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Publication numberUS20070258838 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/416,753
Publication dateNov 8, 2007
Filing dateMay 3, 2006
Priority dateMay 3, 2006
Publication number11416753, 416753, US 2007/0258838 A1, US 2007/258838 A1, US 20070258838 A1, US 20070258838A1, US 2007258838 A1, US 2007258838A1, US-A1-20070258838, US-A1-2007258838, US2007/0258838A1, US2007/258838A1, US20070258838 A1, US20070258838A1, US2007258838 A1, US2007258838A1
InventorsScott Drake, Christopher Deborski, Donald McKelvey
Original AssigneeSherwood Services Ag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Peristaltic cooling pump system
US 20070258838 A1
Abstract
A peristaltic cooling pump system is provided and includes an actuation housing rotatably supporting a rotor assembly. The rotor assembly includes a plurality of rollers each having an axis of rotation parallel to an axis of rotation of the rotor assembly. The peristaltic cooling pump system further includes a cartridge selectively operably connectable to the actuation housing. The cartridge is configured to operatively support a tube. The tube is made of a resilient and selectively compressible material. Accordingly, when the cartridge is connected to the actuation housing the tube is in operative association with at least one roller of the rotor assembly.
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Claims(18)
1. A peristaltic cooling pump system, comprising:
an actuation housing rotatably supporting a rotor assembly, the rotor assembly including a plurality of rollers each having an axis of rotation parallel to an axis of rotation of the rotor assembly; and
a cartridge selectively operably connectable to the actuation housing, the cartridge being configured to operatively support a tube, wherein the tube is resilient and selectively compressible, wherein when the cartridge is connected to the actuation housing the tube is in operative association with at least one roller of the rotor assembly.
2. The peristaltic cooling pump system according to claim 1, wherein the cartridge includes:
a supporting body having a pair of spaced apart arms, wherein a first arm defines a lumen formed near a free end thereof and a second arm defines a passage formed near a free end thereof, wherein the tube is extendable across the pair of arms when the tube is operatively associated with the cartridge; and
the actuation housing having a frame, the frame defining an occlusion surface having a substantially arcuate profile, wherein the tube is operatively engagable with the occlusion surface when the cartridge is in operative engagement with the actuation housing.
3. The peristaltic cooling pump system according to claim 2, wherein the lumen formed near the free end of the first arm is configured and dimensioned to slidably engage the tube when the tube is positioned therein.
4. The peristaltic cooling pump system according to claim 2, wherein the passage formed near the free end of the second arm is configured and dimensioned to fixedly engage the tube when the tube is positioned therein.
5. The peristaltic cooling pump system according to claim 4, wherein the actuation housing is configured to snap-fit engage the cartridge therein.
6. The peristaltic cooling pump system according to claim 2, further comprising an engaging mechanism for approximating the actuation housing toward the rotor assembly.
7. The peristaltic cooling pump system according to claim 6, wherein approximation of the actuation housing towards the rotor assembly compresses the tube between at least one roller and the frame.
8. The peristaltic cooling pump system according to claim 2, further comprising a plurality of dividing walls spaced along a length of the rollers, wherein the dividing walls define pumping regions therebetween.
9. The peristaltic cooling pump system according to claim 8, wherein a plurality of cartridges are provided for operative engagement, one each, into a respective pumping region.
10. The peristaltic cooling pump system according to claim 9, wherein each pumping region is sized to accommodate a different sized tube.
11. The peristaltic cooling pump system according to claim 10, wherein each cartridge has an occlusion surface having a different diameter.
12. The peristaltic cooling pump system according to claim 2, wherein the actuation housing is configured to support a plurality of cartridges thereon.
13. The peristaltic cooling pump system according to claim 12, wherein each cartridge accommodates a tube having a different cross-sectional dimension.
14. A peristaltic cooling pump system, comprising:
an actuation housing rotatably supporting a rotor assembly, the rotor assembly including a plurality of rollers each having an axis of rotation parallel to an axis of rotation of the rotor assembly;
a cartridge selectively connectable to the actuation housing and being configured to support a tube, wherein the tube is resilient and selectively compressible, wherein when the cartridge is connected to the actuation housing the tube is in operative association with at least one roller of the rotor assembly;
the cartridge including a supporting body having a pair of spaced apart arms, wherein a first arm defines a lumen formed near a free end thereof and a second arm defines a passage formed near a free end thereof, wherein the tube is extendable across the pair of arms when the tube is operatively associated with the cartridge;
the actuation housing having a frame, the frame defining an occlusion surface having a substantially arcuate profile, wherein the tube is operatively engagable with the occlusion surface when the cartridge is in operative engagement with the actuation housing; and
a fluid reservoir management system containing a quantity of fluid therein, wherein the fluid reservoir management system is fluidly connected to an inlet and an outlet of the tube.
15. The peristaltic cooling pump system according to claim 14, wherein the fluid reservoir management system includes:
a first reservoir fluidly connectable to an inlet of the tube;
a second reservoir fluidly connectable to an outlet of the tube; and
a diaphragm separating the first and second reservoirs.
16. The peristaltic cooling pump system according to claim 15, wherein, prior to operation of the peristaltic cooling pump system, the first reservoir contains all of the fluid and the second reservoir contains no fluid.
17. The peristaltic cooling pump system according to claim 15, wherein, during operation of the peristaltic cooling pump system, the fluid travels from the first reservoir, through the tube, to the second reservoir.
18. The peristaltic cooling pump system according to claim 17, wherein the diaphragm is configured to move to contract the first reservoir and expand the second reservoir as fluid is flowing therebetween.
Description
BACKGROUND

