Publication numberUS20070252061 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/742,428
Publication dateNov 1, 2007
Filing dateApr 30, 2007
Priority dateApr 28, 2006
Publication number11742428, 742428, US 2007/0252061 A1, US 2007/252061 A1, US 20070252061 A1, US 20070252061A1, US 2007252061 A1, US 2007252061A1, US-A1-20070252061, US-A1-2007252061, US2007/0252061A1, US2007/252061A1, US20070252061 A1, US20070252061A1, US2007252061 A1, US2007252061A1
InventorsRobin Laurence Feetham, Darla Surray Feetham
Original AssigneeRobin Laurence Feetham, Darla Surray Feetham
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Grip hanger
US 20070252061 A1
Abstract
A load carrying apparatus. The apparatus has a rod section with a cross-section which extends along a rod section length. The rod section has a series of bends which define the following: a load carrying portion, cantilevered arm portion, an anchor portion. The anchor portion attaches to a pole which is arranged along a vertical axis perpendicular to a longitudinal and transverse axis. The cantilevered arm portion extends from the vertical pole and the anchor portion. The load carrying portion extends from the cantilevered arm portion and maintains a payload at an offset location from the longitudinal axis. The offset location of the payload results in a torque about the cantilevered arm portion. The cantilevered arm portion transfers to the anchor portion a first moment and a second moment. The first and second moments couple about the vertical pole to maintain the load carrying apparatus on the vertical pole while supporting the payload.
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Claims(41)
1. A load carrying apparatus, said apparatus comprising:
a. a rod section comprising a single uniform cross-section extending along a rod section length, said rod section comprising a series of bends defining a load carrying portion, a cantilevered arm portion, an anchor portion;
b. said anchor portion configured to attach to a substantially vertical pole, said vertical pole arranged along a vertical axis, perpendicular to a longitudinal axis and a transverse axis;
c. said cantilevered arm portion arranged about a cantilevered longitudinal axis, said cantilevered arm portion extending from said anchor portion;
d. said load carrying portion extending from said cantilevered arm portion to maintain a pay-load at an offset location from said longitudinal axis, resulting in a torque about said cantilevered arm portion;
e. said cantilevered arm portion transferring to said anchor portion a first moment and a second moment applied to said vertical pole, said first and second moments coupling said anchor portion to said vertical pole.
2. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said anchor portion further comprises: a first bearing seat and a second bearing seat, said first and second bearing seats connected together by a leverage arm, said leverage arm maintaining said first and second bearing seats a coupling distance apart.
3. The apparatus according to claim 2 above wherein said anchor portion further comprises: said first bearing seat further comprising a first frictional resistant component; said second bearing seat further comprising a second frictional resistance component.
4. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said cantilevered arm portion further comprises: a longitudinally parallel configuration to maintain a substantially parallel alignment with said longitudinal axis when said load carrying apparatus is attached to said vertical pole.
5. The apparatus according to claim 3 wherein said first moment further comprises a major moment resulting from said cantilevered arm supporting said load carrying portion maintaining said pay-load.
6. The apparatus according to claim 5 wherein said second moment further comprises a minor moment resulting from said load carrying portion asserting a torque about said cantilevered arm portion.
7. The apparatus according to claim 6 wherein said minor moment is resolved into an upper minor breaking force and a lower minor breaking force against said vertically aligned pole when said load carrying apparatus is attached to said pole.
8. The apparatus according to claim 7 wherein said major moment is resolved into an upper major breaking force and a lower major breaking force against said vertically aligned pole when said load carrying apparatus is attached to said pole.
9. The apparatus according to claim 8 wherein said upper minor breaking force is applied onto said vertical pole within a first bearing location by said first bearing seat; said lower minor braking force is applied onto said vertical pole within a second bearing location by said second bearing seat.
10. The apparatus according to claim 9 wherein said upper major breaking force is applied onto said vertical pole within a first bearing location by said first bearing seat; said lower major braking force is applied onto said vertical pole within a second bearing location by said second bearing seat.
11. The apparatus according to claim 10 wherein said first frictional resistance component in combination with said upper minor breaking force and said upper major breaking force provide a first frictional resistance force.
12. The apparatus according to claim 11 wherein said second frictional resistance component in combination with said lower minor breaking force and said lower major breaking force provide a second frictional resistance force.
13. The apparatus according to claim 12 wherein said first frictional resistance force and said second frictional resistance force combine to resist a vertical component of said pay-load and maintain said load carrying apparatus on said vertical pole.
14. The apparatus according to claim 13 wherein said payload has a weight capacity range between about 0 lbs and not more than about 50 lbs.
15. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said anchor portion further comprises: said rod section comprising a high coefficient frictional coating.
16. The apparatus according to claim 15 wherein said high coefficient frictional coating further comprises latex rubber tubing.
17. The apparatus according to claim 15 wherein said high coefficient frictional coating further comprises one or more of the following: a silicon material; a butel rubber material; a natural rubber material.
18. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said rod section single uniform cross-section further comprises: a circular cross-section.
19. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said rod section single uniform cross-section further comprises one or more of the following: a rectilinear cross-section; an oval cross-section; a semi-circular cross-section.
20. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said rod section single uniform cross-section further comprises: a tubular cross-section, said tubular cross-section further comprising an inner radius and an outer radius.
21. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said rod section single uniform cross-section further comprises: a solid core material and an outer coating layer.
22. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said load carrying portion further comprises a first carrying arrangement configured to maintain a single payload item at said offset position.
23. The apparatus according to claim 22 wherein said load carrying portion further comprises a second carrying arrangement configured to maintain a second payload in a second offset position.
24. The apparatus according to claim 23 wherein said load carrying portion further comprises a third carrying arrangement configured to maintain a third payload in a third offset position.
25. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said load carrying portion further comprises a substantially U-shaped bend to maintain said payload in an offset position.
26. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said load carrying portion further comprises a substantially V-shaped bend to maintain said payload in an offset position.
27. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said load carrying portion further comprises a substantially semicircular bend to maintain said payload in an offset position.
28. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said load carrying portion further comprises a substantially oval shape bend to maintain said payload in an offset position.
29. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said load carrying portion further comprises a substantially rectilinear shaped bend to maintain said payload in an offset position.
30. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said load carrying portion further comprises a substantially S-shaped configuration to maintain said payload in an offset position.
31. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said payload further comprises: a musical instrument; a bottle beverage and musical paraphernalia.
32. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said anchor portion further comprises: an opposing U-shaped configuration.
33. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said anchor portion further comprises: a spiral-like configuration with a locking leg.
34. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said cantilevered arm portion extends from an upper bearing seat location of said anchor portion.
35. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said cantilever portion extends from a lower bearing seat location of said anchor portion.
36. The apparatus according to claim 2 wherein said cantilever portion extends from intermediate location between said first bearing seat and said second bearing seat of said anchor portion.
37. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said rod section further comprises: an aluminum cross-section material.
38. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said rod section further comprises one or more of the following: a steel material; a copper material; a polycarbonate material; a fiberglass material; a polyvinylchloride material; a graphite material.
39. A method of forming a load carrying apparatus, said method comprising:
a. providing a rod section comprising a single uniform cross-section extending along a rod section length;
b. bending said rod section into a load carrying portion, a cantilevered arm portion, an anchor portion;
c. bending said anchor portion to attach to a substantially vertical pole, said vertical pole arranged along a vertical axis, perpendicular to a longitudinal axis and a transverse axis;
d. bending said cantilevered arm portion to be alinged along a cantilevered longitudinal axis;
e. bending said cantilevered arm portion to extend from said anchor portion;
f. bending said load carrying portion to extend from said cantilevered arm portion to maintain a pay-load at an offset location from said longitudinal axis, resulting in a torque about said cantilevered arm portion;
g. said cantilevered arm portion transferring to said anchor portion a first moment and a second moment applied to said vertical pole, said first and second moments coupling said anchor portion to said vertical pole.
40. A load carrying apparatus, said apparatus comprising:
a. means for providing a rod section comprising a single uniform cross-section extending along a rod section length;
b. means for bending said rod section into a load carrying portion, a cantilevered arm portion, an anchor portion;
c. means for bending said anchor portion to attach to a substantially vertical pole, said vertical pole arranged along a vertical axis, perpendicular to a longitudinal axis and a transverse axis;
d. means for bending said cantilevered arm portion to be alinged along a cantilevered longitudinal axis;
e. means for bending said cantilevered arm portion to extend from said anchor portion;
f. means for bending said load carrying portion to extend from said cantilevered arm portion to maintain a pay-load at an offset location from said longitudinal axis, resulting in a torque about said cantilevered arm portion;
g. said cantilevered arm portion transferring to said anchor portion a first moment and a second moment applied to said vertical pole, said first and second moments coupling said anchor portion to said vertical pole.
41. A load carrying apparatus, said apparatus comprising:
a. a rod section comprising a single uniform cross-section extending along a rod section length, said rod section comprising a series of bends defining a load carrying portion, a cantilevered arm portion, an anchor portion;
b. said anchor portion configured to interoperably attach to a substantially vertical pole, said vertical pole arranged along a vertical axis, perpendicular to a longitudinal axis and a transverse axis;
c. said anchor portion further comprising a first bearing seat and a second bearing seat, said first and second bearing seats connected together by a leverage arm, said leverage arm maintaining said first and second bearing seats a coupling distance apart;
d. said cantilevered arm portion arranged about a cantilevered longitudinal axis, said cantilevered arm portion extending from said first bearing seat, said cantilevered arm portion configured to maintain a substantially parallel alignment with said longitudinal axis when said load carrying apparatus is attached to said vertical pole;
e. said load carrying portion extending from said cantilevered arm portion to maintain said load at an offset location from said longitudinal axis;
f. said load carrying portion asserting a torque about said cantilevered arm portion resulting in a minor moment resolved into a upper minor breaking force and a lower minor breaking force against said vertically aligned pole;
g. said cantilevered arm portion supporting said load carrying portion resulting in a major moment on said vertical pole resolved into an upper major breaking force and a lower major breaking force against said vertically aligned pole;
h. said upper minor breaking force and said upper major breaking force applied onto said vertical pole at a first bearing location by said first bearing seat;
i. said lower minor breaking force and said lower major breaking force applied onto said vertical pole at a second bearing location by said second bearing seat;
j. said first bearing seat comprising a first frictional resistance component;
k. said second bearing seat comprising a second frictional resistance component;
l. said first frictional resistance component in combination with said upper minor breaking force and said upper major breaking force providing a first frictional resistance force;
m. said second frictional resistance component in combination with said lower minor breaking force and said lower major breaking force providing a second frictional resistance force;
n. said first frictional resistance force and said second frictional resistance force combining to resists said load and maintain said load carrying apparatus on said vertical pole.
Description
RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority benefit of U.S. Ser. No. 60/796,316, filed Apr. 28, 2006 (a Saturday) which accordingly under 35 U.S.C. § 119 (e) (3), extends the period of pendency of the provisional application to the next succeeding secular or business, that day being Apr. 30, 2007.

