Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20070256346 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/418,407
Publication dateNov 8, 2007
Filing dateMay 4, 2006
Priority dateMar 1, 2006
Publication number11418407, 418407, US 2007/0256346 A1, US 2007/256346 A1, US 20070256346 A1, US 20070256346A1, US 2007256346 A1, US 2007256346A1, US-A1-20070256346, US-A1-2007256346, US2007/0256346A1, US2007/256346A1, US20070256346 A1, US20070256346A1, US2007256346 A1, US2007256346A1
InventorsLarry Potterfield, Tim Morrow, Russell Potterfield
Original AssigneeBattenfeld Technologies, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shooting rests for supporting firearms and methods for manufacturing shooting rests
US 20070256346 A1
Abstract
Shooting rests for supporting firearms and methods for manufacturing shooting rests are disclosed herein. In one embodiment, a shooting rest includes a base and a support assembly pivotably coupled to the base. The support assembly is configured to carry the firearm such that the recoil of the firearm pivots the support assembly about an axis in a first direction. The shooting rest further includes a resilient member coupled to the base and the support assembly and a triggering mechanism coupled to the support assembly. The resilient member is configured to urge the support assembly about the axis in a second direction opposite the first direction. The triggering mechanism is configured to selectively actuate the trigger of the firearm.
Images(7)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(40)
1. A shooting rest for supporting a firearm with a trigger, the shooting rest comprising:
a base;
a support assembly movably coupled to the base, the support assembly being configured to carry the firearm such that the recoil of the firearm moves the support assembly about an axis in a first direction;
a resilient member coupled to the base and the support assembly, the resilient member configured to pivot the support assembly about the axis in a second direction opposite the first direction; and
a triggering mechanism for selectively actuating the trigger of the firearm when the firearm is carried by the support assembly.
2. The shooting rest of claim 1 wherein:
the resilient member comprises an axially-extendable spring;
the axis is a first axis;
the base comprises a first portion attached to the support assembly and a second portion pivotably coupled to the first portion, the first and second portions being pivotable relative to each other about a second axis generally perpendicular to the first axis;
the shooting rest further comprises an inhibiting member positioned to inhibit rotation of the support assembly about the axis in the first direction; and
the triggering mechanism comprises a remotely actuated triggering mechanism including (a) a first portion positioned at least proximate to the trigger of the firearm when the firearm is carried by the support assembly, and (b) a second portion spaced apart from the support assembly such that an individual can actuate the triggering mechanism without placing a hand over the base and proximate to the support assembly.
3. The shooting rest of claim 1 wherein the triggering mechanism comprises a remotely actuated triggering mechanism including (a) a first portion positioned at least proximate to the trigger of the firearm when the firearm is carried by the support assembly, and (b) a second portion spaced apart from the support assembly such that an individual can actuate the triggering mechanism without placing a hand over the base and proximate to the support assembly.
4. The shooting rest of claim 1 wherein the triggering mechanism comprises a remotely actuated triggering mechanism including a flexible filament.
5. The shooting rest of claim 1 wherein the triggering mechanism comprises a remotely actuated triggering mechanism including a housing, a plunger disposed at least partially within the housing, and a flexible filament coupled to the plunger.
6. The shooting rest of claim 1 wherein the resilient member comprises a torsional spring.
7. The shooting rest of claim 1 wherein the resilient member comprises an axially-extendable spring.
8. The shooting rest of claim 1 wherein the axis is a first axis, wherein the base comprises a first portion attached to the support assembly and a second portion pivotably coupled to the first portion, and wherein the first and second portions are pivotable relative to each other about a second axis generally perpendicular to the first axis.
9. The shooting rest of claim 1 wherein the support assembly comprises a stop for limiting the range of pivot of the support assembly.
10. The shooting rest of claim 1 wherein the triggering mechanism is attached to the support assembly.
11. The shooting rest of claim 1, further comprising an inhibiting member positioned to inhibit rotation of the support assembly about the axis in the first direction.
12. The shooting rest of claim 1, further comprising a handle projecting from the support assembly.
13. A shooting rest for supporting a firearm with a trigger, the shooting rest comprising:
a base;
a support assembly for carrying the firearm, the support assembly being pivotably coupled to the base; and
a remotely actuated triggering mechanism for selectively actuating the trigger of the firearm, the remotely actuated triggering mechanism including a first portion positioned at least proximate to the trigger of the firearm when the firearm is carried by the support assembly, and a second portion spaced apart from the support assembly such that an individual can actuate the triggering mechanism without placing a hand over the base and proximate to the support assembly.
14. The shooting rest of claim 13 wherein the remotely actuated triggering mechanism is coupled to the support assembly.
15. The shooting rest of claim 13 wherein the support assembly is pivotably coupled to the base such that the recoil of the firearm pivots the support assembly about an axis.
16. The shooting rest of claim 13 wherein:
the support assembly is pivotably coupled to the base such that the recoil of the firearm pivots the support assembly about an axis in a first direction; and
the shooting rest further comprises a resilient member coupled to the base and the support assembly, the resilient member being configured to urge the support assembly about the axis in a second direction opposite the first direction.
17. The shooting rest of claim 13 wherein the remotely actuated triggering mechanism further comprises a flexible filament.
18. The shooting rest of claim 13 wherein the remotely actuated triggering mechanism further comprises a housing, a plunger disposed at least partially within the housing, and a flexible filament coupled to the plunger.
