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Publication numberUS20070289233 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/425,338
Publication dateDec 20, 2007
Filing dateJun 20, 2006
Priority dateJun 20, 2006
Also published asEP2035633A2, WO2007149774A2, WO2007149774A3
Publication number11425338, 425338, US 2007/0289233 A1, US 2007/289233 A1, US 20070289233 A1, US 20070289233A1, US 2007289233 A1, US 2007289233A1, US-A1-20070289233, US-A1-2007289233, US2007/0289233A1, US2007/289233A1, US20070289233 A1, US20070289233A1, US2007289233 A1, US2007289233A1
InventorsRobert M.M. Haddock
Original AssigneeHaddock Robert M M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Crowning panel assembly
US 20070289233 A1
Abstract
A panel assembly (40) that addresses oil canning when installed over a substrate or deck (72) is disclosed. The panel assembly (40) includes a panel (42). The panel (42) includes a first primary panel surface (44) that faces the substrate (72) in the installed configuration, as well as a second primary panel surface (46) that faces away from the substrate (72) in the installed configuration. Another component of the panel assembly (40) is a first structure (60) that is disposed between the panel (42) and the substrate (72). Typically, either a first surface (62) of the first structure (60) is chemically bonded directly to the first primary panel surface (44) such that an interface between the first surface (62) and the first primary panel surface (44) includes a chemical bond, or a second surface (64) is chemically bonded directly to the substrate (72) such that an interface between the second surface (64) and the substrate (72) includes a chemical bond. In any case, the first structure (60) produces a convexity on the second primary panel surface (46) to address oil-canning effects or stress wrinkling of the panel (42).
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Claims(26)
1. A panel assembly, comprising:
a metal panel, comprising:
first and second primary panel surfaces that are oppositely disposed, wherein said first primary panel surface projects toward a substrate when said metal panel is installed over the substrate, and wherein said second primary panel surface projects away from the substrate when said metal panel is installed over the substrate; and
a first structure comprising a first surface, wherein said first surface is chemically bonded directly to said first primary panel surface such that an interface between said first surface of said first structure and said first primary panel surface comprises a chemical bond, wherein said first structure produces a convexity on said second primary panel surface when said metal panel is installed over the substrate.
2. The panel assembly of claim 1, wherein said first surface of said first structure is chemically bonded directly to said metal panel by an adhesive.
3. The panel assembly of claim 1, wherein said first structure comprises foam.
4. The panel assembly of claim 1, wherein said first structure is an extrusion.
5. The panel assembly of claim 1, wherein said first surface of said first structure is flat prior to said first structure being chemically bonded to said first primary panel surface.
6. The panel assembly of claim 1, wherein said first structure comprises a second surface that is flat prior to said metal panel being installed over the substrate, that is disposed opposite of said first surface, and that faces the substrate when said metal panel is installed over the substrate.
7. The panel assembly of claim 1, wherein said first structure is hollow.
8. The panel assembly of claim 1, wherein said first surface of said first structure is flat prior to said first structure being chemically bonded to said first primary panel surface, wherein said first structure comprises a pair of curved sidewalls that are convex, as well as a second surface that is flat prior to said metal panel being installed over the substrate, that is disposed opposite of said first surface, and that faces the substrate when said metal panel is installed over the substrate.
9. The panel assembly of claim 1, wherein said metal panel further comprises first and second longitudinal edges, wherein said first and second longitudinal edges are each configured to interconnect with a longitudinal edge of another metal panel to define a standing seam.
10. The panel assembly of claim 1, wherein said metal panel further comprises first and second protruding structures that are linearly extending and that protrude at least generally away from the substrate when said metal panel is installed over the substrate.
11. The panel assembly of claim 10, wherein each of said first and second protruding structures is selected from the group consisting of a standing seam section and a rib.
12. The panel assembly of claim 10, wherein said first structure is linearly extending and is disposed at least generally parallel with said first and second protruding structures.
13. The panel assembly of claim 10, wherein said metal panel further comprises first and second longitudinal edges that are laterally spaced, as well as first and second transverse edges that are longitudinally spaced and that each extend between and interconnect said first and second longitudinal edges, wherein said first structure extends at least generally from said first transverse edge to at least generally said second transverse edge.
14. The panel assembly of claim 10, wherein said metal panel further comprises a flat base section that extends between said first and second protruding structures, and wherein said first structure is chemically bonded to said first primary panel surface within said base section, wherein a center-to-center distance between said first and second protruding structures is at least about 12 inches.
15. The panel assembly of claim 14, wherein said first structure at least generally bisects said base section in a lateral dimension that coincides with a spacing between said first and second protruding structures.
16. The panel assembly of claim 1, wherein said metal panel further comprises a flat first base section, wherein said first structure is chemically bonded to said first primary panel surface within said first base section.
17. A panel assembly, comprising:
a panel, comprising:
first and second primary panel surfaces that are oppositely disposed, wherein said first primary panel surface projects toward a substrate when said panel is installed over the substrate, and wherein said second primary panel surface projects away from the substrate when said panel is installed over the substrate; and
first and second protruding structures that are linearly extending and that protrude at least generally away from the substrate when said panel is installed over the substrate; and
a first structure comprising a first surface that is chemically bonded directly to said first primary panel surface such that an interface between said first surface of said first structure and said first primary panel surface comprises a chemical bond, wherein said first structure produces a convexity on said second primary panel surface somewhere between said first and second protruding structures when said panel is installed over the substrate.
18. A panel assembly, comprising:
a panel, comprising:
first and second primary panel surfaces that are oppositely disposed, wherein said first primary panel surface projects toward a substrate when said panel is installed over the substrate, and wherein said second primary panel surface projects away from the substrate when said panel is installed over the substrate; and
first and second protruding structures that are linearly extending and that protrude at least generally away from the substrate when said panel is installed over the substrate; and
a first structure that is hollow and that produces a convexity on said second primary panel surface somewhere between said first and second protruding structures when said panel is installed over the substrate and by said first structure interacting with said first primary panel surface.
19. A building surface, comprising:
a substrate;
a panel, comprising:
first and second primary panel surfaces that are oppositely disposed, wherein said first primary panel surface projects toward said substrate, and wherein said second primary panel surface projects away from said substrate; and
first and second protruding structures that are linearly extending and that protrude at least generally away from said substrate; and
a first structure that comprises a first surface that is flat prior to said first structure being disposed to interact with one of said substrate and said first primary panel surface, wherein said first structure exerts a force on said first primary panel surface to produce a convexity on said second primary panel surface somewhere between said first and second protruding structures.
20. A building surface, comprising:
a substrate;
a panel, comprising:
first and second primary panel surfaces that are oppositely disposed, wherein said first primary panel surface projects toward said substrate, and wherein said second primary panel surface projects away from said substrate; and
a first structure comprising a first surface chemically bonded directly to one of said first primary panel surface and said substrate such that an interface between said first surface of said first structure and said one of said first primary panel surface and said substrate comprises a chemical bond, wherein said first structure produces a convexity on said second primary panel surface.
21. The building surface of claim 20, wherein said substrate is flat.
22. The building surface of claim 20, wherein said first structure is chemically bonded directly to only one of said first primary panel surface and said substrate, and is in contact with and movable relative to the other of said first primary panel surface and said substrate.
23. A building surface, comprising:
a substrate;
a panel, comprising:
first and second primary panel surfaces that are oppositely disposed, wherein said first primary panel surface projects toward said substrate, and wherein said second primary panel surface projects away from said substrate; and
first and second protruding structures that are linearly extending and that protrude at least generally away from said substrate; and
a first structure that is hollow and that produces a convexity on said second primary panel surface somewhere between said first and second protruding structures by said first structure interacting with said first primary panel surface.
24. A method of installing a panel over a substrate, wherein said panel comprises first and second primary panel surfaces that are oppositely disposed, wherein said method comprises the steps of:
disposing said panel over said substrate such that said first primary panel surface faces said substrate, such that said second primary panel surface faces away from said substrate, and such that a first structure is disposed between said first primary panel surface and said substrate;
providing a chemical bond directly between a first surface of said first structure and one of said first primary panel surface and said substrate such that an interface between said first surface of said first structure and said one of said first primary panel surface and said substrate comprises a chemical bond; and
producing a convexity on said second primary surface of said panel by said first structure being disposed between said first primary panel surface and said substrate.
25. The method of claim 24, wherein said substrate is flat.
26. The method of claim 24, wherein said providing a chemical bond step comprises providing a chemical bond between said first structure and only one of said first primary panel surface and said substrate.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This patent application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) to U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/805,275, that was filed on Jun. 20, 2006, that is entitled “CROWNING PANEL ASSEMBLY,” and the entire disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety herein.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention generally relates to building surfaces that are susceptible to oil canning or stress wrinkling and, more particularly, to reducing its visual impact on building surfaces.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Metal panels are being increasingly used to define building surfaces such as roofs and sidewalls. One type of metal panel is a standing seam panel, where the edges of adjacent standing seam panels of the building surface are interconnected in a manner that defines a standing seam. Standing seam panels are expensive compared to other metal panels, and building surfaces defined by metal panels may be more costly than other types of building surface constructions.

