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Publication numberUS20070271334 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/888,064
Publication dateNov 22, 2007
Filing dateJul 30, 2007
Priority dateSep 7, 2002
Also published asUS7379959, US8060552, US8200746, US8341209, US8682959, US20070011226, US20070271333, US20080263131, US20120059870, US20120246216, US20130144933, US20140156722
Publication number11888064, 888064, US 2007/0271334 A1, US 2007/271334 A1, US 20070271334 A1, US 20070271334A1, US 2007271334 A1, US 2007271334A1, US-A1-20070271334, US-A1-2007271334, US2007/0271334A1, US2007/271334A1, US20070271334 A1, US20070271334A1, US2007271334 A1, US2007271334A1
InventorsAaron Hinni, Guerry Semones, Michael Groner, Roberto Lozano
Original AssigneeAppistry, Inc., A Delaware Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Processing information using a hive of computing engines including request handlers and process handlers
US 20070271334 A1
Abstract
A hive of computing engines, typically including clients, request handlers, and process handlers, is used to process of a processing job in order to determine a processing result. A client assigns a processing job to a request handler, which assigns the processing job to one or more processing handlers. One implementation uses one or more volunteer operations to identify the request handler, and/or the one or more process handlers. One implementation updates the request handler with state information related to the partial processing of the processing job such that the completion of the processing job can be assigned to other one or more process handlers, such as, but not limited to, in response to a detected error condition.
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Claims(21)
1. A system for processing information, the system comprising:
a client configured to cause the processing of a processing job in order to determine a processing result;
a plurality of request handlers; and
a plurality of process handlers;
wherein the client is configured to perform operations comprising: (a) sending to each of the plurality of request handlers a client service request message for the processing job; (b) receiving a plurality of responses to said sent client service request message; (c) selecting a particular request handler of the plurality of request handlers based on said received responses to said sent client service request message; and (d) receiving the processing result from the particular request handler;
wherein each of the plurality of request handlers is configured to perform operations comprising: (a) sending a client service response message to a received said client service request message for the processing job; and (b) if selected by the client to be the particular request handler to handle the processing job: (1) querying the plurality of process handlers to determine a particular process handler of the plurality of process handlers to service the processing job based on a received plurality of responses from different process handlers, including the particular process handler, of the plurality of process handlers; (3) receiving the processing result from the particular process handler; and (4) forwarding said processing result to the client; and
wherein each of the plurality of process handlers is configured to perform operations comprising: (a) responding to said query from the particular request handler; and (b) if identified as the particular process handler by the particular request handler: (1) performing the processing job to determine the processing result; and (2) communicating the processing result to the particular request handler.
2. The system of claim 1, wherein the particular process handler is configured to perform operations including updating the particular request handler with state information pertaining to partial processing of the processing job; and
wherein the particular request handler is configured to perform operations including: receiving said state information pertaining to the partial processing of the processing job; updating a data structure with said state information; and in response to a detected error condition, assigning the processing of the processing job to identify the processing result starting from a partial processing state identified from said state information to one of the plurality of process handlers different from the particular process handler.
3. The system of claim 1, where the processing job includes a reference or identification of a process flow, the process flow identifies a plurality of processing sets, each of the plurality of processing sets identifying a beginning state, a task, and one or more ending states.
4. The system of claim 3, wherein the particular process handler is configured to perform operations including updating the particular request handler with state information pertaining to partial processing of the processing job at the completion of each of one or more of the plurality of processing sets; and
wherein the particular request handler is configured to perform operations including: receiving said state information pertaining to the partial processing of the processing job; updating a data structure with said state information; and in response to a detected error condition, assigning the processing of the processing job to identify the processing result starting from a partial processing state identified from said state information to one of the plurality of process handlers different from the particular process handler.
5. The system of claim 1, where the processing job includes a reference or identification of a process flow;
wherein the particular process handler is configured to perform operations including updating the particular request handler with state information pertaining to partial processing of the processing job at one or more points identified by the process flow; and
wherein the particular request handler is configured to perform operations including: receiving said state information pertaining to the partial processing of the processing job; updating a data structure with said state information; and in response to a detected error condition, assigning the processing of the processing job to identify the processing result starting from a partial processing state identified from said state information to one of the plurality of process handlers different from the particular process handler.
6. The system of claim 1, wherein the particular process handler is configured to perform operations including updating the particular request handler with state information pertaining to partial processing of the processing job at a plurality of different intermediate processing points; and
wherein the particular request handler is configured to perform operations including: receiving said state information pertaining to the partial processing of the processing job; updating a data structure with said state information; and in response to a detected error condition, assigning the processing of the processing job to identify the processing result starting from a partial processing state identified from said state information to one of the plurality of process handlers different from the particular process handler.
7. The system of claim 1, including a plurality of computing devices, wherein each of the plurality of computing devices includes a different one of said plurality of process handlers, and each of said plurality of request handlers is included in a different one of the plurality of computing devices.
8. A networked system for processing information, the system comprising:
a client computer including a client; and
a plurality of computers, each of the plurality of computers including a request handler, a process handler, or both a request handler and a process handler;
wherein each of said request handlers is configured to: send a response to a client service request received from the client if it determines it is available to handle a processing job identified in said client service request received from the client for the processing job, and if identified by the client as the selected request handler to handle the processing job: to send one or more query messages to the plurality of process handlers, to receive responses from said process handlers; to select among said received responses to identify and assign a particular process handler to service the processing job, to receive a processing result from the particular process handler, and to send a result corresponding to the processing result to the client;
wherein each of the process handlers is configured to: respond to said one or more query messages if it is available to handle the processing job, and if identified as the particular process handler by the particular request handler: to process the processing job and to communicate the processing result to said identified request handler; and
wherein the client is configured to: receive a plurality of said responses to the client service request; to select the selected request handler based on said received responses to the client service request; and to receive the processing result from the selected request handler.
9. The system of claim 8, wherein the plurality of process handlers are different processes than the plurality of request handlers.
10. A system for processing information, the system comprising:
a request region including a plurality of request handlers, each of said request handlers being a separate process; and
a plurality of processing regions, each of the plurality of processing regions including a plurality of process handlers, each of the process handlers being a separate process;
wherein each of the plurality of request handlers is configured to send a response if it determines it is available to handle a processing job identified in a client service request received from a client for the processing job, and if identified by the client to handle the processing job: to send one or more query messages to one or more of the processing regions, to receive responses from said processing regions; and to select among said received responses to identify and assign a particular process handler to service the processing job, and to receive a processing result from the particular process handler;
wherein each of the process handlers within said one or more of the processing regions is configured to respond to one of said one or more query messages if it is available to handle the processing job, and if identified as the particular process handler by the particular process handler to process the processing job to determine the processing result, and to communicate the processing result to said identified request handler;
wherein the client is configured to receive a plurality of said responses from the client service request, and to receive the processing result from the particular process handler; and
wherein said operation of being identified by the client to handle the processing job includes the client selecting the particular process handler based on said received responses to the client service request.
11. The system of claim 10, wherein the plurality of process handlers are different processes than the plurality of request handlers.
12. A system for processing information, the system comprising:
a plurality of request handlers, each of said request handlers being a separate process; and
a plurality of process handlers, each of the process handlers being a separate process;
wherein each of the plurality of request handlers is configured to send a response to a client service request received from a client if it determines it is available to handle a processing job identified in said client service request received from the client for the processing job, and if identified by the client to handle the processing job: to send one or more query messages to the plurality of process handlers, to receive responses from said process handlers; and to select among said received responses to identify and assign a particular process handler to service the processing job, to receive a processing result from the particular process handler, and to send the processing result to the client;
wherein each of the process handlers is configured to respond to said one or more query messages if it is available to handle the processing job, and if identified as the particular process handler by the particular process handler: to process the processing job and to communicate the processing result to said identified request handler; and
wherein the client is configured to receive a plurality of said responses from the client service request, to select the particular process handler based on said received responses from the client service request, and to receive the processing result from said the particular process handler assigned to service the processing job.
13. The system of claim 12, wherein the plurality of process handlers are different processes than the plurality of request handlers.
14. A method for processing information in a networked hive of computing engines, the method comprising:
each of a plurality of request handlers receiving a client service request message for a particular job from a client;
a plurality of the plurality of request handlers responding to the client request message by sending a response message to the client;
a selected request handler of said request handlers said responding to client request message receiving instructions from the client to process the particular job, wherein the client is external to the computing engine on which the selected request handler resides;
the selected request handler sending a processing request message for the particular job to a plurality of process handlers;
a plurality of the plurality of process handlers responding to the processing request message by sending a response message to the selected request handler;
the selected request handler selecting a selected process handler from said process handlers said responding to the processing request message and assigning the particular job to the selected process handler;
the selected process handler, in response to said assignment by the selected request handler, performing one or more tasks of the particular job to generate a processing result, and sending the processing result to the selected request handler; and
the selected request handler receiving the processing result and sending the processing result to the client;
wherein the selected request handler and the selected process handler are on different computing engines.
15. A method for processing information in a networked hive of computing engines, the method comprising:
each of a plurality of request handlers receiving a client service request message for a particular job from a client;
a plurality of the plurality of request handlers responding to the client request message by sending a response message to the client;
a selected request handler of said request handlers said responding to client request message receiving instructions from the client to process the particular job, wherein the client is external to the computing engine on which the selected request handler resides;
the selected request handler sending a processing request message for the particular job to a plurality of process handlers;
a plurality of the plurality of process handlers responding to the processing request message by sending a response message to the selected request handler;
the selected request handler selecting a selected process handler from said process handlers said responding to the processing request message and assigning the particular job to the selected process handler;
the selected process handler, in response to said assignment by the selected request handler, performing partial processing of the particular job to generate state information, and sending the state information to the selected request handler;
the selected request handler, subsequent to receiving said state information, assigning the particular job to a second process handler of the plurality of process handlers and communicating said state information to the second process handler;
the second process handler completing processing of the particular job from its partially processed state identified from said state information to generate a processing result, and sending the processing result to the selected request handler; and
the selected request handler receiving the processing result and sending the processing result to the client;
wherein the selected request handler, the selected process handler, and the second process handler are on different computing engines.
16. The method of claim 15, wherein said operation by the selected request handler of assigning the particular job to the second process handler is performed in response to the selected request handler detecting an error.
17. The method of claim 15, comprising: the selected request handler performing a volunteer operation to select the second process handler based on received responses from a plurality of the plurality of process handlers including the second process handler.
18. The method of claim 17, wherein said operation by the selected request handler of assigning the particular job to the second process handler is performed in response to the selected request handler detecting an error.
19. The system of claim 18, where the particular job includes a reference or identification of a process flow, the process flow identifies a plurality of processing sets, each of the plurality of processing sets identifying a beginning state, a task, and one or more ending states; wherein said state information identifies the state of the particular job at one of said ending states.
20. The system of claim 15, where the particular job includes a reference or identification of a process flow, the process flow identifies a plurality of processing sets, each of the plurality of processing sets identifying a beginning state, a task, and one or more ending states; wherein said state information identifies the state of the particular job at one of said ending states.
21. A method for processing information in a networked hive of computing engines, the method comprising:
a request handler of a plurality of request handlers receiving instructions from a client to process the particular job, wherein the client is external to the computing engine on which the request handler resides;
the request handler sending a processing request message for the particular job to a plurality of process handlers;
a plurality of the plurality of process handlers responding to the processing request message by sending a response message to the request handler;
the request handler selecting a selected process handler from said process handlers said responding to the processing request message and assigning the particular job to the selected process handler;
the selected process handler, in response to said assignment by the request handler, performing one or more tasks of the particular job to generate a processing result, and sending the processing result to the request handler; and
the request handler receiving the processing result and sending the processing result to the client;
wherein the request handler and the selected process handler are on different computing engines.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This is a continuation of copending nonprovisional application Ser. No. 10/236,784, filed Sep. 7, 2002, with this application being hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention especially relates to processing of information including, but not limited to transactional processing using multiple networked computing systems; and more particularly, the invention relates to processing information using a hive of computing engines, typically including request handlers and process handlers.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Many businesses are demanding faster, less expensive, and more reliable computing platforms. Brokerage houses,, credit card processors, telecommunications firms, as well as banks are a few examples of organizations that require tremendous computing power to handle a countless number of small independent transactions. Currently, organizations that require these systems operate and maintain substantial servers. Further, the cost associated with these machines stems not only from the significant initial capital investment, but the continuing expense of a sizeable labor force dedicated to maintenance.

