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Publication numberUS20070262088 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/743,556
Publication dateNov 15, 2007
Filing dateMay 2, 2007
Priority dateMay 3, 2006
Also published asCN101448445A, WO2007130439A2, WO2007130439A3
Publication number11743556, 743556, US 2007/0262088 A1, US 2007/262088 A1, US 20070262088 A1, US 20070262088A1, US 2007262088 A1, US 2007262088A1, US-A1-20070262088, US-A1-2007262088, US2007/0262088A1, US2007/262088A1, US20070262088 A1, US20070262088A1, US2007262088 A1, US2007262088A1
InventorsPuneet Nanda
Original AssigneePuneet Nanda
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tissue dispenser with sensory device
US 20070262088 A1
Abstract
A tissue dispenser unit for housing pre-moistened cleansing tissues and other paper products comprises one or more sensory devices. The sensory devices may be included as part of a timing mechanism that is configured to alert a user that a particular time period has elapsed. The lights and/or other sensory devices of the dispenser unit may capture and maintain the attention of a young child or other person to facilitate the performance of an activity.
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Claims(13)
1. A tissue dispenser unit comprising:
a housing configured to hold a dispensable tissue;
a lid pivotably connected to said housing and configured to operate between an open and a closed position; and
at least one timing mechanism coupled to the housing, the timing mechanism including a sensory device and a timer, the timer being configured to determine a period of time and the sensory device configured to indicate when the period of time has elapsed.
2. The dispenser unit of claim 1, wherein the sensory device comprises at least one selected from the following: light, vibrator, movement and auditory device.
3. The dispenser unit of claim 1, wherein the sensory device comprises at least two of the following, activated substantially simultaneously for a substantially simultaneous duration: light, vibrator, movement, and auditory device.
4. The dispenser unit of claim 1, wherein the dispensable tissue is pre-moistened cleansing tissue.
5. The dispenser unit of claim 1, further comprising an activation switch adapted to activate the timing mechanism.
6. The dispenser unit of claim 5, wherein the activation switch is adapted to activate the timing mechanism when the lid is moved between a closed position and an open position.
7. The dispenser unit of claim 5, wherein the activation switch is adapted to activate the timing mechanism when the lid is moved between an open position and a closed position.
8. The dispenser unit of claim 5, wherein the activation switch is positioned to be activated by the user.
9. The dispenser unit of claim 8, wherein the activation switch is positioned to be accessible to the user when the lid is in an open position.
10. The dispenser unit of claim 1, wherein said period of time is about 30 seconds.
11. A tissue dispenser unit comprising:
a housing configured to hold a dispensable tissue;
a lid pivotably connected to said housing and configured to operate between an open and a closed position;
at least one sensory device; and
a control for activating and deactivating said sensory device.
12. The dispenser unit of claim 11, wherein the sensory device comprises at least one selected from the following: light, vibrator, movement and auditory device.
13. The dispenser unit of claim 11, wherein the control comprises one selected from the following: button, switch, lever and tab.
Description
    CLAIM OF PRIORITY
  • [0001]
    This application claims benefit under 35 U.S.C. 119(e) to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/746,334, filed May 3, 2006 which is incorporated herein in its entirety by reference.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTIONS
  • [0002]
    1. Field of the Inventions
  • [0003]
    These inventions relate in general to consumer products and, particularly, to dispensers for disposable wiping articles and other paper products.
  • [0004]
    2. Description of the Related Art
  • [0005]
    Pre-moistened cleansing tissues, which are sometimes referred to as wipes, wet wipes or towelettes, are especially useful for the cleansing of children and infants. For example, wet wipes are typically used to clean an infant's skin during a diaper change. Wet wipes may also be used for general cleaning tasks where soap, cloths and running water are unavailable, unsuitable or inconvenient for a particular task. In almost all instances, wet wipes are provided as stacked and folded sheets of disposable wipes. Typically, each wet wipe is intended for one-time use. Often, children are uncooperative and/or easily distracted while their diapers are being changed or when they are being cleaned, making it more difficult to perform such tasks. Thus, the diaper-changing or other cleaning process using wet wipes or other dispensable tissues would be made easier by providing a way of capturing and maintaining a child's attention.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0006]
    In one embodiment of the invention, a tissue dispenser unit comprises a housing configured to hold a dispensable tissue, a lid pivotably connected to said housing and configured to operate between an open and a closed position and at least one timing mechanism coupled to the housing. The timing mechanism may include a timer configured to determine a period of time and a sensory device configured to indicate when said period of time has elapsed. In one embodiment, the period of time is about 30 seconds. In another embodiment, the sensory device comprises a light, a vibrator, a movement and/or an auditory device. In yet another embodiment, the dispensable tissue is pre-moistened cleansing tissue. In some embodiments, tissue dispenser unit further comprises a means for activating the timing mechanism.