19. A shooting rest for supporting a firearm with a trigger, the shooting rest comprising:
a base;
a support assembly coupled to the base for supporting the firearm; and
a remotely actuated triggering mechanism for selectively actuating the trigger of the firearm when the firearm is carried by the support assembly, the remotely actuated triggering mechanism including a flexible filament.
20. The shooting rest of claim 19 wherein the support assembly is pivotably coupled to the base such that the recoil of the firearm pivots the support assembly about an axis.
21. The shooting rest of claim 19 wherein:
the support assembly is pivotably coupled to the base such that the recoil of the firearm pivots the support assembly about an axis in a first direction; and
the shooting rest further comprises a resilient member coupled to the base and the support assembly, the resilient member being configured to urge the support assembly about the axis in a second direction opposite the first direction.
22. The shooting rest of claim 19 wherein:
the flexible filament comprises a proximal end attached at the support assembly and a distal end opposite the proximal end; and
the remotely actuated triggering mechanism further comprises (a) a housing proximate to the distal end of the filament, and (b) a plunger disposed at least partially within the housing and coupled to the distal end of the filament.
23. A shooting rest for supporting a firearm with a trigger, the shooting rest comprising:
a base;
a support assembly for supporting the firearm, the support assembly being movably coupled to the base such that the recoil of the firearm pivots the support assembly about an axis in a first direction;
means for urging the support assembly about the axis in a second direction opposite the first direction; and
means for selectively actuating the trigger of the firearm when the firearm is supported by the support assembly.
24. The shooting rest of claim 23 wherein the means for urging the support assembly comprise a spring coupled to the support assembly and the base.
25. The shooting rest of claim 23 wherein the means for selectively actuating the trigger comprise a remotely actuated triggering mechanism including (a) a first portion positioned at least proximate to the trigger of the firearm when the firearm is carried by the support assembly, and (b) a second portion spaced apart from the support assembly such that an individual can actuate the triggering mechanism without placing a hand over the base and proximate to the support assembly.
26. The shooting rest of claim 23 wherein the means for selectively actuating the trigger comprise a remotely actuated triggering mechanism including a flexible filament.
27. The shooting rest of claim 23 wherein the means for selectively actuating the trigger comprise a remotely actuated triggering mechanism including a housing, a plunger disposed at least partially within the housing, and a flexible filament coupled to the plunger.
28. A shooting rest for supporting a firearm with a trigger, the shooting rest comprising:
a base;
a support assembly for carrying the firearm, the support assembly being movably coupled to the base such that the recoil of the firearm pivots the support assembly about an axis in a first direction;
a resilient member for urging the support assembly to pivot about the axis in a second direction opposite the first direction, the resilient member being coupled to the base and the support assembly; and
an inhibiting member positioned to inhibit rotation of the support assembly about the axis in the first direction.
29. The shooting rest of claim 28 wherein the inhibiting member is aligned with the axis and positioned between the base and the support assembly.
30. The shooting rest of claim 28 wherein the inhibiting member comprises a spacer.
31. The shooting rest of claim 28 wherein the inhibiting member comprises a torsional spring.
32. The shooting rest of claim 28 wherein the inhibiting member inhibits rotation of the support assembly about the axis in the first direction without a spring.
33. A method for manufacturing a shooting rest for supporting a firearm with a trigger, the method comprising:
pivotably coupling a support assembly to a base with the support assembly configured to carry the firearm such that the recoil of the firearm pivots the support assembly about an axis in a first direction;
attaching a resilient member to the base and the support assembly for urging the support assembly to pivot about the axis in a second direction opposite the first direction; and
coupling a triggering mechanism to the support assembly for selectively actuating the trigger of the firearm when the firearm is carried by the support assembly.
34. The method of claim 33 wherein attaching the resilient member comprises coupling an axially-extendable spring to the base and the support assembly.
35. The method of claim 33 wherein attaching the resilient member comprises coupling a torsional spring to the base and the support assembly.
36. The method of claim 33 wherein coupling the triggering mechanism comprises attaching a remotely actuated triggering mechanism including (a) a first portion positioned at least proximate to the trigger of the firearm when the firearm is carried by the support assembly, and (b) a second portion spaced apart from the support assembly.
37. The method of claim 33 wherein coupling the triggering mechanism comprises attaching a remotely actuated triggering mechanism including a flexible filament.
38. The method of claim 33 wherein coupling the triggering mechanism comprises attaching a remotely actuated triggering mechanism including a housing, a plunger disposed at least partially within the housing, and a flexible filament coupled to the plunger.
39. The method of claim 33, further comprising attaching an inhibiting member to at least one of the support assembly or the base for inhibiting rotation of the support assembly about the axis in the first direction.
40. The method of claim 33 wherein pivotably coupling the support assembly to the base comprises attaching the support assembly to a base having (a) a first portion attached to the support assembly and (b) a second portion pivotably coupled to the first portion.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/778,028, filed on Mar. 1, 2006, entitled “Shooting Rest,” which is incorporated by reference herein.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to shooting rests for supporting firearms and methods of manufacturing shooting rests for supporting firearms.

