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Publication numberUS20070276496 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/438,891
Publication dateNov 29, 2007
Filing dateMay 23, 2006
Priority dateMay 23, 2006
Also published asEP2029036A2, US20100114320, WO2007140170A2, WO2007140170A3
Publication number11438891, 438891, US 2007/0276496 A1, US 2007/276496 A1, US 20070276496 A1, US 20070276496A1, US 2007276496 A1, US 2007276496A1, US-A1-20070276496, US-A1-2007276496, US2007/0276496A1, US2007/276496A1, US20070276496 A1, US20070276496A1, US2007276496 A1, US2007276496A1
InventorsEric C. Lange, Hai H. Trieu, Kent M. Anderson, Randall L. Allard, Aurelien Bruneau
Original AssigneeSdgi Holdings, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical spacer with shape control
US 20070276496 A1
Abstract
An interspinous spacer for placement between adjacent spinous processes includes a flexible, fillable container (e.g., a bag or balloon) for containing a material that is compressible during end use, for example, silicone after curing. The container is impermeable to the material it will be filled with. A structural mesh, for example, made of PET fabric and interwoven shape-memory alloy wire, provides structure for and containment of the container, as well as shape control. The material can be injected into the container through an optional conduit, for example, a one-way valve.
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Claims(56)
1. A surgical spacer, comprising:
a flexible container for containing a material that is compressible during end use, wherein the container is substantially impermeable to the material; and
a structure for at least part of the container when containing the material;
wherein the structure controls at least part of a shape of the surgical spacer.
2. The surgical spacer of claim 1, wherein the material is flowable during filling of the container, the surgical spacer further comprising a conduit coupled to the container for accepting the material.
3. The surgical spacer of claim 2, wherein the conduit comprises a one-way valve.
4. The surgical spacer of claim 1, wherein the container is situated inside the structure.
5. The surgical spacer of claim 1, wherein the container is situated outside the structure.
6. The surgical spacer of claim 1, wherein the container is integral with the structure.
7. The surgical spacer of claim 1, wherein the structure comprises a shape memory alloy.
8. The surgical spacer of claim 7, wherein the shape memory alloy is body temperature activated.
9. The surgical spacer of claim 7, wherein the shape memory alloy is superelastic.
10. The surgical spacer of claim 7, wherein the shape memory alloy is coupled to an inside of the structure.
11. The surgical spacer of claim 7, wherein the shape memory alloy is coupled to an outside of the structure.
12. The surgical spacer of claim 11, wherein the structure comprises a plurality of interlocking links, and wherein the plurality of interlocking links comprise the shape memory alloy.
13. The surgical spacer of claim 7, wherein the structure comprises a structural mesh, and wherein the shape memory alloy comprises at least one shape memory alloy wire within the structural mesh.
14. The surgical spacer of claim 1, wherein the structure has at least a partially preformed shape.
15. The surgical spacer of claim 1, wherein the structure comprises at least one substantially inflexible shaped member.
16. The surgical spacer of claim 15, wherein the at least one substantially inflexible shaped member comprises a substantially straight member.
17. The surgical spacer of claim 15, wherein the at least one substantially inflexible shaped member comprises a roughly U-shaped member.
18. The surgical spacer of claim 1, wherein the container and the structure together comprise a layer of rubber thick enough to roughly maintain a desired shape.
19. The surgical spacer of claim 1, wherein the container comprises at least one of silicone, rubber, polyurethane, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyolefin, polycarbonate urethane, and silicone copolymer.
20. The surgical spacer of claim 1, wherein the material comprises at least one of a curable polymer and an adhesive.
21. The surgical spacer of claim 1, wherein the structure comprises at least one of PET fabric, polypropylene fabric, polyethylene fabric and metal wire.
22. The surgical spacer of claim 1, wherein the surgical spacer comprises an interspinous spacer, and wherein the structure is shaped to fit between adjacent spinous processes.
23. The surgical spacer of claim 1, wherein the structure is shaped for spacing adjacent spinous processes, and wherein the surgical spacer is capable of resisting a compressive load with a stiffness of about 40 N/mm to about 240 N/mm.
24. The surgical spacer of claim 1, wherein the structure is shaped to replace at least part of an intervertebral disc.
25. The surgical spacer of claim 1, wherein the structure is at least partially permeable.
26. An interspinous spacer, comprising:
a flexible container for containing an injectable material that is compressible during end use, wherein the container is substantially impermeable to the injectable material;