  • [0007]
    In some embodiments of the present invention, a tissue dispenser unit comprises a housing configured to hold a dispensable tissue, a lid pivotably connected to said housing and configured to operate between an open and a closed position, at least one sensory device and a control for activating and deactivating said sensory device. In one embodiment, the sensory device comprises a light, a vibrator, a movement and/or an auditory device. In another embodiment, the control comprises a button, a switch, a lever and/or a tab.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0008]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an embodiment of a tissue dispenser unit comprising a timing mechanism according to an aspect of the invention.
  • [0009]
    FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of the tissue dispenser unit comprising a timing mechanism according to an embodiment of the invention.
  • [0010]
    FIG. 3 is a block diagram of a timing mechanism.
  • [0011]
    FIG. 4 is a rear side view of a tissue dispenser unit comprising a timing mechanism according to one embodiment.
  • [0012]
    FIG. 5 is a rear view of an embodiment of a tissue dispenser unit comprising a timing mechanism according to an aspect of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0013]
    FIG. 1 illustrates a tissue dispenser unit 10 comprising a main housing 20, a bottom base 22 and a timing mechanism (only partially shown). The timing mechanism is configured to provide feedback to the user and/or those in proximity of the user of the tissue dispenser unit 10. For example, the sensory output generated by the timing mechanism may be used to entertain or otherwise preoccupy children during a diaper changing or other cleaning procedure. The sensory output may also be used to relax a child or help it fall asleep. Alternatively, the timing mechanism may be used as a general timing device, as it is configured to alert a user that a certain time period has expired. This is especially helpful when the need to administer a particular medication to a child for a prescribed time period arises. The timing feature may also be used when taking a child's temperature or performing any other activity where keeping track of time is important. In some embodiments, the timing mechanism is configured to alert the user after a set time period has passed (e.g., 30 seconds, 1 minute, etc.). However, in other embodiments, the timing mechanism may be configured to permit a user to optionally adjust such a minimum time period.
  • [0014]
    Initially, the tissue dispensing unit 10 may be provided with or without any tissues. In FIG. 1, the housing 20 is snap fitted to the base 22, allowing for easy detachment and attachment of the two pieces (see FIG. 2). Other joining methods may be used to connect the housing 20 to the base 22. Examples of other non-limiting methods include flanged, threaded, Velcro or hinged connections. Such a detachable arrangement permits a user to fill and/or refill the dispenser unit 10 with tissue of his or her choice. Preferably, a box of stacked and folded tissues is provided in the cavity created by the housing 20 and the base 22. The box of tissues is advantageously shaped and sized to fit within the cavity. Further, the tissues are dispensed from the top of the box such that the opening in the box of tissues generally corresponds to the dispensing area 32 of the dispensing unit 10. Alternatively, the dispenser unit 10 may be initially provided with tissues to eliminate the need for subsequent filling. Thus, in some embodiments, the housing 20 may not be detachable from the base 22. Consequently, other ways of inserting additional tissues underneath the housing 20 may be provided. For example, a portion of the base 22 may comprise an opening configured to permit access to the inner cavity. Alternatively, the housing 20 may include one or more access openings (e.g., removable upper portion).
