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Publication numberUS20070294319 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/449,163
Publication dateDec 20, 2007
Filing dateJun 8, 2006
Priority dateJun 8, 2006
Publication number11449163, 449163, US 2007/0294319 A1, US 2007/294319 A1, US 20070294319 A1, US 20070294319A1, US 2007294319 A1, US 2007294319A1, US-A1-20070294319, US-A1-2007294319, US2007/0294319A1, US2007/294319A1, US20070294319 A1, US20070294319A1, US2007294319 A1, US2007294319A1
InventorsUdgith A. Mankad, Christophe A.D. Balczunas
Original AssigneeEmc Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for processing a database replica
US 20070294319 A1
Abstract
A computer system for mounting a replica of a database. The computer system includes a first instance of a database operating in a first environment. The first instance has allocated to it a first amount of a resource. A replica of this first instance is created and a second instance of the database is created from this replica. The second instance is created in a second environment and has allocated to it a second amount of the resource. The second amount of the resource is different from the first amount of the resource.
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Claims(20)
1. A method for use with a computer system, the computer system comprising a first instance of a database operating in a first environment, the first instance having allocated thereto a first amount of a resource, the method comprising:
creating a replica of the first instance of the database; and
establishing from the replica a second instance of the database in a second environment, the second instance having allocated thereto a second amount of the resource, the second amount of the resource being different from the first amount of the resource.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the database has a parameter that specifies allocation of the resource, the parameter having a first value for the first instance; and
wherein establishing the second instance comprises establishing the second instance with the parameter having a second value, different from the first value.
3. The method of claim 2, wherein the replica includes the first value of the parameter; and
the method further comprises modifying the replica to replace the first value with the second value.
4. The method of claim 3, wherein establishing the second instance of the database comprises mounting the modified replica in the second environment.
5. The method of claim 2, wherein the database has a second parameter having a third value in the first instance and wherein establishing the second instance comprises establishing the second instance with the same third value of the second parameter.
6. The method of claim 2, wherein the first instance of the database comprises an instance of a database application, and wherein the first parameter specifies the amount of memory allocated to the instance of the database application.
7. The method of claim 6, wherein the instance of the database application is a first instance of a database application and the second instance of the database has a second instance of the database application, and the method further comprises:
operating the first instance of the database in the first environment on a first device with a first amount of memory allocated to the first instance of the database application; and
operating the second instance of the database in the second environment on a second device with a second amount of memory allocated to the second instance of the database application.
8. The method of claim 1, wherein the first instance of the database is on a first device and the second instance of the database is established on a second device, the method further comprising, on the second device:
establishing from a second replica an instance of a second database; and
operating the second instance of the database and the instance of the second database concurrently.
9. The method of claim 8, wherein operating the second instance of the database and the instance of the second database comprises running a report on each of the second instance and the instance of the second database.
10. A method for use with a computer system, the computer system comprising a first instance of a database operating in a first environment, the first instance having allocated thereto a first amount of a resource, the method comprising:
establishing a second instance of the database in a second environment based on a replica of the first instance, the replica having a first value of a parameter specifying the first amount of the resource, the second instance having a second value of the parameter so that a second amount of the resource, different from the first amount, is allocated to the second instance.
11. The method of claim 10, wherein the first instance is associated with a first initialization file, the first initialization file comprising the value of the parameter specifying the first amount of the resource; and
wherein establishing the second instance comprises mounting the replica in a second environment using a second initialization file, the second initialization file comprising the second value of the parameter.
12. The method of claim 11, further comprising creating the second initialization file by editing the first initialization file.
13. The method of claim 11, further comprising creating the second initialization file by selectively combing values from the first initialization file and override values.
14. At least one computer-readable medium for use with a computer system comprising a first instance of a database operating in a first environment, the first instance having allocated thereto a first amount of a resource, the at least one computer-readable medium having stored thereon computer-executable instructions for:
creating a replica of the first instance of the database; and
establishing from the replica a second instance of the database in a second environment, the second instance having allocated thereto a second amount of the resource, the second amount of the resource being different from the first amount of the resource.
15. The at least one computer-readable medium of claim 14, wherein the first instance of the database comprises a first instance of a database application and database data, and the replica comprises:
a first data structure stored on the at least one computer-readable media, the first data structure comprising a plurality of fields, each field for storing an identification of a component containing an image of a portion of the database data in the first instance of the database;
a second data structure stored on the at least one computer-readable media, the second data structure comprising a plurality of fields, each field for storing a value of a parameter associated with a first instance of the database application, the first instance of the database application being associated with the first instance of the database, wherein at least one field of the plurality of fields of the second data structure holds a value of a resource parameter indicating an amount of a resource used by the first instance of the database application.
16. The at least one computer-readable medium of claim 15, wherein the first data structure is a catalog for a replica of the database.
17. The computer-readable medium of claim 16, wherein the second data structure is a copy of an initialization file used to create the first instance of the database application.
18. The at least one computer-readable medium of claim 14, wherein the computer-executable instructions for establishing a second instance is a portion of an application program for automating mounting of database replicas.
19. The at least one computer-readable medium of claim 15, wherein the computer-executable instructions for establishing a second instance of the database comprise computer-executable instructions for:
establishing the second instance with a second instance of the database application configured to operate according to values of parameters stored in a portion of the plurality of fields in the second data structure and a value of the resource parameter different than the value stored in the second data structure; and
configuring the second instance to access components of the database image identified in the first data structure.
20. The at least one computer-readable medium of claim 14, further having stored thereon computer-executable instructions for making a backup copy of the first instance of the database from the second instance of the database.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to techniques for processing a replica of a database.