a conduit coupled to the container for accepting the injectable material; and
a structure for at least part of the container when containing the material;
wherein the structure has a shape during end use to fit between adjacent spinous processes.
27. The interspinous spacer of claim 26, wherein the structure is roughly H-shaped.
28. The interspinous spacer of claim 26, wherein the structure comprises:
at least one substantially inflexible member; and
a mesh for enveloping the at least one substantially inflexible member.
29. The interspinous spacer of claim 28, wherein the at least one substantially inflexible shaped member comprises a substantially straight member.
30. The interspinous spacer of claim 28, wherein the at least one substantially inflexible shaped member comprises a roughly U-shaped member.
31. The interspinous spacer of claim 26, wherein the conduit comprises a one-way valve.
32. The interspinous spacer of claim 26, wherein the container is situated inside the structure.
33. The interspinous spacer of claim 26, wherein the container is situated outside the structure.
34. The interspinous spacer of claim 26, wherein the container is integral with the structure.
35. The interspinous spacer of claim 26, wherein the structure comprises a shape memory alloy.
36. The interspinous spacer of claim 35, wherein the shape memory alloy is body temperature activated.
37. The interspinous spacer of claim 35, wherein the shape memory alloy is superelastic.
38. The interspinous spacer of claim 35, wherein the shape memory alloy is coupled to an inside of the structure.
39. The interspinous spacer of claim 35, wherein the shape memory alloy is coupled to an outside of the structure.
40. The interspinous spacer of claim 39, wherein the structure comprises a plurality of interlocking links, and wherein the plurality of interlocking links comprise the shape memory alloy.
41. The interspinous spacer of claim 35, wherein the structure comprises a structural mesh, and wherein the shape memory alloy comprises at least one shape memory alloy wire within the structural mesh.
42. The interspinous spacer of claim 26, wherein the structure has at least a partially preformed shape.
43. The interspinous spacer of claim 26, wherein the structure comprises at least one substantially inflexible shaped member.
44. The interspinous spacer of claim 43, wherein the at least one substantially inflexible shaped member comprises a substantially straight member.
45. The interspinous spacer of claim 43, wherein the at least one substantially inflexible shaped member comprises a roughly U-shaped member.
46. The interspinous spacer of claim 26, wherein the container and the structure together comprise a layer of rubber thick enough to roughly maintain a desired shape.
47. The interspinous spacer of claim 26, wherein the container comprises at least one of silicone, rubber, polyurethane, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyolefin, polycarbonate urethane, and silicone copolymer.
48. The interspinous spacer of claim 26, wherein the material comprises at least one of a curable polymer and an adhesive.
49. The interspinous spacer of claim 26, wherein the structure comprises at least one of PET fabric, polypropylene fabric, polyethylene fabric and metal wire.
50. A method of controlling at least part of a shape of a surgical spacer, the surgical spacer comprising a flexible container for containing a material that is compressible during end use, wherein the container is substantially impermeable to the material, and a structure for at least part of the container when containing the material, the method comprising creating the structure with at least one material for controlling at least part of a shape of the surgical spacer.
51. The method of claim 50, wherein the creating comprises adding a shape memory alloy to the structure.
52. The method of claim 51, wherein the structure comprises a structural mesh, and wherein the creating comprises adding at least one shape-memory alloy wire to the structural mesh.
53. The method of claim 51, wherein the creating comprises coupling the at least one shape memory alloy to the structure.
54. The method of claim 50, wherein the creating comprises adding at least one substantially inflexible shaped member to the structure.
55. The method of claim 50, wherein the creating comprises adding a layer of rubber thick enough to roughly maintain a desired shape.
56. A method of spacing adjacent spinous processes, the method comprising:
providing an interspinous spacer, the interspinous spacer comprising:
a flexible container for containing an injectable material that is compressible during end use, wherein the container is substantially impermeable to the injectable material;
a conduit coupled to the container for accepting the injectable material; and
a structure for at least part of the container when containing the material;
wherein the structure has a shape during end use to fit between adjacent spinous processes;
implanting the interspinous spacer between adjacent spinous processes; and
injecting the injectable material into the container through the conduit such that the shape is achieved.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS/PATENTS