1. Technical Field

The present disclosure relates to cooling pumps and systems and, more particularly, to peristaltic cooling pumps and/or systems typically used to circulate sterile fluids and the like to a target surgical site and/or through a surgical instrument for cooling and the like.

2. Background of Related Art

A wide variety of pump types have been used in the past for pumping any number of a variety of different liquids for any of a number of different functions and applications. Typically, a peristaltic-type pump is used in connection with many medical applications and is applied externally of the fluid delivery tube. Thus, the peristaltic pump does not interfere with the sterile state which must be maintained for the infusion fluid within the fluid delivery tube.

Many peristaltic pumps are typically used in medical, biomedical and laboratory applications, including and not limited to, irrigation devices and/or systems, suction devices and/or systems, circulation devices and/or systems, and the like. One example of a peristaltic pump is shown schematically in FIG. 1 and is described in commonly assigned U.S. Pat. No. 6,575,969, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference. This so-called “cool-tip” radiofrequency thermosurgery electrode system includes an example of a pump for circulating cooling fluid.

More particularly and as seen in FIG. 1, an insulated electrode shaft 104 with exposed tip 103 is provided for insertion into a patient's body so that tip 103 achieves a target volume to be ablated. A high frequency generator such as a radiofrequency generator 107 is provided for supplying RF power to electrode shaft 104, as shown by the RF power P line. At the same time, electrode shaft 104, is provided with a temperature sensor, provides feed back to the RF generator or controller circuit 109 relating to a temperature reading To or multiple temperature readings of a similar nature of the tissue coolant fluid or tip arrangement. Depending upon the temperature reading, the RF output power P may be modified by controller 109 by modulating the RF voltage, current, and/or power level, accordingly, to stabilize the ablation volume or process. If temperature rises to boiling, as indicated by temperature measurement To, the power could be either shut off or severely cut back by generator 107 or controller 109. Thus a feedback loop between power and temperature (or any other set of parameters associated with the lesion process) can be implemented to make the process safer or to simply monitor the process as a whole.