  • [0015]
    Although the dispensing unit 10 may have any of a variety of shapes, the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1 is generally box-like with rounded corners. The container 20, base 22, lid 40 and other portions of the dispensing unit 10 may be constructed of one or more durable materials, including plastic, metal (e.g., stainless steel) or the like. For example, the dispensing unit 10 can comprise a thermoplastic or polymeric material, such as ethylene acrylic acid, ethylene vinyl acetate, linear low density polyethylene, polyethylene terephtalate glycol, poly(hydroxyamino ethers), polyethylene terephtalate, polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, cellulose material, mixtures thereof, and the like. The dispensing unit 10 may be colored and/or decorated in a manner that further enhances its overall aesthetic appearance.
  • [0016]
    As used herein, the term “tissue” is a broad term and is used in accordance with its ordinary meaning and may include, without limitation a wet wipe, a pre-moisturized tissue, a wipe, a towelette (wet or dry), etc. Such terms may be used interchangeably herein.
  • [0017]
    In FIG. 1, the housing 20 of the dispensing unit 10 includes a top a lid 40, a recessed area 26 configured to accommodate the lid 40 in a closed position (FIG. 2), a latch 46 for engaging the lid in a closed position and an opening 32 within the recessed area 26 configured to provide access to the interior cavity between the housing 20 and the base 22. In the illustrated embodiment, the lid 40 is pivotably connected to the housing 20 using one or more hinges 42. Those of skill in the art will appreciate that other ways of connecting the lid 40 to the dispensing unit 10 may also be used. In order to dispense a tissue from the dispensing unit 10, a user first moves the latch 46 to release the lid into an open position. The user is then able to access one or more tissues T through the opening 32. Preferably, the tissues within the dispensing unit 10 are arranged so that extraction of a tissue T from the opening 30 draws the leading edge of the next tissue T through the opening 32. This type of tissue arrangement provides easy access to the next tissue T to be dispensed. However, the tissues may be arranged in any other suitable manner. For example, in some embodiments, the user may be required to reach down through the opening 30 to retrieve the next tissue T.
  • [0018]
    Once the desired number of tissues T has been dispensed, the lid 40 is preferably closed. This is especially important if wet tissues are stored within the dispensing unit 10 in order to prevent loss of moisture. The latch 46 engages the edge of the lid 40 and keeps it in the closed position.
  • [0019]
    The tissue dispenser unit 10 includes one or more timing mechanisms. As shown schematically in FIG. 3, the timing mechanism 60 may include one or more of the following: a sensory device 54, a timing device 62 and a power supply 64. The sensory device 54 is preferably configured to generate an output that can be perceived by a person. For example, the sensory device 54 may comprise one or more lights, vibrators (e.g., a rotating unbalanced mass), auditory systems (e.g., speaker), articulating device (e.g., an articulating arm), visual display and the like. The timing mechanism 60 operates only for a predetermined time period in order to alert a person of the passage of such a time period. For example, one or more lights of a timing mechanism 60 may stay lit or may continue to flash for one or more minutes. In some embodiments, the timing mechanism 60 comprises an hourglass, a mechanical or electric timer or other reliable time keeping device.
  • [0020]
    The power supply 64 provides power to one or more components of the timing mechanism Preferably, the timing mechanism 60 is configured so that the power supply 64 provides power to both the one or more sensory devices 54 and the timing devices 62. The power supply 64 may include one or more batteries or another energy source device (e.g., small solar panel) to energize the different components of the timing mechanism 60. Of course, those of skill in the art will appreciate that not all embodiments of the timing mechanism 60 require a power supply 64 (e.g., certain mechanical timing devices).
  • [0021]
    The timing device 62 of the timing mechanism 60 may comprise a clock, a timer (e.g., mechanical timer, electric timer, etc.), an hourglass and/or any other timing device. In some embodiments, initiation of timing cycle results in the activation of one or more sensory devices. With continued reference to FIG. 1, activation of the timing device causes a series of lights 54 to illuminate and/or flash. The lights 54 in FIG. 1 are powered by a power supply (not shown) in the form of a small battery. In a preferred embodiment, the one or more batteries or other power source are positioned along the inner wall of the housing 20. The lights 54 comprise one or more light emitting diodes (LED) or other suitable illumination device for capturing the attention of a person. The lights 54 will remain lit and/or flash until the predetermined time period has elapsed. Alternatively, a person may control the period of time during which the lights 54 or other sensory device remains activated using a switch or other similar control. The timing mechanism 60 can be configured to flash (preferably repeatedly) or provide continuous illumination to effectively alert a person. The sensory effect may be further enhanced if the lights 54 are configured to illuminate in different colors.
