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Publication numberUS20070261340 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/415,182
Publication dateNov 15, 2007
Filing dateMay 2, 2006
Priority dateMay 2, 2006
Also published asWO2008140510A2, WO2008140510A3, WO2008140510A9
Publication number11415182, 415182, US 2007/0261340 A1, US 2007/261340 A1, US 20070261340 A1, US 20070261340A1, US 2007261340 A1, US 2007261340A1, US-A1-20070261340, US-A1-2007261340, US2007/0261340A1, US2007/261340A1, US20070261340 A1, US20070261340A1, US2007261340 A1, US2007261340A1
InventorsFederico Cecilio, Sherry Walker
Original AssigneeHuber Engineered Woods Llc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and system for installation of diverse exterior sheathing components of buildings
US 20070261340 A1
Abstract
A method and system is provided for facilitating the proper installation and ease of inspection therefor of a sheathed building structure having a sheathing system comprising diverse sheathing units to be used for roofing and sidewalls thereof which incorporates a visual signaling system to ensure proper panel selection and installation.
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Claims(20)
1. A method for facilitating the proper installation and ease of inspection therefor of a sheathed building structure incorporating a sheathing system comprising diverse sheathing units to be used for roofing and sidewalls thereof, comprising:
providing a plurality of roofing panels each having a first water-resistant major surface having a visually observable first panel color, and a plurality of sidewall panels each having a second water-resistant major surface having a visually observable second panel color which is visually different from the first panel color, wherein the first and second panel colors are correlated to a common panel parameter category selected from the group consisting of panel load strength, panel surface slip resistance, and panel fastening pattern, wherein the roofing panels have a first panel parameter amount or pattern as applicable for the common panel parameter category that is different from a second panel parameter amount or pattern as applicable for the common panel parameter category for the sidewall panels;
selecting, by a building structure assembler, the roofing panels with visual reference to the first panel color;
attaching, by the building structure assembler, the selected roofing panels to rafters forming part of an underlying first supporting structural frame portion of a building frame, wherein the first water-resistant major surface of each roofing panel faces outward;
selecting, by the building structure assembler, the sidewall panels with visual reference to the second panel color;
attaching, by the building structure assembler, the selected sidewall panels to wall frame forming part of a second supporting structural portion of said building frame, wherein the second water-resistant major surface of each sidewall panel faces outward.
2. A method according to claim 1, further comprising providing the building structure assembler access to a medium before the assembler selects the roofing panels, wherein the medium visually displays an image of a representative building structure properly sheathed with the sheathing system in which the first panel color of the roofing panels is visible exclusively on a representative roof of said representative building structure displayed in the image, and the second panel color of the sidewall panels being visible exclusively on representative exterior sidewalls of said representative building structure displayed in the image.
3. A method according to claim 2, wherein the medium is selected from the group consisting of a printed document, a still photograph, an electronic digital camera image, a cellular phone transmitted image, a computer-displayed still image, a videotape, a CD video, internet-delivered streaming video, internet webpage information, a television broadcast, and an image printed directly on the roofing and sidewall panels.
4. A method according to claim 1, wherein the first and second panel colors correlate to different panel load strengths of the respective roofing and sidewall panels.
5. A method according to claim 1, wherein the first and second panel colors correlate to different surface slip resistances of the respective roofing and sidewall panels.
6. A method according to claim 1, wherein the first and second panel colors correlate to different fastening patterns for the respective roofing and sidewall panels.
7. A method according to claim 1, wherein said outward-facing surface of said roofing panels further comprises a first fastening pattern comprising a pattern of colored indicia having a first fastening pattern color that is visibly distinct from the first panel color of said outward-facing surface of said roofing panels and said second panel color of said outward-facing sidewall panels.
8. A method according to claim 1, wherein said outward-facing surface of said sidewall panels further comprises a second fastening pattern comprising a pattern of colored indicia having a second fastening pattern color that is visibly distinct from the second panel color of said outward-facing surface of said sidewall panels, said first panel color of said outward-facing roofing panels, and said first fastening pattern color.
9. A method according to claim 1, wherein said providing step comprises production and delivery of said roofing and sidewall panels to a building structure assembler.