As further seen in FIG. 1, element 108 represents the coolant fluid supply and pump system which can be configured to measure pressure and/or flow. Input flow from element 108 to electrode shaft 104 and output flow are indicated by the arrows to and from the electrode shaft 104 and element 108, respectively. Accordingly, the controller 109 monitors the procedure and regulates the fluid flow of the coolant between controller 109 and element 108 which, in turn, prevents the electrode from over heating. In conjugation, the combined mediation of flow, power, temperature, or other lesioning parameters could be integrated in controller 109, and the entire system of generator 107, element 108, and controller 109 can be one large feedback control network and system. Fluid bath 110 may also be included with the system as a reservoir of coolant fluid which may also be regulated by controller 109.

Typically, element 108, including the pump, is an integral part of control system 100. Accordingly, should the pump fail, break down, become contaminated or the like, the entire control system 100 needs to be replaced or extensive work performed on control system 100 in order to replace, remove, sterilize, dispose and/or otherwise treat the pump of element 108.

SUMMARY

Accordingly, a need exists for improved pumps and/or systems for use with sterile fluids which overcome at least some of the deficiencies and/or drawbacks of existing pumps and/or systems. A need thus exists for improved pumps and/or pump systems that can be or are sterilized and that are used in connection with the transmission of sterile fluids.

A further need also exists for improved pumps and/or pump systems that can be selectively coupled and un-coupled to and from an ablation generator as needed and/or desired. Yet another need exists for improved pumps and/or pump systems having interchangeable components, which components may be each individually sterilizable, replaceable and/or disposable. A still further need exists for improved pumps and/or pump systems for use with cool-tip radiofrequency thermosurgery electrode system and improved pumps and/or pump systems having improved fluid management characteristics.

According to an aspect of the present disclosure, a peristaltic cooling pump system is provided and includes an actuation housing rotatably supporting a rotor assembly. The rotor assembly includes a plurality of rollers each having an axis of rotation parallel to an axis of rotation of the rotor assembly. The peristaltic cooling pump system further includes a cartridge selectively operably connectable to the actuation housing. The cartridge is configured to operatively support a tube. The tube is made of a resilient and selectively compressible material. Accordingly, when the cartridge is connected to the actuation housing the tube is in operative association with at least one roller of the rotor assembly.

The cartridge may include a supporting body having a pair of spaced apart arms, wherein a first arm defines a lumen formed near a free end thereof and a second arm defines a passage formed near a free end thereof, wherein the tube is extendable across the pair of arms when the tube is operatively associated with the cartridge.

The lumen formed near the free end of the first arm may be configured and dimensioned to slidably engage the tube when the tube is positioned therein. The passage formed near the free end of the second arm may be configured and dimensioned to fixedly engage the tube when the tube is positioned therein.

The peristaltic cooling pump system may further include a plurality of dividing walls spaced along a length of the rollers. The dividing walls define pumping regions therebetween. A plurality of cartridges may be provided for operative engagement, one each, into a respective pumping region. Each pumping region may be sized to accommodate a different sized tube. Accordingly, each cartridge may have an occlusion surface having a different diameter.

The actuation housing may be configured to support a plurality of cartridges thereon. Each cartridge may accommodate a tube having a different cross-sectional dimension.

The peristaltic cooling pump system may further include a fluid reservoir management system containing a quantity of fluid therein. The fluid reservoir management system is fluidly connected to an inlet and an outlet of the tube. The fluid reservoir management system may include a first reservoir fluidly connectable to an inlet of the tube; a second reservoir fluidly connectable to an outlet of the tube; and a diaphragm separating the first and second reservoirs. In use, prior to the operation of the peristaltic cooling pump system the first reservoir may contain all of the fluid and the second reservoir contains no fluid. Further, during operation of the peristaltic cooling pump system the fluid may travel from the first reservoir, through the tube, to the second reservoir. The diaphragm may be configured to move to contract the first reservoir and expand the second reservoir as fluid is flowing therebetween.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of a prior art cool-tip control system for RF heating ablation showing an RF generator, coolant system, fluid bath source and control system that monitors and regulates critical parameters relating to temperature, power and fluid flow;

