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Publication numberUS20070262632 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/624,609
Publication dateNov 15, 2007
Filing dateJan 18, 2007
Priority dateJan 18, 2006
Publication number11624609, 624609, US 2007/0262632 A1, US 2007/262632 A1, US 20070262632 A1, US 20070262632A1, US 2007262632 A1, US 2007262632A1, US-A1-20070262632, US-A1-2007262632, US2007/0262632A1, US2007/262632A1, US20070262632 A1, US20070262632A1, US2007262632 A1, US2007262632A1
InventorsRobert Cody, Daniel Haser, Philip Savalle, Scott Montesi, Mark Herrell, Andrew Roberts, Shawn Demers
Original AssigneeCollins & Aikman Products Co.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sliding Armrest
US 20070262632 A1
Abstract
The present invention relates to a slidable armrest that may be used in combination with a console within a transportation vehicle. The armrest may be slidably mounted to a mounting bracket and overlie a console lid/compartment and be moveable forward to provide arm support for vehicle occupants or rearward to allow access to an underlying storage compartment. Two exemplary embodiments of actuating mechanisms for controlling fore/aft positioning of the armrest are disclosed.
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Claims(9)
1. A movable armrest capable of slidable movement in a vehicle, comprising;
an armrest portion, including one or more slides;
a base portion, wherein said base portion includes a detent mechanism for adjustably positioning said movable armrest in said vehicle; and
a mounting bracket, wherein said one or more slides are slidably engaged to said bracket and wherein one or more projections extend from said bracket to releasably engage with said detent mechanism in said base portion.
2. The movable armrest of claim 1 wherein said armrest portion includes an upper portion and a lower portion which cooperate to form a storage compartment therebetween.
3. The movable armrest of claim 2 wherein said upper portion comprises one of injection molded plastic, a layer of skin overlying injection molded plastic, a layer of skin overlying a layer of foam overlying injection molded plastic, and a combined foam and skin layer overlying injection molded plastic.
4. The movable armrest of claim 2 wherein said upper portion and said lower portion are hingedly connected to allow access to said storage compartment.
5. The movable armrest of claim 1 including a console containing a storage compartment and said movable armrest overlies said storage compartment in said console when said movable armrest is in a first position, which movable armrest may be slidably moved to a second position to allow access to said console storage compartment.
6. The movable armrest of claim 1 wherein said detent mechanism comprises:
a comb-like component including a plurality of teeth which engage said one or more projections extending from said bracket and including one or more pins that extend from said comb-like component;
a slider, the slider having angled slots for receiving said one or more pins;
a handle connected to said slider; and
one or more springs connecting said slider to said base portion.
7. The movable armrest of claim 1 wherein said detent mechanism comprises:
a latch handle connected to said one or more projections by a cable;
one or more rows of inverted depressions formed in said base portion which are capable of aligning with said one or more projections;
wherein said one or more projections include at least one spring which forces said one or more projections to engage with said one or more inverted depressions when said spring is in a relatively expanded condition and which acts upon said cable to reposition said latch handle when in a relatively compressed condition.
8. The movable armrest of claim 5 wherein said bracket is attached to said console.
9. The movable armrest of claim 1 wherein said movable armrest is adjustable fore/aft in said vehicle in concert with an adjacent seat for an occupant.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of the filing dates of U.S. Provisional Application Nos. 60/759,790, filed Jan. 18, 2006 and 60/762,631, filed Jan. 27, 2006, the teachings of which are incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a movable armrest which may overlie a console assembly in a vehicle, and more particularly, to a sliding armrest supported separately from the console, capable of fore/aft adjustment and including a storage space located therein.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Storage and ergonomics in transportation vehicles are key considerations to excite and delight the consumer and encourage purchase. The storage of articles in the center console area between the seats may include a need for cupholders, as well as space to store cellular phones, sunglasses, CD's, PDA's, wallets, maps, tools and the like. Generally, the lid of a center console is not at the optimal level for supporting a forearm while driving. Further, the lid may not have a soft padded surface to cushion an occupant's forearm.

Given the extensive amount of time that occupants spend in their vehicles each day, it is important to provide “creature features”. While secure storage of items is important, cushioned support of the body is even more important to prevent fatigue. With turnpike driving at higher speeds on straighter roads there is less turning of the wheel. New guidelines for driving encourage grasping the wheel at four o'clock and eight o'clock rather than the previously recommended ten o'clock and two o'clock. This leaves the arms in a much lower position where the forearms should be supported by an armrest.