When it comes to mission-critical computing, businesses and other organizations face increasing pressure to do more with less. On one hand, they must manage larger transaction volumes, larger user populations, and larger data sets. They must do all of this in an environment that demands a renewed appreciation for the importance of reliability, fault tolerance, and disaster recovery. On the other hand, they must satisfy these growing requirements in a world of constrained resources. It is no longer an option to just throw large amounts of expensive hardware, and armies of expensive people, at problems. The challenge businesses face is that, when it comes to platforms for mission-critical computing, the world is fragmented. Different platforms are designed to satisfy different sets of requirements. As a result, businesses must choose between, and trade off, equally important factors.

Currently, when it comes to developing, deploying, and executing mission-critical applications, businesses and other organizations can choose between five alternative platforms. These are mainframes, high-availability computers, UNIX-based servers, distributed supercomputers, and PC's. Each of these approaches has strengths and weaknesses, advantages and disadvantages.

The first, and oldest, solution to the problem of mission-critical computing was the mainframe. Mainframes dominated the early days of computing because they delivered both availability and predictability. Mainframes deliver availability because they are located in extremely controlled physical environments and are supported by large cadres of dedicated, highly-trained people. This helps to ensure they do not fall victim to certain types of problems. However, because they are typically single-box machines, mainframes remain vulnerable to single-point failures. Mainframes deliver predictability because it is possible to monitor the execution and completion of processes and transactions and restart any that fail. However, the limitation of mainframes is that all monitoring code must be understood, written, and/or maintained by the application developer. The problem mainframes run into is that such systems fall short when it comes to three factors of high importance to businesses. First, mainframes tend not to offer high degrees of scalability. The only way to significantly increase the capability of such a system is to buy a new one. Second, because of their demanding nature, mainframes rely on armies of highly-trained support personnel and custom hardware. As a result, mainframes typically are neither affordable nor maintainable.

Developed to address the limitations and vulnerabilities of mainframes, high-availability computers are able to offer levels of availability and predictability that are equivalent to, and often superior to, mainframes. High-availability computers deliver availability because they use hardware or software-based approaches to ensure high levels of survivability. However, this availability is only relative because such systems are typically made up of a limited number of components. High-availability computers also deliver predictability because they offer transaction processing and monitoring capabilities. However, as with mainframes, that monitoring code must be understood, written, and/or maintained by the application developer. The problem with high-availability computers is that have many of the same shortcomings as mainframes. That means that they fall short when it comes to delivering scalability, affordability, and maintainability. First, they are largely designed to function as single-box systems and thus offer only limited levels of scalability. Second, because they are built using custom components, high-availability computers tend not to be either affordable or maintainable.

UNIX-based servers are scalable, available, and predictable but are expensive both to acquire and to maintain. Distributed supercomputers, while delivering significant degrees of scalability and affordability, fall short when it comes to availability. PC's are both affordable and maintainable, but do not meet the needs of businesses and other organizations when it comes to scalability, availability, and predictability. The 1990s saw the rise of the UNIX-based server as an alternative to mainframes and high-availability computers. These systems have grown in popularity because, in addition to delivering availability and predictability, they also deliver significant levels of scalability. UNIX-based servers deliver degrees of scalability because it is possible to add new machines to a cluster and receive increases in processing power. They also deliver availability because they are typically implemented as clusters and thus can survive the failure of any individual node. Finally, UNIX-based servers deliver some degree of predictability. However, developing this functionality can require significant amounts of custom development work.

One problem that UNIX-based servers run into, and the thing that has limited their adoption, is that this functionality comes at a steep price. Because they must be developed and maintained by people with highly specialized skills, they fall short when it comes to affordability and maintainability. For one thing, while it is theoretically possible to build a UNIX-based server using inexpensive machines, most are still implemented using small numbers of very expensive boxes. This makes upgrading a UNIX-based server an expensive and time-consuming process that must be performed by highly-skilled (and scarce) experts. Another limitation of UNIX-based servers is that developing applications for them typically requires a significant amount of effort. This requires application developers to be experts in both the UNIX environment and the domain at hand. Needless to say, such people can be hard to find and are typically quite expensive. Finally, setting up, expanding, and maintaining a UNIX-based server requires a significant amount of effort on the part of a person intimately familiar with the workings of the operating system. This reflects the fact that most were developed in the world of academia (where graduate students are plentiful). However, this can create significant issues for organizations that do not have such plentiful supplies of cheap, highly-skilled labor.

A recent development in the world of mission-critical computing is the distributed supercomputer (also known as a Network of Workstations or “NOW”). A distributed supercomputer is a computer that works by breaking large problems up into a set of smaller ones that can be spread across many small computers, solved independently, and then brought back together. Distributed supercomputers were created by academic and research institutions to harness the power of idle PC and other computing resources. This model was then adapted to the business world, with the goal being to make use of underused desktop computing resources. The most famous distributed supercomputing application was created by the Seti@Home project. Distributed supercomputers have grown in popularity because they offer both scalability and affordability. Distributed supercomputers deliver some degree of scalability because adding an additional resource to the pool usually yields a linear increase in processing power. However that scalability is limited by the fact that communication with each node takes place over the common organizational network and can become bogged down. Distributed supercomputers are also relatively more affordable than other alternatives because they take advantage of existing processing resources, be they servers or desktop PC's.

One problem distributed supercomputers run into is that they fall short when it comes to availability, predictability, and maintainability. Distributed supercomputers have problems delivering availability and predictability because they are typically designed to take advantage of non-dedicated resources. The problem is that it is impossible to deliver availability and predictability when someone else has primary control of the resource and your application is simply completing its work when it gets the chance. This makes distributed supercomputers appropriate for some forms of off-peak processing but not for time-sensitive or mission-critical computing. Finally, setting up, expanding, and maintaining a distributed supercomputer also requires a significant amount of effort because they tend to offer more of a set of concepts than a set of tools. As a result, they require significant amounts of custom coding. Again, this reflects the fact that most were developed in the world of academia where highly trained labor is both cheap and plentiful.

PC's are another option for creating mission-critical applications. PC's have two clear advantages relative to other solutions. First, PC's are highly affordable. The relentless progress of Moore's law means that increasingly powerful PC's can be acquired for lower and lower prices. The other advantage of PC's is that prices have fallen to such a degree that many people have begun to regard PC's as disposable. Given how fast the technology is progressing, in many cases it makes more sense to replace a PC than to repair it. Of course, the problem with PC's is that they do not satisfy the needs of businesses and other organizations when it comes to scalability, availability, and predictability. First, because PC's were designed to operate as stand-alone machines, they are not inherently scalable. Instead, the only way to allow them to scale is to link them together into clusters. That can be a very time-consuming process. Second, PC's, because they were designed for use by individuals, were not designed to deliver high levels of availability. As a result, the only way to make a single PC highly available is through the use of expensive, custom components. Finally, PC's were not designed to handle transaction processing and thus do not have any provisions for delivering predictability. The only way to deliver this functionality is to implement it using the operating system or an application server. The result is that few organizations even consider using PC's for mission-critical computing.