FIG. 2 is a schematic plan view of a cartridge according to an embodiment of the present disclosure;

FIG. 3 is a partially broken away side elevational view illustrating an installation of the cartridge of FIG. 2 into an actuation housing according to an embodiment of the present disclosure;

FIGS. 4-6 are perspective schematic views of a peristaltic cooling pump system according to an embodiment of the present disclosure, shown at various stages of loading and operation;

FIG. 7 is a schematic plan view of a fluid reservoir management system for use with the peristaltic pump system of FIGS. 4-6;

FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view of the fluid reservoir management system of FIG. 7, as taken through line 8-8 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a schematic perspective view of a peristaltic pump system according to an alternate embodiment of the present disclosure;

FIG. 10 is an elevational view of a cartridge for use with the peristaltic pump system of FIG. 9; and

FIG. 11 is side, elevational view of the peristaltic pump system of FIG. 9 illustrating the operative engagement of the cartridge of FIGS. 9 and 10 thereto.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The presently disclosed sterilizable pumps and systems, together with attendant advantages, are best understood by reference to the following detailed description in conjunction with the figures.

Referring again to FIG. 1, a prior art control system for RF heating ablation is shown generally as 100. Control system 100 includes an insulated electrode shaft 104 having an exposed tip 103 for insertion into a patient's body such that exposed tip 103 can achieve a target volume to be ablated. Electrode shaft 104 extends from a hub 106 and includes at least one mechanical interface (not shown) for connecting electrode shaft 104 to RF generator 107 and coolant supply and pump 108.

RF generator 107 supplies RF power to electrode shaft 104, as shown by the RF power connection “P”. At the same time, electrode shaft 104 which includes a temperature sensor (not shown), feeds temperature information back to RF generator 107 and/or a controller circuit 109 relating to a temperature reading To or multiple temperature readings of the tissue coolant fluid or tip arrangement. According to the temperature reading, any modulation of the RF output power “P” is accorded by controller 109. More particularly, controller 109 modulates the RF voltage, current, and/or power level to stabilize the ablation volume or process. If temperature reading To rises to a boiling point, the power is either shut off or severely cut back to generator 107 by controller 109. Thus a feedback loop between power and temperature (or any other set of parameters associated with the lesion process) can be implemented to monitor the overall process.

In addition, as seen in FIG. 1, control system 100 further includes power measurement connections from RF generator 107 to controller 109 and a feedback power control signal from controller 109 to RF generator 107. The entire heating process may be preconfigured by the operator before the procedure based on the imaging and preplanned calculations of ablation volume verses the tip geometry and other ablation parameters. Thus, controller 109 is capable of regulating the entire heating process by controlling the RF power “P” from generator 107.

With continued reference to FIG. 1, control system 100 further includes a coolant fluid supply and pump system 108 with potential thermo-monitoring, pressure monitoring, flow monitoring, etc. Input flow from coolant fluid supply and pump system 108 to electrode shaft 104 and output flow from the electrode shaft are indicated by the arrows which connect hub 106 and the coolant fluid supply and pump system 108. Such input and output flow can be monitored by appropriate pressure or flow monitoring elements or detection devices (not shown). These are well known in the fluid control industry. Accordingly, the fluid flow and the temperature of the coolant can be fed back between controller 109 and coolant supply 108 so the controller 109 can regulate the input and output flow. Combined regulation mediation of flow, power, temperature, and/or other lesioning parameters may also be integrated in controller 109, the generator 107, and the coolant supply 108. The controller 109 may also be configured as one large feedback control network and system.

Control system 100 may also include a reservoir of coolant fluid 110 which may have possible interior temperature regulation within the fluid bath. Bath temperatures and control signals are fed back and forth to controller system 109. These parameters also could be integrated in the overall control of the ablation process. Indwelling controllers, electronics, microprocessors, or software may be included to govern the entire process or allow preplanned parameters to be configured by the operator based on the selection of a tip geometry and overall ablation volume which are typically selected according to a tumor or pathological volume to be destroyed. Many variants or interconnections of the block diagram shown in FIG. 1 or additions of the diagram could be devised by those skilled in the art of fluid control power and regulation systems.