This application contains subject matter which is related to the subject matter of the following applications, each of which is assigned to the same assignee as this application and filed on the same day as this application. Each of the below listed applications is hereby incorporated herein by reference in its entirety:

“Surgical Spacer,” by Lange et al. (Attorney Docket No. P22790.00).

“Systems and Methods for Adjusting Properties of a Spinal Implant,” by Lange et al. (Attorney Docket No. P23186.00); and

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention generally relates to surgical spacers for spacing adjacent body parts. More particularly, the present invention relates to surgical spacers having a flexible container for containing a material that is compressible during end use, the container being substantially impermeable to the material, and a structure for controlling at least part of a shape of the container when containing the material.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The human spine is a biomechanical structure with thirty-three vertebral members, and is responsible for protecting the spinal cord, nerve roots and internal organs of the thorax and abdomen. The spine also provides structural support for the body while permitting flexibility of motion. A significant portion of the population will experience back pain at some point in their lives resulting from a spinal condition. The pain may range from general discomfort to disabling pain that immobilizes the individual. Back pain may result from a trauma to the spine, the natural aging process, or the result of a degenerative disease or condition.

Procedures to address back problems sometimes require correcting the distance between spinous processes by inserting a device (e.g., a spacer) therebetween. The spacer, which is carefully positioned and aligned within the area occupied by the interspinous ligament, after removal thereof, is sized to position the spinous processes in a manner to return proper spacing thereof.

Dynamic interspinous spacers are currently used to treat patients with a variety of indications. Essentially, these patients present a need for distraction of the posterior elements (e.g., the spinal processes) using a mechanical device. Current clinical indications for the device, as described at SAS (Spine Arthroplasty Society) Summit 2005 by Guizzardi et al., include stenosis, disc herniation, facet arthropathy, degenerative disc disease and adjacent segment degeneration.

Marketed interspinous devices include rigid and flexible spacers made from PEEK, titanium or silicone. Clinical success with these devices has been extremely positive so far as an early stage treatment option, avoiding or delaying the need for lumbar spinal fusion. However, all devices require an open technique to be implanted, and many require destroying important anatomical stabilizers, such as the supraspinous ligament.

Current devices for spacing adjacent interspinous processes are preformed, and are not customizable for different sizes and dimensions of the anatomy of an interspinous area of an actual patient. Instead, preformed devices of an approximately correct size are inserted into the interspinous area of the patient. Further, the stiffness or flexibility of the devices must be determined prior to the devices being inserted into the interspinous area.

Thus, a need exists for improvements to surgical spacers, such as those for spacing adjacent interspinous processes.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Briefly, the present invention satisfies the need for improvements to surgical spacers by providing shape control. A flexible container is provided that is fillable in situ to a desired amount, with a structure for at least part of the container providing shape control thereto. An optional conduit coupled to the container allows for filling of the container, for example, by injecting a material into the container.

The present invention provides in a first aspect, a surgical spacer. The surgical spacer comprises a flexible container for containing a material that is compressible during end use, wherein the container is substantially impermeable to the material. The surgical spacer further comprises a structure for at least part of the container when containing the material, wherein the structure controls at least part of a shape of the surgical spacer.

The present invention provides in a second aspect, an interspinous spacer. The interspinous spacer comprises a flexible container for containing an injectable material that is compressible during end use, wherein the container is substantially impermeable to the injectable material. The interspinous spacer further comprises a conduit coupled to the container for accepting the injectable material, and a structure for at least part of the container when containing the material, wherein the structure has a shape during end use to fit between adjacent spinous processes.

The present invention provides in a third aspect, a method of controlling at least part of a shape of a surgical spacer. The surgical spacer comprises a flexible container for containing a material that is compressible during end use, wherein the container is substantially impermeable to the material. The surgical spacer further comprises a structure for at least part of the container when containing the material. The method comprises creating the structure with at least one material for controlling at least part of a shape of the surgical spacer during end use.