In a dynamic environment, it is important to be able to find available services. Service Location Protocol, RFC 2165, June 1997, provides one such mechanism. The Service Location Protocol provides a scalable framework for the discovery and selection of network services. Using this protocol, computers using the Internet no longer need so much static configuration of network services for network based applications. This is especially important as computers become more portable, and users less tolerant or able to fulfill the demands of network system administration. The basic operation in Service Location is that a client attempts to discover the location of a Service. In smaller installations, each service will be configured to respond individually to each client. In larger installations, services will register their services with one or more Directory Agents, and clients will contact the Directory Agent to fulfill requests for Service Location information. Clients may discover the whereabouts of a Directory Agent by preconfiguration, DHCP, or by issuing queries to the Directory Agent Discovery multicast address.

The following describes the operations a User Agent would employ to find services on the site's network. The User Agent needs no configuration to begin network interaction. The User Agent can acquire information to construct predicates which describe the services that match the user's needs. The User Agent may build on the information received in earlier network requests to find the Service Agents advertising service information.

A User Agent will operate two ways. First, if the User Agent has already obtained the location of a Directory Agent, the User Agent will unicast a request to it in order to resolve a particular request. The Directory Agent will unicast a reply to the User Agent. The User Agent will retry a request to a Directory Agent until it gets a reply, so if the Directory Agent cannot service the request (say it has no information) it must return an response with zero values, possibly with an error code set.

Second, if the User Agent does not have knowledge of a Directory Agent or if there are no Directory Agents available on the site network, a second mode of discovery may be used. The User Agent multicasts a request to the service-specific multicast address, to which the service it wishes to locate will respond. All the Service Agents which are listening to this multicast address will respond, provided they can satisfy the User Agent's request. A similar mechanism is used for Directory Agent discovery. Service Agents which have no information for the User Agent MUST NOT respond.

While the multicast/convergence model may be important for discovering services (such as Directory Agents) it is the exception rather than the rule. Once a User Agent knows of the location of a Directory Agent, it will use a unicast request/response transaction. The Service Agent SHOULD listen for multicast requests on the service-specific multicast address, and MUST register with an available Directory Agent. This Directory Agent will resolve requests from User Agents which are unicasted using TCP or UDP. This means that a Directory Agent must first be discovered, using DHCP, the DA Discovery Multicast address, the multicast mechanism described above, or manual configuration. If the service is to become unavailable, it should be deregistered with the Directory Agent. The Directory Agent responds with an acknowledgment to either a registration or deregistration. Service Registrations include a lifetime, and will eventually expire. Service Registrations need to be refreshed by the Service Agent before their Lifetime runs out. If need be, Service Agents can advertise signed URLs to prove that they are authorized to provide the service.

New mechanisms for computing are desired, especially those which may provide a reliable computing framework and platform, including, but not limited to those which might produce improved levels of performance and reliability at a much lower cost than that of other solutions.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A hive of computing engines, typically including clients, request handlers, and process handlers, is used to process information.

One embodiment includes a client configured to cause the processing of a processing job in order to determine a processing result using one or more request handlers, and one or more process handlers. The client is configured to perform operations including: sending a message assigning the processing job to a particular request handler, and receiving the processing result from the particular request handler. Each of the request handlers is configured to perform operations including: in response to receiving the processing assignment, sending a message assigning the processing job to a particular process handler; receiving the processing result from one of the process handlers; and forwarding the processing result to the client. Each of the process handlers is configured to perform operations including: in response to receiving a processing assignment of the processing job, processing the processing job to determine the processing result, and communicating the processing result to the particular request handler.

In one embodiment, the request handler for a particular job is determined using a volunteer pattern initiated by the client. In one embodiment, the process handler for a particular job is determined using a volunteer pattern initiated by the request handler currently handling the job.

In one embodiment, the request handler is configured to receive state information pertaining to the partial processing of the processing job such that the request handler can assign further processing of the processing job to another process handler from a processing state identified based on the state information, with such reassignment possibly being in response to a detected error condition.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The appended claims set forth the features of the invention with particularity. The invention, together with its advantages, may be best understood from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings of which:

FIG. 1A illustrates an architecture of hives used in one embodiment;

FIG. 1B illustrates a computing platform used for a hive engine for implementing request handlers, process handlers, and/or other processes of a hive of one embodiment, or also used for simulating the operation of a hive in one embodiment;

FIG. 2A illustrates a hierarchy of a hive, request regions, territories, and processing regions as used in one embodiment;

FIG. 2B illustrates an interaction of a client, request handlers, and process handlers of one embodiment;

FIG. 2C illustrates multicast addresses used in one embodiment;

FIG. 2D illustrates the flow of messages between components of one embodiment;

FIG. 2E illustrates an interaction of a client, request handlers, process handlers and possibly tasks of one embodiment;

FIG. 3 is a flow diagram of a client process used in one embodiment;

FIGS. 4A-C are flow diagrams of request hander processes used in one embodiment;

FIG. 5A-B are flow diagrams of process hander processes used in one embodiment;

FIG. 5C is a flow diagram of a task handler process used in one embodiment;

FIG. 5D is a flow diagram of a recovery layer process used in one embodiment;

FIG. 6A illustrates a definition of an application used in one embodiment;

FIG. 6B illustrates a definition of an process flow used in one embodiment;

FIG. 6C illustrates a process used in one embodiment for executing a process flow;

FIG. 7A illustrates a hierarchy of a senior region leaders, region leaders, and region members among multiple processing regions as used in one embodiment;

FIGS. 7B-7C are flow diagrams of processes used in one embodiment to establish and maintain a hierarchical relationship among distributed processes;

FIG. 8A is a flow diagram of a senior processing region leader process used in one embodiment;

FIG. 8B is a flow diagram of a processing region leader process used in one embodiment;

FIG. 8C illustrates the splitting of a region as performed in one embodiment; and

FIG. 9 illustrates a process used in one embodiment for initializing a hive engine.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A hive of computing engines, typically including request handlers and process handlers, is used to process information. Each of the claims individually recites an aspect of the invention in its entirety. Moreover, some embodiments described may include, but are not limited to, inter alia, systems, networks, integrated circuit chips, embedded processors, ASICs, methods, apparatus, and computer-readable medium containing instructions. The embodiments described hereinafter embody various aspects and configurations within the scope and spirit of the invention, with the figures illustrating exemplary and non-limiting configurations.

The term “system” is used generically herein to describe any number of components, elements, sub-systems, devices, packet switch elements, packet switches, routers, networks, computer and/or communication devices or mechanisms, or combinations of components thereof. The term “computer” is used generically herein to describe any number of computers, including, but not limited to personal computers, embedded processing elements and systems, control logic, ASICs, chips, workstations, mainframes, etc. The term “processing element” is used generically herein to describe any type of processing mechanism or device, such as a processor, ASIC, field programmable gate array, computer, etc. The term “device” is used generically herein to describe any type of mechanism, including a computer or system or component thereof. The terms “task” and “process” are used generically herein to describe any type of running program, including, but not limited to a computer process, task, thread, executing application, operating system, user process, device driver, native code, machine or other language, etc., and can be interactive and/or non-interactive, executing locally and/or remotely, executing in foreground and/or background, executing in the user and/or operating system address spaces, a routine of a library and/or standalone application, and is not limited to any particular memory partitioning technique. The steps, connections, and processing of signals and information illustrated in the figures, including, but not limited to any block and flow diagrams and message sequence charts, may be performed in the same or in a different serial or parallel ordering and/or by different components and/or processes, threads, etc., and/or over different connections and be combined with other functions in other embodiments in keeping within the scope and spirit of the invention. Furthermore, the term “identify” is used generically describe any manner or mechanism for directly or indirectly ascertaining something, which may included, but is not limited to receiving, retrieving from memory, determining, calculating, generating, etc.

Moreover, the terms “network” and “communications mechanism” are used generically herein to describe one or more networks, communications mediums or communications systems, including, but not limited to the Internet, private or public telephone, cellular, wireless, satellite, cable, local area, metropolitan area and/or wide area networks, a cable, electrical connection, bus, etc., and internal communications mechanisms such as message passing, interprocess communications, shared memory, etc. The term “message” is used generically herein to describe a piece of information which may or may not be, but is typically communicated via one or more communication mechanisms of any type, such as, but not limited to a packet.

As used herein, the term “packet” refers to packets of all types or any other units of information or data, including, but not limited to, fixed length cells and variable length packets, each of which may or may not be divisible into smaller packets or cells. The term “packet” as used herein also refers to both the packet itself or a packet indication, such as, but not limited to all or part of a packet or packet header, a data structure value, pointer or index, or any other part or identification of a packet. Moreover, these packets may contain one or more types of information, including, but not limited to, voice, data, video, and audio information. The term “item” is used herein to refer to a packet or any other unit or piece of information or data. The phrases “processing a packet” and “packet processing” typically refer to performing some steps or actions based on the packet, and which may or may not include modifying and/or forwarding the packet.