BACKGROUND

Many shooters accurize their firearms to increase the firearm's consistency. Because most modern firearms are mass produced with interchangeable parts that have a range of acceptable tolerances, accurizing an individual firearm can significantly improve its accuracy. The goal of accurizing a firearm is to improve the consistency of firing each projectile (e.g., bullet). The accuracy and consistency of a firearm are typically determined by (a) placing the firearm in a shooting rest to eliminate human movement, (b) firing several shots at a target, and (c) measuring the distance between the two holes that are spaced apart by the largest distance (i.e., the group size).

FIG. 1 is an isometric view of a conventional shooting rest 1 for testing a firearm 90 in accordance with the prior art. The shooting rest 1 includes a base 10, a pivot arm 30 attached to the base 10 and pivotable about an axis Z, a spring 58 attached to the base 10 and the pivot arm 30, and a trigger release 60 attached to the pivot arm 30. When a shooter actuates the trigger release 60 and discharges the firearm 90, the recoil of the firearm 90 pivots the pivot arm 30 and the firearm 90 in a direction S about the axis Z from the firing position (shown in FIG. 1) to a recoil position in which the firearm 90 is aimed upward. The spring 58 slows and eventually stops the rotation of the pivot arm 30 and the firearm 90 about the axis Z in the direction S so that the pivot arm 30 and the firearm 90 remain in the recoil position. After discharge, the shooter manually pivots the pivot arm 30 and the firearm 90 from the recoil position back to the firing position to discharge another shot.

The conventional shooting rest 1 has several drawbacks. First, the shooting rest 1 requires the shooter to manually pivot the firearm 90 from the discharge position to the firing position after each shot. This process is time consuming and presents a safety hazard because the shooter must approach the firearm 90 when the firearm 90 is loaded and aimed upward. Second, the trigger release 60 requires the shooter to place his hand close to the firearm 90 to discharge the firearm 90, which also presents safety issues. Third, the base 10 of the shooting rest 1 is expensive to manufacture because it has three different plates with separate knobs to adjust the horizontal aim or windage of the firearm 90. Accordingly, there exists a need to improve shooting rests for testing firearms.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an isometric view of a conventional shooting rest in accordance with the prior art.