The present invention provides in a fourth aspect, a method of spacing adjacent spinous processes. The method comprises providing an interspinous spacer, the interspinous spacer comprising a flexible container for containing an injectable material that is compressible during end use, wherein the container is substantially impermeable to the injectable material. The interspinous spacer further comprises a conduit coupled to the container for accepting the injectable material, and a structure for at least part of the container when containing the material, wherein the structure has a shape during end use to fit between adjacent spinous processes. The method further comprises implanting the interspinous spacer between adjacent spinous processes, and injecting the injectable material into the container through the conduit such that the shape is achieved.

Further, additional features and advantages are realized through the techniques of the present invention. Other embodiments and aspects of the invention are described in detail herein and are considered a part of the claimed invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The subject matter which is regarded as the invention is particularly pointed out and distinctly claimed in the claims at the conclusion of the specification. The foregoing and other objects, features, and advantages of the invention are apparent from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 depicts adjacent vertebrae of the lumber region of a human spinal column.

FIG. 2 depicts a more detailed view of a portion of a human spinal column including the vertebrae of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 depicts the spinal column portion of FIG. 2 after implantation and filling of one example of an interspinous spacer in accordance with an aspect of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a partial cut-away view of one example of an unfilled surgical spacer with the container in the structure, in accordance with an aspect of the present invention.

FIG. 5 depicts an example of a surgical spacer with integrated container and structure, in accordance with an aspect of the present invention.

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of one example of a surgical spacer with external container, in accordance with an aspect of the present invention.

FIG. 7 depicts one example of the construction of a structure for use with one example of a surgical spacer, in accordance with another aspect of the present invention.

FIG. 8 depicts another example of a surgical spacer with integrated container and structure, in accordance with another aspect of the present invention.

FIG. 9 depicts one example of a structure for a surgical spacer including at least one substantially inflexible shaped member, in accordance with another aspect of the present invention.

FIG. 10 depicts another example of a structure for a surgical spacer including at least one substantially inflexible shaped member, in accordance with another aspect of the present invention.

FIG. 11 depicts still another example of a structure for a surgical spacer including a supra-structure, in accordance with another aspect of the present invention.

FIG. 12 depicts a portion of a surgical spacer with a structural mesh coupled at least one least one substantially inflexible shaped member, in accordance with another aspect of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

A surgical spacer of the present invention can be formed in situ during a procedure. The spacer includes the following basic aspects: a flexible container, and a structure for at least part of the container that controls at least part of the shape of the surgical spacer. The flexible container can be filled or injected though an optional conduit after placement. Further, the structure may be folded or otherwise reduced in size prior to use in some aspects. Together with an unfilled container, in some aspects, the spacer can create a smaller footprint during implantation. Once filled, the structure provides support and containment for the container, as well as providing shape control for at least part of the spacer.

FIG. 1 depicts adjacent vertebrae 100, 102 of the lumbar region of a human spinal column. As known in the art, each vertebrae comprises a vertebral body (e.g., vertebral body 104), a superior articular process (e.g., superior articular process 106), a transverse process (e.g., transverse process 108), an inferior articular process (e.g., inferior articular process 110), and a spinous process (e.g., spinous process 112). In addition, between vertebral bodies 104 and 114 is a space 116 normally occupied by an intervertebral disc (see FIG. 2), and between spinous processes 112 and 118 is a space 120 normally occupied by an interspinous ligament (see FIG. 2).

FIG. 2 depicts the vertebrae of FIG. 1 within an area 200 of the lumbar region of a human spine. As shown in FIG. 2, spinous processes 112 and 118 are touching and pinching interspinous ligament 202, calling for spacing of the spinous processes.

FIG. 3 depicts spinous processes 112 and 118 after spacing with an interspinous spacer 300 in accordance with one aspect of the present invention. As shown in FIG. 3, interspinous ligament 202 has been removed in a conventional manner prior to insertion of spacer 300. Although shown in its filled state, in this example, spacer 300 is implanted in its unexpanded state, as described more fully below. The spacer is filled with a material described below through a conduit 302 after implantation. For example, the material may be injected into the spacer through the conduit (e.g., a one-way valve). Prior to implantation and filling, measurement of the space between the interspinous processes and determination of the spacer size and desired amount of filling can be performed. Conventional methods can be used, such as, for example, the use of templates, trials, distractors, scissor-jacks or balloon sizers.