The term “storage mechanism” includes any type of memory, storage device or other mechanism for maintaining instructions or data in any format. “Computer-readable medium” is an extensible term including any memory, storage device, storage mechanism, etc. The term “memory” includes any random access memory (RAM), read only memory (ROM), flash memory, integrated circuits, and/or other memory components or elements. The term “storage device” includes any solid state storage media, disk drives, diskettes, networked services, tape drives, and other storage devices. Memories and storage devices may store computer-executable instructions to be executed by a processing element and/or control logic, and data which is manipulated by a processing element and/or control logic. The term “data structure” is an extensible term referring to any data element, variable, data structure, data base, and/or one or more or an organizational schemes that can be applied to data to facilitate interpreting the data or performing operations on it, such as, but not limited to memory locations or devices, sets, queues, trees, heaps, lists, linked lists, arrays, tables, pointers, etc. A data structure is typically maintained in a storage mechanism. The terms “pointer” and “link” are used generically herein to identify some mechanism for referencing or identifying another element, component, or other entity, and these may include, but are not limited to a reference to a memory or other storage mechanism or location therein, an index in a data structure, a value, etc.

The term “one embodiment” is used herein to reference a particular embodiment, wherein each reference to “one embodiment” may refer to a different embodiment, and the use of the term repeatedly herein in describing associated features, elements and/or limitations does not establish a cumulative set of associated features, elements and/or limitations that each and every embodiment must include, although an embodiment typically may include all these features, elements and/or limitations.

In addition, the terms “first,” “second,” etc. are typically used herein to denote different units (e.g., a first element, a second element). The use of these terms herein does not necessarily connote an ordering such as one unit or event occurring or coming before the another, but rather provides a mechanism to distinguish between particular units. Additionally, the use of a singular tense of a noun is non-limiting, with its use typically including one or more of the particular item rather than just one (e.g., the use of the word “memory” typically refers to one or more memories without having to specify “memory or memories,” or “one or more memories” or “at least one memory”, etc.) Moreover, the phrases “based on x” and “in response to x” are used to indicate a minimum set of items x from which something is derived or caused, wherein “x” is extensible and does not necessarily describe a complete list of items on which the operation is performed, etc. Additionally, the phrase “coupled to” is used to indicate some level of direct or indirect connection between two elements or devices, with the coupling device or devices modify or not modifying the coupled signal or communicated information. The term “subset” is used to, indicate a group of all or less than all of the elements of a set. Moreover, the term “or” is used herein to identify a selection of one or more, including all, of the conjunctive items.

Numerous means for processing information using a hive of computing/hive engines are disclosed. One implementation includes a request region including multiple request handlers and multiple processing regions, each typically including multiple process handlers. Each request handler is configured to respond to a client service request of a processing job, and if identified to handle the processing job: to query one or more of the processing regions to identify and assign a particular process handler to service the processing job, and to receive a processing result from the particular process handler. As typically used herein, a result corresponds to the outcome of a successfully or unsuccessfully completed job, task or other operation or an error condition, and typically includes one or more indications of a final value or outcome and/or state information (e.g., indications of to the processing performed or not performed, partial or final results, error descriptors, etc.) Each of the process handlers is configured to respond to such a query, and if identified as the particular process handler: to service the processing job, to process the processing job, to update said identified request handler with state information pertaining to partial processing of said processing job, and to communicate the processing result to the identified request handler.

In one embodiment, a volunteer pattern allows a software application (e.g., client process, request handler, process handler, task handler, tasks, or another hive engine process, etc.) to automatically detect a group of software applications on the same network, and to select and communicate with the most appropriate application without any prior knowledge to the location and capabilities of the chosen software application. In one embodiment, messages are sent among processes typically using multicast UDP, unicast UDP, and standard TCP connections.

In one embodiment, the volunteer pattern includes the following steps. First, hive engines that wish to volunteer its capabilities begin by listening for volunteer requests on a known multicast address. Next, a client looking for a request handler to handle its request transmits its needs by issuing a volunteer or service request packet. The service request packet is a small text buffer which includes the type of service it is requesting and any potential parameters of that request. The service request packet also includes the return IP address of the client for hive engines to use to communicate their volunteer responses. The volunteer packet is communicated via multicast to the known multicast group corresponding to the request region. Request handlers of multiple hive engines on the client's network will detect this request. Third, hive engines that receive the service request packet examine its contents. If the hive engine is capable of servicing this request, it responds by sending a response (e.g., a UDP packet) to the client which made the request. The UDP packet typically contains the TCP address of the hive engine's communication port. Unicast UDP packets are used so that only the client that initiated the service request will receive the volunteer responses from the request handlers. Fourth, the client receives unicast UDP packets from the hive engines, selects one, and connects to the hive engine via TCP socket. The client and hive engine will typically use this socket for all subsequent communications during the processing of this application.

In one embodiment, regionalization is used to allow participating hive engines on the same network to detect each other and organize into logical groups of processing regions without any prior configuration to minimize bandwidth usage and CPU consumption in the entire system. Regionalization provides an automated mechanism that allows these processing regions grow and split as needed, which may provide for an unlimited growth of a hive. Thus, volunteer requests (e.g., processing requests, task requests, etc.) can be within a processing region without affecting all hive engines sending these requests or other communications using a multicast address assigned to a specific processing region. This places a bound on the number of responses to be generated (e.g., by the number of hive engines in a processing region.) Typically, hive engines participate in an automated self-organization mechanisms, which allows participating hive engines on the same local or wide area network to detect each other and organize into logical groups without any prior configuration. However, an embodiment may use any mechanism for defining a regionalization, or even one embodiment does not use regionalization. For example, in one embodiment, a hive engine is pre-configured with parameters to define which region or regions in which to participate; while in one embodiment, users or a centralized control system is used to specify to one or more hive engines which region or regions in which to participate.

A hive typically has multiple processing regions and a single request region; although, one embodiment includes multiple request regions and one or more processing regions. One way to view a processing region is that it is a set of processes on one or more hive engines for executing processing jobs. In one embodiment, a processing region has a leader that keeps track of the number of hive engines in the region. If the number of hive engines in the region reaches the user defined maximum, the region leader instructs the hive engines in the region to divide into two separate smaller regions. If the number of hive engines in the regions reaches the user defined minimum, the region leader instructs the hive engines in the region to join other regions in the hive.

In one embodiment, the processing regions are self-healing in that if the region leader shuts down for any reason all the region members detect the lack of a region leader. A region member promotes itself to region leader. If a processing region has multiple region leaders, the youngest region leaders demotes themselves back to region members, leaving one region leader.

A request region typically hides that the hive consists of multiple regions and directs the processing load across all the regions. From one perspective, spreading the request region across multiple hive engines provides an increased level of fault tolerance, as these services detect the loss of a connection and rebuild or shutdown as necessary. The hive recovers most failure cases, however, when a request is in an indeterminate state, the request is typically terminated to prevent multiple executions.

In one embodiment, a single senior region leader forms the request region. The senior region leader discovers the region leaders via the volunteer pattern. The senior region leader discovers the size of the request region by asking the region leaders for the number of hive engines in their region that are also members of the request region. If the request region has too many or too few members, the senior region leader directs the region leaders to re-allocate the hive engines to or from the request region. The request region is typically self-healing in that if the senior region leader shuts down for any reason all the region leaders detect the lack of a senior region leader. A region leader promotes itself to senior region leader. If the new senior region leader is not the most senior region leader, the senior region leader demotes itself and the most senior region leader promotes itself to senior region leader. If more than one senior region leader exists, the senior region leaders that are less senior or junior to another senior region leader demotes itself.

In one embodiment, a client processing job is specified in terms of a process flow, typically specifying a set of tasks as well state variables typically before and after each task for storing state information. The hive process flow contains the information on the sequence of sub-routines to be called, timeout and retry information if the sub-routines fail, and which sub-routine to call next based on the sub-routine's result. Once specified, it is up to the hive software to execute the sub-routines in the process flow. A process flow may described in any manner or format. For example, in one embodiment, a process flow is described in a XML process definition file. The process flow definition file defines the process flow name, the task to be performed, the task's recovery procedure including the timeout limit and retry limit, and the transition from one state to the next state based on the previous task's result.

In order to maintain high-availability and fault tolerance, a client processing job is typically performed using a self-organized, non-administered, network of services across several hive engines that work together to guarantee execution of a request even in the event that any of the individual services or hive engines fail. For example, in one embodiment, a processing job is received by a request handler from a client using the volunteer pattern. The request engine selects a process handler based on pattern. The process handler proceeds to perform the processing job, and at intermediate steps within the process flow, the process handler communicates state information to the request engine, such that the state and progress of the processing job at discrete steps is known by multiple processes, typically on different physical hive engines, and possibly in different territories (which may be defined to be in physically different locations, or using different communications and/or electrical systems, etc.) Thus, should a failure occur, the processing job typically can be resumed by another process handler newly selected by the request handler, or possibly completed by the original process handler with it storing results and/or communicating the results to the client via a different path (e.g., using a different request handler, etc.)

In one embodiment, processing a request typically includes the request setup, request processing, and request teardown. In the request setup, the client submits a request for a volunteer to the request region. A request handler receives the request, opens a TCP connection, and sends a response to the client. The client sends the request over the TCP connection to the request handler. The request handler receives the request and submits a request for a volunteer. A process handler receives the request, opens a TCP connection, and sends a response to the request handler. The request handler receives the response and sends the request over the TCP connection to the process handler. The process handler receives the request and sends an acknowledgement message. The request handler receives the acknowledgement message then sends an acknowledgement message to the client. The client receives the acknowledgement message then sends a process command to the request handler. The request handler receives the process command sends the process command to the process handler. The process handler receives the process command and begins processing the request. If the client loses connection with the request handler during this procedure, the client should perform a retry.