FIG. 2 is a top isometric view of a shooting rest in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the shooting rest illustrated in FIG. 2 with the support assembly in the discharge position.

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of the shooting rest illustrated in FIG. 2 with the support assembly in the recoil position.

FIG. 5 is a top isometric view of a shooting rest in accordance with another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 6 is a top isometric view of a shooting rest in accordance with another embodiment of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION A. Overview

The following disclosure describes several embodiments of shooting rests for supporting firearms and methods for manufacturing such shooting rests. In one embodiment, a shooting rest includes a base and a support assembly pivotably coupled to the base. The support assembly is configured to carry the firearm such that the recoil of the firearm pivots the support assembly about an axis in a first direction. The shooting rest further includes a resilient member coupled to the base and the support assembly and a triggering mechanism coupled to the support assembly. The resilient member is configured to urge the support assembly about the axis in a second direction opposite the first direction. The resilient member can be an axially-extendable spring, a torsional spring, or another suitable device. The triggering mechanism is configured to selectively actuate the trigger of the firearm when the firearm is carried by the support assembly.

In another embodiment, a shooting rest includes a base, a support assembly for carrying the firearm, and a remotely actuated triggering mechanism for selectively actuating the trigger of the firearm. The support assembly is pivotably coupled to the base. The remotely actuated triggering mechanism includes a first portion positioned at least proximate to the trigger of the firearm and a second portion spaced apart from the support assembly such that an individual can actuate the triggering mechanism without placing a hand over the base and proximate to the support assembly. The remotely actuated triggering mechanism can be coupled to the support assembly.

In another embodiment, a shooting rest includes a base, a support assembly coupled to the base for supporting the firearm, and a remotely actuated triggering mechanism for selectively actuating the trigger of the firearm. The remotely actuated triggering mechanism includes a flexible filament, such as a wire, cable, or fiber. The triggering mechanism may further include a plunger coupled to an end of the filament and a housing around at least part of the plunger.

In another embodiment, a shooting rest includes a base and a support assembly for carrying the firearm. The support assembly is pivotably coupled to the base such that the recoil of the firearm pivots the support assembly about an axis in a first direction. The shooting rest further includes (a) a resilient member for urging the support assembly to pivot about the axis in a second direction opposite the first direction, and (b) an inhibiting member positioned to inhibit rotation of the support assembly about the axis in the first direction.

Another aspect of the invention is directed to methods for manufacturing shooting rests for supporting firearms. In one embodiment, a method includes (a) pivotably coupling a support assembly to a base with the support assembly configured to carry the firearm such that the recoil of the firearm pivots the support assembly about an axis in a first direction, (b) attaching a resilient member to the base and the support assembly for urging the support assembly to pivot about the axis in a second direction opposite the first direction, and (c) coupling a triggering mechanism to the support assembly for selectively actuating the trigger of the firearm when the firearm is carried by the support assembly.

Specific details of several embodiments of the invention are described below with reference to shooting rests for supporting handguns, but in other embodiments the shooting rests can be configured to support rifles and other firearms with longer barrels. Several details describing well-known structures or processes often associated with shooting rests and firearms are not set forth in the following description for purposes of brevity and clarity. Also, several other embodiments of the invention can have different configurations, components, or procedures than those described in this section. A person of ordinary skill in the art, therefore, will accordingly understand that the invention may have other embodiments with additional elements, or the invention may have other embodiments without several of the elements shown and described below with reference to FIGS. 2-6. Where the context permits, singular or plural terms may also include the plural or singular term, respectively. Moreover, unless the word “or” is expressly limited to mean only a single item exclusive from other items in reference to a list of at least two items, then the use of “or” in such a list is to be interpreted as including (a) any single item in the list, (b) all of the items in the list, or (c) any combination of the items in the list. Additionally, the term “comprising” is used throughout to mean including at least the recited feature(s) such that any greater number of the same features and/or other types of features and components are not precluded.