BACKGROUND

U.S. Pat. No. 6,231,018 discloses a guitar hanger. In the Summary of the Invention section in col. 1 around line 40, “the present invention includes a base member operable to attach to a substantially vertically oriented plane; and a hanger member including two spaced apart substantially longitudinally disposed rods, the rods having respective ends terminating at a coupling portion and respective distal ends defining an opening region for receiving a guitar neck, wherein the coupling portion is operable to engage the aperture such that hanger member removably connects to the base member, the rod extending outward from the plane and the coupling portion engages the aperture.”

U.S. Pat. No. 6,204,440 discloses a guitar holder device. In the Summary of the Invention section in col. 1 around line 13 the main purpose is “to provide a guitar holder device which can be hung on a rack. In addition, the present invention is to provide a guitar holder which has a disk to be rotated to any predetermined angle. To accomplish these purposes, the device has a U-shaped hanger, an L-shaped rod on the U-shaped hangar, a holderjoint at one end of the L-shaped rod, a disk inserted in the holderjoint pivotably and a U-shape bar connected to the disk. The U-shaped hanger can be adjusted angularly about the disk in the horizontal plane.”

U.S. Pat. No. 5,941,490 discloses a holder for musical instrument, or the like, such as a guitar where the instrument is not in use by the owner. The holder has three points of impingement, one on the front of the instrument, a second on the rear of the instrument, and a third on a support means such as a shelf, where the three points of impingement are interconnected. In the Summary of the Invention section in col. 1 around line 38, “the holder of the invention needs only a ledge, shelf or protrusion, approximately ¼ inch to ½ inch wide in order to give it the purchase to hold a guitar.” Furthermore at line 53 in the same column, “the guitar neck is placed in between a V-shaped member, impinging on the back of the neck with the guitar neck cradled in the ‘V’ and a lower member impinging on the front of neck. This provides essentially a three-point retaining system”.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,991,809 discloses a musical instrument support. Referring to col. 1 around line 50, “a musical instruments support is movably connected to a support or an amplifier. The support is adapted to support a guitar.” A back clip is connected to a front clip with springs connecting the front and back clip together so that the support can be stretched over the top face of the amplifier and maintained in a relatively static position while it is supporting the musical instrument.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,182,505 discloses a musical instrument hanger and cover therefore. The hangar portion is attached (as seen in col. 2 around line 17) to an aperture board, where the hangar has a horizontal rod connected at its outer extremity by a rivet to a cross plate. A stiff U-shaped wire is welded to the upper surface of the plate providing the hangar with a pair of longitudinal extensions. The space between the legs is adapted to receive a musical instrument such as a guitar neck. As seen in column one around line 38, this invention is “directed to a protective device for covering the musical instrument hangar which has a lateral base and a pair of longitudinal extensions providing space for receiving a musical instrument. The device includes at least one tubular body connected to an elongated flexible retaining means. The tubular body covers a longitudinal extension of the hangar and a retaining means wraps around the lateral base portion to retain the tubular body.”