Standing seam metal panels for building surfaces are typically formed from relatively thin sheet metal stock. Sheet meal stock is cold-worked to define the desired profile for the panel, as well as to define its pair of oppositely disposed, standing seam-defining longitudinal edges. Generally, a piece of sheet metal is directed through a plurality of sets of forming rollers or forming stations to shape or form the sheet metal into the desired panel configuration (e.g., to define one or more ribs, as well the pair of standing-seam defining longitudinal edges). In any case, standing seam panels, as well as possibly other panels, may include a relatively large, planar or flat base section that may tend to exhibit waviness or other surface irregularities after the panel is installed. This is commonly referred to in the art as “oil canning.” Although oil canning does not necessarily adversely affect the performance of the building surface defined by a plurality of metal panels, many owners and building designers find the aesthetics visually distracting and unacceptable, particularly in view of the premium cost associated with metal panel building surfaces.

Oil canning of metal panels has been addressed by the industry in various ways. In some cases tension (or “stretch”) leveling methods have been used to flatten and straighten the coil material prior to fabrication. This process is expensive, inconvenient, and increases material handling requirements. In other cases, heavier gauge thicknesses of metal are used to “stiffen” the flat area of the panels' profile. This method significantly increases material costs. Another method employed in fabrication is to reduce the width dimension of the panel, thereby reducing the area of the planar base section. This method also increases material costs and significantly changes the architectural effect. Often surface irregularities persist due to the fabrication and installation process, notwithstanding the added process, decreased panel width, or increased panel thickness.

Metal panels have also been fabricated in a manner to address oil canning. One or more small structures have been formed/shaped into the base section(s) of a metal panel to address oil canning. These structures are commonly referred to as crests, minor ribs, intermediate ribs, pencil ribs, striations, fluting, or flutes. While these methods may in some cases reduce some degree of oil canning, often they are not effective. Additionally, some users find these alternative structures themselves aesthetically annoying and undesireable.

Attempts have also been made to address oil canning of metal panels by their manner of installation. One approach has been to use a foam rope, strip, or backer rod centered beneath the flat area of the metal panel to force an “arch” into the flat, base portion of the panel, thus directing the surface undulations into a defined and consistent shape, and thereby reducing the visual distraction. One method of installation is to nail this material to a plywood deck over which the metal panels are installed. Another approach has been to apply backer rod to the under-side of a metal panel prior to being positioned over the plywood deck. This has been done by taping the backer rod to the panel, so that the backer rod is disposed between the tape and the metal panel. These types of installation techniques are cumbersome, time consuming, inconvenient, and subject to human error. Additionally, commonly used “backer rod” structures and materials may not be well-suited to this kind of use.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A first aspect of the present invention is directed to what may be characterized as a panel assembly. This panel assembly includes a metal panel having first and second primary panel surfaces that are oppositely disposed. The first primary panel surface projects toward a substrate when the metal panel is installed over the substrate, while the second primary surface projects away from the substrate when the metal panel is installed over the substrate. A first structure includes a first surface, and this first surface is disposed on and is chemically bonded to the first primary panel surface, which again projects toward or faces the substrate when the metal panel is installed over the substrate. That is, the interface between the first surface of the first structure and the first primary panel surface includes a chemical bond. Generally, this first structure produces a convexity on the second primary panel surface when the metal panel is installed over the substrate (the second primary panel surface again projecting away from the substrate when the metal panel is installed over the substrate). Stated another way, the first structure produces a “crown” or the like on the second primary panel surface when the metal panel is installed over the substrate.

Various refinements exist of the features noted in relation to the first aspect of the present invention. Further features may also be incorporated in the first aspect of the present invention as well. These refinements and additional features may exist individually or in any combination. Generally, the first aspect may be characterized as a panel assembly that addresses oil canning or stress wrinkling by generally directing surface irregularities into a “crown.” That is, the noted convexity in the metal panel provided by the first structure should desirably reduce the visual impact of oil canning or stress wrinkling of the metal panel.

The metal panel used by the panel assembly of the first aspect may be of any appropriate size, shape, configuration, and/or type (e.g., of an at least generally rectangular profile in plan view; at least generally pie-shaped in plan view, for instance to define a silo on a roof). In one embodiment, the metal panel has first and second longitudinal edges configured to define a standing seam when appropriately interconnected with an adjacent panel (e.g., the metal panel may include a pair of laterally spaced standing seam sections of any appropriate configuration/type and which define the noted first and second longitudinal edges). However, the metal panel could be of other configurations, such as metal panels that are used to define what is at least sometimes referred to as a trapezoidal ribbed or lap-seam metal panel surface in the construction industry. It should be noted that the first aspect is directed to the panel assembly, and does not require the combination of a panel assembly and a substrate over which it may be installed. Therefore, the first aspect encompasses the panel assembly both prior to and after its installation. Moreover, this panel assembly may be used to define a roofing surface, a soffit surface, a siding surface, or any other appropriate building surface when installed over an appropriate substrate. It should also be appreciated that the panel assembly is applicable to both interior and exterior building surfaces.