  • [0022]
    In other embodiments, activating a timing cycle may have no effect until the predetermined time period has elapsed. Under such a configuration, activation of the timing mechanism may prompt the lights 54 to illuminate and/or flash only after the predetermined timing period has expired. Regardless of how the timing mechanism is configured to operate, activation of the one or more sensory devices is designed to get and keep the attention of a nearby child. With the child focuses on the one or more sensory devices, certain activities that require a child to remain still and/or attentive may become easier to perform. Non-limiting examples include a diaper change, bathing or other cleaning, feeding, administering medication, taking temperature, etc. The sensory devices may even help lull a child to sleep. Further, activation or deactivation of the sensory device may be used as a timer to alert a user that a particular time period has elapsed. For example, a parent may use this timing function to determine when a thermometer measurement has been adequately taken. Preferably, the timing device resets after completion of a timing cycle.
  • [0023]
    Once the sensory device is activated, the timing mechanism 60 starts measuring time. After a predetermined length of time has elapsed, the timing mechanism 60 deactivates the sensory device, alerting the user that a particular time period has expired. In some embodiments, the length of time measured by the timer is fixed and generally corresponds to a desirable duration for performing a particular activity (e.g., administration of medication, thermometer reading, etc.).
  • [0024]
    In some embodiments, the time period associated with the timing mechanism 60 may be relatively short (e.g., 10 seconds, 15 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 35 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds and ranges encompassing such lengths of time). In one embodiment, the desired time period is about 30 seconds. Alternatively, the time period may be shorter or longer depending on the particular situation for which the timing mechanism is being used. For example, the desired time period may be about 1 second, 5 seconds, 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 30 minutes, 1 hour, etc.). In some embodiments, the time measured by the timer is adjusted to compensate for the time it takes to perform some related ancillary activity (e.g., sterilizing or resetting the thermometer prior to initiating a temperature reading). Additionally, the timing device of the timing mechanism 30 may include a controller that permits a user to optionally adjust the time associated with a particular activation period.
  • [0025]
    The timing device is preferably electronically driven. Alternatively, the timing mechanism may comprise a mechanically or otherwise driven timing device. For example, the timing device may comprise a windup clock, motion powered timing device or other suitable mechanical device. In FIG. 1, the timing mechanism is configured to start measuring time when the user depresses a button 50 located on the top surface of the housing 20. Alternatively, the timing mechanism may be activated in other ways. For example, in FIG. 1, the timing mechanism may be configured to commence upon movement of the latch 46 (e.g., during the opening of the lid 40). However, the button 50 can be activated at any time in an attempt to preoccupy a child's attention, to time a particular activity or for any other purpose. In other embodiments, the timing mechanism comprises a motion sensor, the activation of which initiates the beginning of the time period. In yet other embodiments, the timing cycle may be initiated using a voice activated sensor, a temperature sensor capable of detecting temperature changes (e.g., simply by touching a surface of the dispensing unit 10), an audio sensor (e.g., in response to a loud noise or particular words or phrases, etc.) or by any other method.
  • [0026]
    The components of the timing mechanism can be attached to any suitable part of the dispenser unit 10. In FIG. 1, the timing mechanism components are positioned in different locations from one another. For example, the button 50 is on the top surface of the housing 20, the power source (e.g., battery) is on the inside wall of the housing 20 and the sensory devices (e.g., lights 54) are along the side walls of the housing 20. The various components of the timing mechanism may be attached to the dispenser unit 10 using any known methods. In a preferred embodiment, the housing 20 is custom molded to securely accommodate the components. However, adhesives, fasteners, mounting structures or any other attachment methods may also be used.