DESCRIPTION OF THE RELATED ART

Computer applications are widely used in business settings and frequently are implemented in a computing environment that includes a storage system capable of holding a large amount of data. As users access the application to perform transactions, data in the storage system is updated. For example, an enterprise may track all of its sales transactions with a database application that stores and updates data on the storage system. Such a database that is actively in use for processing transactions within an enterprise is called a production database. For an enterprise, it is often desirable that its production database be reliably and continuously available.

To ensure that a production database is reliably and continuously available, a system administrator may create a “replica” of the database. The replica captures the state of the production database at an instant in time. The system administrator may use the replica in any of multiple ways. One example is to create a backup copy of the production database, which may increase the reliability of the overall system by allowing the data to be recovered if a system failure should render the database unusable.

The backup copy can be made from a replica mounted on different computer resources than the production environment. An advantage of creating a backup copy of the database from such a replica rather than directly from the production database is that operation of the application is not suspended or degraded if network bandwidth and computer resources are used to transfer data from the storage system to a backup device.

Database replicas also may be used in other contexts in which accessing data in the production environment could interfere with operation of the application. For example, reports may be generated from the replica rather than from the production database.

Replicas may be created by a replication manager. A replication manager may create the replica by leveraging features provided by one or more storage systems on which the production database is stored. Under control of the replication manager, the storage system may create an image of the database, which is a copy of the objects in the storage system that belong to the production database. The image, together with other information that specifies how to recreate the state of the database application, constitutes the replica.

To use the replica, it is mounted in a computing environment, which may be an environment separate from the production environment in which the application operates while processing transactions within the enterprise. Thus, the mount environment may include a mount server that is separate from the production server. To use the replica, it is first “mounted” on the mount server. As part of mounting the replica, an instance of the database application is created on the mount server.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In the drawings, each identical or nearly identical component that is illustrated in various figures is represented by a like numeral. For purposes of clarity, not every component may be labeled in every drawing. In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a diagram of a computer system executing a database application according to an embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a diagram of a production environment according to an embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 3 is a diagram of a prior art database replica;

FIG. 4 is a diagram of a mount environment according to an embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 5 is a diagram of a mount environment according to an alternative embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 6 is a diagram of an embodiment of an override file 470 as shown in FIG.4;

FIG. 7 is a diagram of an alternative embodiment of an override file 470 as shown in FIG. 4; and

FIG. 8 is a flow chart of a process of mounting a replica according to an embodiment of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

When mounting a replica, the mount environment is usually configured to duplicate the production environment. For example, an instance of a database application program in the mount environment is usually configured the same as a production application instance of the database program. This configuration increases the likelihood that the replica will operate in the mount environment the same way that the production database operates in the production environment.