The first surface of the first structure may be chemically bonded directly to the metal panel in any appropriate manner in the case of the first aspect such that the interface between the first surface of the first structure and the first primary panel surface includes a chemical bond. In one embodiment, an adhesive may be appropriately disposed between the first surface of the first structure and the first primary panel surface (e.g., the adhesive could be disposed on the first primary panel surface, on the first surface of the first structure, or both). Another option would be to dispose double-sided tape or the like between the first primary panel surface and the first surface of the first structure. Another option would be to dispense an appropriate material (e.g., in a liquid-like or paste-like state or form; in the form of a “bead”) on the metal panel in any appropriate manner, where this dispensation would both chemically bond the material to the first primary panel surface and at least eventually define the first structure (possibly after being allowed to air cure, possibly after some type of post-processing or the like (e.g., a heat treatment), or both). Another option would be to form the first structure (e.g., extrusion) and to thereafter position the first structure onto the metal panel while still in a “wet” or “uncured” state such that a chemical bond will exist/develop between the opposing surfaces of the first structure and the first primary panel surface. Yet another option would be to move the metal panel relative to a supply of the first structure (e.g., a “roll” of the first structure) while positioning or dispensing the first structure on the metal panel. In this case, an appropriate adhesive could be applied to the metal panel, an appropriate adhesive could be applied to the first structure before being positioned on the metal panel, or both. It also may be possible to have pre-applied adhesive to the first structure in some manner prior to being transferred to its supply position. It may also be possible to incorporate a material with an inborne adhesive or adhesive characteristic within the composition of the first structure.

The first structure could be mounted to the metal panel at any appropriate time in the case of the first aspect, including without limitation in any of the above-noted manners. For instance, the first structure could be mounted to the metal panel at the job site. Another option would be to mount the first structure to the metal panel as part of the overall fabrication of the metal panel or at least in a “plant” environment. Consider the case where a piece of sheet metal is directed through one or more sets of rollers or the like to shape the sheet metal into the desired end configuration for the metal panel. The first structure could be formed/mounted on the first primary panel surface of the metal panel at any appropriate point in the fabrication process (e.g., prior to roll forming; in tandem with roll forming; subsequent to roll forming). For instance, an appropriate material could be dispensed in any appropriate manner (e.g., using a nozzle) onto the metal panel as the metal panel is being advanced relative to a supply of this material, again where this material will chemically bond to the first primary panel surface and at least eventually will define the first structure. Another option would be for an appropriate adhesive or the like to be dispensed onto the metal panel as the metal panel is being advanced relative to the adhesive source, and some time thereafter the first structure may be positioned over this adhesive (e.g., as the metal panel is being advanced relative to the first structure). Another option would be for the first structure, with pre-applied adhesive or the like or itself having adhesive-like characteristics (e.g., in the form of double-sided adhesive tape; with the first structure incorporating an inborne adhesive or the like within its composition; with the first structure being in a “wet” or “uncured” state, such that when it is disposed on the panel and thereafter cures, a chemical bond will develop/exist between the opposing surfaces of the first structure and the first primary panel surface), to be positioned on the metal panel as the metal panel is being advanced relative to the first structure. Yet another option would be to dispense an appropriate adhesive or the like onto the first structure, and to thereafter position this first structure on the metal panel as the metal panel is being advanced relative to the first structure. Once again, adhesive could be applied to both the metal panel and the first structure.

Various characterizations may be made in relation to the first structure used by the panel assembly of the first aspect. One is that the first structure may be disposed between first and second protruding structures that are linearly extending and that protrude at least generally away from the substrate when the metal panel is installed over the substrate. In this case, the apex of the convexity on the second primary panel surface provided by the first structure may extend at least generally along a line that is disposed at least generally parallel with the noted first and second protruding structures of the metal panel. Each of the first and second protruding structures may be in the form of a standing seam section at one of the two longitudinal edges of the metal panel (a standing seam section being that structure of the metal panel that interconnects with a standing seam section of another metal panel to collectively define a standing seam), may be in the form of a rib, or may be any other appropriate protruding structure. The term “rib” encompasses a protruding structure of any size, shape, configuration, and/or type that is located somewhere between the two longitudinal edges of the metal panels, whether characterized as a crest, minor rib, intermediate rib, pencil rib, striation, fluting, or flute. The metal panel may include any appropriate number of ribs between its first and second longitudinal edges, regardless of whether the first and second longitudinal edges are associated with standing seam sections or not.

The first structure may also be a linearly extending structure when installed on the first primary panel surface, and further may be disposed at least generally parallel with the above-noted first and second protruding structures in the case of the first aspect. In one embodiment, a center-to-center distance or spacing between the noted first and second protruding structures is at least about 12 inches, and the first structure is mounted to a flat base section that extends or spans the entire distance between these first and second protruding structures. For instance, the first structure may at least generally bisect this flat base section in a dimension corresponding with the spacing between the first and second protruding structures.

Another characterization that may be made in relation to the metal panel used by the first aspect is that it may include first and second longitudinal edges that are laterally spaced, as well as first and second transverse or lateral edges that are longitudinally spaced and that each extend between and interconnect the first and second longitudinal edges, and where the first structure extends at least generally from the first transverse edge to at least generally the second transverse edge (e.g., the first structure could terminate at or within a few inches of the noted transverse edges). Yet another characterization is that the first structure may be disposed on a flat base section or the like of the metal panel (e.g., a flat region between an adjacent pair of raised ribs or the like that may be incorporated into the structure of the metal panel; between an adjacent pair of protruding structures (e.g., standing seam sections; ribs) that extend or protrude at least generally away from the substrate when the metal panel is installed over the substrate, including both where the adjacent pair of protruding structures are of a common type (e.g., a pair of standing seam sections; a pair of ribs) and where the adjacent pair of protruding structures are not a common type (e.g., a standing seam section and a rib). It may be desirable for the first structure to at least generally bisect this base section in the lateral dimension (e.g., a dimension extending from the above-noted first longitudinal edge to the above-noted second longitudinal edge of the metal panel).

The first structure used by the panel assembly of the first aspect may be of any appropriate size, shape, configuration, and/or type, and may be formed from any appropriate material or combination of materials (e.g., a foam; plastic foam; rubber foam; synthetic foam; or any other flexible rope-like material). In one embodiment, the first structure is in the form of what is referred to as “backer rod” in the construction industry. Backer rod is generally intended for use as a caulking backer within a joint, but has been adapted to other purposes as well. The first structure may also be characterized as a compressible structure. Generally, the first structure should be sufficiently compressible so that the first structure will not bend or otherwise permanently deform the metal panel when under normal design loads. In this regard, there may be a gap between the metal panel and the substrate when the meal panel is installed over the substrate. The height or thickness of the first structure would then have to be greater than the height of this gap to produce the desired convexity on the second primary panel surface. In any case, it would be desirable for the first structure to at least temporarily compress if the metal panel experiences a normal design load (e.g., a person walking on the panel) so that the first structure would not bend or permanently deform the metal panel in this instance. Although the first structure could be elastic, such need not be the case. That is, after undergoing a compression, the first structure would not necessarily have to assume its original configuration once the load is removed (although an elastic first structure is of course encompassed by the first aspect), but preferably the first structure would at least move back toward its original configuration (e.g., by a subsequent expansion) upon experiencing a reduction in the applied load.