B. Embodiments of Shooting Rests

FIG. 2 is a top isometric view of a shooting rest 100 for supporting a firearm 190 in accordance with one embodiment of the invention. The shooting rest 100 includes a base 110 and a support assembly 130 attached to the base 110 and pivotable about a first axis A-A between a discharge position (shown in FIGS. 2 and 3) and a recoil position (shown in FIG. 4). The illustrated base 110 includes a first portion 112 and a second portion 116 rotatably coupled to the first portion 112. The first portion 112 is configured to contact a table, bench, or other support surface and may include skid-reducing feet (not shown) to inhibit movement of the shooting rest 100 relative to the surface when the firearm 190 is discharged. The second portion 116 includes a projection 117 attached to the support assembly 130. As a result, the second portion 116 and the support assembly 130 can pivot relative to the first portion 112 about a second axis B-B. The pivotable base 110 advantageously allows a shooter to adjust the windage or horizontal aim of the firearm 190 without picking up the entire shooting rest 100. In other embodiments, the base 110 may not include pivotable components. In additional embodiments, the base 110 may not include the first portion 112, but can have a different mechanism for adjusting windage.

In the illustrated embodiment, the base 110 further includes a range of motion mechanism 118 for limiting and controlling the pivot of the second portion 116. The illustrated range of motion mechanism 118 includes an arcuate slot 120 in the second portion 116, a pin 122 attached to the first portion 112 and received in the slot 120, and a head 124 attached to the pin 122 and positioned external to the slot 120. The arcuate slot 120 is centered about the second axis B-B so that the pin 122 slides in the slot 120 as the second portion 116 pivots relative to the first portion 112. When the pin 122 contacts one of the ends of the slot 120, the range of motion mechanism 118 prevents further movement of the second portion 116 in that particular direction about the second axis B-B. As such, the B-B length of the slot 120 defines the maximum range of motion of the second portion 116. The head 124 selectively contacts the second portion 116 to prevent the pin 122 from moving within the slot 120. For example, the pin 122 can have a threaded end and the head 124 can be a threaded nut that screws onto the threaded end of the pin 122. In this embodiment, the shooter can rotate the nut about the pin 122 such that the nut contacts the second portion 116 and prevents the pin 122 from moving in the slot 120. The range of motion mechanism 118 accordingly controls and limits the relative movement of the first and second portions 112 and 116 of the base 110. In several applications, the range of motion mechanism 118 further includes a plurality of marks 128 on the second portion 116 that enable the shooter to identify the precise location of the pin 122 within the slot 120. In other embodiments, the range of motion mechanism 118 may have a different configuration, or the base 110 may not include a range of motion mechanism.

The support assembly 130 is pivotably attached to the base 110 and configured to engage the firearm 190. The illustrated support assembly 130 includes a pivot arm 132 attached to the projection 117 of the second portion 116, a plate 140 detachably coupled to the pivot arm 132, and first and second inserts 148 a-b positioned between the pivot arm 132 and the plate 140. The pivot arm 132, the plate 140, and the inserts 148 include a plurality of aligned holes 139 for receiving corresponding fasteners (not shown) to secure the components together. The illustrated holes 139 in the pivot arm 132 have a hexagonal shape for receiving a fastener with a hexagonal head to facilitate attachment of the components. In other embodiments, however, the pivot arm 132, the plate 140, and the inserts 148 may include a different arrangement of holes or be secured together with a different device.

The illustrated inserts 148 have an inner surface (not shown) with a contour corresponding to the shape of the firearm 190. As such, the firearm 190 can be placed between the first and second inserts 148 a-b and secured in a fixed position relative to the support assembly 130 such that the recoil of the firearm 190 causes the entire support assembly 130 to pivot in a first direction SI about the first axis A-A from the discharge position (shown in FIGS. 2 and 3) to the recoil position (shown in FIG. 4). In other embodiments, the shooting rest 100 can include different inserts with various surface contours to secure firearms with other configurations. In additional embodiments, the shooting rest 100 may not include the first and second inserts 148 a-b, but rather the firearm 190 can be secured to the pivot arm 132 with a different mechanism. For example, the firearm 190 can be bolted directly to the pivot arm 132. In either case, the support assembly 130 releasably secures the firearm 190 and pivots with the firearm 190 about the first axis A-A.