FIG. 4 depicts a partially cut-away view of one example of a spacer 400, in accordance with one aspect of the present invention. As shown in FIG. 4, the spacer comprises an unfilled container 402 inside a structure 404. Preferably, the container is in an evacuated state during implantation and prior to being filled. Where a valve (e.g., a one-way valve) is coupled to the container, the container is preferably evacuated prior to or during the process of coupling the valve thereto. In the present example, the structure is outside the container. However, as will be described in more detail below, the container can be outside the structure, or the container and structure can be integrated. In addition, although the structure is shown to be roughly H-shaped to fit between adjacent spinous processes, the structure can have any shape necessary for the particular surgical application. For example, the structure could instead have a roughly cylindrical shape to replace an intervertebral disc. As another example, the structure could be spherically or elliptically shaped to replace part of the intervertebral disc, for example, the nucleus pulpous, leaving the rest of the disc intact. Further, although the structure is shown enveloping the container, the structure could be for only a portion of the container, depending on the particular application. For example, it may be desired to prevent bulging of the container only in a particular area. Coupled to the container is an optional conduit 406 for accepting a material that is compressible during end use. The structure provides support for and containment of the container when filled.

The container is flexible and substantially impermeable to the material it will be filled with. However, depending on the application, the container may be permeable to other materials, for example, it may be air and/or water permeable. In the present example, the container takes the form of a bag or balloon, but can take other forms, so long as flexible and substantially impermeable to the material it will be filled with. Thus, the container must be substantially impermeable to the filling material, for example, in a liquid state during filling and prior to curing. Examples of container materials include silicone, rubber, polyurethane, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyolefin, polycarbonate urethane, and silicone copolymers.

Conduit 406 accepts the material being used to fill the container. Preferably, the conduit comprises a one-way valve, however, a two-way valve is also contemplated, as another example. The conduit can comprise any material suitable for implanting, for example, various plastics. Also preferably, the conduit is constructed to be used with a delivery system for filling the container, such as, for example, a pressurized syringe-type delivery system. However, the delivery system itself forms no part of the present invention. As noted above, the conduit is optional. Other examples of how to fill the container comprise the use of a self-sealing material for the container, or leaving an opening in the container that is closed (e.g., sewn shut) intraoperatively after filling. Using a curable material to fill the container may also serve to self-seal the container.

In use, the container is filled with a material that is compressible during end use. The compressibility characteristic ensures that the material exhibits viscoelastic behavior and that, along with the structure, the spacer can accept compressive loads. Of course, the degree of compressibility will depend on the particular application for the surgical spacer. For example, if a spacer according to the present invention is used between adjacent spinous processes, the spacer would need to accept compressive loads typically experienced in the posterior region of the spine, for example, up to about 80 shore A. In other words, the spacer is preferably capable of resisting compressive motion (or loads) with a stiffness of about 40 to about 240 N/mm (newtons per millimeter). The material is preferably injectable, and may be compressible immediately or after a time, for example, after curing. For purposes of the invention, the compressibility characteristic is necessary during end use, i.e., after implantation. Materials that could be used include, for example, a plurality of beads (e.g., polymer beads) that in the aggregate are compressible, or materials that change state from exhibiting fluid properties to exhibiting properties of a solid or semi-solid. Examples of such state-changing materials include two-part curing polymers and adhesive, for example, platinum-catalyzed silicone, epoxy, polyurethane, etc.

As noted above, the structure provides support for and containment of the container when filled, as well as at least partial shape control of the spacer. The structure comprises, for example, a structural mesh comprising a plurality of fibers and/or wires 408. Within the structural mesh are shape-control fibers and/or wires 410. In one example, shape control is provided by wires of a shape-memory alloy (e.g., Nitinol). The shape-memory alloy wire(s) can be coupled to the structural mesh (inside or outside), or weaved into the mesh (i.e., integrated). Coupling can be achieved, for example, by stitching, twisting, or closing the wire on itself. Alternatively, shape control can be provided by other wires or fibers that do not “give” in a particular direction, for example, metal or metal alloys (e.g., tantalum, titanium or steel, and non-metals, for example, carbon fiber, PET, polyethylene, polypropalene, etc.). The shape-memory alloy can be passive (e.g., superelastic) or active (e.g., body-temperature activated). The use of metal, metal alloy or barium coated wires or fibers can also improve radiopacity for imaging. The remainder of the structure can take the form of, for example, a fabric jacket, as shown in FIG. 4. Although the shape-memory alloy wires make up only a portion of the structural mesh of FIG. 4, it will be understood that there could be more such wires, up to and including comprising the entirety of the mesh. The fabric jacket in this example contains and helps protect the container from bulging and damage from forces external to the container, while the shape-memory alloy provides shape control of the spacer in a center region 412. The fibers of the jacket comprise, for example, PET fabric, polypropylene fabric, polyethylene fabric and/or steel, titanium or other metal wire. Depending on the application, the structure may be permeable to a desired degree. For example, if bone or tissue growth is desired to attach to the structure, permeability to the tissue or bone of interest would be appropriate. As another example, permeability of the structure may be desired to allow the material used to fill the container to evacuate air or water, for example, from the container, in order to prevent bubbles from forming inside. Where a mesh is used, for example, the degree of permeability desired can be achieved by loosening or tightening the weave.