10. A method according to claim 1, wherein said providing step comprises a building structure assembler obtaining the roofing panels and sidewall panels from a building materials retailer.
11. A method according to claim 1, further comprising, prior to said providing step, packaging said roofing panels as respective first bundled units in combination with first exterior packaging displaying a first exterior packaging color, and packaging said sidewall panels as respective second bundled units in combination with second exterior packaging displaying a second exterior packaging color, wherein the first and second exterior packaging colors visually differ from each other, and the first and second exterior packaging colors each substantially corresponds to the respective first and second panel colors, respectively, effective to provide a visual cue to a warehouse inventory manager, a building materials supplier, and/or building structure assembler regarding the roofing or sidewall panel contents associated with packaged bundled units of building panels combined with either the first or second exterior packaging.
12. A method according to claim 1, wherein proper installation of the roofing and sidewall panels is confirmed by visual comparison of the sheathed building structure with the image displayed in the medium.
13. A method according to claim 1, wherein the first panel color is displayed on at least about 50% of the total outward surface area of the roofing panels and the second panel color is displayed on at least about 50% of the total outward surface area of the sidewall panels.
14. A method according to claim 1, wherein the first panel color is displayed on at least about 90% of the total outward surface area of the roofing panels and the second panel color is displayed on at least about 90% of the total outward surface area of the sidewall panels.
15. A method according to claim 1, further comprising seaming tape applied to seams located between adjacent assembled roofing panels and between assembled sidewall panels on the building structure.
16. A method according to claim 1, wherein the sidewalls are attached to the second supporting structural frame portion in an orientation that is substantially vertical relative to a plane of a base of the building structure, and the roofing panels are attached to said first supporting structural frame portion in a non-parallel inclined orientation relative to the plane of the base of the building structure.
17. A method according to claim 1, wherein the roofing panels are assembled in a first quilt pattern forming a substantially continuous flat roof surface atop the first supporting structural frame portion, and the sidewall panels are assembled in a second quilt pattern forming a substantially continuous flat sidewall surface on the second supporting structural frame portion.
18. The building product of the method of claim 1.
19. A system facilitating the proper installation and ease of inspection therefor of a building structure incorporating a sheathing system comprising diverse sheathing units to be used for roofing and sidewalls thereof, comprising:
a first packaged bundle of first sheathing panel units which each having a first water-resistant major surface having a visually observable first panel color, said first packaged bundle having first exterior packaging displaying a first packaging color corresponding to said first panel color;
a second packaged bundle of second sheathing panel units which each having a second water-resistant major surface having a visually observable second panel color, said second packaged bundle having second exterior packaging displaying a second packaging color corresponding to said second panel color, wherein the second panel color is visually different from the first panel color, and wherein the first and second panel colors are correlated to a common panel parameter category selected from the group consisting of panel load strength, panel surface slip resistance, and panel fastening pattern, wherein the first sheathing panels have a first panel parameter amount or pattern as applicable for the panel parameter category that is different from a second panel parameter amount or pattern as applicable for said panel parameter category for the second sheathing panels;
a medium visually displaying an image of a representative building structure properly sheathed with the sheathing system in which the first panel color of the first sheathing panels being visible exclusively on a representative roof of said representative building structure displayed in the image, and the second panel color of the second sheathing panels being visible exclusively on representative exterior sidewalls of said representative building structure displayed in the image.
20. A system according to claim 19, wherein the first panel color is displayed on at least about 50% of the total outward surface area of the roofing panels and the second panel color is displayed on at least about 50% of the total outward surface area of the sidewall panels.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to a method and system for installing diverse exterior sheathing components of buildings.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The roof of a residential or commercial building is typically constructed by attaching several roofing panels to the rafters of an underlying supporting structural frame; the panels are most often placed in a quilt-like pattern with the edge of each panel generally aligned with the edges of adjacent panels so as to form a substantially continuous flat surface atop the structural frame.