In one embodiment, in the request process procedure, the process handler submits a volunteer request to a processing region. A task handler receives the volunteer request, opens a TCP connection, and sends a response. The process handler receives the volunteer response and sends the first task in the process flow to the task handler over the TCP connection. The task handler processes the task and sends the results to the process handler. If the task does not complete within the specified amount of time and retries are set to zero, the request handler returns an error code as the final result to the request handler. If the task does not complete within the specified amount of time and retries are greater than zero, the request handler resubmits the task to another task handler. If snapshot is enabled on this task or if retries is set to zero, the process handler sends the result to the request handler. This repeats until the next state is finish. When the next state is finish, the process handler sends the final result to the request handler. If the client loses connection with the request handler during this procedure, the client should perform a recover.

In one embodiment, in the request teardown procedure, the request handler sends the final result to the client. The client receives the result and sends an acknowledgement to the request handler. The request handler receives the acknowledgement and sends an acknowledgement to the process handler. If the client loses connection with the request handler during this procedure, the client should perform a recover.

In one embodiment, the task service runs on each worker machine. Task services have an IP address and assigned TCP port on their worker machine. All task services in the Hive share common UDP multicast groups based on their worker machine's current region. On completion of the volunteer pattern for a simple task, the connected TCP socket will be passed off to the task handler. When responding to a volunteer pattern for a daemon task, this service will UDP the daemon task's IP and port to the requester. The service has both task handlers and daemon tasks. Upon receiving a task to execute from a process handler, the service will spin off a task handler or delegate the task to a daemon task, as appropriate. Upon completion of the task, the task handler or daemon task will return the results to the process handler.

One embodiment uses an intra-process recovery which enables the hive to recover from a connection loss between the client and the request handler while the request handler is overseeing the processing of a request. When the client loses the connection with a first request handler, once the request processing has completed the request setup phase, the first request handler continues processing the request and the client submits a request for a new request handler (second request handler). The client issues the recover command and second request handler listens queries the recover service for a user-defined amount of time. If second request handler does not receive the result within the specified amount of time, second request handler returns an error. When first request handler receives the final result, first request handler writes the final result to the recover service.

One embodiment operates slightly differently as multiple process handlers are used for each step in a process flow. For example, both process handlers typically maintain the current state of the request such that if either of the process handlers is lost, the other picks up in its place. If the request handler is lost, the client and/or process handlers can establish a new request handler. The request handler manages the interface between software requesting processing from the hive and the hive. A primary process handler is a service that walks a request through the steps and recovery defined in a process flow. A secondary process handler is a service that monitors the primary process handler. If something happens to the primary process handler, the secondary process handler continues going through the steps and recovery defined in a process flow. A task handler is a service that performs the sub-routine defined in the process flow.

For example, in one embodiment, first, a request handler finds two process handlers. The request handler designates one as the primary process handler and the other as the secondary process handler. Next, the request handler sends the primary process handler the secondary process handler's IP address and sends the secondary process handler the primary process handler's IP address. The primary process handler and secondary process handler open a TCP port for communication then send acknowledgement messages to the request handler. The primary process handler finds a task handler. The task handler opens a TCP port and sends the request to the primary process handler. The primary process handler prepares the initial process flow state and sends that state to the secondary process handler. The secondary process handler and the request handler monitor the task states over the TCP connection. The task handler processes the request, sends the result to the primary process handler.

One embodiment provides an assimilation mechanism which recognizes new hive engines trying to join a hive. These steps occur without stopping execution of the entire hive, and he hive updates its hive engines in a measured rate to ensure that portions of the hive are continually processing requests ensuring constant availability of the hive applications.

In one embodiment, when a new hive engine joins the hive, the new hive engine finds the operating system image and the base hive software via DHCP. The new hive engine self installs the OS image and hive software using automated scripts defined by client. If a hive engine has an old version of the OS, the region leader makes the hive engine unavailable for processing. The hive engine is erased and rebooted. The hive engine then joins the hive as a new hive engine and re-installs the OS and hive software accordingly.

In addition, in one embodiment, when a hive engine joins the hive, the hive engine sends a request to the region leader. The hive engine receives a response from the region leader and selects a region to join. The region leader queries the hive engine for information about services, software, and versions. If the region leader is running a newer version of the hive system, the region leader makes the hive engine unavailable for processing. The region leader updates the hive engine by transmitting the current version of the hive system. The hive engine installs the update and commences processing. If the hive engine is running a newer version of hive system than the region leader, the region leader makes itself unavailable for process, receives the newer version of the hive system from the hive engine, installs the software, and continues processing. Once the region leader is updated, the region leader begins updating its region's members and the other region leaders. For example, in one embodiment, a hive engine then receives a response from the region leaders and selects a region to join. The region leader queries the hive engine for information about services, software, and versions. If the region leader is running the most current version of the hive applications, the region leader automatically updates the hive engine's hive applications. If the hive engine is running the most current version of the hive applications, the region leader automatically updates its hive applications. Once the region leader is updated, the region leader begins updating its region's members and the other region leaders.

Turning to the figures, FIG. 1A illustrates an architecture of hives used in one embodiment. Shown are multiple hives 100-101. A hive 100-101 is a logical grouping of one or more hive engines (e.g., computers or other computing devices) networked together to perform processing resources to one or more hive clients 110. For example, hive 100 includes multiple hive engines 105-106 connected over a network (or any communication mechanism) 107.

In one embodiment, a hive is a decentralized network of commodity hardware working cooperatively to provide vast computing power. A hive typically provides high-availability, high-scalability, low-maintenance, and predictable-time computations to applications (e.g., those corresponding to processing jobs of clients) executed in the hive. Each hive engine in the hive is typically capable to individually deploy and execute hive applications. When placed on the same network, hive engines seek each other out to pool resources and to add availability and scalability.

FIG. 1B illustrates a computing platform used for a hive engine for implementing request handlers, process handlers, and/or other processes of a hive as used in one embodiment (or also used for simulating the operation of one or more elements of a hive in one embodiment). As shown, hive engine 120 is configured to execute request handlers, process handler, and other hive processes, and to communicate with clients and other hive engines as discussed herein.

In one embodiment, hive engine 120 includes a processing element 121, memory 122, storage devices 123, communications/network interface 124, and possibly resources/interfaces (i.e., to communicate to other resources ) which may be required for a particular hive application (e.g., specialized hardware, databases, I/O devices, or any other device, etc.) Elements 121-125 are typically coupled via one or more communications mechanisms 129 (shown as a bus for illustrative purposes). Various embodiments of hive engine 120 may include more or less elements. The operation of hive engine 120 is typically controlled by processing element 121 using memory 122 and storage devices 123 to perform one or more hive processes, hive tasks, or other hive operations according to the invention. Memory 122 is one type of computer-readable medium, and typically comprises random access memory (RAM), read only memory (ROM), flash memory, integrated circuits, and/or other memory components. Memory 122 typically stores computer-executable instructions to be executed by processing element 121 and/or data which is manipulated by processing element 121 for implementing functionality in accordance with the invention. Storage devices 123 are another type of computer-readable medium, and typically comprise solid state storage media, disk drives, diskettes, networked services, tape drives, and other storage devices. Storage devices 123 typically store computer-executable instructions to be executed by processing element 121 and/or data which is manipulated by processing element 121 for implementing functionality in accordance with the invention.

In one embodiment, hive engine 120 is used as a simulation engine 120 to simulate one or more hive engines, and/or one or more hive processes, tasks, or other hive functions, such as, but not limited to those disclosed herein, especially the operations, methods, steps and communication of messages illustrated by the block and flow diagrams and messages sequence charts. Hive simulator engine 120 typically is used to simulate the performance and availability of hive application fabrics. The simulator allows dynamic simulation of any environment using simple text directives or a graphical user interface. For example, hive simulator engine 120 can be used to determine the hive performance using particular computing hardware by specifying such things as the computer type, instantiation parameters, and connection fabric, which is used by hive simulator engine 120 to produce a representation of the performance of a corresponding hive. In one embodiment, multiple hive simulator engines 120 are used, such as a unique three-level, two-dimensional mode connection fabric that allows hive simulator engines 120 to transmit requests uni-directionally or bi-directionally and to access other hive simulator engines 120 for subset processing while processing a request. Thus, one or more hive simulator engines 120 allow for modeling at the software level, hardware level, or both levels. Additionally, a hive simulator engine 120 is typically able to transmit requests through a simulated network or real hive network, such as hive 100 (FIG. 1A).

FIG. 2A illustrates a hierarchy of a hive, request regions, territories, and processing regions as used in one embodiment. As shown, hive 200 is logically divided into one or more request regions 205 (although most hives use only one request regions), territories 210 and 216, with multiple processing regions 211-212 and 217-218.

The use of territories 210 and 216 provides a mechanism for associating a physical location or quality of a corresponding hive engine which can be used, for example, in determining which responding request or process handlers to select via a volunteer pattern. When defined based on physical location, if performance is the major issue, then it is typically advantageous (but not required) to process all requests within the same territory. If reliability is the major issue, then it is typically advantageous (but not required) store state recover information in another territory.

FIG. 2B illustrates an interaction of a client, request handlers, and process handlers of one embodiment. Client 220 generates a service request 221 to request handlers 222, such as via a request region multicast message, one or more messages, a broadcast message, or other communication mechanisms. Those request handlers 222 that are available to process the request return responses 223 to client 220, typically via a unicast message directly to client 220 which includes a communications port to use should the sending request handler be selected by client 220. Client 220 selects, optionally based on territory considerations, typically one (but possibly more) of the responding request handlers, and communicates processing job 224 to the selected request handler 225.