Although the structure is shown in a roughly H-shape in the example of FIG. 4, it will be understood that in practice, the structure can be made to be folded, unexpanded, or otherwise compacted. This is particularly true where, for example, the structure comprises a fabric or other easily folded material. A folded or unexpanded state facilitates implantation, allowing for a smaller surgical opening, and unfolding or expansion in situ upon filling of the container. Further, the structure can have a different final shape, depending on the shape-control material used. For example, the shape-memory wires in FIG. 4 may be in their inactive state, whereupon activation by body temperature causes contraction thereof, making the spacer of FIG. 4 “thinner” than shown in the center region.

One example of the construction of a structural mesh 700 for use as one example of a structure of the present invention will now be described with reference to FIG. 7. Two roughly cylindrical members 702 and 704 are sewn together around a periphery 706 of an opening along a side (not shown) in each. Each member in this example comprises a fabric mesh (e.g., fabric mesh 714) similar in composition to the fabric jacket of FIG. 4. Interwoven with the fabric are a plurality of shape-memory alloy wires both horizontally (e.g., wire 716) and vertically (e.g., wire 718). An opening 708 is created in one of the members for accepting the container, for example, by laser cut. In one example, a conduit described above would poke through opening 708. The ends of the cylindrical members (e.g., end 710) are then trimmed and sewn shut, as shown in broken lines (e.g., lines 712) in FIG. 7.

FIG. 5 depicts an outer view of another example of a surgical spacer 500 in accordance with an aspect of the present invention. A container conduit 501 is shown pointing outward from an opening 503. As shown, the structure 502 delimits the final shape of the spacer, in this example, a rough H-shape. The structure comprises a mesh 504 of shape-memory alloy wire, that is soaked through with a dispersion polymer 506 (e.g., silicone). The dispersion polymer (after curing) acts as the container and is shown filled in FIG. 5. This is one example of the container and the structure being integral. Although the mesh of FIG. 5 is described as being all shape-memory alloy wire, it will be understood that, like FIG. 4, the shape-memory alloy could only form a part of the structure.

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of another example of a surgical spacer 600 in accordance with the present invention. Surgical spacer 600 is similar to the spacer of FIG. 5, except that instead of being soaked in a dispersion polymer, a structural mesh 602 of a shape-memory alloy wire is coated with a dispersion polymer (e.g., silicone) 604 or other curable liquid appropriate for the container material, creating an outer container. The coating can be done in a conventional manner, for example, by dip molding on the outside of the mesh.

FIG. 8 depicts another example of a surgical spacer 800 with an integrated container and structure, in accordance with another aspect of the present invention. The container and structure in the example of FIG. 8 both comprise a single layer 802 of rubber that is thick enough for a given application to perform the functions of both the container and structure (including shape control). Such a rubber shell would be able to return to its original shape when unconstrained. In addition, spacer 800 preferably includes a conduit 804 (preferably, a one-way valve) for filling internal space 806. The material can be any of the filling materials described above, for example, silicone. Where the spacer is used, for example, to space adjacent spinous processes, the thickness of layer 802 is preferably in the range of about 0.2 mm to about 2.5 mm. A layer of rubber of that thickness will contain the material chosen, and, when filled, will sufficiently maintain the shape of the spacer for the intended use.

In an alternate aspect, the rubber shell of FIG. 8 can be augmented with internal, external, or integrated features to further control shape. Examples of such features include thread, wires (e.g., metal, including shape-memory alloys), cables, tethers, rings or a mesh.