However, small gaps along the edges of adjoining roofing panels remain after roof assembly, which over time change in size as the panels expand and contract. Because the roofing panels are typically installed days or even weeks before shingles are installed, it is important to have a panel system that minimizes leakage resulting from exposure to the elements until such time as the roof is completed. To prevent water from leaking through the gaps between panels, it is commonly practiced in the industry to put a water-resistant barrier layer on top of the roofing panels.

The building construction industry has used water-resistive materials before shingle installation, primarily in the form of felt paper. While this provides protection against water penetration, it has the disadvantage of being difficult and time-consuming to install because the paper or felt must be first unrolled and spread over the roof surface and then secured to the panels. The felt paper is vulnerable to the weather. Strong wind, rain, and other events weaken the felt paper; often this barrier fails to maintain its ability to shed bulk water, and must be re-installed prior to shingle installation. Sometimes, the damaged barrier layer is not repaired prior to shingle installation and the home owner is left with an inferior roof.

Wall construction similarly involves installation of a weather-resistive barrier before siding installation in the form of felt or housewrap. Same as roof installation, this involves an extra step of unrolling the felt or housewrap, attaching to the panels with staples or button cap nails, cutting and folding at fenestration openings such as windows and doors. These are difficult to install, since housewrap typically comes in nine foot wide rolls, which can be difficult to maneuver on a scaffold, especially during high-wind conditions. Poor installation of the housewrap leads to problems that are difficult to detect until they cause serious damage. For instance, a housewrap can trap water between itself and the sheathing over which it is installed. This situation can cause mold and rot.

Roofing panels and wall panels used in building construction often have significantly different performance requirements from one another. Panel requirements are often specified differently for roofing and wall panels by state and/or local applicable building codes, ordinances, requirements, standards, etc. Many jurisdictions also currently require inspections of both roofing and wall sheathing as part of the building permit process.

Sheathing panels having different thicknesses and/or different imprinted fastening regimens are often present and available for use on building sites. These panels also often are made with generally similar wood composite materials, such as plywood or oriented strand board (OSB). Panel thickness is one of the most often used variables which is adjusted by panel manufacturers to adjust panel performance ratings. Absent careful time-consuming measurements, these differences in panel thicknesses are often imperceptible. However, there is a risk that the design of the structure under construction may be compromised and/or fail inspection in the event diverse paneling used for roofing and wall sheathing was interchanged. Moreover, after the building is assembled, a building inspector has not been able to readily determine and detect if appropriate types of panels were properly selected and used in constructing the entire respective roof and wall sheathing systems.

As will become apparent from the descriptions that follow, the invention addresses these needs as well as provides other advantages and benefits.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a method and system for facilitating the proper installation and ease of inspection therefor of a sheathed building structure having a sheathing system comprising diverse sheathing units to be used for roofing and sidewalls thereof which incorporates a visual signaling system to ensure proper panel selection and installation.

In one embodiment, the method comprises providing a plurality of roofing panels each having a first water-resistant major surface having a visually observable first panel color, and a plurality of sidewall panels each having a second water-resistant major surface having a visually observable second panel color which is visually different from the first panel color. The first and second panel colors are correlated to a common panel parameter category selected from the group consisting of panel load strength, panel surface slip resistance, and panel fastening pattern, wherein the roofing panels have a first panel parameter amount or pattern as applicable for the common panel parameter category that is different from a second panel parameter amount or pattern as applicable for the common panel parameter category for the sidewall panels. A building structure assembler selects the roofing panels with visual reference to the first panel color, and attaches the selected roofing panels to rafters forming part of an underlying first supporting structural frame portion of a building frame, wherein the first water-resistant major surface of each roofing panel faces outward. A building structure assembler also selects the sidewall panels with visual reference to the second panel color and attaches the selected sidewall panels to wall frame forming part of a second supporting structural portion of the building frame, wherein the second water-resistant major surface of each sidewall panel faces outward.

This invention aids building structure assemblers and inspectors in readily and accurately differentiating between roof-grade paneling with integrated water-resistive barriers and wall-grade paneling with integrated water-resistive barriers. In this manner, it makes it possible to ensure that the roofing and wall paneling, as installed on the building by assemblers, meets the applicable sheathing performance requirements. For example, the method of the present invention allows for accurate selection between diverse panel supplies on site such that the paneling as installed meets the applicable roof or wall sheathing performance requirements, such as load requirements, fastening schedule, and surface slip resistance. This invention thus makes it possible to overcome differences in language, level of education and literacy at a building site, since it is commonly known in the building industry that there routinely exist huge differences in these areas amongst building crews. The color scheme system, as presented and applied herein, provides a universal communication mode which visually communicates information to builders and building inspectors so that they can readily identify and distinguish between different types of paneling off or on the building.