U.S. Pat. No. 1,170,684 discloses a violin supporting attachment for musical stands. Referring to col. 1 around line 44, “the main feature of the invention is the swiveling of a fork member where the member can be readily swung about its axis when a violin is supported. A body part configured as a cylindrical block has a transverse cylindrical passage to receive the tubular section of the musical stand. A threaded screw is aligned along the central axis of the tubular body at the aft end of the tubular body and extends into the transverse cylindrical passageway to impinge upon the music stand. A fork member made of a U-shaped wire frame receives the neck of a violin to engage and strings or the pin.”

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the load carrying apparatus holding a musical instrument;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the load carrying apparatus;

FIG. 3A is a plan view of a first embodiment of the load carrying apparatus;

FIG. 3B is a front elevational view of a first embodiment of the load carrying apparatus;

FIG. 3C is a side elevational view of a first embodiment of the load carrying apparatus;

FIG. 4A is a plan view of a second embodiment of the load carrying apparatus;

FIG. 4B is a front elevational view of a second embodiment of the load carrying apparatus;

FIG. 4C is a side elevational view of a second embodiment of the load carrying apparatus;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of an alternative embodiment of the load carrying apparatus with a two payload configuration;

FIG. 5A is a plan view of an alternative embodiment of the load carrying apparatus with a three payload configuration;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of an alternative embodiment of the load carrying apparatus with an alternative two payload configuration;

FIG. 7 is a plan view of an alternative embodiment of the load carrying apparatus with a V-shaped configuration;

FIG. 8 is a plan view of an alternative embodiment of the load carrying apparatus with an S-shaped configuration;

FIG. 9 is a plan view of an alternative embodiment of the load carrying apparatus with a two payload configuration;

FIG. 10 is a side elevational view of an alternative embodiment of the load carrying apparatus with a two cantilevered arm configuration;

FIG. 11 is a side elevational view of an alternative embodiment of the load carrying apparatus with a lower cantilever arm configuration;

FIG. 12 is a side elevational view of an alternative embodiment of the load carrying apparatus with an intermediate cantilevered arm configuration.

DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENTS

The present device acts as a load carrying or holding device which can easily attach to any suitable stable vertical metal rod, for example, musician stage poles or playing venue poles which support musical sheets etc.

Generally speaking, the device uses a coupling action about the rod and applies a braking force in combination with frictional vertical resistance along the vertically aligned pole using, in one embodiment, a high-coefficient friction coating which may be latex rubber tubing and which is installed over the metal rod portion. The metal rod section is a single continuous piece of solid or hollow tubing. An offset load is maintained relative to the vertical central axis of the support pole, offset from the longitudinal/vertical plane (as discussed below) and running parallel to the cantilevered arm portion. The offset load is maintained by, in one embodiment, a U-hanger, which is arranged through bending of the single continuous piece of rod section. The offset load creates major coupling forces and minor coupling forces due to the offset location of the vertical load. Loads as high as 30 lbs. are supported in various embodiments. The material used for the rod section may consist of aluminum cross-section, steel cross-section, copper cross-section, or any other suitable metallic, polycarbonate, fiberglass, plastic or PVC, graphite, or any other material suitable to maintain the load its present position. Furthermore, the present embodiment utilizes an outer layer of high frictional coefficient resisting material, such as the latex rubber tubing, but in some embodiments, the latex rubber tubing is not required in order to maintain the load carrying device in any vertical position on the vertical pole.

Referring to FIG. 1, one embodiment of the load-carrying device 10 is shown holding a musical instrument 12, which in this particular embodiment is a guitar. The load-carrying device has three major portions. The first portion is a cantilevered portion 18 which acts as a cantilevered arm to hold the musical instrument 12 longitudinally away from the vertically aligned pole 22, to which the load carrying device 10 is inter-operably attached. The second portion is an anchor portion 20. The third portion is a transversely aligned load carrying portion 16.

The anchor portion 20 maintains the musical instrument 12 in position with the vertical pole 22 by resisting both a major moment and a minor moment. The major moment is resultant of the load carried in a longitudinally offset position which is located along the cantilevered portion 18, and the minor moment a result of the load carried in a transversely offset location from the longitudinal axis which results in a torsional moment about the cantilevered portion. The anchor portion 20, as will be discussed below, has a support origin seat 68 which is also considered a first seat 30 or the upper bearing seat 30 and a leverage seat 32, also referred to as a second seat or lower bearing seat 32, as shown in FIG. 3C. As discussed below, the seats act as opposing breaking force applicators for both of the major breaking forces, and the minor (torsional) breaking forces as discussed in more detail below. As shown in FIG. 2, the origin seat 30 is vertically positioned above the leverage seat 32, the seats being connected by a leverage arm 66.