Previous examples of adjustable armrests or consoles tend to be, e.g. relatively complex assemblies having multiple components and, therefore, expensive to manufacture and, even worse, subject to mechanical failure over their useful life. Another difficulty may involve the mounting of the adjustable armrest such that it may be adjustable, and sturdy, and allow relatively easy access to the console bin.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed at a slidable armrest which may, for instance, overlie the console in a vehicle. The armrest may lock into multiple fore/aft positions to accommodate occupants at various seating positions and may also allow access to the console beneath the armrest. The armrest portion itself may also include a storage compartment for the storage of small objects.

In a first exemplary embodiment, the actuating mechanism for the slidable armrest may include a paddle latch which when squeezed may actuate a slide which is attached to a comb-like member. The comb-like member may engage a pin which may be welded to a support bracket. The slide may include one or more slots at about a 45° angle, such that actuation of the latch allows the comb to disengage the pin and may allow the armrest to be slid fore or aft. Releasing the latch may cause springs to re-engage the comb around the pin, but in a different fore/aft location. Since relatively few mechanical components may be involved, greater reliability, less wear and fewer buzz, squeak and rattle issues may result. The armrest upper portion may be of various constructions: skin, foam, wrapped, injection molded, etc.

In a second exemplary embodiment, the actuating mechanism for the slidable armrest may include a hinged latch handle which when actuated (e.g. squeezed) may actuate a cable assembly which is attached to a detent plate. The detent plate may be attached through a detent housing to a support bracket and engage one or more depressions formed in the armrest base. Actuation of the latch allows the cable to pull the spring-loaded detent plate from engagement with the one or more depressions and may allow the armrest to be slid fore or aft. Releasing the latch may cause the springs to force projections formed in the detent plate back into engagement with the depressions, but in a different fore/aft location. Since relatively few mechanical components may be involved, greater reliability, less wear and fewer buzz, squeak and rattle issues may result. The armrest upper portion may be of various constructions: skin, foam, wrapped, injection molded, etc.

The sliding armrest may overlie a center console or any other trim component in the vehicle which may include a storage compartment. The armrest may be mounted on a bracket separate from the console and may be positioned fore/aft relative to the bracket along slides allowing for multiple forward positional adjustments of the armrest surface to support an occupant's arms as well as to a rearward position which may allow relatively easy access to the storage compartment in the underlying console. In this manner, the slidable armrest of the present invention may function independently, and need not be associated with or adjacent to, a console in a vehicle.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

These and other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon reading the following written description thereof together with reference to the accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1A is a perspective view of a center console for a vehicle including an adjustable armrest.

FIG. 1B is another view of the adjustable armrest of FIG. 1A, with the bin within the armrest exposed.

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the first exemplary actuating mechanism of the slidable armrest.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the lower base portion and attachment bracket of the first exemplary actuating mechanism.

FIG. 4 illustrates the sliding mechanism of the first exemplary actuating mechanism.

FIG. 5 illustrates a comb-like detent mechanism assembled into the lower base portion shown in FIG. 3.

FIG. 6 illustrates the slider with exemplary 45° slots assembled to the comb-like detent mechanism shown in FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 illustrates the paddle latch assembled to the slider.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the slidable armrest illustrating the storage bin and latches.

FIG. 9 is an exploded view of the second exemplary actuating mechanism of the slidable, according to the present invention.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view from beneath the lower base portion and attachment bracket of the second exemplary actuating mechanism of the slidable armrest.

FIG. 11 illustrates a second exemplary sliding mechanism of the adjustable armrest.

FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional view of the slidable armrest of FIG. 10 along lines 12-12 illustrating the engagement of the detent plate projections into the depressions of the inverted tray, according to the present invention.

FIG. 13 illustrates a portion of the cable assembly and latching arrangement of the second exemplary actuating mechanism, according to the present invention.

FIG. 14 is a perspective view of the second exemplary actuating mechanism slidable armrest illustrating the storage bin and latches.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is described more fully hereinafter with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which preferred embodiments of the invention are shown. This invention, may, however, be embodied in many different forms and should not be construed as limited to the embodiments set forth herein; rather, these embodiments are provided so that this disclosure will be thorough and complete, and will fully convey the scope of the invention to those skilled in the art.