In a further embodiment, the building structure assembler is provided access to a medium before the assembler selects the roofing panels, wherein the medium visually displays an image of a representative building structure properly sheathed with the sheathing system in which the first panel color of the roofing panels is visible exclusively on a representative roof of the representative building structure displayed in the image, and the second panel color of the sidewall panels being visible exclusively on representative exterior sidewalls of the representative building structure displayed in the image. The builder references the medium or media before selecting and assembling the roofing and wall sheathing. In yet another embodiment, proper installation of the roofing and sidewall panels is confirmed by visual comparison of the sheathed building structure with the image displayed in the medium. For example, a building site manager or building inspector can reference the medium or media when inspecting the roofed and walled building. In a particular embodiment, the medium is selected from the group consisting of a printed document, a still photograph, an electronic digital camera image, a cellular phone transmitted image, a computer-displayed still image, a videotape, a CD video, internet-delivered streaming video, internet webpage information, a television broadcast, and an image printed directly on the roofing and sidewall panels.

In another further embodiment, the outward-facing surface of the roofing panels further comprises a first fastening pattern comprising a pattern of colored indicia having a first fastening pattern color that is visibly distinct from the first panel color of the outward-facing surface of the roofing panels and the second panel color of the outward-facing sidewall panels. Also, the outward-facing surface of the sidewall panels may further comprise a second fastening pattern comprising a pattern of colored indicia having a second fastening pattern color that is visibly distinct from the second panel color of the outward-facing surface of the sidewall panels, the first panel color of the outward-facing roofing panels, and the first fastening pattern color.

In another embodiment, the roofing and side panels are provided via production and delivery of the roofing and sidewall panels to a building structure assembler, such as located at a building site or building materials storage site therefor. Alternatively, the roofing and sidewall panels may be provided by a building structure assembler obtaining the roofing panels and sidewall panels from a building materials retailer.

In another embodiment, prior to providing the panels to a building structure assembler, the roofing panels are packaged as respective first bundled units in combination with first exterior packaging displaying a first exterior packaging color, and the sidewall panels are packaged as respective second bundled units in combination with second exterior packaging displaying a second exterior packaging color, wherein the first and second exterior packaging colors visually differ from each other, and the first and second exterior packaging colors each substantially corresponds to the respective first and second panel colors, respectively, effective to provide a visual cue to a warehouse inventory manager, a building materials supplier, and/or building structure assembler regarding the roofing or sidewall panel contents associated with packaged bundled units of building panels combined with either the first or second exterior packaging.

In another embodiment, the first panel color is displayed on at least about 50%, particularly at least about 90%, of the total outward surface area of the roofing panels and the second panel color is displayed on at least about 50%, particularly at least about 90%, of the total outward surface area of the sidewall panels.

The difference in color provided between the roofing and wall sheathing panels may be any visually-discernible difference in colors that can be perceived by the human eye. Preferably, the color choices are at least two colors apart on the color wheel so that a builder or inspector can readily visually distinguish the roof-grade from wall-grade panels. The two colors preferably may differ from each other in the range between a color diad to complementary colors. The two colors may vary from one another in terms of hue, lightness, saturation, tint, tone, shade and/or value.

In another embodiment, a seaming tape is applied to seams located between adjacent assembled roofing panels and between assembled sidewall panels on the building structure. The sidewalls are attached to the second supporting structural frame portion in an orientation that is substantially vertical relative to a plane of a base of the building structure, and the roofing panels are attached to the first supporting structural frame portion in a non-parallel inclined orientation relative to the plane of the base of the building structure. In a particular embodiment, the roofing panels are assembled in a first quilt pattern forming a substantially continuous flat roof surface atop the first supporting structural frame portion, and the sidewall panels are assembled in a second quilt pattern forming a substantially continuous flat sidewall surface on the second supporting structural frame portion.

Building products of methods of the present invention are also encompassed.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a method for facilitating the proper installation and ease of inspection therefor of a sheathed building structure incorporating a sheathing system comprising diverse sheathing units to be used for roofing and sidewalls in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of building constructed with panelized roofing and wall sheathing assembled using color schemed panels according to a method of the present invention.

FIGS. 3 and 4 illustrate roof and wall panels, respectively, with respective integral fastening guides imprinted on their outer surfaces.