  • [0027]
    Preferably, the lights 54 or other sensory devices are easily perceivable to the user and/or to a child in close proximity of the dispenser unit 10. The lights 54 may be positioned on one or more sides of the housing 20, on the top surface of the housing 20, on the base 22 or any other part of the dispenser unit 10. In other embodiments, the sensory device may not be visible from outside the dispenser unit 10. For example, if the sensory device produces sound (e.g., music) or a vibration, the necessary components (e.g., speaker, oscillating elements, etc.) could be contained completely within an interior portion of the dispenser unit 10, and, thus, hidden from view.
  • [0028]
    In FIG. 1, a button 50 positioned on top of the housing 20 is configured to activate the one or more sensory devices. Alternatively, the sensory devices may be activated by movement of the latch 46, by simply touching the dispenser unit 10 or by any other suitable method. As described herein, the sensory devices are activated for a particular time period. However, the dispenser unit 10 may be configured without a timing feature, requiring a user to both voluntarily activate and deactivate the sensory device. For example, in the illustrated embodiment, a user may have to press the button 50 a second time to deactivate the lights 54.
  • [0029]
    In FIG. 1, the sensory devices comprise a plurality of lights 54 disposed on the sides of the housing 20. The number, size, orientation, color, intensity, arrangement and mode of operation of the lights may be varied depending on the particular dispenser unit 10. One or more other sensory devices may be used in lieu of or in conjunction with lights 54. Non-limiting examples of other sensory devices include audible sounds (e.g., music), vibrations, other movements, etc. Thus, the lights 54 can be flashing simultaneously with a musical sound, in one embodiment. In some embodiments, music or other sounds can be active without lights, or in conjunction with other indicators, such as vibration. The timing mechanism may be configured so that the sensory actions randomly or non-randomly vary from cycle to cycle. Alternatively, the user may choose what sensory actions are performed during a particular timing cycle. In other embodiments, the sensory actions performed may depend on one or more factors (e.g., time, temperature, etc.).
  • [0030]
    Moreover, various decorative features may be incorporated into the design of the dispenser unit 10 to further enhance the overall aesthetic appearance. For instance, the outer surface of the housing 20 may be painted with bright colors (e.g., red, yellow, etc.) and may include one or more surface texture features. Preferably, the various components of the dispenser unit 10, including the sensory devices, are constructed of one or more durable materials that are capable of withstanding normal human contact and any elements to which they may be exposed (e.g., water, other liquid, etc.).
  • [0031]
    FIG. 4 illustrates a rear side view of the dispenser unit 10A according to another embodiment. The side wall of the housing 20A includes an image of several cartoon characters 70 (e.g., fireflies). In the depicted embodiment, the image is illustrated on a sticker or other adhesive, which is attached to the housing 20A. However, in other embodiments, the image may be directly painted or drawn onto the surface of the housing 20A. In FIG. 4, several lights 54A, 54B on the surface of the housing 20A are strategically incorporated into the image. For example, certain lights 54A are positioned near the depicted cartoon characters 70 to signify the lighted portion of a firefly. In addition, star-shaped lights 54B are also included at various locations of the housing 20A wall. When the timing mechanism is activated, one or more lights 54A, 54B will be lit. In some embodiments, some or all of the lights 54A, 54B may also flash, change colors or intensity, or transform in other ways.
  • [0032]
    Activation of the timing mechanism may also prompt other sensory devices to operate (e.g., playing a buzzing sound or music). In some embodiments, one or more portions of the cartoon characters 70 or other illustrated items may be configured to optionally vibrate, rotate or otherwise move. For example, a cartoon character 70 may move its arms, legs, wings or any other body part. Those of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that any combination of sensory devices, whether or not listed herein, may be used. Regardless, such sensory devices preferably remain active until a predetermined period of time has expired. Alternatively, the user manually deactivates the sensory devices by pressing a button, operating a switch, etc. The illustrations, sensory devices and other features used to decorate the dispenser unit 10A are particularly well suited for capturing and maintaining the attention of young children.
  • [0033]
    With continued reference to FIG. 4, one or more sensory devices, illustrations or other decorative features may also be positioned on the surface of the lid 40A or any other surface of the dispensing unit 10A. For example, the lid 40A may comprise a mirror, small stuffed animal or other toy. Although some of the above-described embodiments primarily consist of a single timing mechanism, a plurality of timing mechanisms may also be used.