The third main portion of this particular embodiment is the load carrying portion 16 as shown in FIG. 1. In one embodiment, the load carrying portion is configured as an open-ended u-shaped slot and is arranged to support the neck portion of the musical instrument 12. Other embodiments of the load carrying portion are discussed below.

The entire load carrying device 10 is constructed of a single continuous rod-section member 14. In the present embodiment, as discussed above, the rod section member 14 is made of a single continuous piece of aluminum. The aluminum rod section is solid, although in some embodiments utilizing a different material; for example, a steel tubing-type configuration would likely support the desired load carrying characteristics.

All of the major portions of the load carrying device 10 are defined by the single continuous rod section piece 14. A series of reverse bends provide for the definition of the major portions of the load carrying device 10. Discussion of these bends will now be provided.

Referring to FIGS. 3A-3C, there will now be a discussion of the load carrying device 10 with an opposing U-shape clip anchor arrangement in the embodiment shown, and how the three major portions of the rod section are defined by a series of bends to arrange the rod section a load-bearing configuration.

Referring first to FIG. 3A, the rod section is defined by a first terminal end 80 and the second terminal end 82. Because the rod section is a continuous member, it only has two ends. In this particular environment, the load carrying portion 16 is defined by a series of bends to create an open-ended u-shaped configuration to hold the previously-mentioned musical instrument 12.

In order to adequately define the U-shaped configuration, discussion will be made referring to an axial system. The vertically aligned pole 22 has a vertical central axis 24, and a longitudinal axis 40 extends perpendicularly away from the central axis and defines a vertical. Parallel with the longitudinal axis 40 is a cantilevered longitudinal axis 42 which is substantially centered along the cantilevered arm portion 18. Perpendicular to the longitudinal axis 40 is a transverse axis 41 which originates from the same central vertical axis 24 as the longitudinal axis 40.

In the present embodiment (FIGS. 3A-3C) of the load carrying device 10, the rod section defines a cantilevered tail end 28 of the load carrying portion 16. This cantilevered tail end runs from the first terminal end 80 and transitions into a first 180-degree reverse U-bend 84. This U-bend 84 is vertically aligned. The rod section then defines the first of two substantially horizontal and longitudinally parallel U-shaped legs, an outermost longitudinal leg 86, and an innermost longitudinal leg 87. Connecting these legs is a bottom U-shaped leg 90 through which the rod section is connected together by a first 90-degree bend and a second 90-degree bend 89. In the alternative, the entire U-shaped load carrying apparatus is formed from a single 90 degree U-bend. Afterwards, the rod section transitions to the cantilevered arm portion 18 through a second 180-degree reverse U-bend 92 (also vertically positioned).

The cantilevered arm portion 18 then transitions into the first of two anchor seats. The first anchor or origin seat 30 is defined by a third 180-degree U-bend 31 (arranged substantially horizontally). Immediately after the third 180 degree U-bend 31, the rod section transitions to the lever arm portion 66 through a third 90-degree bend 94 (arranged substantially vertical). The lever arm in this particular embodiment maintains a substantially S-shaped configuration 96 while still providing a vertically planar orientation parallel with the longitudinal axis 40. The right section then transitions to a fourth 90-degree bend 98, and then immediately transitions into the substantially horizontally (longitudinal and transverse plane) aligned fourth 180-degree reverse u-bend 100 which forms the second anchor seat or leverage seat 32. The rod section terminates at the second terminal end 82.

A brief discussion will now be provided of a second embodiment (as seen in FIGS. 4A-4C) where the load-carrying device 10 is configured as a load-carrying device with spiral anchor portion 150. In the present alternative embodiment, the load-carrying portion 16 and the cantilevered arm portion 18 are both configured as previously mentioned in FIGS. 3A-3C. The anchor portion 20 is configured differently as a downwardly spiraling leg oriented to wrap around the vertically aligned pole 22.

After the rod section 14 completes the cantilevered arm portion 18, the rod section transitions into the origin seat 30, which in this case this a third 180 degree reverse U-band 156 which is orientated in a vertically downward angular direction. This angular direction ranges from 30-60 degrees from the horizontal, but in the present embodiment is about 45 degrees. After completing the 180 degree bend, the rod section then transitions into a fourth 180 degree U-bend 160 which completes a second downward angular direction spiraling around the vertical pole 22. The leverage seat 32 in this case is the fourth 180 degree U-bend 160.