Turning now to FIGS. 2 and 3, a cartridge 300, according to an embodiment of the present disclosure, is shown and described. Cartridge 300 is configured and adapted for use with a peristaltic pump system 200, as will be described in greater detail below. Cartridge 300 includes a clevis-like supporting body 302 having a pair of upstanding spaced apart arms 304, 306. First arm 304 includes a lumen 308 formed in a free end 304 a thereof. Lumen 308 is configured and dimensioned to permit tube “T” to slide therewithin. Second arm 306 includes a passage 310 formed in a free end 306 a thereof. Passage 310 is configured and dimensioned to engage tube “T” when tube “T” is properly positioned therewithin such that tube “T” is fixed in position. Tube “T” may be fixed within passage 310 in any suitable manner, such as with a suitable adhesive.

As seen in FIG. 3, in one embodiment, arms 304, 306 have an ovular cross-sectional profile. As such, arms 304, 306 are inserted into an opening 310 a of an actuation housing 202. Once a particular arm is inserted into passage 310 a, the cartridge 300 is rotated approximately 90° such that the long axis of the arm cross-sectional profile is substantially aligned with a longitudinal axis of a pouch 310 b. In so doing, an arm is thus substantially fixed in position within pouch 310 b.

Cartridge 300 functions to hold tube “T” in position during connection with the remainder of peristaltic pump system 200, such that a user does not have to hold tube “T”.

Turning now to FIGS. 4-6, a peristaltic pump system 200 is shown, in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure, for use in control system 100 and with coolant supply 108. Pump system 200 includes a rotor assembly 220 rotatably supported on an actuation housing 202. Actuation housing 202 may include a drive mechanism (e.g., a drive motor or the like) which is adapted for delivering either forward or reverse rotation to rotor assembly 220. As will be described in greater detail below, rotor assembly 220 functions to repetitively compress tube “T” in order to squeeze fluid contained within tube “T” therefrom and to create or produce a volumetric pumping effect through tube “T”.

As seen in FIGS. 4-6, rotor assembly 220 includes a plurality of rollers 222 rotatably supported at the free ends of a frame (not shown). The axis of rotation of each roller 222 is parallel to an axis of rotation “X” of rotor assembly 220. For example, each roller 222 may be supported near a free end of a spoke, which spoke is secured or otherwise operatively connected to a rotational drive shaft of the drive mechanism (not shown). Accordingly, in use, as the shaft of the drive mechanism is rotated, the rollers 222 rotate in a planetary orbit around rotational axis “X” of rotor assembly 220.

While only two rollers 222 are shown in FIGS. 4-6, three, evenly spaced apart rollers may be provided. Rotor assembly 220 may be provided with any number of rollers 222 or may be provided with any other appropriate structure for accomplishing the volumetric pumping effect desired.

As seen in FIGS. 4-6, pump system 200 further includes cartridge 300, as described above, operatively supported by actuation housing 202 and operatively engagable with rollers 222 of rotor assembly 220. Actuation housing 202 includes a frame 330 that defines an annular recess 332 defining an occlusion surface 334 formed in a surface thereof. Occlusion surface 334 of frame 330 is configured and dimensioned for operative association with rollers 222 of rotor assembly 220 and with a section of tube “T” (i.e., the section of tube “T” disposed between arms 304, 306 of cartridge 300). Occlusion surface 334 of frame 330 may include a groove 334 a extending along the length thereof which is configured and dimensioned to at least partially receive the portion of tube “T” therein. Occlusion surface 334 may extend for approximated 1800.