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the shooting rest 100 illustrated in FIG. 2. The illustrated support assembly 130 further includes a stop 134 for limiting the pivot of the support assembly 130 about the first axis A. The illustrated stop 134 is an integral portion of the pivot arm 132 and projects radially outward from the first axis A. The stop 134 can be positioned to contact the second portion 116 of the base 110 when the support assembly 130 pivots about the first axis A in the first direction S1 to a maximum desired distance. The stop 134 can be a separate component attached to the pivot arm 132 in other embodiments.

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of the shooting rest 100 with the support assembly 130 in the recoil position and with the stop 134 contacting the second portion 116 of the base 110 to prevent additional rotation of the support assembly 130 about the first axis A in the first direction S1. In several applications, the recoil of the firearm 190 may not cause the support assembly 130 to pivot about the first axis A in the first direction S1 such that the stop 134 contacts the base 110. In other embodiments, the stop can have a different configuration, or the shooting rest 100 may not include a stop.

Referring back to FIG. 3, the illustrated shooting rest 100 further includes an angle adjustment mechanism 150 for adjusting the elevation or vertical aim of the firearm 190. The illustrated angle adjustment mechanism 150 includes a threaded shaft 152, a head 153 carried by the shaft 152, and a nut 154 threadably coupled to the shaft 152. The shaft 152 projects from the second portion 116 of the base 110, and the head 153 is positioned to contact a projection 136 on the pivot arm 132 to prevent the support assembly 130 from pivoting about the first axis A in a second direction S2 opposite the first direction S1. The nut 154 is positioned against the second portion 116 of the base 110 and can be rotated on the shaft 152 to drive the shaft 152 upward in a direction D1 or downward in a direction D2. Because the projection 136 rests on the head 153 when the support assembly 130 is in the discharge position, the upward or downward movement of the shaft 152 pivots the support assembly 130 about the first axis A and, consequently, adjusts the elevation of the firearm 190. In other embodiments, the shooting rest 100 may include other mechanisms for adjusting the angle of the firearm 190.

In the illustrated embodiment, the shooting rest 100 further includes a resilient member 180 for urging the support assembly 130 about the first axis A in the second direction S2. The illustrated resilient member 180 includes a first end portion 182 pivotably attached to the second portion 116 of the base 110 and a second end portion 184 pivotably attached to the pivot arm 132 of the support assembly 130. The resilient member 180 is extendable between a first length when the support assembly 130 is in the discharge position (shown in FIG. 3) and a second length when the support assembly 130 is in the recoil position (shown in FIG. 4). The resilient member 180 can be an axially-extendable spring (e.g., a gas spring, a cord spring, or a shock chord) or other suitable member. In either case, the resilient member 180 places a force on the support assembly 130 to urge the assembly 130 to pivot about the first axis A in the second direction S2. As such, the resilient member 180 maintains the support assembly 130 in the discharge position until the firearm 190 is discharged or another external force acts on the support assembly 130. After discharge, the recoil of the firearm 190 drives the support assembly 130 about the first axis A in the first direction S1, and the resilient member 180 slows and eventually stops the rotation of the support assembly 130 and returns the support assembly 130 and the firearm 190 to the discharge position. In additional embodiments, the resilient member 180 can have other configurations. For example, a resilient member can be attached to (a) the pivot arm 132 and (b) the second portion 116 of the base 110 proximate to the range of motion mechanism 118. As such, the resilient member can push the pivot arm 132 to urge the assembly 130 to pivot about the first axis A in the second direction S2. Alternatively, as described below with reference to FIG. 5, the shooting rest may include a torsional resilient member in lieu of an axially-extendable resilient member. In other embodiments, the shooting rest 100 may not include a resilient member for returning the support assembly 130 to the discharge position.

Referring back to FIG. 2, the illustrated shooting rest 100 further includes a triggering mechanism 160 for remotely actuating a trigger 192 of the firearm 190. The illustrated triggering mechanism 160 includes a linkage 162 pivotably coupled to the support assembly 130 and positioned to contact the trigger 192. The linkage 162 includes a lever 164 attached to the pivot arm 132 and pivotable about a third axis C-C, a link 166 attached to the lever 164, and a spur 168 projecting from the link 166 and positioned proximate to the trigger 192. The lever 164 includes a first end portion 165 a attached to the link 166 and a second end portion 165 b opposite the first end portion 165 a. The illustrated link 166 has a plurality of holes 167 so that the link 166 can be attached to the lever 164 at several different places to adjust the position of the spur 168 and accommodate various configurations of firearms.