The inventors have appreciated that conventional techniques for mounting a replica of a database in a mount environment that is identical to the production environment have some limitations. For example, it may be desirable to mount the replica in a mount environment configured differently than the production environment. In some embodiments, the replica will be mounted in an environment with less resources (e.g. memory, CPU cycles) allocated to it than are allocated to the production environment in which the replica was created. Because there is a cost associated with having resources available on a mount server, if a replica can be mounted with fewer resources, the cost the of computer system used to implement a mount environment can be decreased. Alternatively, reducing the resources allocated to mount a replica without reducing the total amount of resources available on the mount server allows the mount server to be used for more functions. For example, when fewer resources are allocated to each replica, a mount server may host multiple replicas simultaneously.

One embodiment of the invention relates to a method of creating a replica of a first instance of a database that is operating in a computing environment. A second instance of the database is then established from the replica in a second environment, but with the second instance having allocated to it resources that are not identical to those allocated to the first instance from which the replica was created.

Another embodiment relates to automating the mounting of a replica with a different configuration than the database in the production environment. The mount environment may be created in part from information in the replica, so some characteristics of the mount environment will be the same as in the production environment. However, other characteristics may be set based on information from other sources so that other characteristics of the mount environment differ from the characteristics of the production environment.

FIG. 1 illustrates an example of a computing system on which a replica may be created and/or mounted. FIG. 1 is just one example of the type of computer systems in which the invention may be employed, and the invention may be used in conjunction with any suitable computer system.

The computer system of FIG. 1 includes multiple interconnected computer devices, shown as storage system 110, production host 120, replication server 130, client 140 and mount host 150. In this embodiment, the devices are interconnected through a network 160. Network 160 may be an Ethernet network or any other type of network, whether now known or hereafter developed. In some embodiments, the computer system may span an enterprise having facilities in multiple geographic locations. Accordingly, network 160 may contain multiple subnets interconnected through a wide area network. However, the type of network used is not a limitation on the invention and the computer system may include any suitable network or networks.

Storage system 110, for example, may be from the line of SYMMETRIX® or CLARIION® storage systems sold by EMC Corporation of Hopkinton, Mass. However, any other suitable storage system may be used because the aspects of the invention described herein are not limited to use with any particular type of storage system.

Storage system 110 includes physical storage media, such as multiple physical disk drives (not expressly shown). Each disk drive may be capable of storing a large amount of data (e.g. Gigabytes of data). The type of storage media, the number of physical disk drives and the amount of data stored in each physical disk drives is not a limitation on the invention because any suitable storage system may be used, including storage systems that employ a simple disk drive or other type of storage medium.

Storage system 110 may make storage resources available to a host computer for assignment to entities therein, such as a file system, database manager or logical volume manager. If the storage system is a so-called “dumb” storage device, the storage resources made available to the computer will correspond in a one-to-one relationship to physical storage devices within the storage system. However, when the storage system is an intelligent storage system, it will present logical volumes of storage to the host computer that need not necessarily correspond in a one-to-one relationship to any physical devices with the storage system, because the intelligent storage system may map each logical volume of storage presented to the host across one or more physical storage devices.

In the example of FIG. 1, storage system 110 is an intelligent storage system. Controller 112 implements a mapping between logical volumes and physical locations. Consequently, storage system 110 may be considered to contain data stored in one or more logical volumes, of which logical volumes 114A, 114B, 114C and 114D are shown in FIG. 1. Some or all of these logical volumes may be used to store data associated with an application, such as a database.