As seen in FIGS. 4-6 and described above in FIG. 3, cartridge 300 is mounted to actuation housing 202 such that tube “T” is placed into operative engagement between rollers 222 of rotor assembly 220 and occlusion surface 334 of frame 330. Tube “T” may be fabricated from an elastomeric material that allows for tube “T” to be compressed between rollers 222 and occlusion surface 332 and that returns to its un-compressed condition when not between rollers 222 and occlusion surface 332.

With continued reference to FIGS. 4-6, pump system 200 is further provided with an engaging mechanism 240 configured and adapted to move actuation housing 202 toward and away from rotor assembly 220 to thereby secure tube “T” therebetween and to vary the flow rate of fluid through tube “T”. As seen through FIGS. 4-6, rotation of engaging mechanism 240, in the direction of arrow “A” about the rotational axis “X”, results in the movement of actuation housing 202 toward rotor assembly 220. Likewise, rotation of engaging mechanism 240, in the direction opposite to arrow “A” about the rotational axis “X”, results in the movement of actuation housing 202 away from rotor assembly 220.

As seen in FIG. 4, with tube “T” operatively supported in cartridge 300, cartridge 300 is mounted to actuation housing 202 such that cartridge 300 is spaced a distance away from rotor assembly 220. With cartridge 300 mounted to actuation housing 202 and tube “T” positioned between frame 330 and rotor assembly 220, engaging mechanism 240 is rotated, in the direction of arrow “A”, to approximate actuation housing 202 toward rotor assembly 220. Engaging mechanism 240 is rotated an amount sufficient to securely clamp tube “T” between frame 330 and rotor assembly 220, as seen in FIG. 5.

With reference now to FIGS. 5 and 6, the use of engaging mechanism 240 to control of the rate of fluid flow through tube “T” is shown. Engaging mechanism 240 includes an indicator 242 which illustrates the degree of the rate of fluid flow through tube “T”. In use, the greater the amount of indicator 242 that is visible the greater the rate of fluid flow through tube “T”. Accordingly, as seen in FIG. 5, a relatively small amount of indicator 242 is visible and thus a relatively small rate of fluid will flow through tube “T”. As seen in FIG. 6, a relatively larger amount of indicator 242 is visible and thus a relatively greater rate of fluid will flow through tube “T”.

Adjustment of the rate of fluid flow through tube “T” is accomplished by further rotation of engagement mechanism 240 about the rotational axis “X”, in the direction of arrow “A”. The greater the degree of rotation of engagement mechanism 240 about the rotational axis “X”, the more actuation housing 202 is approximated toward rollers 222 of rotor assembly 220 and the greater the degree of compression of tube “T” by rollers 222 of rotor assembly 220 against occlusion surface 334 of frame 330. In operation, the greater the degree of compression of tube “T” between rollers 222 of rotor assembly 220 against occlusion surface 334 of frame 330 the greater the rate of fluid flow through tube “T”.

In operation, when fluid “F” is pumped through tube “T”, fluid “F” is pumped to the operative site (i.e., to electrode shaft 104) to thereby maintain the operative site at a substantially constant temperature during the surgical procedure. Engagement mechanism 240 may be provided with tactile feedback structure (not shown), which provides the user with sensory feedback during the rotation of engagement mechanism 240 about the rotational “X” axis.

Turning now to FIGS. 7 and 8, a fluid reservoir management system for use with the peristaltic pump system of FIGS. 2-6 (or any of the pump systems disclosed herein), is shown and is generally designated as 400. Fluid management reservoir 400 includes a pair of bladders 410 and 420 each defining a chamber or reservoir 412 and 422, respectively. A respective nozzle 414, 424 is operatively connected to each bladder 410, 420 for providing access to each chamber or reservoir 412, 422. Valves 430 a, 430 b are fluidly connected to each nozzle 414, 424, respectively, and provide selective opening and closing of bladders 410, 420.

Chambers or reservoirs 412, 422 are fluidly separated from one another. Bladders 410, 420 may be fabricated from any material known by one having skill in the art, including and not limited to pliable, flexible and/or elastomeric materials; rigid, non-flexible materials or any combinations thereof.