In one embodiment of the first aspect, the first surface of the first structure is flat prior to being positioned on the first primary panel surface. Although the first structure could be fabricated in any appropriate manner to realize the desired shape/configuration, in one embodiment the first structure is an extrusion (e.g., compressible/expandable foam). The first structure also could include a second surface that is disposed oppositely of the first surface and that is also flat prior to interfacing with a substrate when the metal panel is installed over the substrate. A pair of opposing sidewalls extending between these flat first and second surfaces of the first structure could be flat or curved (e.g., convexly-shaped). The first structure also could be “solid” in cross-section, or the first structure could include one or more apertures that extend along its length dimension (e.g., the first structure could be in the form of a tube; the first structure could be hollow).

In another embodiment of the first aspect, the first structure is positioned on the first primary panel surface while the first structure is in a “wet” or “uncured” state. This may provide for a suitable chemical bond between the opposing first structure and the first primary panel surface—that is, such that the interface between the first surface of the first structure and the first primary panel surface includes a chemical bond. This may also allow the first structure to deform to a certain extent by placing the first structure into contact with the metal panel (and possibly placing the same in compression to a degree) such that a flat surface is formed on the portion of the first structure that interfaces with the first primary panel surface.

A second aspect of the present invention is directed to a panel assembly. This panel assembly includes a panel having first and second primary panel surfaces that are oppositely disposed. The first primary panel surface projects toward a substrate when the panel is installed over the substrate, while the second primary panel surface projects away from the substrate when the panel is installed over the substrate. The panel also includes at least two protruding structures that are linearly extending and that protrude at least generally away from the substrate when the panel is installed over the substrate. A first structure includes a first surface, and this first surface is disposed on and is chemically bonded to the first primary panel surface at a location that is somewhere between the first and second protruding structures. That is, the interface between the first surface of the first structure and the first primary panel surface includes a chemical bond. Again, the first primary panel surface projects toward or faces the substrate when the panel is installed over the substrate. Generally, this first structure produces a convexity on the second primary panel surface somewhere between the first and second protruding structures when the panel is installed over the substrate (again, where the second primary panel surface projects or faces away from the substrate when the panel is installed over the substrate).

Various refinements exist of the features noted in relation to the second aspect of the present invention. Further features may also be incorporated in the second aspect of the present invention as well. These refinements and additional features may exist individually or in any combination. Generally, the second aspect may be characterized as a panel assembly that addresses oil canning or stress wrinkling. That is, the convexity in the standing seam panel provided by the first structure should desirably reduce the visual impact of oil canning or stress wrinkling of the panel by generally directing surface irregularities into a “crown.”

The various features discussed above in relation to the first aspect may be used by this second aspect as well, individually or in any combination. Each of the noted first and second protruding structures may be of any appropriate size, shape, configuration, and/or form. For instance, one or both of these first and second protruding structures could be in the form of a standing seam section at one of the two longitudinal edges of the panel. One or both of these first and second protruding structures also could be in the form of a rib (as defined above in relation to the first aspect) that is somewhere between the two longitudinal edges of the panel (regardless of whether in the form of a standing seam section or not). Typically, the two longitudinal edges of the panel, any rib located between these two longitudinal edges, and the first structure will be disposed in at least substantially parallel relation to each other.

A third aspect of the present invention is generally directed to a panel assembly having a panel and a first structure. The panel includes first and second primary panel surfaces that are disposed opposite of each other (e.g., on opposite “sides” of the panel). The first primary panel surface projects toward a substrate when the panel is installed over the substrate, while the second primary panel surface projects away from the substrate when the panel is installed over the substrate. The panel also includes first and second protruding structures that are linearly extending and that protrude at least generally away from the substrate when the panel is installed over the substrate. The noted first structure is hollow and interfaces with the first primary panel surface at least when the panel is installed over the substrate so as to produce a convexity on the second primary panel surface somewhere between the first and second protruding structures. The various features discussed above in relation to the first aspect may also be used by this third aspect, individually or in any combination. However, the first structure may be integrated with the panel or substrate in any appropriate manner (e.g., a chemical bond is not required between the opposing surfaces of the first structure and the panel in the case of the third aspect, or stated another way, the interface between the first surface of the first structure and the first primary panel surface need not include a chemical bond in the case of the third aspect).

The first through the third aspects encompass a panel assembly prior to being installed over a substrate, as well as a panel assembly after it has been installed over a substrate. Representative examples of panel assemblies used in combination with a substrate will now be presented. The panel assemblies of the first through the third aspects may be used with the types of substrates that will now be discussed in relation to any of the fourth through the sixth aspects, and further otherwise may be used in accordance with any of the fourth through the sixth aspects where appropriate.

A fourth aspect of the present invention is embodied by a building or other appropriate surface (e.g., roof; siding; soffit; interiorly disposed; exteriorly disposed) that includes a substrate, a panel, and a first structure, and thereby encompasses the resulting building surface as well as the method of defining this building surface. The panel includes first and second primary panel surfaces that are disposed opposite of each other (e.g., on opposite “sides” of the panel). The first primary panel surface projects toward the substrate when the panel is installed over the substrate, while the second primary panel surface projects away from the substrate when the panel is installed over the substrate. The panel also includes first and second protruding structures that are linearly extending and that protrude at least generally away from the substrate when the panel is installed over the substrate. The noted first structure includes a first surface that is flat prior to the first structure being disposed in interfacing or opposing relation with either the substrate or the first primary panel surface. Another portion of the first structure engages the other of the substrate and the first primary panel surface so that the first structure produces a convexity on the second primary panel surface somewhere between the first and second protruding structures. The various features discussed above in relation to the first aspect may also be used by this fourth aspect, individually or in any combination. The various features that will now be discussed in relation to a fifth aspect of the present invention also may be used by this fourth aspect, individually or in any combination. However, it should be appreciated that the first structure may be integrated with the panel or substrate in any appropriate manner in the case of the fourth aspect (e.g., a chemical bond is not required between opposing surfaces of the first structure and either of the panel or substrate in the case of the fourth aspect, or stated another way, the interface between the first surface of the first structure and either the first primary panel surface or the substrate need not include a chemical bond in the case of the fourth aspect).

A fifth aspect of the present invention is embodied by a building or other appropriate surface (e.g., roof; siding; soffit; interiorly disposed; exteriorly disposed) that includes a substrate, a panel, and a first structure, and thereby encompasses the resulting building surface as well as the method of defining this building surface. The panel includes first and second primary panel surfaces that are oppositely disposed, where the first primary panel surface projects toward or faces the substrate, and where the second primary panel surface projects away from the substrate. The first structure includes a first surface, and this first surface is disposed on and is chemically bonded to one of the first primary panel surface and the substrate, again where the first primary panel surface projects toward or faces the substrate. That is, the interface between the first surface of the first structure and either the first primary panel surface or the substrate includes a chemical bond. Generally, this first structure produces a convexity on the second primary panel surface (again, where the second primary panel projects away from the substrate).