Discussion will now be provided with regard to the carrying capacity of the load-carrying device 10 as seen in FIGS. 3A-3C. The discussion will be focused on the load positioned in an offset location, and the results of this offset load position on the load-carrying device 10 with discussion about the resultant major coupling moment 70 a.k.a. the first moment, and the minor coupling moment 72 a.k.a. the second moment.

The offset load center of gravity 44 is located somewhere around the midpoint between the transversely positioned longitudinally aligned U-shaped legs 86 and 87. Because the load-carrying portion 16 acts as a transversely aligned cantilever extending perpendicular to the cantilevered arm portion 18 (arranged longitudinally parallel with the longitudinal axis 40), the load 44 exerts a torque about the central longitudinal axis 42 of the cantilever. In this particular embodiment, this torque acts in a counterclockwise direction. As seen in FIG. 3B, taking sum of the moments about the origin coupling point 56, produces an upper minor braking force 50 which is exerted in the transverse direction perpendicular to the vertically aligned central axis 24 against the outer surface of the vertically aligned pole, the pole surface in contact with the cantilevered arm portion 18 and origin seat 30. This outer surface will be referred to as the minor upper bearing surface 51.

An equal but opposite lower minor braking force 52 is exerted in the opposite transverse direction against the opposite side of the vertical pole by the leverage seat 32 exerting the minor lower braking force 52 against a minor lower braking force bearing surface 53 of the outer surface of the vertical pole.

The leverage arm 66 transmits the shear forces generated by the torsional force about the cantilevered central longitudinal axis 42 and applies the shear forces to the leverage seat 32 thus substantially balancing the minor lower braking force 52 against the minor lower bearing surface 53.

Acting concurrently with the minor coupling moment 72 is a major coupling moment 70 which is generated by the offset load 44 combined with the cantilevered longitudinal load arm 60 which extends from the center of gravity of the offset load to the vertical central axis 24. The sum of the moments is taken about the coupling origin point 56 which results in a major upper braking force 62 and a major lower braking force 64. These two braking forces combined together with the coupling distance 54 to equal the offset load 44 in combination with the cantilevered longitudinal load arm 60. To provide continuity and connection between the leverage seat 32 and origin seat 30, the leverage arm 66 transmits the shear forces generated by the major coupling moment 70 to the origin seat 30 and the leverage seat 32.

The major coupling moment 70 exerts the major and minor breaking forces 62 and 64, against the vertical pole in equal and opposite directions. The support origin seat 30 exerts the major upper breaking force 62 against an outer surface of the vertically aligned pole, or in other words the major breaking force upper bearing surface 61. In the opposite longitudinal direction, the major lower breaking force 64 exerted by the leverage seat 32 is distributed over the major breaking force lower surface or in other words the major breaking force lower bearing surface 63.

The upper bearing surface 61 a is a resultant combination of the major upper bearing surface 61 and the minor upper bearing surface 51. Similarly, the lower bearing surface 63 a is a combination of the major lower bearing surface 63 and the minor lower bearing surface 53. Because the rod section 14 has as previously discussed above an outer surface layer which has a high coefficient of frictional resistance, this material friction coefficient combined with the major and minor breaking forces at the upper and the lower location and distributed over the major and minor upper and lower bearing surfaces resists the transposed vertical load 44 as it acts along the vertical pole pulling the load carrying device downwards due to the gravitational pull.

Referring to FIGS. 4A-4C, discussion of the alternative load carrying device with a spiral anchor portion 150 will now be provided. Particular discussion of the load carrying device and the spiral anchor portion or anchor leg 158 will be discussed with description of the minor coupling moment 72 as resulting from the offset position of the load 44, as well as the major coupling moment 70 as a result of the load combined with the cantilevered longitudinal load arm distance 60.

Referring to FIG. 4B, the upper bearing seat 170 which correlates to the third 180 degree reverse U-bend 156, is connected to the cantilevered portion 18 and starts the downward spiral of the spiral anchor leg 158. The entire spiral anchor leg 158 completes a nearly 360 degree turn while spiraling downward at a downward angle 172, having a range which varies between 30° and 60° from the horizontal plane (the horizontal plane defined by the longitudinal axis and the transverse axis). In this particular embodiment, the downward angle 172 is approximately 45°. The leverage arm 174 is that portion of the spiral anchor leg 158 which does not receive or apply either the upper minor braking force 50 or the lower minor braking force 52 as well as the major upper braking force 62 nor the major lower braking force 64 against the vertically aligned pole 22.