FIG. 5 is a modified rendition of the Color Wheel, within the constraints of black and white illustration, showing the relative locations of primary, secondary and tertiary colors with applicable labeling.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

As used herein, a “color” may be a primary color (a color that cannot be made as a combination of any other colors), a secondary color (a color created from a combination of two primary colors), a tertiary color (a combination of three colors that are primary or secondary) or other intermediates, or black, and includes earth colors. A “color wheel” refers to a traditional color wheel (see, e.g., FIG. 5), such as a Johannes Itten color wheel, based on the RYB model (red/yellow/blue) with secondary colors of orange, green, and violet (purple), and tertiary colors comprising combinations of primary and secondary colors (i.e., yellow-orange, red-orange, red-violet, blue-violet, blue-green, yellow-green). A “color diad” or “diadic color scheme” is one using two colors that are two colors apart on the color wheel (e.g., red and orange). A “complementary color scheme” is one that uses colors or hues that are directly across from each other on the color wheel (e.g., blue and orange). “Hue” is the name of the color itself, the dominant wavelength of light or the choice of pigment. “Lightness (brightness)” is the lightness or darkness of the color, the amount of light reflected or transmitted. “Saturation” is the level of white, black or grey, ranges from neutral to brilliant (pastel to full color). “Tint” is base color plus white. “Tone” is base color plus grey. “Shade” is base color plus black. “Value” is how light or dark a color is.

As used herein, “wood” is intended to mean a cellular structure, having cell walls composed of cellulose and hemicellulose fibers bonded together by lignin polymer. “Wafer board” is intended to mean panels manufactured from reconstituted wood wafers bonded with resins under heat and pressure. By “wood composite material” it is meant a composite material that comprises wood and one or more other additives, such as adhesives or waxes. Non-limiting examples of wood composite materials include oriented strand board (“OSB”), waferboard, particleboard, chipboard, medium-density fiberboard, plywood, and boards that are a composite of strands and ply veneers. As used herein, “flakes” and “strands” are considered equivalent to one another and are used interchangeably. A non-exclusive description of wood composite materials may be found in the Supplement Volume to the Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology, pp. 765-810, 6th sup. edition. As used herein, “structural panel” is intended to mean a panel product composed primarily of wood which, in its commodity end use, is essentially dependent upon certain mechanical and/or physical properties for successful end use performance such as plywood. A non-exclusive description may be found in the PS-2-92 Voluntary Product Standard.

The following describes preferred embodiments of the present invention which provides a method for selecting and installing panels for panelized roofing and wall sheathing systems that facilitates proper selection, installation and inspection amongst diverse panels used in the construction. The method is suitable for use in the construction of residential and commercial buildings.

Referring to FIG. 1, the block diagram describes a sequence of steps for implementing a building method 100 of the present invention. In Steps 1001 a, 1001 b, a plurality of roofing panels is provided having a water-resistant major surface having a visually observable first panel color (“Color 1”), and a plurality of sidewall panels also is provided having a water-resistant major surface having a visually observable second panel color (“Color 2”), which is visually different from the first panel color. The first and second panel colors are correlated to a common panel parameter category selected from the group consisting of panel load strength, panel surface slip resistance, and panel fastening pattern, wherein the roofing panels have a first panel parameter amount or pattern as applicable for the common panel parameter category that is different from a second panel parameter amount or pattern as applicable for the common panel parameter category for the sidewall panels.

The selection of contrasting colors for Color 1 and Color 2 involves choosing colors that will be easily distinguished by unskilled or skilled workers for installation and inspection, and that will appropriately maintain that distinction. The first panel color is displayed on at least about 50%, particularly at least about 90%, of the total outward surface area of the roofing panels and the second panel color is displayed on at least about 50%, particularly at least about 90%, of the total outward surface area of the sidewall panels. Color 1 and Color 2 can be provided as a continuous coat across the entire exposed outer face of the given panel (approx. 100% coverage), or, alternatively, it may be provided in pattern form or discontinuously on the exposed outer face with a neutral colored background area on the same face of the panel relative. For example, Color 1 and Color 2 could be imprinted or coated on the outer surface in the form of a pattern of colored logos, geometric shapes (e.g., stripes, circles, etc.), patterns (e.g., plaid), and so forth, on a white or other neutral colored background different from Color 1 and Color 2.