Various refinements exist of the features noted in relation to the fifth aspect of the present invention. Further features may also be incorporated in the fifth aspect of the present invention as well. These refinements and additional features may exist individually or in any combination. Generally, the fifth aspect may be characterized as addressing oil canning or stress wrinkling. That is, the convexity in the panel provided by the first structure should desirably reduce the visual impact of oil canning or stress wrinkling of the panel by generally directing surface irregularities into a “crown.” In any case, the various features discussed above in relation to the first aspect may also be used by this fifth aspect where appropriate, individually or in any combination.

The substrate in the case of the fifth aspect may be of any appropriate size, shape, configuration, and/or type, and further may be formed from any appropriate material or combination of materials. The substrate may be in the form of a plywood deck or the like, a metal deck or the like, a deck defined by one or more foam boards or the like, as well as a deck defined by wood, concrete, or any other appropriate material/structure. A membrane or the like may be disposed between the above-noted types of structures and the panel, and thereby may be characterized as the substrate for purposes of this fifth aspect. In any case, the substrate will typically be in the form of a flat surface. Generally, the substrate may be characterized as that structure that is disposed directly underneath the panel, or that structure that, in combination with the panel, “sandwiches” the first structure therebetween.

The building surface of the fifth aspect may be in any appropriate location in relation to the building. For instance, the building surface of the fifth aspect encompasses both interior and exterior surfaces. Moreover, this building surface may define any appropriate surface, such as an interior wall or ceiling, exterior siding, a roof, or a soffit. In one embodiment, the roof has a pitch and the panel is installed such that its first and second longitudinal edges run at least generally up/down the pitch of the roof (e.g., the first and second longitudinal edges may be disposed at least generally perpendicularly to a peak of the roof). Another way to characterize the positioning of the first and second longitudinal edges of the panel on the roof is that they may be disposed in a vertical reference plane, they may be oriented such that the elevation of the first and second longitudinal edges progressively changes proceeding along their length dimension, or both.

The first surface of the first structure may be chemically bonded directly to the relevant structure prior to disposing the panel over the substrate. One embodiment has the first surface of the first structure being chemically bonded directly to the substrate prior to disposing the panel over the substrate such that the interface between the first surface of the first structure and the substrate includes a chemical bond. In this case, the panel would be in contact with the first structure, but preferably would be movable relative to the first structure (e.g., preferably the first structure is not bonded to both the panel and the substrate). Another embodiment has the first surface of the first structure being chemically bonded directly to the first primary panel surface prior to disposing the panel over the substrate such that the interface between the first surface of the first structure and the first primary panel surface includes a chemical bond. In this case, the panel would be in contact with the substrate, but would be movable relative to the substrate. The first surface of the first structure may be chemically bonded directly to the relevant structure at least generally in any of the manners discussed above in relation to the first aspect.

A sixth aspect of the present invention is embodied by a building or other appropriate surface (e.g., roof; siding; soffit; interiorly disposed; exteriorly disposed) that includes a substrate, a panel, and a first structure, and thereby encompasses the resulting building surface as well as the method of defining this building surface. The panel includes first and second primary panel surfaces that are oppositely disposed, where the first primary panel surface projects toward or faces the substrate, and where the second primary panel surface projects away from the substrate. The first structure is disposed between the panel and the substrate so as to produce a convexity on the second primary panel surface. In a first embodiment of the sixth aspect, the first structure includes a flat first surface prior to this first surface being disposed in interfacing or opposing relation with either the panel or substrate. The first surface of the first structure could be chemically bonded directly to the panel or the substrate in accordance with the fifth aspect such that the interface between the first surface of the first structure and either the panel or the substrate includes a chemical bond, although the first structure could be mounted to the panel and/or substrate in any appropriate manner in the case of the first embodiment of the sixth aspect. In a second embodiment of the sixth aspect, the first structure is hollow. The first surface of the first structure could be chemically bonded directly to the panel or the substrate in accordance with the fifth aspect such that the interface between the first surface of the first structure and either the panel or the substrate includes a chemical bond, although the first structure could be mounted to the panel and/or substrate in any appropriate manner in the case of the second embodiment of the sixth aspect.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a conventional standing seam roof.

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional schematic of one of the standing seams of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a schematic of a standing seam panel installed over a deck using a first structure to address oil canning or stress wrinkling of the panel.

FIG. 4 is a top view of the standing seam panel of FIG. 3, and without illustrating the underlying deck.

FIG. 5A is an end view of the first structure illustrated in FIG. 3.

FIG. 5B is an end view of an alternative configuration for the first structure of FIG. 5A.

FIG. 5C is an end view of another alternative configuration for the first structure of FIG. 5A.

FIG. 6A is an alternative configuration for a standing seam panel (two base sections) that may be used in combination with any of the first structures of FIGS. 5A-C to address oil canning or stress wrinkling of the panel.

FIG. 6B is an alternative configuration for a standing seam panel (three base sections) that may be used in combination with any of the first structures of FIGS. 5A-C to address oil canning or stress wrinkling of the panel.

FIG. 7A is a schematic of a standing seam defined by the interconnection of a pair of standing seam sections of the type used by the standing seam panel of FIG. 3.

FIGS. 7B-G are various alternative standing seam profiles/configurations for standing seam panels that may be used in combination with a first structure to address oil canning or stress wrinkling.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1 illustrates a representative roof 12 of a building. The roof 12 may be of any pitch, but at least generally slopes downwardly from a peak 14 of the roof 12 to an eave 16 of the roof 12. Multiple panels 22 (e.g., metal) are interconnected to define the roof 12. The interconnection of adjacent panels 22 defines a standing seam 18. The length dimension of each standing seam 18 extends from the peak 14 of the roof 12 to the eave 16 of the roof 12, and furthermore the elevation of the various standing seams 18 progressively changes proceeding along their respective length dimensions. Each panel 22 includes a flat, planar base 20 that is disposed between each adjacent pair of standing seams 18. The standing seams 18 may be further characterized as extending at least generally away from the bases 20 that are disposed on each side of the relevant standing seam 18 (FIG. 2, where an upper end 19 of the standing seam 18 is vertically spaced from the adjacent bases 20 of the panels 22). The panels 22 may be of any appropriate configuration, the standing seams 18 may be of any appropriate configuration, and the standing seams 18 may be disposed in any appropriate orientation relative to the adjacent bases 20.