The minor coupling distance 152 is the distance between the upper minor braking force 50 and the lower minor braking force 52 which are centered about the minor coupling moment 72. Here the minor coupling distance 152 is a smaller distance than the previously mentioned coupling distance 54 as seen in FIGS. 3B and 3C. This is because the spiral anchor leg 158 completes the 180 degree turn from the upper minor bearing surface 176 to the lower minor bearing surface 178 within a smaller vertical distance, thus creating a tighter couple. The last 180 degree turn of the spiral anchor leg 158 acts as the previously mentioned fourth 180 degree U-bend 160 but in this instance creates a locking tail. Without the locking tail, the load carrying device 150 may become dislodged from the vertically aligned pole 22 if accidentally hit with an upwards force against the load carrying portion 16 or the cantilever portion 18. Therefore a locking couple 179 separated by a locking couple distance is resisted between the tail bearing surface 180 and the lower bearing surface 178.

Along the same lines, the major coupling moment 70 is applied by the payload 44 exerted downwards on the cantilevered portion 18 and is equal to the payload times the cantilevered longitudinal load arm 60. The major coupling moment 70 is resolved into the previously mentioned upper major braking force 62 and the lower major braking force 64. The major coupling distance 154 is somewhat of a smaller distance than the coupling distance 54 as seen previously in FIGS. 3B-3C because of the spiral configuration of anchor leg 158. Here the major upper braking force 62 is applied to a major upper bearing surface 185 which distributes the major upper braking force uniformly along the outer surface of the vertically aligned pole where the upper bearing seat 170 begins.

Additionally, the lower bearing seat 174 distributes the major lower braking force 64 against the major lower bearing surface 183. This force is distributed fairly uniformly along the outer surface of the vertically aligned pole where the anchor spiral leg comes in contact with the vertical aligned pole at the bearing seat locations as previously discussed. The tail bearing surface 180 continues to wrap itself around the vertically aligned pole and provides a bearing surface to maintain a locking couple 181 which resists minor upward forces placed against the cantilevered portion 18 or the load carrying portion 16.

In addition to the previously mentioned embodiments, other types of load carrying portion arrangements for the load carrying portion 16 can be configured. For example, multiple payload carrying arrangements for the load carrying portion 16 can be bent into shape utilizing the rod section 14.

Referring to FIG. 5, a two payload load carrying configuration 190 for the load carrying portion 16 is shown. Here the previously mentioned U-shaped configuration 192 is provided along with a cup carrying arrangement 194. An optional tail hanger 196 is also provided. Depending on the items hung from the payload carrying portion 190, the resultant offset load center of gravity 44 may vary in location along the transverse axial plane perpendicular to the longitudinal axis 40. If the transversely aligned cantilevered distance 198 exceeds the previously mentioned cantilevered longitudinal load arm 60 distance, the moment about the longitudinal axis (the minor moment) may be greater than the moment the transverse axis (the major moment) or in other words the value of the minor moment may be greater than the value of the major moment. Because of the arrangement of the bearing seats this change should not affect the performance of the device.

Referring to FIG. 6, an alternative two payload portion design 200 is provided with a U-shaped seat configuration 192 and a deep-seated longitudinal U-shaped configuration 210. The deep-seated U-shaped configuration 202 is arranged to support beverage containers such as beer bottles and the like for the musician during playing of a musical set on the stage. More than one bottle may be inserted into the carrying portion 204 of the longitudinal elongated U-shaped configuration 202.

Referring to FIG. 5A, a three payload design 220 is provided. The U-shaped configuration 192 transitions into a deep slotted longitudinally aligned U-shaped configuration 210. This slotted configuration 210 then transitions into a cup carrying arrangement 194. The cup carrying arrangement 194 is a semicircular arrangement which has an end tail to provide for support of miscellaneous objects.

Referring to FIG. 7, a V-shaped load carrying portion 230 is provided. The general design provides for supportive musical instruments having varying neck widths and the like. The first leg 232 and the second leg 234 extend from a common origin point 236 which is the bottom of the V-shaped configuration. The legs radiate outwards from the origin point to form a V-shape enabling support of various musical instruments or other payload items through use of the varying transverse distance 238 between the two legs.

In an alternative embodiment, the upper portions or the outermost longitudinal portions of the legs are kept vertically higher than the origin 236 so that the load carrying device maintains its position within the hangar portion 16.

Referring to FIG. 8, a two payload alternative embodiment of the load carrying portion in an S-shaped configuration 240 is shown. Here the load carrying portion 16 extends from the cantilevered arm 18 and creates a bottom S-shaped leg 242 and a top S-shaped leg 240. This particular configuration can provide support for example cups and the like within the load carrying area of the S-shaped bottom leg 242 and carrying of musical instruments and the like in the load carrying area of the top leg of the S-shape 244.