The difference in color provided between the roofing and wall sheathing panels may be any visually-discernible difference in colors that can be perceived by the human eye. Preferably, the color choices are at least two colors apart on the color wheel so that a builder or inspector can readily visually distinguish the roof-grade from wall-grade panels. The two colors preferably differ from each other in the range between a color diad to complementary colors. For example, referring to FIG. 5, Color 1 could be Yellow-Orange and Color 2 could be Yellow-Green. Alternatively, for example, Color 1 could be Red-Orange and Color 2 could be Blue-Green, and so forth. It will be appreciated that shades of the twelve hues indicated in FIG. 5 also can be used, which are not shown due to limitations of black and white illustration, but will be understood by those familiar to the pigment arts and the like. The two colors may vary from one another in terms of hue, lightness, saturation, tint, tone, shade and/or value.

The visually-discernible color difference between Color 1 and Color 2 also can be expressed as different respective Pantone color numbers. For instance, Color 1 of the roof sheathing products may be selected to be Pantone 167U, while Color 2 of the wall sheathing products may be selected to be Pantone 576U. Other color combinations based on visually-different colors having different respective Pantone numbers also may be used in selecting the roofing and wall panel colors.

The visually-discernible color difference between Color 1 and Color 2 also can be expressed quantitatively, such as with the CIE L*a*b* Color Scale. In one aspect, the first and second panel colors have differing respective total color difference values, ΔE*; differing respective chroma values, ΔC*; and/or differing respective hue angle values, ΔH*; based on CIE L*a*b* Color Scale measurements taken on the panels using a Hunterlab color measurement instrument that correlate to visually-different colors. For example, the roofing panels may be designed in this alternate embodiment to have a ΔE*Color 1 value that quantitatively differs from the ΔE*Color 2 value of the wall panel in an amount that correlates to visually-perceptible differences between Color 1 and Color 2. Similarly, differences in ΔC* and/or ΔH* values can be provided as between roofing panel Color 1 and wall panel Color 2 that correlate to visually-perceptible differences between Color 1 and Color 2.

In step 1002 a, a builder selects the roofing panels with visual reference to the first panel color. In step 1003 a, the builder then attaches selected roofing panels to rafters forming part of an underlying first supporting structural frame portion of a building frame with the first water-resistant major surface of each roofing panel facing outward. Alternatively, in step 1003 a, the builder selects the sidewall panels with visual reference to the second panel color. In step 1003 b, the builder attaches the selected sidewall panels to wall frame forming part of a second supporting structural portion of the building frame with the second water-resistant major surface of each sidewall panel faces outward. In step 1004, the paneled structure is inspected by the builder or building inspector by reference to the panel colors observed at the roof and sidewalls of the building.

The builder is trained to correlate color with type of panel. For example, in step 1000 a or alternatively step 1000 b, the builder is provided access to a medium displaying a building structure image to the builder that indicates the proper color scheme of the roofing and wall panels relative to each other. The builder can reference that image before selecting and assembling the roof panels and wall panels on the building frame to ensure and confirm proper placement of the respective different types of panels. The medium also may be used for post-construction inspections of the paneled building. The medium may be printed or electronic. It must be in a format useful to communicate color differences. The medium may be selected from the group consisting of a printed document (e.g., a brochure, flyer, etc.), a still photograph, an electronic digital camera image, a cellular phone transmitted image, a computer-displayed still image, a videotape, a CD video, internet-delivered streaming video, internet webpage information, a television broadcast, and an image printed directly on the roofing and sidewall panels, or combinations of these.

The method of this invention for installing roof and wall sheathing having an integrated water-resistive barrier minimizes builder crews' potential mistake of interchanging panels for the intended application by providing visual cues as a visually distinct color for the overlay of roof sheathing panels and a different color for the overlay of wall sheathing panels. It also allows building structure assemblers and inspectors to readily and accurately differentiate between roof-grade paneling with integrated water-resistive barriers and wall-grade paneling with integrated water-resistive barriers. In this manner, it makes it possible to ensure that the roofing and wall paneling, as installed on the building by assemblers, meets the applicable sheathing performance requirements. This invention makes it possible to overcome differences in language, level of education and literacy at a building site, since it is commonly known in the building industry that there routinely exist huge differences in these areas amongst building crews. The color scheme system, as presented and applied herein, provides a universal communication mode which visually communicates information to builders and building inspectors so that they can readily identify and distinguish between different types of paneling off or on the building.