FIG. 3 illustrates one embodiment of a building or any other appropriate surface 70. The building surface 70 is applicable to both interior and exterior surfaces. Moreover, the building surface 70 may be incorporated at any appropriate location, such as an interior wall or ceiling, a roof, siding, or a soffit. In any case, the building surface 70 is defined by a plurality of what may be characterized as panel assemblies 40 (only one being illustrated in FIG. 3 and in the form of a panel 42 and a first structure 60, where multiple panels 42 would be at least generally interconnected in the manner discussed above in relation to the roof 12) that are installed over an appropriate substrate or deck 72. Portions of the substrate 72 are removed in FIG. 3 to highlight the illustration of at least certain portions of the panel assembly 40. The substrate 72 is a flat or planar structure, and may be formed/constructed in any appropriate manner. Typically the substrate 72 will be in the form of plywood sheets that are nailed to the rafters or other underlying supports of the building surface 70. However, the substrate 72 could be in the form of a metal deck or the like, a deck defined by one or more foam boards or the like, as well as a deck defined by wood, concrete, or any other appropriate material/structure. Moreover, a membrane or the like may be disposed between the above-noted types of structures and the panel 42 of the panel assembly 40, and thereby itself may be characterized as the substrate 72. Generally, the substrate 72 may be characterized as that structure that is disposed directly underneath the panel 42, or that structure that, in combination with the panel 42, “sandwiches” the first structure 60 of the panel assembly 40 therebetween.

The panel assembly 40 includes a panel 42, which is illustrated in both FIG. 3 and FIG. 4. The illustrated panel 42 is in the form of what is commonly referred to as a standing seam panel 42 based upon the manner in which it is interconnected with adjacent panels 42 to define the building surface 70. However, the panel 42 may be of any appropriate configuration in relation to the manner in which it is assembled to define a building surface. Although the panel 42 could be formed from any appropriate material, typically the panel 42 will be formed from an appropriate metal. In any case, the panel 42 includes a first primary panel surface 44 that projects toward or faces the substrate 72 when the panel assembly 40 is installed over the substrate 72. A second primary panel surface 46 is disposed oppositely of the first primary panel surface 44, and thereby faces or projects at least generally away from the substrate 72 when the panel assembly 40 is installed over the substrate 72.

The panel 42 includes a pair of longitudinal edges 48 a, 48 b that extend in what may be characterized as a longitudinal dimension. In the illustrated embodiment, the longitudinal edges 48 a, 48 b are in the form of standing seam sections 48 a, 48 b. The standing seam sections 48 a, 48 b each may be of any appropriate configuration (e.g., FIGS. 7A-G), and may be disposed in any appropriate orientation so as to be able to interconnect with an adjacent panel 42 when the panels 42 are installed over the substrate 72 and that will define a standing seam (e.g., standing seams 49 a-g of FIGS. 7A-G, respectively). However and in accordance with the foregoing, the longitudinal edges 48 a, 48 b need not be in the form of standing seam sections.

In the case where the building surface 70 of FIG. 3 is in the form of a roof, the roof may have a pitch and the panel 42 will typically be installed such that its longitudinal edges 48 a, 48 b run at least generally up/down the pitch of the roof (e.g., the longitudinal edges 48 a, 48 b may be disposed at least generally perpendicularly to a peak of the roof; the longitudinal edges 48 a, 48 b may extend from a peak of the roof to an eave of the roof). Another way to characterize the positioning/orientation of the longitudinal edges 48 a, 48 b of the panel 42 on the building surface 70 in the form of a roof is that they may be disposed in a vertical reference plane, the longitudinal edges 48 a, 48 b may be oriented such that the elevation of the longitudinal edges 48 a, 48 b progressively changes proceeding along their respective length dimensions, or both.

Extending between and interconnecting the longitudinal edges or standing seam sections 48 a, 48 b of the panel 42 is a pair of transverse or lateral edges 50. The longitudinal edges or standing seam sections 48 a, 48 b may be characterized as being longitudinally extending and spaced in a lateral dimension. The transverse edges 50 thereby may be characterized as being laterally extending and spaced in a longitudinal dimension. In the illustrated embodiment, the longitudinal edges or standing seam sections 48 a, 48 b are parallel to each other, as are the transverse edges 50, although such may not be required in all instances.

A base section 54 is disposed between the longitudinal edges or standing seam sections 48 a, 48 b in the case of the panel 42, and is a flat or planar structure. The width dimension of the base section 54 coincides with the dimension in which the longitudinal edges or standing seam sections 48 a, 48 b of the panel 42 are spaced from each other in the illustrated embodiment (again, where the longitudinal edges or standing seam sections 48 a, 48 b each define a standing seam 49 a in the illustrated embodiment when appropriately interconnected with an adjacent panel 42 and as illustrated in FIG. 7A), and corresponds with the dimension “W” in FIG. 3. The base section 54 of the panel 42 is particularly susceptible to oil canning or stress wrinkling. It should be appreciated that the panel 42 could be configured to include more than one base section 54 (not shown in FIG. 3, but see FIGS. 6A-B to be discussed below) by including one or more “ribs” (discussed below) between the longitudinal edges or standing seam sections 48 a, 48 b.

The panel assembly 40 further includes an associated first structure 60 that is disposed between the substrate 72 and first primary panel surface 44 of the associated panel 42. In one embodiment, the first structure 60 is at least generally in the form of a foam (e.g., a material of the type that is typically used to define backer rod). Although the first structure 60 may be fabricated in any appropriate manner, in one embodiment the first structure 60 is extruded, such that it may be referred to as an extrusion.

The first structure 60 may be formed from any appropriate material or combination of materials, may be of any appropriate size, shape, configuration, and cross-sectional profile, or both, so long as the first structure 60 provides a desired convexity for the second primary panel surface 46 in a manner that will be discussed in more detail below. However, generally it would be desirable for the first structure 60 to be sufficiently compressible so that the first structure 60 will not bend or otherwise permanently deform the panel 42 when under normal design loads. It would be desirable for the first structure 60 to at least temporarily compress if the panel 42 experiences a normal design load (e.g., a person walking on the panel 42) so that the first structure 60 would not bend or permanently deform the panel 42 in this instance. Although the first structure 60 could be elastic, such need not be the case. That is, after undergoing a compression by the panel 42 being exposed to a load, the first structure 60 would not necessarily have to assume its original configuration once the load is removed or reduced (although the first structure 60 could in fact be elastic), but preferably the first structure 60 would at least move back toward its original configuration (e.g., by a subsequent expansion) upon experiencing a removal/reduction of the applied load.

Referring now to FIGS. 3, 4, and 5A, a first surface 62 of the first structure 60 faces and may be in direct contact with the first primary panel surface 44 (such that the first surface 62 and the first primary panel surface 44 are in opposing relation), while an oppositely disposed second surface 64 faces and may be in direct contact with the substrate 72 (such that the second surface 64 and the first primary panel surface 44 are in opposing relation). The interface between the first surface 62 and the first primary panel surface 44, the interface between the second surface 62 and the substrate 72, or both, may include an adhesive (e.g., such that there may not be direct contact between the first structure 60 and the relevant structure). In any case, both the first surface 62 and the second surface 64 are flat in the illustrated embodiment prior to being disposed in opposing relation with the corresponding structure, or with the first structure 60 being in an uncompressed state. The sidewalls 63 that interconnect the surfaces 62 and 64 are also flat, although other configurations may be appropriate. Typically either the first surface 62 will be chemically bonded to the first primary panel surface 44 such that the interface between the first surface 62 and the first primary panel surface 44 includes a chemical bond, or the second surface 64 of the first structure 60 will be chemically bonded to the substrate 72 such that the interface between the second surface 64 and the substrate 72 includes a chemical bond. That is, typically the first structure 60 will be chemically bonded directly to only one of the panel 42 and the substrate 72. However, the first structure 60 could possibly be chemically bonded directly to each of the panel 42 and substrate 72, although this may in fact be disadvantageous in one or more respects. The first structure 60 may be a solid structure, or may be hollow by including one or more apertures 66 that extend along its length dimension (illustrated by dashed lines in FIG. 5A). Each aperture 66 may be of any appropriate cross-sectional profile, and multiple apertures 66 used by the first structure 60 may be disposed in any appropriate arrangement. When the first structure 60 includes a single aperture of the type shown in FIG. 5A, the first structure 60 may be characterized as a tube or at least as being tube-like.