The illustrated triggering mechanism 160 further includes a housing 172, a plunger 174 disposed at least partially within the housing 172, a flexible filament 176 (not shown) extending between the plunger 174 and the linkage 162, and a tube 178 encasing the flexible filament 176. The housing 172 is configured to inhibit accidental actuation of the plunger 174. The housing 172 includes two flanges 173 positioned so that a shooter can place two fingers on corresponding flanges 173 and press the plunger 174 in a direction X1 relative to the housing 172. The filament 176 has a first end 177 a attached to the plunger 174 and a second end 177 b attached to the second end portion 165 b of the lever 164 with a wire clamp 170. The filament 176 can be a fiber, cable, wire, or other flexible member that enables a shooter to move the housing 172 to a comfortable position spaced apart from the firearm 190. In operation, the shooter presses the plunger 174 in the direction X1 to move the filament 176 within the tube 178, which drives the second end portion 165 b of the lever 164 in a direction X2 and pivots the lever 164 in a direction S3 about the third axis C-C so that the spur 168 contacts and actuates the trigger 192 of the firearm 190. In other embodiments, the shooting rest 100 can include other triggering mechanisms that may or may not be remotely actuated. In additional embodiments, the shooting rest 100 may not include a triggering mechanism for actuating the trigger 192 of the firearm 190.

The illustrated shooting rest 100 further includes an inhibiting member 158 for inhibiting rotation of the support assembly 130 about the first axis A-A in the first direction S1. The illustrated inhibiting member 158 is a spacer (e.g., nylon washer) aligned with the first axis A-A and positioned between the pivot arm 132 and the projection 117 of the base 110. The inhibiting member 158 creates resistance and/or friction between the pivot arm 132 and the projection 117 that inhibits the support assembly 130 from pivoting about the first axis A-A. The shooter can adjust the resistance by changing the tension of the fastener 129 that connects these components together. Although the illustrated inhibiting member 158 does not include a spring, in other embodiments, the inhibiting member 158 can be a torsional spring, such as the spring 58 illustrated in FIG. 1, or have a different configuration. In additional embodiments, the shooting rest 100 may not include an inhibiting member for inhibiting rotation of the support assembly 130 about the first axis A-A.

One feature of the shooting rest 100 described above with reference to FIGS. 2-4 is that the resilient member 180 automatically pivots the support assembly 130 and the firearm 190 from the recoil position to the discharge position after each shot. An advantage of this feature is that the shooting rest 100 is safer to operate than conventional shooting rests, such as the shooting rest 100 illustrated in FIG. 1, because the shooter does not need to approach the firearm 190 after discharge. Moreover, the shooting rest 100 enables a shooter to fire multiple shots more quickly because the shooter need not manually pivot the firearm 190 from the recoil position to the discharge position after each shot.

Another feature of the shooting rest 100 described above with reference to FIGS. 2-4 is that the triggering mechanism 160 allows a shooter to remotely actuate the trigger 192 of the firearm 190. An advantage of this feature is that the shooter can select a comfortable position from which to discharge the firearm 190. Another advantage of this feature is that the shooting rest 100 is safer to operate than conventional shooting rests, such as the shooting rest 100 illustrated in FIG. 1, because the shooter need not place his hand next to the firearm 190 and over the base 110 to discharge the firearm 190. Rather, the shooter can discharge the firearm 190 in the shooting rest 100 from a safe position spaced apart from the firearm 190.

C. Additional Embodiments of Shooting Rests

FIG. 5 is a top isometric view of a shooting rest 200 in accordance with another embodiment of the invention. The illustrated shooting rest 200 is generally similar to the shooting rest 100 described above with reference to FIGS. 2-4. For example, the shooting rest 200 includes a base 110, a support assembly 130 pivotably coupled to the base 110, and a triggering mechanism 160 for selectively actuating the trigger 192 of the firearm 190. The illustrated shooting rest 200, however, includes a torsional resilient member 280 for urging the support assembly 130 about the first axis A-A in the second direction S2. The torsional resilient member 280 can be a torsional spring that is aligned with the first axis A-A and attached to the support assembly 130 and the base 110. In other embodiments, the shooting rest 200 may not include the torsional resilient member 280.