FIG. 9 depicts one example of a structure for a surgical spacer including at least one substantially inflexible shaped member, in accordance with another aspect of the present invention. The substantially inflexible member(s) are used to achieve at least part of a preformed shape for a given application. Structure 900 comprises blades 902 and 904 that are substantially inflexible and are substantially straight. In one example, the blades comprise metal, such as, for example, a nickel-titanium alloy. The blades provide a specific shape for at least part of the surgical spacer. Coupling the blades is, for example, a structural mesh 906. The structure can be paired with any of the types of containers described herein. In addition, the structural mesh can take any of the forms described herein. For example, the structural mesh could take the form of a PET fabric mesh, with or without other shape-enhancing elements (e.g., shape-memory alloy fabric or wire). In one example, the mesh covers the blades. In another example, the mesh is coupled at a periphery of the blades.

As shown in the example of FIG. 12, a portion of a surgical spacer 1200 comprises a blade 1202 and structural mesh 1204. At the periphery 1206 of the blade, the mesh is coupled to the blade by stitching through a plurality of holes (e.g., hole 1208).

Similarly, FIG. 10 depicts another example of a structure 1000 including at least one substantially inflexible shaped member. In this example, there are two substantially inflexible shaped members 1002 and 1004, each being roughly U-shaped. In one example, the U-shaped members comprise metal blades, such as, for example, nickel-titanium allow blades. Coupling the blades is, for example, a structural mesh 1006 similar to that described above with respect to FIG. 9. In addition, as also noted above with respect to FIG. 9, the structure of FIG. 10 can be paired with any of the containers described herein.

FIG. 11 depicts still another example of a structure 1100 for a surgical spacer, in accordance with another aspect of the present invention. In this example, the structure comprises a supra-structure 1102 coupled to a main structure 1104. The main structure need not provide shape control, since that is provided by the supra-structure, however, it could also provide shape control. For example, the main structure could provide shape control in one or more directions, while the supra-structure provides shape control in one or more other directions. Of course, the supra-structure could provide shape control uniformly, e.g., if added to all surfaces. In one example, the main structure comprises a fabric mesh (e.g., PET fabric) with or without added shape memory control fibers or wires. In one example, shown inset in FIG. 11, supra-structure 1102 comprises a plurality of interlocking links 1106, the links comprising, for example, a shape-memory alloy. The links could provide resistance to expansion in one or more directions or uniformly, and/or could allow pliability, permitting deformation in one or more directions. The supra-structure can be loosely or rigidly coupled to the main structure, for example, via loops, hooks, stitches or frictional mechanisms. Of course, the supra-structure could instead be coupled to an inside 1108 of the main structure in another example. As with other embodiments herein, the shape-memory alloy can be passive (e.g., superelastic) or active (e.g., body-temperature activated).

Although preferred embodiments have been depicted and described in detail herein, it will be apparent to those skilled in the relevant art that various modifications, additions, substitutions and the like can be made without departing from the spirit of the invention and these are therefore considered to be within the scope of the invention as defined in the following claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8007521 *Jan 22, 2007Aug 30, 2011Kyphon SarlPercutaneous spinal implants and methods
US8118844 *Apr 24, 2006Feb 21, 2012Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc.Expandable device for insertion between anatomical structures and a procedure utilizing same
US20110082504 *Jun 2, 2009Apr 7, 2011Synthes Usa, LlcInflatable interspinous spacer
WO2009121064A2 *Mar 30, 2009Oct 1, 2009Spineology, Inc.Method and device for interspinous process fusion
Classifications
U.S. Classification623/17.12
International ClassificationA61F2/44
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2/442, A61B17/7065, A61B2017/00557, A61F2002/4495, A61F2/441
European ClassificationA61B17/70P4
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 21, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: WARSAW ORTHOPEDIC, INC., INDIANA
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:SDGI HOLDINGS, INC.;SOFAMOR DANEK HOLDINGS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:020282/0321
Effective date: 20060428
May 23, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: SDGI HOLDINGS, INC., DELAWARE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:LANGE, ERIC C.;ANDERSON, KENT M.;BRUNEAU, AURELIEN;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:017910/0468;SIGNING DATES FROM 20060424 TO 20060519