A first end of tube “T” is connectable to nozzle 414 of first reservoir 412, through valve 430 a, while a second end of tube “T is connectable to second reservoir 422, through valve 430 b. Prior to operation or use of fluid reservoir management system 200 first reservoir 412 of first bladder 410 is filled with a fluid, such as distilled or sterile water, while second reservoir 422 of second bladder 420 is empty. In use, as pump system 200 is in operation, fluid “Fout” is drawn out of first reservoir 412 and communicated through tube “T” passing through pump system 200, and fluid “Fin” is deposited into second reservoir 422. Pump system 200 also delivers fluid to the target surgical site before returning the fluid to the second reservoir 422.

Effectively, fluid management reservoir 400 is a single use-type reservoir. Once the initial fluid contained within first reservoir 412 is completely used and deposited within second reservoir 422, fluid management reservoir 400 is replaced with a new fluid management reservoir.

Fluid management reservoir 400 includes a diaphragm 450 separating first reservoir 410 from second reservoir 420. In operation, as fluid flows from first reservoir 412 to second reservoir 422, thereby emptying first reservoir 412 and filling second reservoir 422, diaphragm 450 moves from second reservoir 422 toward first reservoir 412 thereby constricting first reservoir 412 and expanding second reservoir 422.

Turning now to FIGS. 9-11, a peristaltic pump system in accordance with another embodiment of the present disclosure, for use in control system 100 and with coolant supply 108, is shown generally as 500. Pump system 500 includes a rotor assembly 520 rotatably supported on an actuation housing 202. Actuation housing 202 may include a drive mechanism (e.g., a drive motor or the like) which is adapted for delivering either forward or reverse rotation to rotor assembly 220. As will be described in greater detail below, rotor assembly 220 functions to repetitively compress at least one tube “T” in order to squeeze fluid contained within the tube(s) “T” therefrom and create or produce a volumetric pumping effect through tube(s) “T”.

As seen in FIGS. 9 and 11, rotor assembly 520 includes a plurality of rollers 522 extending from actuation housing 202. Rollers 522 are rotatably connected to actuation housing 202 in such a manner so as to rotate about a central axis of rotation “X” for rotor assembly 520. Each roller 522 may define an axis “Xn” of rotation which is parallel to axis of rotation “X” of rotor assembly 520. For example, each roller 522 may be operatively supported in actuation housing 202 in such a manner that rollers 522 are rotatable about the central rotational “X” axis, and each roller 522 is rotatable about their respective longitudinal axes “Xn”.

While only three rollers 522 are shown in FIG. 9, rotor assembly 520 may include any suitable number of rollers 522 or may include any other appropriate structure.

As seen in FIGS. 9 and 11, pump system 500 includes a plurality of dividing walls 526 disposed along the length of rollers 522. Each dividing wall 526 is provided with an aperture 526 a through which rollers 522 extend. In this manner, a plurality of pumping regions 528 are defined between dividing walls 526. Dividing walls 526 are supported on actuation housing 202 by a beam, arm or the like 204 extending from actuation housing 202.

As seen in FIGS. 9-11, pump system 500 further includes at least one cartridge 530 which is selectively, and operatively positionable in pumping regions 528. Cartridge 530, when positioned in pumping region 528 resides in operative engagement with rollers 522 of rotor assembly 520. Cartridge 530 includes an annular recess 532 which defines an occlusion surface 534 formed in a surface thereof. Occlusion surface 534 of cartridge 530 is configured and dimensioned for operative association with rollers 522 of rotor assembly 520 and with a section of tube “T”. Occlusion surface 534 may extend for approximated 180°.