For elements common to the various embodiments of the invention, the numerical reference character between the embodiments is held constant, but distinguished by the addition of an alphanumeric character to the existing numerical reference character. In other words, for example, an element referenced at 10 in the first embodiment is correspondingly referenced at 10A, 10B, and so forth in subsequent embodiments. Thus, where an embodiment description uses a reference character to refer to an element, the reference character applies equally, as distinguished by alphanumeric character, to the other embodiments where the element is common.

An exemplary embodiment of the sliding armrest according to the present invention is shown in perspective view in FIGS. 1A and 1B. FIG. 1A is a perspective view of a center console for a transportation vehicle such as would be positioned between the front seats of that vehicle. Alternatively, a similar console, without the shifting mechanism, may be placed in any row of seats in a vehicle such as a minivan or SUV. The console 1 may include a shifting level 2, cupholders 3, a lid 4 which may overlie a storage compartment (not shown) and sides 5 which may be adjacent to seats in the interior of a vehicle. A sliding armrest 10 may overlie the lid 4 of the console storage compartment and may be adjustable fore and aft in the vehicle (see Arrow A) to coordinate with multiple fore/aft positions of the seats. Further, the sliding armrest 10 may be slid rearward (aft) to expose the console lid and provide ease of access to the underlying storage compartment.

FIG. 1B is another perspective view (from a somewhat more forward angle) of the console 1 including the sliding armrest 10 of the present invention and illustrates the upper armrest portion 20 of the sliding armrest 10 hinged open to expose a bin 42, or additional storage area, formed within the lower armrest portion 40. From this view it is evident that the sliding armrest 10 may overlie the console lid 4 in a forward position and would allow access thereto if moved to a more rearward position.

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the first exemplary embodiment of the actuating mechanism of the sliding armrest 10 of the present invention. The sliding armrest 10 may comprise an assembly having three main components, an upper armrest portion 20, a lower armrest portion 40 and a base portion 50 assembled to a bracket 70 via slides 60. The upper armrest portion 20 may include a retainer 26 which may be covered by a foam layer 24 which may further be covered by an outer skin layer 22. In this manner a soft cushioning surface may be formed to support the forearm of the vehicle occupant. The upper surface of the upper armrest portion 20 may be preferably located at a height to support the forearm of a 95th percentile adult occupant in a vehicle. An alternative construction for the upper armrest portion 20 may include a hard, preferably injection molded, retainer 26 as the outer surface without skin and foam cushioning layers, for instance, for less expensive vehicles, such as light trucks. Another option may be to cover the retainer with a skin layer 22 only or a single combined thin foam and skin layer. The upper armrest portion may be “foamed-in-place” as is known to those skilled in the art or may include a separately formed foam bun 24 and skin 22 which is hand wrapped over the foam and retainer to integrate those components together. In that particular embodiment a closeout panel 28 may be included to provide means to cover the edges of the wrapped skin. Grommets 27 may be included to mechanically attach the skin 22 to the closeout panel 28. In addition, rubber or plastic bumpers 29 may be inserted into the lower surface of the closeout panel 28 to prevent buzz, squeak and rattle issues between the closeout panel 28 and the lower armrest portion 40.

The lower armrest portion 40 preferably comprises an injection molded plastic component which includes a bin 42 or depressed storage area which may be accessible by raising the upper armrest 20 portion from the lower armrest portion 40. This may provide storage for small items without having to access the center console storage compartment. The lower armrest portion 40 may be attached to the upper portion 20 by way of hinge 30 which may be attached near the rear of closeout panel 28. A rear panel 44 may close out the lower armrest portion and may include controls for HVAC or other vehicle features which are thus accessible to rear seat occupants. A front closeout panel or latch carrier 46 may carry a paddle latch 48 and a button latch 46. The button latch may serve to connect and disconnect the upper armrest portion 20 from the lower armrest portion 40 and allow access to the bin 42. The paddle latch 48 may actuate the internal mechanism which may allow the armrest to slide fore/aft and be locked into different positions relative to the underlying console, as will be explained below.