In response, selected request handler 225 generates a processing request 226 to process handlers 227, such a via one or more processing region multicast messages or other communication mechanisms. Those process handlers 227 that are available to process the request return responses 228 to selected request handler 225, typically via a unicast message directly to selected request handler 225 which includes a communications port to use should the sending request handler be selected by selected request handler 225. Selected request handler 225 selects, optionally based on territory considerations, typically one (but possibly more) of the responding process handlers, and communicates processing job with state information 229 to the selected process handler 230. Inclusion of the state information is emphasized in regards to processing job with state information 229 because the processing job might be ran from the beginning or initialization state, or from an intermittent position or state, such as might happen in response to an error or timeout condition.

In response, selected process handler 230 proceeds to execute the process flow (or any other specified application), and at defined points in the process flow, updates selected request handler 225 with updated/progressive state information 237. Typically based on the process flow, selected process handler 230 will sequentially (although one embodiment allows for multiple tasks or sub-processes to be executed in parallel) cause the tasks or processing requests to be performed within the same hive engine or by other hive engines.

In one embodiment, selected process handler 230 selects a hive engine to perform a particular task using a volunteer pattern. For example, selected process handler 230 sends a multicast task request 231 to task handlers typically within the processing region (although one embodiment, sends task requests 231 to hive engines in one or more processing and/or request regions). Those task handlers 232 able to perform the corresponding task send a response message 233 to selected process handler 230, which selects, possibly based on territory, hive engine (e.g., itself as less overhead is incurred to perform the task within the same hive engine) or other considerations, one of the responding task handlers 232. Selected process handler 230 then initiates the task and communicates state information via message 234 to the selected task handler 235, which performs the task and returns state information 236 to selected process handler 230. If there are more tasks to perform, selected process handler 230 typically then repeats this process such that tasks within a process flow or application may or may not be performed by different hive engines. Upon completion of the application/process flow, selected process handler 230 forwards the final state information (e.g., the result) 237 to selected request handler 225, which in turn, forwards the result and/or other information 238 to client 220.

In one embodiment, selected process handler 230 performs tasks itself or causes tasks to be performed within the hive engine in which it resides (and thus selected task handler 235 is within this hive engine, and one embodiment does not send task request message 231 or it is sent internally within the hive engine.) In one embodiment, selected task handler 235 is a separate process or thread running in the same hive engine as selected process handler 230. Upon completion of the application/process flow, selected process handler 230 forwards the final state information (e.g., the result) 237 to selected request handler 225, which in turn, forwards the result and/or other information 238 to client 220.

FIG. 2C illustrates multicast addresses 240 used in one embodiment. As shown, multicasts addresses 240 includes: a multicast request region address 241 using which a client typically sends a service request message, a processing region leader intercommunication multicast address 242 used for processing region leaders to communicate among themselves, a processing region active region indications multicast address 243 which is typically used to periodically send-out messages by region leaders to indicate which processing regions are currently active, and multiple processing region multicasts addresses 244, one typically for each processing region of the hive. Of course, different sets or configurations of multicast addresses or even different communications mechanisms may be used in one embodiment within the scope and spirit of the invention.

FIG. 2D illustrates the flow of messages among components of one embodiment. Client 250 sends a multicast hive service request message 256 into the request region 251 of the hive. Request handlers available for performing the application corresponding to request 256 respond with UDP messages 257 to client 250, which selects selected request handler 252, one of the responding request handlers. In one embodiment, this selection is performed based on territory or other considerations, or even on a random basis. Client 250 then communicates the processing job in a message 258 over a TCP connection to the selected request handler 252.

In response and using a similar volunteer pattern, selected request handler 252 multicasts a processing request message 259 to a selected processing region 253, and receives UDP response messages 260 from available processing engines to service the request (e.g., perform the processing job). Selected request handler 252 selects selected process handler 254, one of the responding request handlers. In one embodiment, this selection is performed based on territory or other considerations, or even on a random basis. Selected request handler 252 then forwards the processing job with state information in message 261 to selected process handler 254, which returns an acknowledgement message 262. In response, selected request handler 252 sends an acknowledgement message 263 to client 250 (e.g., so that it knows that the processing is about to be performed.)

Selected process handler 254 then causes the processing job to be executed, typically by performing tasks within the same hive engine if possible for optimization reasons, or by sending out one or more tasks (possibly using a volunteer pattern) to other hive engines. Thus, selected process handler 254 optionally sends a multicast task request message 264 typically within it own processing region (i.e., selected processing region 253) (and/or optionally to one or more other processing or request regions), and receives responses 265 indicating available task handlers for processing the corresponding task. Task request message 264 typically includes an indication of the type or name of the task or task processing to be performed so that task handlers/hive engines can use this information to determine whether they can perform the task, and if not, they typically do not send a response message 265 (as it is less overhead than sending a response message indicating the corresponding task handler/hive engine cannot perform the task.) Note, in one embodiment, a task handler within the same hive engine as selected process handler 254 sends a response message 265.

Whether a task handler to perform the first task is explicitly or implicitly determined, selected process handler initiates a first task 266, which is performed by one of one or more individual task threads 255 (which may be the same or different task threads on the same or different hive engines), which upon completion (whether naturally or because of an error or timeout condition), returns state information 272 to selected process handler 254, which in turn updates selected request handler 252 via progressive state message 273. (Note, if there was only one task, then completion/state message 276 would have been sent in response to completion of the task.) This may continue for multiple tasks as indicated by optional MCAST task request and response messages 268-269 and task-n initiation 270 and state messages 272. When processing of the application/process flow is completed as determined by selected process handler 254 in response to state messages from the individual task threads 255, selected process handler 254 forwards a completion and result state information 276 to selected process handler 252, which forwards a result message 277 to client 250. In response, client 250 sends an acknowledgement message 278 to confirm receipt of the result (indicating error recovery operations do not need to be performed), and an acknowledgement message 279 is forwarded to selected process handler 254, and processing of the processing job is complete.

FIG. 2E illustrates an interaction of a client, request handlers, process handlers and possibly tasks of one embodiment. Many of the processes and much of the flow of information is the same as illustrated in FIG. 2B and described herein, and thus will not be repeated. FIG. 2E is used to emphasize and explicitly illustrate that different embodiments may implement features differently, and to emphasize that a process flow may specify tasks or even other process flows to be performed or the same process flow to be performed recursively.

For example, as shown, selected process handler 230 of FIG. 2B is replaced with selected process handler 280 in FIG. 2E. Selected process handler 280, in response to being assigned to execute the clients processing job by receiving processing job with state information message 229, proceeds to execute the corresponding application/process flow, which may optionally include performing a volunteer pattern using processing or task request messages 281 and response messages 283 to/from one or more task or process handlers 282. In response to the volunteer operation or directly in response to receiving the processing job with state information message 229, selected process handler 280 will sequentially (although one embodiment allows for multiple tasks or sub-processes to be executed in parallel) perform itself or send out tasks or processing requests to corresponding selected task or process handlers 290, in which case task or processing job with state information messages 284 are typically sent and results or state information messages 296 are typically received. The number of levels used in performing a processing job is unbounded as indicated in FIG. 2E.

FIG. 3 is a flow diagram of a client process used in one embodiment. Processing begins with process block 300, and proceeds to process block 302, wherein an application, data, and hive to process these is identified. Next, in process block 304, a multicast service request message indicating application is sent into the request layer of the selected hive. In process block 306, responses are received from the hive (if no responses are received, processing returns to process block 302 or 304 in one embodiment). Next, in process block 308, a request handler is selected based on the responses, and a communications connection is established to the selected request handler in process block 310. Next, in process block 312, the processing job is submitted to the selected request handler and a global unique identifier (GUID) is included so that the client and hive can uniquely identify the particular processing job. As determined in process block 314, if an acknowledgement message is not received from the hive indicating the job is being processed within a timeframe, then processing returns to process block 304.

Otherwise, if results are received from the hive within the requisite timeframe as determined in process block 320, then an acknowledgement message is returned to the hive in process block 322, and processing is complete as indicated by process block 324. Otherwise, as determined in process block 330, if the client determines it wishes to perform a recover operation, then in process block 332, a multicast recovery request message specifying the GUID is sent to the request layer of the hive, and processing returns to process block 320 to await the recovery results. Otherwise, as determined in process block 340, if the client determines to again request the job be performed, then processing returns to process block 304. Otherwise, local error processing is optionally performed in process block 342, and processing is complete as indicated by process block 344.

FIGS. 4A-C are flow diagrams of request hander processes used in one embodiment. FIG. 4A illustrates a process used in one embodiment for responding to service requests of clients. Processing begins with process block 400, and proceeds to process block 402, wherein a multicast port is opened for receiving service request messages. As determined in process blocks 404 and 406, until a service request is received and the request handler is available to handle the request, processing returns to process block 404. Otherwise, the request handler responds in process block 408 by sending a response message to the requesting client, with the response message typically identifying a port to use and the GUID of the received service request. As determined in process block 410, if the service request corresponds to a recovery request, then in process block 412, a recovery thread is initialized (such as that corresponding to the flow diagram of FIG. 4C) or the recovery operation is directly performed. Otherwise, in process block 414, a selected request handler thread is initialized (such as that corresponding to the flow diagram of FIG. 4B) or the request is handled directly. Processing returns to process block 404 to respond to more requests.