  • [0034]
    In operation, under the embodiment depicted in FIG. 1, a user depresses the button 50 to initiate the timing mechanism. Consequently, one or more lights 54 and/or other sensory devices are activated. The lights 54 and/or other sensory device remain activated (e.g., remain lit, flash, etc.) for a predetermined time period (e.g., 30 seconds). Once this time period has elapsed, the lights and/or other sensory devices will be deactivated, thus informing the user that the time period has expired. Alternatively, the timing mechanism 30 may be configured to permit the user to adjust this time period according to his or her preferences. The length of time during which the lights or other sensory devices remain activated may signify a minimum recommended period for performing a particular activity. Because the timing mechanism 30 is conveniently incorporated within the dispenser unit 10 design, a user does not need to use a separate time keeping device. In other embodiments, the user must manually deactivate the sensory devices by pressing the button 50 a second time.
  • [0035]
    FIG. 5 depicts an alternative embodiment, wherein components are substantially the same as in previous embodiments, except that a prime symbol (′) has been added. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5, an alternative arrangement of lights 54A′ has been displayed. The lights 54A′ can activate in a sequence, which can be synchronized to other indicators, such as auditory or physical changes, including music, vibration or other movements, or alterations in appearance, such as changes in coloring of cartoon figures. In some embodiments, the lights 54A′ can illuminate in a random pattern. In some embodiments, the lights 54A′ activate in a repeated sequence which cycles through a duration determined by a timer. In some embodiments, the sequence displayed can be randomly determined from a number of sequences, with repeated random sequences successively displayed.
  • [0036]
    The various methods and techniques described above provide a number of ways to carry out the invention. Of course, it is to be understood that not necessarily all objectives or advantages described may be achieved in accordance with any particular embodiment described herein. Thus, for example, those skilled in the art will recognize that the methods may be performed in a manner that achieves or optimizes one advantage or group of advantages as taught herein without necessarily achieving other objectives or advantages as may be taught or suggested herein.
  • [0037]
    Furthermore, the skilled artisan will recognize the interchangeability of various features from different embodiments disclosed herein. Similarly, the various features and steps discussed above, as well as other known equivalents for each such feature or step, can be mixed and matched by one of ordinary skill in this art to perform methods in accordance with principles described herein. Additionally, the methods which are described and illustrated herein are not limited to the exact sequence of acts described, nor are they necessarily limited to the practice of all of the acts set forth. Other sequences of events or acts, or less than all of the events or simultaneous occurrence of the events, may be utilized in practicing the embodiments of the invention.
  • [0038]
    Although the invention has been disclosed in the context of certain embodiments and examples, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the invention extends beyond the specifically disclosed embodiments to other alternative embodiments and/or uses and obvious modifications and equivalents thereof. Accordingly, the invention is not intended to be limited by the specific disclosures of preferred embodiments herein.
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7832890 *Sep 28, 2007Nov 16, 2010Billin JesseFacial tissue container with integrated night light
US9143750 *Dec 28, 2012Sep 22, 2015Electronics And Telecommunications Research InstituteApparatus and method for processing media in convergence media service platform
US20090084693 *Sep 28, 2007Apr 2, 2009Jesse BillinFacial tissue container with integrated night light
US20100288658 *Dec 31, 2009Nov 18, 2010Lorrie Lynn KrynockTissue Carton with Lights
US20130322856 *Dec 28, 2012Dec 5, 2013Electronics And Telecommunications Research InstituteApparatus and method for processing media in convergence media service platform
WO2015038769A1 *Sep 11, 2014Mar 19, 2015International Great Brands LLCConsumable product package with pivoting lid
Classifications
U.S. Classification221/305
International ClassificationA47F1/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47K2010/389, A47K2010/3266, G09B19/0076, A47K10/421
European ClassificationG09B19/00L, A47K10/42B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 17, 2009ASAssignment
Owner name: DR. FRESH, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NANDA, PUNEET;REEL/FRAME:022276/0680
Effective date: 20090211
Owner name: DR. FRESH, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NANDA, PUNEET;REEL/FRAME:022271/0311
Effective date: 20090211