FIG. 2 illustrates a building product 101 assembled with a method of the present invention. Building 101 includes a panelized roof sheathing construction system 10 and panelized wall sheathing system 110 having a plurality of panels 20 and 120, respectively, attached to a building frame structure 102 including rafters 116 and wall frame 115, in substantially abutting relationship. The differently angled imaginary diagonal lines d1 and d2 included in the depictions of roofing panels 20 and wall panels 120, respectively, denote differently colored outer surfaces therebetween.

Referring still to FIG. 2, the roofing panels 20 have an inward-facing surface 22, an outward facing surface 24 displaying “Color 1”, and at least one peripheral edge. Surfaces 22 are major panel surfaces facing the space enclosed by the sheathing, and surfaces 24 are major panel surfaces on the opposite sides of the respective panels that face away from the enclosed space. Also, the roofing system 10 preferably includes a plurality of water-resistant sealing means 40, each of the means 40 sealing at least one of the joints 25 between the adjacent panels 20. The wall panels 120 have an inward-facing surface 121 (i.e., a major panel surface that faces the building space enclosed by the sheathing), and an outward facing surface 122 (i.e., a major panel surface that faces away from the enclosed building space) displaying “Color 2”, and have at least one peripheral edge. The roofing system 10 also preferably includes water resistant barrier layers adhesively secured to at least one of the surfaces of the panels 20.

The wall sheathing system 110 preferably includes a plurality of water-resistant sealing means 140, each of the means 140 sealing at least one of the joints 127 between the adjacent panels 120. The wall sheathing system 110 also preferably includes water resistant barrier layers adhesively secured to at least one of the surfaces of the panels 120.

In meeting load design requirements, builders often utilize 7/16 inch, ½ inch, ⅝ inch, 23/32 inch, or other suitable thickness panels for roof construction. 7/16 inch paneling requires either a closer rafter spacing or use of H-clips to prevent buckling, deflection and misalignment between panel edges, whilst utilizing ½ inch panels allow for wider rafter spacing as well as eliminate the need for H-clips due to its higher load capacity. Structural wall sheathing on the other hand typically will have either 7/16 inch or ½ inch thickness, although the 7/16 inch thickness paneling often is typically adequate to meet wall sheathing requirements and thus is usually used. However, when the present invention is not used, the panels may be easily mixed up in the job site when ½ inch panels are required for roofing and 7/16 inch panels are needed for wall sheathing, and the like. For example, the present invention eliminates the risk of 7/16 inch “wall” panels being used for a roof construction having ½ inch thickness structural load design or requirement.

As illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4, fastening schedules between roof and wall installation typically differ due to differences in the building code and installation practices. The fastening locations are indicated at sites 31 in FIG. 3 and at sites 32 in FIG. 4. As common with the panel suppliers to the building industry, manufacturers provide fastening guide patterns to make it easier, faster and more convenient for the building crew to install roof and wall sheathing. However, all the current arts utilize printing on the engineered wood panel itself, be it in the form of plywood or oriented strand board (OSB). Felt and housewrap are installed after sheathing installation, and hence do not come with a fastening or nailing pattern.

Printing fastening schedules on the surface of the overlay, or more specifically, the weather-resistive barrier has the downside of using a wall fastening schedule on a roof and vice-versa, the design from a loading, wind-resistance, wind-uplift, wall racking and a host of other factors are different for roof and wall construction. Hence, there exists the possibility that a builder will follow a fastening schedule not for its intended use. For example, as illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4, there is a basic difference between roof and wall, i.e., roof sheathing are typically installed horizontally relative to the rafters, whilst wall sheathing can be installed vertically or horizontally. Utilizing a fastening guide design for a different application will result in compromising the structural integrity of the building. The method of the present invention makes it possible for builders to readily differentiate between roofing and wall panels based on the color scheme.

In a further embodiment, the outward-facing surface of the roofing panels can be provided a fastening pattern imprinted as a pattern of colored indicia in a color that is visibly distinct from the color of the host panel and the panel color of the wall panels. Similarly, the outward-facing surface of the wall panels can be provided a fastening pattern imprinted as a pattern of colored indicia in a color that is visibly distinct from the color of its host panel, the color of the roofing panels as well as the color of the fastening pattern on the roofing panels.