FIG. 4B illustrates a flow diagram of a process used by a selected request handler in one embodiment. Processing begins with process block 430, and loops between process blocks 432 and 434 until a job is received (and then processing proceeds to process block 440) or until a timeout condition is detected and in which case, processing is complete as indicated by process block 436.

After a processing job has been received (e.g., this process has been selected by the client to handle the request), a state data structure is initialized in process block 440. Then, in process block 442, a multicast processing request message is sent into one of the processing layers of the hive. As determined in process block 444, if no responses are received within a requisite timeframe, then a no processing handler response message is returned to the client in process block 445, and processing is complete as indicated by process block 436.

Otherwise, in process block 446, a particular process handler is selected. In one embodiment, this selection is performed based on territories (e.g., a process handler in a different territory than the selected request handler), other considerations or even on a random basis. In process block 448, a communications connection is established if necessary to the selected process handler, and the state information and data for the client processing request is sent (which may correspond to the initial state of the data received from the client or to an intermediate state of processing the client job request).

As determined in process block 450, if an error or timeout condition is detected, processing returns to process block 442. Otherwise, as determined in process block 452, until a state update message is received, processing returns to process block 450. As determined in process block 454, if the received state is not the finished or completed state, then in process block 456, the state data structure is updated, and processing returns to process block 450. Otherwise, processing has been completed, and in process block 458, the result is communicated to the client; in process block 460, the communications connection is closed; and processing is complete as indicated by process block 462.

FIG. 4C illustrates a flow diagram of a process used by a selected request handler performing error recovery in one embodiment. Processing begins with process block 470, and loops between process blocks 472 and 474 until a job is received (and then processing proceeds to process block 478) or until a timeout condition is detected and in which case, processing is complete as indicated by process block 476.

After a processing job has been received (e.g., this process has been selected by the client to perform the recover processing), in process block 478, a multicast recovery request message specifying the GUID of the job being recovered is sent into one or more of the recovery modules of the hive. As determined in process block 480, if no responses are received within a requisite timeframe, then a no recover response message is returned to the client in process block 481, and processing is complete as indicated by process block 476.

Otherwise, in process block 482, a particular recovery handler is selected, possibly based on territory considerations—such as a recovery handler in a different territory then this selected request handler. In process block 484, a communications connection is established if necessary to the selected recovery handler thread, and a recovery request is sent, typically including the GUID or other indication of the job to be recovered.

As determined in process block 486, if an error or timeout condition is detected, processing returns to process block 478. Otherwise, the recovered information is received as indicated by process block 488. In process block 490, the information is typically communicated to the client, or if this communication fails, it is saved to the recovery system. In one embodiment, the partially completed state, errors and/or other indications are stored to a local storage mechanism (e.g., some computer-readable medium) to be made available for use by a recovery process. In one embodiment, more significant process handling is performed, or the error communicating the error to another process, thread or hive engine for handling. The communications connection is then closed in process block 492, and processing is complete as indicated by process block 494.

FIGS. 5A-B are flow diagrams of process hander processes used in one embodiment. FIG. 5A illustrates a process used in one embodiment for responding to service requests of request handlers. Processing begins with process block 500, and proceeds to process block 502, wherein a multicast port is opened for receiving processing request messages. As determined in process blocks 504 and 506, until a processing request is received and the process handler is available to handle the request, processing returns to process block 504. Otherwise, the process handler responds in process block 508 by sending a response message to the requesting request handler, with the response message typically identifying a port to use and possibly the GUID corresponding to the received processing request. The processing request is received in process block 510. Next, in process block 512, a selected process handler thread is initialized (such as that corresponding to the flow diagram of FIG. 5B) or the processing request is handled directly. Processing returns to process block 504 to respond to more requests.

FIG. 5B illustrates a flow diagram of a process used by a selected process handler in one embodiment. Processing begins with process block 520, and loops between process blocks 522 and 524 until a job is received (and then processing proceeds to process block 530) or until a timeout condition is detected and in which case, processing is complete as indicated by process block 526.

After a processing job has been received (e.g., this process has been selected by a selected request handler (or possibly other process handler) to handle the request), a state data structure is initialized in process block 530. In process block 532, the processing requirements of the next statement(s) within the process flow corresponding to the received job are identified. As determined in process block 534, if a sub-process is to be spawned (e.g., the process flow specifies a process flow to be executed), then in process block 536, the current state is pushed on to a state stack and the state is initialized to that of the new process flow, the selected request handler is updated in process block 538, and processing returns to process block 532 to process the new process flow.

Otherwise, as determined in process block 540, if the task handler is not already known (e.g., an optimization to perform the task on the same hive engine) such as it is not guaranteed to be performed locally, the task is a “limited task” in that it can only be performed by a subset of the task handlers or the processing of the task is made available to other hive engines (e.g., for performance or load balancing etc.), then in process block 542 the task handler to perform the task is identified. One embodiment identifies the task handler by sending a multicast task request messages, receives the responses, and selects, based on territory, load or other considerations, a task handler to perform the task.

Limited tasks provide a mechanism for identifying hive engines that have special hardware or other resources. Task handlers only on the hive engines with the specialized hardware or other resources possibly required to perform the task will be enabled to perform the corresponding task and thus these enabled task handlers will be the ones to respond to a task request for the corresponding task. Additionally, limited tasks provide a mechanism to limit the number of task handlers or hive engines allowed to access a particular resource by restricting the number and/or location of task handlers allowed to perform a task that accesses the particular resource. Thus, limited tasks may be useful to limit the rate or number of accesses to a particular resource (e.g., database engine, a storage device, a printer, etc.)

In process block 544, a task is initiated to perform the next operation identified in the current process flow with the current state information and characteristics (e.g., timeout, number of retries, etc.) on the identified, selected, or already known task handler. As determined in process block 546, after completion of the processing requirements of the processing statement(s), if the finish state has not been reached, then the state data structure is updated with the task result in process block 548, the selected request handler is updated with the current state information in process block 549, and processing returns to process block 532.

Otherwise, processing is completed of the current process flow as determined in process block 546, and if the current process flow is a sub-process (e.g., spawned process flow) (as determined in process block 550), then in process block 552, the state is popped from the state stack, and processing proceeds to process block 548. Otherwise, in process block 554, the result/state information is communicated to the selected request hander. As determined in process block 555, if an error has been detected, then error processing is performed in process block 556. In process block 558, the communications connection is closed, and processing is complete as indicated by process block 559. Note, in some embodiments, communications connections are not established and disconnected each time, but rather a same communications channel is used more than once.

FIG. 5C illustrates a flow diagram of a task handler performed by a hive engine in one embodiment. Processing begins with process block 580. As determined in process blocks 581 and 583, until a task request is received and the task handler is available to handle the request, processing returns to process block 581. Otherwise, the task handler responds in process block 584 by sending a response message to the requesting process (typically a process handler), with the response message typically identifying a port to use and the GUID of the received task request. As determined in process block 585, if the task is actually received (e.g., this task handler was selected by the process handler sending the task request), then in process block 586, the task is performed or at least attempted to be performed and resultant state information (e.g., completed state, partially completed state, errors and/or other indications) sent to the requesting process handler. Processing returns to process block 581. Note, in one embodiment, multiple processes illustrated in process block 5C or some variant thereof are performed simultaneously by a hive engine for responding to multiple task requests and/or performing tasks in parallel.

FIG. 5D illustrates a flow diagram of a recovery processing performed by a hive engine in one embodiment. Processing begins with process block 590, and loops between process blocks 591 and 592 until a recovery job is received (and then processing proceeds to process block 594) or until a timeout condition is detected and in which case, processing is complete as indicated by process block 593. In process block 594, the recovery is retrieved from local storage and is communicated to the selected request hander. As determined in process block 595, if an error has been detected, then error processing is performed in process block 595. In process block 598, the communications connection is closed, and processing is complete as indicated by process block 599.

In one embodiment, a hive application is a collection of process flows that carry out specific sets of tasks. Applications can share process flows. An application definition file (XML descriptor file) typically describes the application, and the application definition file typically consists of the following: application name, process flow names, task names and module file names, support files, and/or configuration file names.

FIG. 6A illustrates an example definition file 600 of an application for use in one embodiment. As show, application definition file 600 specifies a set of corresponding process flows 601, tasks 602, support files 603, and configuration files 604.

FIG. 6B illustrates a definition of an process flow 620 “doProcessOne” used in one embodiment. Shown are four process flow statements 621-624, each specifying its beginning state, tasks to be performed, and next state depending on the outcome of the statements execution.

FIG. 6C illustrates a process used in one embodiment for executing a process flow or processing job, such as that illustrated in FIG. 6B. Note, in one embodiment, the process illustrated in FIG. 5B is used to execute a process flow or processing job. In one embodiment, a combination of the processes illustrated in FIGS. 5B and 6C or another process is used to execute a process flow or processing job.

Turning to FIG. 6C, processing begins with process block 650, and proceeds to process block 652, wherein the current state is set to the START state. Next, in process block 654, the task associated with the current state is attempted to be performed. As determined in process block 656, if the task timed-out before completion, then as determined in process block 658, if the task should be retried (e.g., the number of retries specified in the process flow or a default value has not been exhausted), processing returns to process block 656. Otherwise, in process block 660, the current state is updated to that corresponding to the task's completion status (e.g., complete, non-complete, not-attempted, etc.). As determined in process block 662, if an error occurred (e.g., an invalid next state or other error condition), then an error indication is returned to the selected request handler in process block 664, and processing is complete as indicated by process block 666. Otherwise, if the next state is the FINISH state (as determined in process block 670), then the result and possibly a final set of state information is sent to the selected request handler in process block 672, and processing is complete as indicated by process block 672. Otherwise, in process block 674, the selected request handler is updated with current state information, such as, but not limited to (nor required to include) the current state name, intermediate results, variable values, etc. Processing then returns to process block 654.