Any appropriate way of providing a chemical bond between opposing surfaces of the first structure 60 and the panel 42/substrate 72 may be utilized. One appropriate way to provide the noted chemical bond would be via an appropriate adhesive. This adhesive could be applied by the manufacturer of the panel 42 (in which case the first surface 62 of the first structure 60 would be chemically bonded directly to the panel 42), could be applied by a contractor at the job site (in which case the first surface 62 of the first structure 60 could be chemically bonded directly to the panel 42, the substrate 72, or both), or at any other appropriate time. Another appropriate way to provide the noted chemical bond would be to use double-sided tape and in any appropriate manner (e.g., the first surface 62 of the first structure 60 could be chemically bonded directly to the panel 42 prior to arriving at the job site and including being attached by the manufacturer of the panel 42; the first surface 62 of the first structure 60 could be chemically bonded directly to the panel 42 at the job site; the second surface 64 of the first structure 60 could be chemically bonded to the substrate 72 at the job site). It also may be such that the first structure 60 could be formed on the first primary panel surface 44 as part of its overall fabrication process, such as by dispensing an appropriate material onto the first primary panel surface 44 as a piece of sheet metal moves relative to the dispenser (e.g., prior to the sheet metal passing through a roll forming station or the like, where such a roll forming station may utilize a plurality of forming rollers or the like that shape/define the longitudinal edges or standing seam sections 48 a, 48 b; as the sheet metal passes through a roll forming station or the like; after the sheet metal has passed through a roll forming station or the like). This dispensed material may be in the form of a liquid or a paste that may be deposited directly on the panel 42. In any case, it may be such that this deposition would both chemically bond the material to the first primary panel surface 44 and at least eventually define the first structure 60 (possibly after being allowed to air cure, possibly after some type of post-processing or the like (e.g., a heat treatment), or both). Yet another option would be to form the first structure 60 (e.g., by extrusion) and to thereafter position the first structure 60 onto the first primary panel surface 44 while in a “wet” or “uncured” state such that a chemical bond will develop/exist between the interfacing surfaces of the first structure 60 and the first primary panel surface 44.

Any way of mounting the first structure 60 to the panel 42 as part of its overall fabrication process may be utilized as well (e.g., in a roll forming line; in a separate line from the roll forming line). For instance: 1) an appropriate adhesive or the like could be dispensed onto the panel 42 as the panel 42 is being advanced relative to the adhesive source, and at some time thereafter the first structure 60 could be positioned over this adhesive as the panel 42 is being advanced relative to the first structure 60; 2) the first structure 60, with pre-applied adhesive or the like (e.g., in the form of double-sided adhesive tape; an inborne adhesive or adhesive characteristic may be part of the composition of the first structure 60), could be positioned on the panel 42 as the panel 42 is being advanced relative to the first structure 60; 3) an appropriate adhesive or the like could be dispensed onto the first structure 60, and thereafter the first structure 60 could be positioned on the panel 42 as the panel 42 is being advanced relative to the first structure 60; 4) an appropriate adhesive or the like could be dispensed onto the panel 42 as the panel 42 is being advanced relative to the adhesive source, an appropriate adhesive or the like could be dispensed onto the first structure 60, and thereafter the first structure 60 could be positioned on the panel 42 as the panel 42 is being advanced relative to the first structure 60; and 5) the first structure 60 could be formed (e.g., extruded), and while the first structure 60 is still in a “wet” or an “uncured” state, the first structure 60 may be positioned on the first primary panel surface 44 such that a chemical bond will develop/exist between the interfacing surfaces of the first structure 60 and the first primary panel surface 44, and which may also result in a “flattening” of the interfacing surface of the first structure 60 (the surface thereof that interfaces with the first primary panel surface 44)—possibly after placing the first structure 60 in compression to enhance the mounting of the first structure 60 to the panel 42.

The first structure 60 is installed so as to produce a convexity on the second primary panel surface 46 on the base section 54 of the panel 42 and as illustrated in FIG. 3. This desirably addresses oil canning or stress wrinkling of the base section 54. That is, the panel assembly 40 should reduce the visual impact of oil canning or stress wrinkling of the panel 42 when the panel assembly 40 is installed over the substrate 72. In this regard, the first surface 62 of the first structure 60 engages or faces the first primary panel surface 44 (again, the interface may be in the form of an adhesive layer or film), while the second surface 64 of the first structure 60 engages or faces the substrate 72 (again, the interface may be in the form of an adhesive layer or film). Typically the first structure 60 is installed at the lateral midpoint of the base section 54, although other positionings may be appropriate. More than one first structure 60 could be installed on the base section 54 as well. Moreover, typically the first structure 60 extends from at least generally one transverse edge 50 to at least generally the other transverse edge 50 (e.g., to or within a few inches of each transverse edge 50), and furthermore at least in generally parallel relation with the longitudinal edges or standing seam sections 48 a, 48 b that again each define a standing seam 49 a (FIG. 7A) when appropriately interconnected with an adjacent panel 42. Other installed positions may be appropriate.

As noted, the first structure 60 may be of any appropriate cross-sectional configuration. For instance, the first structure 60 could be cylindrical, for instance when the first structure 60 is in a “wet” or “uncured” state when initially disposed on the first primary panel surface 44 and as discussed above. FIGS. 5B and 5C illustrate other representative alternative cross-sectional profiles for the first structure 60. Other than having different cross-sectional profiles, the discussion presented above with regard to the first structure 60 is equally applicable to the first structures 60′ and 60″ of FIGS. 5B and 5C, respectively.

FIG. 5B illustrates that the first structure 60′ includes a single flat first surface 62′ (flat before being disposed in interfacing relation with the relevant structure or with the first structure 60′ being in an uncompressed state) and an oppositely disposed convex or curved second surface 64′, as well as convex or curved sidewalls 63′. Generally, the first structure 60′ may be characterized as a cylindrical rod with a single flat (first surface 62′) formed on its exterior surface. In the illustrated embodiment, the first structure 60′ is semicircular. In any case and in accordance with the first structure 60, the first structure 60′ may include one or more optional apertures 66′ (illustrated by dashed lines). The first surface 62′ could be chemically bonded to the relevant structure (either the first primary panel surface 44 of the panel 42 or the substrate 72). The configuration shown in FIG. 5B may also be realized after a “wet” or “uncured” first structure 60 is disposed on the first primary panel surface 44 in the above-noted manner.