Referring to FIG. 9, an alternative two payload U-shape with oval hangar option 215 is shown. Here the U-shaped load carrying portion 192 transitions into a semi-oval hangar portion 252. A portion of the oval is removed at 254 for insertion of various payload items to be carried by the load carrying portion 16.

Referring to FIG. 10, a double cantilevered arm configuration 260 is shown. Here an upper cantilevered arm 262 extends from the upper seat 30 as previously discussed first embodiment as seen in FIGS. 3A-4C. Additionally, a lower cantilevered arm 264 extends from the second or bottom seat 32. Both the upper cantilevered arm 262 and the lower cantilever 264 maintain load carrying portions to support various pay loads. In this particular embodiment, the load carrying portions are equal but opposite, as provided, the upper U-shaped load carrying portion 266 is configured as previously mentioned in FIGS. 3A-4C, the lower U-shaped carrying portion 268 extends vertically downward from the lower cantilevered arm 264 and then transitions into the transversely aligned U-shaped hangar with the same general configuration as the embodiments in FIGS. 3A-4C with the difference being that the lower U-shaped hangar carrying portion 268 is maintained below the lower cantilevered arm 264.

Referring to FIG. 11, a bottom cantilevered arm configuration 270 is shown. Here the cantilevered arm extends from the bottom seat 32 within the same plane as the bottom seat and the lower cantilevered arm 272 then transitions into a load carrying portion which is defined as a U-shaped load carrying portion 274. The payload center of gravity 44 creates the moment about the pivot point 68 which then creates the couple between the upper seat 30 and the lower seat 32 as previously discussed in FIGS. 3A-4C.

Referring to FIG. 12, an intermediate cantilevered arm configuration 280 is provided where the cantilever arm is positioned vertically at an intermediate location 286 and which extends longitudinally from the vertically aligned pole 22 then transitioning into the load carrying portion 284. The intermediately located cantilevered arm 282 can be positioned anywhere within the coupling distance 54 between the first or upper seat 30 and the second or lower seat 32.

A brief discussion of a method of manufacture of the load carrying device 10 will now be provided. A 36-inch length of ⅜-inch aluminum rod in one embodiment is provided and placed in a position of a rod bender with a 2-inch radius die and the initial load carrying portion 16 as seen in FIG. 1, or U-bent, is made. A 1-inch radius die is then placed into the bender portion of the rod bender and a 1-inch bend which is the measured and established and a 65/100 of an inch radius bend creating the third 180 degree reverse U-bend 31 is made. Once the upper bearing seat 30 or first bearing seat is provided, the rod section 14 is placed in a secured vice and bent at a 90 degree angle and taken somewhat further beyond the 90 degree angle for determination of the length of the leverage arm 66. Once the leverage arm length is determined, the rod section is bent back to the horizontal. A final rod bend about a 65/100 of an inch radius pin completes the second bearing seat or lower bearing seat 32 or leverage seat 32 into parallel alignment with the upper bearing seat. The first bearing seat and the second bearing seats are now opposing U-shaped seats connected by the leverage arms to engage the vertically aligned rod and leverage the load support device to maintain the payload in the off set position.

While the present invention is illustrated by description of several embodiments and while the illustrative embodiments are described in detail, it is not the intention of the applicants to restrict or in any way limit the scope of the appended claims to such detail. Additional advantages and modifications within the scope of the appended claims will readily appear to those sufficed in the art. The invention in its broader aspects is therefore not limited to the specific details, representative apparatus and methods, and illustrative examples shown and described. Accordingly, departures may be made from such details without departing from the spirit or scope of applicants' general concept.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7744047Jan 6, 2009Jun 29, 2010Ron ThornRotary neck cradle
US8348072Mar 20, 2009Jan 8, 2013Helen Of Troy LimitedTension-mounted pole caddy
US8746640 *Jan 31, 2011Jun 10, 2014Simon BroadleyHanger hook
US8770531 *Jul 26, 2012Jul 8, 2014John Patrick CundyBag-supporting frame apparatus which is mountable on a substrate, and method of using same
US20110186702 *Jan 31, 2011Aug 4, 2011Sonetics CorporationHanger hook
US20130025242 *Jul 26, 2012Jan 31, 2013Cundy John PBag-supporting frame apparatus which is mountable on a substrate, and method of using same
US20130327900 *Jun 12, 2013Dec 12, 2013Clifford Mark BURGINCable catching device
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/302
International ClassificationA47H1/16
Cooperative ClassificationG10G5/00, A47F5/0006
European ClassificationG10G5/00, A47F5/00B