One embodiment of a hive uses a logical hierarchy of hive engines for delegation of performing administrative and/or other hive related tasks. In one embodiment, each hive engine participates in the processing region hierarchy as a region member with one hive engine in each processing region being a region leader, and there one overall senior region leader for the hive. For example, shown in FIG. 7A are multiple processing regions 700-701, having an overall senior region leader 703 (denoted senior leader/region leader/region member as it performs all functions) residing in processing region 700, a region leader/region member 707 in processing region 701, region members 704-705 in processing region 700, and region members 708-709 in processing region 701.

FIGS. 7B-7C are flow diagrams of processes used in one embodiment to establish and maintain this hierarchical relationship among distributed processes or systems, such as among hive engines. The generic terms of heartbeat leader and heartbeat member are used in describing this process, because it can be used in many different applications for establishing and maintaining a hierarchical relationship in a set of dynamic and autonomous processes and systems. For example, in one embodiment, the processes illustrated in FIGS. 7B-C are used to establish and maintain which hive engine in a region is the region leader, and between region leaders for establishing which hive engine is the senior region leader.

Processing of the heartbeat leader flow diagram illustrated in FIG. 7B begins with process block 720, and proceeds to process block 722 wherein a multicast heartbeat request message is sent on the multicast address belonging to the group in which the hierarchical relationship is being established and maintained. In process block 724, the responses are received. As determined in process block 725, if the process is senior over those from which a response was received, then it remains the leader or senior process, and optionally in process block 726, piggybacked information (e.g., number of regions, number of members in each region, etc.) is processed and possibly actions taken or initiated in response. As indicated by process block 727, the process delays or waits a certain period of time before repeating this process, and then processing returns to process block 722. Otherwise, in process block 728, the process demotes itself from being the leader or senior process (such as by initiating or switching to performing actions consistent with being a region member if not already performing the functions of a region member), and processing is complete as indicated by process block 729.

Processing of the heartbeat member flow diagram illustrated in FIG. 7C begins with process block 740, and proceeds to process block 742, wherein the process watches for and identifies heartbeat request messages during a predetermined timeframe. As determined in process block 744, if a no heartbeat request is received, then in process block 745, the process promotes itself to being the heartbeat leader, and processing returns to process block 742. Otherwise, if this process is senior to a process sending a heartbeat request message as determined in process block 748, then processing proceeds to process block 745 to promotes itself. Otherwise, in process block 749, a heartbeat response message is sent to the sender of the received heartbeat request message, and optionally other information is included in the heartbeat response message. Processing then returns to process block 742. Note, determining seniority can be performed in numerous manners and mechanisms, such as that based on some physical or logical value associated with a hive engine (e.g., one of its network addresses, its serial number, etc.) FIG. 8A illustrates some of the functions performed by a senior processing region leader in one embodiment. Processing begins with process block 800, and proceeds to process block 802, wherein a heartbeat request is sent to all region leaders, typically by sending a multicast packet to the processing region leader intercommunication multicast address 242 (FIG. 2C) and piggybacked information is collected from received responses with this information typically including, but not limited to the number of processing regions, number of processing handlers, number of request handlers, limited task information, etc. As determined in process block 804, if the number of request handlers needs to be adjusted (e.g., there are too few or too many), then in process block 806, a region leader is selected and directed to start or stop a request handler. Next, as determined in process block 808, if the number of processing regions needs to be adjusted (e.g., there are too few or too many), then in process block 810, a region leader is selected and directed to disband or spit a region. Next, as determined in process block 812, if the number of task handlers that can perform a particular task (i.e., a “limited task” as typically and by default, all tasks can be performed by all task handlers) needs to be adjusted (e.g., there are too few or too many), then in process block 814, a region leader is selected and directed to adjust the number of task handlers within its region which can perform the particular limited task. Next, as determined in process block 816, if some other action needs to be performed, then in process block 818, the action is performed or a region leader is instructed to perform the action. Next, processing usually waits or delays for a predetermined or dynamic amount of time as indicated by process block 819, before processing returns to process block 802.

FIG. 8B illustrates some of the functions performed by a region leader in one embodiment. Processing begins with process block 830, and proceeds to process block 832, wherein a heartbeat request is sent to all region member, typically by sending a multicast packet to the processing region multicast address 244 (FIG. 2C), and piggybacked information is collected from received responses with this information typically including, but not limited to the number of processing handlers, number of request handlers, etc.; or possibly instructions are received from the senior region leader. As determined in process block 834, if the number of request handlers needs to be adjusted (e.g., there are too few or too many), then in process block 836, a process handler is selected and directed to start or stop a request handler. Next, as determined in process block 838, if the number of processing regions needs to be adjusted (e.g., there are too few or too many), then in process block 840, an instruction to disband or spit the region is issued. Next, as determined in process block 842, if the number of task handlers permitted to perform a particular limited task needs to be adjusted (e.g., there are too few or too many), then in process block 844, an instruction is provided (directly, indirectly such as via a request or process handler, or based on a volunteer pattern) to a particular task handler to permit or deny it from performing the particular limited task. Next, as determined in process block 846, if some other action needs to be performed, then in process block 848, the action is performed or a process handler is instructed to perform the action. Next, processing usually waits or delays for a predetermined or dynamic amount of time as indicated by process block 849, before processing returns to process block 832.

FIG. 8C illustrates the splitting of a region as performed in one embodiment. Region leader 860 sends a multicast message 871 requesting a volunteer to head the new region to region members 861, some of which typically return a positive response message 872. Region leader 860 then identifies a selected region member 862 to head the new processing region, and sends an appointment message 873 to selected region member 862. In response, selected region member 862 creates a new processing region as indicated by reference number 874, typically including identifying an unused processing region multicast address 244 (FIG. 2C) as it monitored the traffic or processing region active indication messages sent to processing region active region indications multicast address 243. Then, selected region member 862 multicasts a volunteer message 875 to processing regions in the old (and still used) processing region and typically receives one or more responses 876. Selected region member 862 then selects a certain number, typically half of the number of process handlers in the old processing region, of responding process handlers, and notifies them to switch to the new processing region via move instruction 877, and they in turn, send a confirmation message 878 to selected region member 862.

FIG. 9 illustrates a process used in one embodiment for initializing a hive engine. Processing begins with process block 900, and proceeds to process block 902, wherein a hive version request and hive join multicast message is sent typically to all region leaders. As determined in process block 904, if no responses are received, then in process block 912, a new processing region is formed, and request hander and region leader processes are initiated. Next, in process block 914, process handler, recovery module, and region member processes are initiated, and startup processing is completed as indicated by process block 916. Otherwise, as determined in process block 906, if a hive software update is available, then, in process block 908, one of the responders is selected, the updates are acquired, and the software (e.g., hive software, operating system, etc.) is updated. In process block 910, the hive engine joins the smallest or possibly one of the smaller processing regions, possibly with this selection being determined by identified territories, and processing proceeds to process block 914.

In one embodiment, the hive is updated by a client with special administrative privileges. This administrative client sends a request to the senior region leader of the hive. The senior region leader opens a TCP connection and sends the administration client the connection information. The administration client sends the new application to the senior region leader. When the senior region leader receives an update, the senior region leader multicasts the update command to all the hive members. The senior region leader sends multicast message containing the name of the file that is being updated, the new version, and the total number of packets each hive member should receive. The senior region leader then multicasts the data packets, each packet typically includes the file id, the packet number, and data. If a hive member does not receive a packet, that hive member sends a request to the senior region leader for the missing packet. The senior region leader resends, multicasts, the missing packet. The hive members store the update in a staging area until they receive the activation command. To activate an update, the administration client sends the activation command to the senior region leader. The senior region leader multicasts the activate command to the hive members. The hive members remove the old application or files and moves the update from the staging area to the production area. To update the hive software or operating system, the senior region leader distributes the updates and restarts volunteers in a rolling fashion. When the hive service manager detects a new version of itself, the service manager forks the process and restarts with a new version. Also, the senior region leader can send other update commands. An active message indicates that the corresponding application, patch, or OS that should be running on the hive. A deactivated messages indicates that the corresponding application, patch, or OS should not be running on the hive and should remain installed on hive members. A remove message indicates that the corresponding application, patch, or OS was once installed on the Hive and any instances found on Hive members should be removed. This allows hive engines to be updated and also to move back to previous releases.

In view of the many possible embodiments to which the principles of our invention may be applied, it will be appreciated that the embodiments and aspects thereof described herein with respect to the drawings/figures are only illustrative and should not be taken as limiting the scope of the invention. For example and as would be apparent to one skilled in the art, many of the process block operations can be re-ordered to be performed before, after, or substantially concurrent with other operations. Also, many different forms of data structures could be used in various embodiments. The invention as described herein contemplates all such embodiments as may come within the scope of the following claims and equivalents thereof.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7979751 *Dec 15, 2008Jul 12, 2011International Business Machines CorporationManaging by one process state of another process to facilitate handling of error conditions
US20130275994 *Apr 11, 2012Oct 17, 2013Nokia CorporationMethod and apparatus for activity management across multiple devices
Classifications
U.S. Classification709/203
International ClassificationG06F15/16
Cooperative ClassificationH04L67/10, H04L69/16, H04L69/163, H04L41/00, H04L67/42, H04L67/16
European ClassificationH04L29/06J7, H04L29/08N9