FIG. 5C illustrates that the first structure 60″ includes a flat first surface 62″ (flat before being disposed in interfacing relation with the relevant structure or with the first structure 60″ being in an uncompressed state) and an oppositely disposed flat second surface 64″ (flat before being disposed in interfacing relation with the relevant structure or with the first structure 60″ being in an uncompressed state). Generally, the first structure 60″ may be characterized as a cylindrical rod with a pair of opposing flats (first surface 62″ and second surface 64″) formed on its exterior surface. In this regard, a pair of convex or curved sidewalls 63″ extend between and interconnect the surfaces 62″ and 64″. In accordance with the first structure 60, the first structure 60″ may include one or more optional apertures 66″. Generally, one of the surfaces 62″, 64″ would be disposed in interfacing relation with the first primary panel surface 44 of the panel 42, while the other of the surfaces 62″, 64″ would be disposed in interfacing relation with the substrate 72.

The panel 42 may be installed in any appropriate manner relative to the substrate 72. For instance, the entire first primary panel surface 44 may be disposed in spaced relation to the substrate 72. In this case, the height or thickness of the first structure 60 (including the variations thereof addressed herein) would of course need to be greater than the size of this gap to provide the desired convexity on the second primary panel surface 46. Alternatively and in the absence of the first structure 60 (including the variations thereof addressed herein), the panel 42 may be installed such that the base section 54 of the panel 42 is disposed on the substrate 72. However, the first structure 60 (including the variations thereof addressed herein) will of course dispose at least a portion of the base section 54 in spaced relation to the substrate 72.

The first structure 60 (including the variations thereof addressed herein) may be used with a panel of any appropriate configuration. Representative alternative standing seam panel configurations are illustrated in FIGS. 6A-B. The panel 42 i of FIG. 6A includes a pair of longitudinal edges 48 a i, 48 b i in the form of standing seam sections, and a single rib 53 (a “rib” again being a protruding structure of any appropriate size, shape, and/or configuration that is located between the longitudinal edges of a panel, including without limitation a crest, minor rib, intermediate rib, pencil rib, striation, fluting, or flute) that is disposed midway between these longitudinal edges or standing seam sections 48 a i, 48 b i. The panel 42 i thereby includes two base sections 54 i—one between the rib 53 and each of the two longitudinal edges or standing seam sections 48 a i, 48 b i. One or more first structures 60 (or any of the variations thereof addressed herein) may be disposed so as to interface with the first primary panel surface 44 i in each of the base sections 54 i to produce a convexity on the second primary panel surface 46 i at least generally in accordance with the foregoing.

The panel 42 ii of FIG. 6B includes a pair of longitudinal edges 48 a ii, 48 b ii in the form of standing seam sections, and two or more ribs 53 (of any appropriate size, shape, and/or configuration) that are typically equally spaced between these longitudinal edges or standing seam sections 48 a ii, 48 b ii. The panel 42 ii thereby includes at least three base sections 54 ii—one between each rib 53 and the adjacent longitudinal edge or standing seam section 48 a ii, 48 ii, and another between each adjacent pair of ribs 53. One or more first structures 60 (or any of the variations thereof addressed herein) may be disposed so as to interface with the first primary panel surface 44 ii in each of the base sections 54 ii to produce a convexity on the second primary panel surface 46 ii at least generally in accordance with the foregoing.

As noted above, longitudinal edges in the form of standing seam sections 48 a, 48 b each may be of any appropriate size, shape, and/or configuration. FIG. 7A illustrates a pair of standing seam panels that are of the type illustrated in FIG. 3 and that are interconnected to define a standing seam 49 a. FIGS. 7B-7G illustrate representative, alternative standing seams 49 b-g defined by the interconnection of the standing seam sections of a pair of adjacent standing seam panels. The standing seam section configurations illustrated in FIGS. 7A-G may be used in relation to any of the panels described herein, where a first structure is used in combination with this panel to provide a convexity on its second primary panel surface to address oil canning.

Summarizing the foregoing, a first structure is disposed in opposing relation with a first primary panel surface of a panel somewhere between an adjacent pair of protruding structures (e.g., a standing seam section; a rib) to produce a convexity on the second primary panel surface, where each protruding structure is both linearly extending and protrudes at least generally away from the substrate when the panel is installed over the substrate. Therefore, the longitudinal edges or standing seam sections 48 a, 48 b (as well as the variations thereof addressed herein) and the ribs 53 would each be such a protruding structure. A first structure could be disposed between an adjacent pair of protruding structures of a common type, or between protruding structures of different types. Typically, the first structure will be disposed on a flat base section between an adjacent pair of protruding structures, where the center-to-center spacing between these protruding structures is at least about 12 inches. Although these protruding structures may be associated with a standing seam panel to address oil canning, the first structure may be used in relation to any panel having at least two protruding structures of the type discussed herein to address oil canning as well.

The foregoing description of the present invention has been presented for purposes of illustration and description. Furthermore, the description is not intended to limit the invention to the form disclosed herein. Consequently, variations and modifications commensurate with the above teachings, and skill and knowledge of the relevant art, are within the scope of the present invention. The embodiments described hereinabove are further intended to explain best modes known of practicing the invention and to enable others skilled in the art to utilize the invention in such, or other embodiments and with various modifications required by the particular application(s) or use(s) of the present invention. It is intended that the appended claims be construed to include alternative embodiments to the extent permitted by the prior art.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8146299Jun 22, 2011Apr 3, 2012Vermont Slate & Copper Services, Inc.Roofing grommet forming a seal between a roof-mounted structure and a roof
US8151522Jun 22, 2011Apr 10, 2012Vermont Slate & Copper Services, Inc.Roofing system and method
US8153700Mar 19, 2010Apr 10, 2012Vermont Slate & Copper Services, Inc.Roofing system and method
US8166713Oct 12, 2011May 1, 2012Vermont Slate & Copper Services, Inc.Roofing system and method
US8181398Oct 11, 2011May 22, 2012Vermont Slate & Copper Services, Inc.Roofing system and method
US8209914Oct 28, 2010Jul 3, 2012Vermont Slate & Copper Services, Inc.Roofing grommet forming a seal between a roof-mounted structure and a roof
US8272174Oct 11, 2011Sep 25, 2012Vermont Slate & Copper Services, Inc.Roofing grommet forming a seal between a roof-mounted structure and a roof
US8312678 *Aug 17, 2009Nov 20, 2012Haddock Robert M MRoof framing structure using triangular structural framing
US8448407Dec 12, 2011May 28, 2013Gregory M. WienerRoof mounting assembly
US8631629May 13, 2013Jan 21, 2014Gregory M. WienerRoof mounting assembly
US8656649Nov 2, 2012Feb 25, 2014Robert M. M. HaddockRoof framing structure using triangular structural framing
US20130145711 *Dec 12, 2012Jun 13, 2013Robert M.M. HaddockMounting device using opposing seam fasteners for hollow rib standing seam panels
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/309.4
International ClassificationE04C1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04D3/366, E04C2/08, E04D3/30, E04D3/363, E04D3/364
European ClassificationE04C2/08, E04D3/366, E04D3/363, E04D3/30, E04D3/364