Another difference that commonly exists between roofing and wall panels is in slip resistance requirements. A panel product used in the roof typically will have more stringent requirements in terms of slip resistance than the sidewalls because builders typically walk on roofing construction panels during construction of the roof. The color scheme used in the present invention also can be used to aid workers in readily differentiating more skid resistant panels from less skid resistant ones.

Other advantages of using a visual-based instruction aid in building construction in accordance with the present invention also include the following: mistake-proof building sheathing construction based on visual aids is provided; contractors can show the benefits and advantages of “mistake-proofing” to buyers during the construction process, creating a higher confidence level of having a more robust/safer dwelling place; lumberyards, home building supply retailers, inventory and supply chain systems, can more easily differentiate not only the panel colors, but also packaging of the panels that would carry the same visual aid differentiation, resulting in a more efficient sales and distribution process and lowering the probability of shipping similar panels by mistake for roof vs. wall applications. Also, the building inspection process will be improved in both ease and accuracy regarding building roofing and sheathing inspections. Also, while new products in the construction industry typically require considerable communication and training, the visual-based differentiation system based on color as used in the inventive method allows a significantly simpler and easier opportunity for building inspectors to differentiate and ensure that the proper materials are installed for roof versus wall applications when they go around the construction sites.

Although not limited thereto, and aside from the color feature thereof, structural panels with built-in waterproof surfaces that may be used for panelized roof sheathing and panelized wall sheathing systems used in methods of the present invention, include those described, for example, in U.S. Published Pat. Appln. Nos. US2005/0229504 A1, US2005/0229524 A1, and US2005/0257469 A1, which descriptions are incorporated herein by reference. Also, panel seaming means (such as tape, laminate, caulk, foam, spray, putty, mechanical means, or any other suitable sealing mechanism used to seal the joints or seams between adjoining panels), panel tongue-and-groove fasteners, and panel-to-frame fastening systems, and the like, which may be used in the assembly of panelized roofing and wall systems in methods of the present invention, also are generally described, for example, in these '504, '524 and '469 published patent publications, which are incorporated herein by reference. The roofing panels are suitable for use behind numerous exterior finishes for roofs such as shingles, metal, and tile, and the wall panels are suitable for use behind numerous exterior finishes, such as siding, brick, lap siding, vinyl, and the like. As will be appreciated, the roofing and wall sheathing systems as installed in methods of the present invention ordinarily will be inspected before such exterior finishes are applied. It will be appreciated that the outer surfaces of the roofing and wall panels described therein will be modified for purposes of the present invention to further include color schemes in accordance with embodiments of the present invention. For instance, the outer surfaces of the roofing and wall panels may provided with an appropriate color by any suitable technique such as painting, coating, or overlaying a substrate panel with pigmented or colored paper or a pigmented or colored synthetic plastic film, and so forth, using any conventional or otherwise suitable technique for providing a colored major surface thereon.

While the invention has been particularly described with specific reference to particular process and product embodiments, it will be appreciated that various alterations, modifications and adaptations may be based on the present disclosure, and are intended to be within the spirit and scope of the present invention as defined by the following claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7607270Aug 16, 2006Oct 27, 2009Benjamin Obdyke IncorporatedWeatherproofing; moistureproofing
US7698857 *Sep 1, 2006Apr 20, 2010Rubbermaid IncorporatedRoof assembly method and apparatus
US7858174Sep 10, 2009Dec 28, 2010Benjamin Obdyke IncorporatedDrainage-promoting wrap for an exterior wall or roof of a building
US8435039 *Dec 15, 2010May 7, 2013Jeffrey PaganiniAdjustable pitch simulated roof for training firefighters in roof ventilation procedures
US20110143324 *Dec 15, 2010Jun 16, 2011Jeffrey PaganiniAdjustable pitch simulated roof for training firefighters in roof ventilation procedures
WO2009101408A1 *Feb 12, 2009Aug 20, 2009Martin InghamBuilding roof system
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/311.1
International ClassificationE04F15/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04D13/00, E04F13/10, E04B2001/741, E04B1/762
European ClassificationE04F13/10, E04D13/00, E04B1/76D
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