The illustrated shooting rest 200 further includes a handle 246 attached to the plate 140 for enabling the shooter to (a) pivot the support assembly 130 about the first axis A-A, and/or (b) hold the support assembly 130 in the recoil position. As a result, the shooter can grasp the handle 246, pivot the support assembly 130, hold the support assembly 130 in the recoil position, and change the magazine in the firearm 190 without removing the firearm 190 from the shooting rest 200. In other embodiments, the shooting rest 200 may not include the handle 246. In additional embodiments, the shooting rest 200 may further include a kickstand (not shown) or other device that selectively maintains the support assembly 130 in the recoil position so that the shooter may release the handle 246 while changing the magazine in the firearm 190.

FIG. 6 is a top isometric view of a shooting rest 300 in accordance with another embodiment of the invention. The illustrated shooting rest 300 is generally similar to the shooting rest 100 described above with reference to FIGS. 2-4. For example, the shooting rest 300 includes a base 110 and a support assembly 130 pivotably coupled to the base 110. The illustrated shooting rest 300, however, does not include a resilient member for urging the support assembly 130 about the first axis A-A. Rather, a shooter manually pivots the support assembly 130 from the recoil position to the discharge position after discharging the firearm 190. In additional embodiments, the shooting rest 300 may include a resilient member for urging the support assembly 130 about the first axis A-A.

The illustrated shooting rest 300 further includes a triggering mechanism 360 for selectively actuating the trigger 192 of the firearm 190. The triggering mechanism 360 includes a lever 364 pivotably attached to the support assembly 130, a link 166 attached to the lever 364, and a spur 168 projecting from the link 166 and positioned proximate to the trigger 192. The lever 364 is pivotable about a third axis C-C and includes a first end portion 365 a attached to the link 166 and a second end portion 365 b opposite the first end portion 365 a. The second end portion 365 b projects away from the pivot arm 132 to enable a shooter to easily press the second end portion 365 b in a direction X2 to actuate the triggering mechanism 360 and discharge the firearm 190. In other embodiments, the shooting rest 300 can have triggering mechanisms 360 with different configurations.

The illustrated shooting rest 300 further includes a sighting tube 388 attached to the plate 140 and a plurality of marks 319 (identified as 319 a-b) on the base 110 and the support assembly 130. The sighting tube 388 is positioned parallel to the bore of the firearm 190 so that a shooter can look through the sighting tube 388 and determine the aim of the firearm 190 in the shooting rest 300. The marks 319 on the base 110 and the support assembly 130 enable the shooter to compare the recoil of different firearms. In the illustrated embodiment, the pivoting arm 132 includes a single mark 319 a and the projection 117 includes a plurality of second marks 319 b. In other embodiments, the shooting rest 300 may not include the sighting tube 388 and/or the marks 319.

From the foregoing, it will be appreciated that specific embodiments of the invention have been described herein for purposes of illustration, but that various modifications may be made without deviating from the spirit and scope of the invention. For example, many of the elements of one embodiment can be combined with other embodiments in addition to or in lieu of the elements of the other embodiments. Accordingly, the invention is not limited except as by the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8297172 *Nov 12, 2008Oct 30, 2012Alliant Techsystems Inc.Unmanned air vehicle weapon adapter
US8474170Aug 31, 2009Jul 2, 2013Alliant Techsystems Inc.Firearm support devices and related methods
US20120255212 *Apr 5, 2011Oct 11, 2012Werner Theodore JCleaning, maintenance, and servicing rest for accommodating both a pistol and a revolver non-simultaneously
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/94, 89/27.3, 73/167
International ClassificationF41C27/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41A23/16
European ClassificationF41A23/16
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 4, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: BATTENFELD TECHNOLOGIES, INC., MISSOURI
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:POTTERFIELD, LARRY;MORROW, TIM;POTTERFIELD, RUSSELL A.;REEL/FRAME:017875/0887
Effective date: 20060501