Each cartridge 530 is configured and adapted for engagement in any of pumping regions 528. In particular, each cartridge 530 includes a locking element 536 b (see FIGS. 10 and 11) that is configured and adapted for selective snap-fit engagement in a complementary locking feature 526 b (see FIG. 11) provided in dividing walls 526. Cartridge 530 may be pivotally connected to dividing walls 526 by way of a pivot pin 536 a (see FIG. 10) or the like. Cartridge 530 may also be provided with a finger tab 536 c for facilitating movement of cartridge 530 between a position in which occlusion surface 534 is in close cooperative arrangement with rollers 522 and a second position in which occlusion surface 534 is in spaced non-cooperative arrangement with rollers 522.

In operation, when tube “T” is positioned in a pumping region 528 and a respective cartridge 530 is moved to a close cooperative arrangement with rollers 522, fluid may be pumped through tube “T” and to the operative site (i.e., to electrode shaft 104) to thereby maintain the operative site at a substantially constant temperature during the surgical procedure.

In accordance with the present embodiment, a plurality of tubes “T” may be placed in respective pumping regions 528 and respective cartridges 530 may be used to operatively engage tubes “T” and create a pumping action through the tubes “T” as the rotor assembly 520 is rotated. In this manner, a plurality of different cooling paths or circuits are defined, more particularly, a plurality of discrete fluid paths are defined. In other words, the fluid from one cooling path does not mix with the fluid from another fluid path.

Tubes “T” of varying diameters may be placed into various pumping regions 528 in order to pump varying volumes of fluid at varying rates. Dividing walls 526 may be spaced by varying amounts in order to define pumping region 528 of varying sizes which in turn can accommodate tubes “T” of various sizes. Accordingly, it is envisioned that cartridges 530 must be provided in varying sizes to cooperate and complement the sizes of the pumping regions 528.

Additionally, occlusion surface 534 of cartridge 530 may have a relatively larger or smaller diameter depending on the size of tube “T” which is being used. For example, if a relatively larger diameter tube “T” is being used, a cartridge 530 having an occlusion surface 534 with a relatively larger diameter will be used. Likewise, if a relatively smaller diameter tube “T” is being used, a cartridge 530 having an occlusion surface 534 with a relatively smaller diameter will be used.

Cartridges 530 may be provided with tactile feedback structure (not shown) which provides the user with sensory feedback during the connection and/or placement of cartridges 530 into pumping regions 528.

As seen in FIG. 10, pump system 500 may include a latch structure 540 or the like for locking and maintaining cartridge 530 into position between walls 526 and against tube “T”.

Although illustrative embodiments of the present disclosure are described herein, the disclosure is not limited to those embodiments, and various other changes and modifications may be affected therein by one skilled in the art without departing from the scope or spirit of the disclosure. All such changes and modifications are intended to be included within the scope of the present disclosure.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8052403 *Aug 9, 2007Nov 8, 2011Becher James JPeristaltic pump
US8272857 *Feb 22, 2008Sep 25, 2012Medtronic Xomed, Inc.Method and system for loading of tubing into a pumping device
US8757991 *Jun 29, 2009Jun 24, 2014Bien-Air Holding S.A.Peristaltic pump and insertable irrigation line with a tube portion having a determined profile
US20110165005 *Jun 29, 2009Jul 7, 2011Bien-Air Holding S.A.Peristaltic pump and irrigation line
EP2284397A1 *Feb 18, 2009Feb 16, 2011Medtronic Xomed, Inc.System for loading of tubing into a pumping device
WO2009105436A1 *Feb 18, 2009Aug 27, 2009Medtronic Xomed, Inc.Method and system for loading of tubing into a pumping device
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/477.11, 417/477.2
International ClassificationF04B43/12, F04B43/08
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2205/12, A61M5/14232, F04B43/1253, A61B2018/00023, F04B43/0072, A61B18/14, F04B43/1292
European ClassificationF04B43/12G, F04B43/12G10, F04B43/00D8T
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 3, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: SHERWOOD SERVICES AG, SWITZERLAND
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:DRAKE, SCOTT;DEBORSKI, CHRISTOPHER A.;MCKELVEY, DONALD;REEL/FRAME:017842/0624;SIGNING DATES FROM 20060106 TO 20060110