As further shown in exploded view in FIG. 2, a base portion 50 may close out the underside of the lower armrest portion 40 and may include the mechanism which allows fore/aft positional adjustment for the sliding armrest 10. Slides 60 may be riveted to the underside of base portion 50 and may be slidably attached to a bracket 70 which may attach to vehicle structure. Alternatively, the bracket 70 may attach to the base structure of the console 1. Preferably, bolts through the bracket 70 may engage slots (not shown) in the underside of the slides 60 to allow range of movement of the sliding armrest 10 relative to the console 1.

A pin 72 may protrude from the upper surface of the bracket 70 to engage the actuation mechanism contained within base portion 50. The pin is preferably of metal, welded to the bracket 70 and may be covered with a plastic coating to reduce friction and any buzz, squeak and rattle concerns. The actuation mechanism may include a comb-like component 56 which may engage to pin 72 between a pair of its teeth. A slider 54 may overlie the comb 56 and may engage pins 51 extending from the comb 56 into 45° angled slots 53. The slots may be at other angles than 45° to the longitudinal axis of the slider 54, such as between 10° and 80° and all 1° increments therebetween. However, an angle approximating 45° is preferred for ease of actuation (lower force).

A front closeout panel 52 may overlie the latches 48 and 49 and the front of the base portion 50.

Each of the subcomponents described above will now be illustrated in greater detail in the remaining FIGS.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the base portion 50 slidably assembled to the bracket 70 by way of slides 60. Pin 72 is shown as protruding through a slot in the bottom of the base portion 50.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the bracket 70 with slides 60 slidably assembled thereto.

FIG. 5 is a somewhat enlarged view of the interior of base portion 50 and further shows the placement of the comb-like member 56 above the slot in the bottom of the base portion and engaging pin 72 which extends from the reinforcement 70. It should be noted that the teeth 84 of comb-like member 56 may engage raised bosses 82 to lock the comb into a set position within the base portion 50. In addition, rubber or plastic bumper 58 may be biased against the comb-like member 56 to reduce any opportunity for the mechanism to rattle. Springs 57 may provide the biasing force which must be overcome to allow the comb 56 and base portion 50 to move relative to pin 72. Pins 51 may extend from the upper surface of the comb 56 to engage the slots 53 in the slider 54.

FIG. 6 is another perspective view of base portion 50 illustrating the next step in the assembly of the actuating mechanism. Here, the slider 54 has been placed on top of comb-like member 56 and may be held in place by fingers 59 which allow for sliding movement of the slider 54 relative to the base portion 50. A pin 92 may extend from the front end of the slider 54 for connection to the paddle latch 48 (see FIG. 7) through slot 86. Pins 51 which extend from the comb 56 locate in slots 53 in the slider 54 to translate motion from the slider to the comb.

As can best be seen in FIG. 6, forward movement of the slider 54, loosely held by fingers 59, may force pins 51 of the comb-like member 56 along the 45° slots 53 and in opposition to springs 57. When the pin 51 has traveled most of the length of slot 53, the comb-like member 56 will be moved away from bumpers 58 and the teeth 84 will clear pin 72 and allow free travel of the base portion (and sliding armrest) the full length of comb-like member 56. Releasing the latch 48 will allow the springs 57 to reposition the comb 56 around pin 72 at a different fore/aft location relative to the bracket 70 and adjacent console 1.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view showing additional details as to how the paddle latch 48 may engage the slider 54 through slot 86. A spring 88 may be used on pin 92 to bias slider 54 against the base portion 50. Upward movement (squeezing) of the paddle portion of the latch 48 may pull the slider 54 forward and displace the comb 56 from its static position held by spring 57. Releasing the paddle latch 48 may cause the spring 88 and springs 57 to urge the pins 51 back along the slots 53 and the comb-like member 56 to its locked position against bumpers 58.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the lower armrest portion 40 and base portion 50 slidably mounted on bracket 70. The upper armrest portion has been removed to expose storage bin 42. The paddle portion of paddle latch 48 and button latch 49 protrude from front closeout panel 52.

An exemplary process for adjusting the fore/aft position of the sliding armrest of the present invention may proceed as follows:

With reference to FIG. 8, the paddle portion of the paddle latch 48 located at the front of the sliding armrest 10 may be pulled upward or squeezed by an occupant, toward the top surface of front closeout panel 52. This action translates through hinge points 94 (see FIG. 7) into forward motion (out of base portion 50) of the paddle latch 48 where it may engage slide 54. This motion (against springs 88 and 57) may force the 45° slide slots 53 forward which in turn may exert a force on pins 51, which are attached to comb 56. This force may move the comb-like member 56 laterally in the base portion 50 and disengage the comb 56 from pin 72 (see FIG. 6). Thus, the pins 51 may ride along the slots 53 to disengage the comb 56. At this point the armrest may be free to move fore/aft to the desired position (forward for arm support, rearward to provide access to the console lid and storage compartment below) (see FIGS. 1A, 1B).

Upon release of the paddle latch 48, the springs 57 attached to the comb-like member 56 may pull the comb fingers 59 into a locked position around pin 72. As noted above, the springs 57 and bumpers 58 are designed to provide a slight amount of tension/compression in the locked state to prevent buzz, squeak and rattle.

The design of the actuating mechanism of the sliding armrest 10 herein therefore may require the use of few components, most of which may be plastic, and only a few springs as mechanical elements which could potentially fail. This may therefore provide fewer warranty issues as greater reliability and less wear should result.

Thus, a slidably adjustable armrest which may overlie a console is provided, including a comb-like detent mechanism for selectively positioning the armrest. A paddle latch may actuate a slider which may engage pins in the comb-like mechanism to disengage the comb from a locating pin and allow fore/aft adjustability.

FIG. 9 is an exploded view of a second exemplary embodiment of the actuating mechanism of the sliding armrest 10 of the present invention. Here, a base portion 50 may close out the underside of the lower armrest portion 40 and may include the mechanism which allows fore/aft positional adjustment for the sliding armrest 10. Slides 60 may be riveted to the underside of base portion 50 and may be slidably attached to a bracket 70 which may attach to vehicle structure. Alternatively, the bracket 70 may attach to the base structure of the console 1. Preferably, bolts through the bracket 70 may engage slots (not shown) in the underside of the slides 60 to allow range of movement of the sliding armrest 10 relative to the console 1.

The second embodiment of the actuating mechanism which releasably connects the base portion 50 to the reinforcement or support bracket 70 will now be described. A detent plate 156 including one or more projections 110 may be loosely held in place on the bracket by detent housing 153 (see FIG. 11). Springs 157 may be located between the detent plate 156 and the support bracket 70 and may bias the plate against the housing. The cable assembly 154 may attach at one end to latch handle 148 and at the opposite end attach to the detent plate 156. When the hatch handle 148 is squeezed, it may pull on the wire in cable assembly 154 causing the detent plate 156 to move downward and compress springs 157 against reinforcement 70.

The center area of base portion 50 may be formed into one or more rows 151 of inverted depressions 100 (see FIG. 10) which may engage the projections 110 on the detent plate 156 (see FIG. 11) to latch the armrest 10 in selected fore/aft positional locations. Retraction of the projections 110 out of engagement with the inverted depressions 100 by actuation of the latch handle 148 and cable 154, may allow the armrest 10 to be slid fore/aft (see FIG. 12).

A front closeout panel 52 may overlie the latches 148 and 49 and the front of the base portion 50.

Each of the subcomponents described above will now be illustrated in greater detail in the remaining FIGS.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view from underneath the armrest 10 of the base portion 50 which has been slidably assembled to the bracket 70 by way of slides 60. In this view, it is possible to see that the cable assembly 154 may attach to the reinforcement 70 and engage the detent plate (not shown). The inverted tray section 151 of lower base 50 is also shown including a plurality, in this example two rows, of depressions 100 which may engage the detent plate. The configuration of the underside of the tray section 151 may resemble an inverted ice cube tray.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the bracket 70 with slides 60 slidably assembled thereto. A detent housing 153 may be attached between the slides 60 to the bracket 70, the housing loosely fitting over the spring-loaded detent plate 156. The plate may include one or more, preferably two, rows of projections 110 that may be shaped to correspond to the rows of depressions 100 formed in the underside of base portion 50.

FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional view taken through the sliding armrest 10 of FIG. 10 taken along lines 12-12 and illustrating the engagement of projections 110 into depressions 100 to immobilize the armrest from fore/aft slidable movement. Springs 157 bias the detent plate 156 against the inverted tray portion 151. The detent plate 156 may be loosely held within housing 153 which is mechanically attached to bracket 70. When latch handle 148 is actuated, that motion may be translated through the cable assembly (not shown) which may pull down on plate 156 causing the projections 110 to be retracted at least partially into housing 153 and clearing engagement with the depressions in tray 151. The armrest 10 may then be slid fore/aft along the slides to a different position.

FIG. 13 is a perspective view of the front inside of base portion 50 illustrating two rows 151 of inverted depressions. Also shown is one end of the cable assembly 154 illustrating the attachment of the assembly into the base and the cable wire passing over a radius or roller 158 to engage the latch handle at the front of armrest 10. At reference numeral 149, the latching mechanism for unlatching the upper armrest portion 20 from the lower armrest portion 40 is indicated, allowing access to bin 42.

FIG. 14 is a perspective view of the lower armrest portion 40 and base portion 50 slidably mounted on bracket 70. The upper armrest portion has been removed to expose storage bin 42. Latch handle 148 and button latch 49 may be enclosed by the front closeout panel 52.

An exemplary process for adjusting the fore/aft position of the sliding armrest of the present invention may proceed as follows:

With reference to FIG. 14, the handle portion of latch 148 located at the front of the sliding armrest 10 may be pulled upward or squeezed by an occupant, toward the top surface of front closeout panel 52. This action translates through hinge points into forward motion of the cable wire within the cable assembly. This motion (against springs 157) (see FIG. 12) may force the detent plate 156 downward such that projections 110 may disengage depressions 100 of the inverted tray section 151 of base portion 50. At this point the armrest may be free to move fore/aft to the desired position (forward for arm support, rearward to provide access to the console lid and storage compartment below) (see FIGS. 1A, 1B).

Upon release of the latch handle 148, the springs 157 push the detent plate 156 into engagement with the tray portion 151 (and projections 110 into depressions 100) to lock the armrest into the desired position.

It should also be appreciated that in any of the embodiments disclosed herein, the features may be interchangeable and should not be understood as limited to the particular exemplary embodiment being described. Thus, a movable adjustable armrest which may overlie a console is provided, including a projecting detent mechanism which engages a series of matching depressions, for selectively positioning the armrest. A latch handle may actuate a cable assembly which may cause projections in the detent mechanism to disengage the depressions in the inverted tray portion of the base and allow fore/aft adjustability.

While the description herein is directed at two exemplary detent mechanisms for allowing discrete positional location of a movable armrest relative to seats or a console in a transportation vehicle, it is also contemplated that any detent mechanism may be utilized. Such detent may provide engagement directly or indirectly between a movable armrest and a support structure. The moveable armrest may receive an input and translate that input into the removal of an interference between the moveable armrest and support structure. The removal of the interference may allow for repositioning of the armrest and subsequent immobilization of the armrest from further movement.

The description and drawings illustratively set forth the presently preferred invention embodiments. We intend the description and drawings to describe this embodiment and not to limit the scope of the invention. Obviously, it is possible to modify these embodiments while remaining within the scope of the following claims. Therefore, within the scope of the claims one may practice the invention otherwise than as the description and drawings specifically show and describe.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7731258 *Oct 7, 2005Jun 8, 2010Ford Global Technologies, LlcCenter floor console sliding armrest
US7770953 *Sep 10, 2008Aug 10, 2010Moriroku Company, Ltd.Vehicle console with adjustable armrest
US7878567 *Apr 13, 2009Feb 1, 2011Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AktiengsellschaftCenter console for a motor vehicle
US8132861May 12, 2010Mar 13, 2012Cvg Management CorporationAdjustable sliding armrest
US8167348Mar 22, 2010May 1, 2012Ford Global Technologies, LlcCable activated latch pawl for floor console armrest
US8333432 *Mar 5, 2012Dec 18, 2012Cvg Management CorporationAdjustable sliding armrest
US20130153447 *Dec 19, 2011Jun 20, 2013Chrysler Group LlcArmrest assembly
US20140138975 *Jun 15, 2012May 22, 2014Nifco Inc.Slide structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/411.35
International ClassificationA47C7/54
Cooperative ClassificationB60N2/4646, B60N2/4686
European ClassificationB60N2/46C6, B60N2/46H2