One or more levels of mapping may be used to associate components of a database to information stored within a specific logical volume within storage system 110. For example, database components, such as data tables, may be associated with files and files may in turn be associated with specific logical volumes.

The foregoing is only one example of possible mappings between components used by an application and logical volumes as maintained in a storage system. Computer systems exist that have more or fewer levels of mapping. The aspects of the present invention can be used on systems having any number and configuration of mapping layers because the invention is not limited in this respect.

Production host 120 runs an application that accesses the data in storage system 110. For example, production host 120 may run a database application (e.g. those available from ORACLE® or SAP®) that maintains data on transactions undertaken within an enterprise. However, the invention is not limited to use in conjunction with programs conventionally known as “database” applications and may be used in conjunction with databases stored or maintained by any program, regardless of how it is classified. The invention is not limited by the specific application that manipulates data within storage system 110 and may be employed with any suitable application.

Production host 120 may be a conventional server, whether now known or hereafter developed. For example, a server, such as a SOLARIS®, HP®, Linux or AIX® server may be used. However, any suitable hardware may be used to implement production host 120. In many embodiments, production host 120 will interface with many users throughout an enterprise and process numerous transactions. Accordingly, production host 130 may be a server having a large amount of resources (e.g. memory and processing capability). However, the specific hardware used to implement production host 120 is not a limitation on the invention because the aspects of the invention described herein can be used with any type of hardware.

An instance of one or more applications performing various functions executes on production host 120 and is referred to herein as a “production instance.” The production instance may be a database application or other application that stores and retrieves production data within storage system 110.

Storage system 110 may use a portion of its logical volumes 114A, 114B, 114C and 114D to hold a primary version of the production data. Storage system 110 may use another portion of its logical volumes 114A, 114B, 114C and 114D to store a copy of the production data. Many storage systems, such as servers in the SYMMETRIX and CLARIION lines of storage systems made by EMC Corporation of Hopkinton, Mass., allow a user to configure the logical volumes in the storage system to designate some logical volumes for storing production data and some for storing a copy of that production data. The volumes storing the production data are sometimes called the “STD volumes,” and those storing the copy are sometimes called “Business Continuity Volumes” or “BCV.”

The storage system may be controlled to make a copy of the production data onto the BCV. Such a copy is sometimes called an “image” of the production data. The image may be made in response to a specific command or may be made in whole or in part dynamically as the production data is changed.

Creating a replica may involve a user, such as a system administrator, issuing commands to storage system 110 and the application instance of the application (e.g. a database application) to cause them to store information that describes the state of the computer system. The computer system of FIG. 1 includes replication server 130 that acts as a controller. Replication server 130 may be any suitable hardware device programmed to aid a user to issue the desired commands. An example of suitable software to control replication server 130 is replication management software provided by EMC Corporation of Hopkinton, Mass., although the invention is not limited to this example. The software can run on any suitable server or any other computer (including, for example, production host 120 or mount host 150). However, any suitable hardware or software may be used because the invention is not limited to any particular system configuration or any particular type of controller to manage the creation of a replica.

The replication software may present an interface to a system administrator or other user. The interface may be presented on a client computer, such as client 140 or any other computer in the system. Through that interface, the user may specify parameters of the replica to be created, including the data for which a replica is to be created. The replication software can then interact with the application to identify information include in the replica.

When portions of the replication software are located on a separate computer, the replication software may include an agent that is installed on production host 120 and interacts with the application instance. The replication software may issue appropriate commands to the application instance and to the storage system to create the replica in a manner described below.

To create a replica, the storage system ensures that the image represents a copy of the production data at a specific instance in time and does not change it after that. As the image is being created, the application instance may continue to interact with users changing the production data. As discussed below, these changes may be captured in a log file, which may constitute a portion of the replica because this information can be used to recreate the state of the application instance as it existed at the end of the process of creating a replica.

Information about the replica may be stored in a solid database 132 associated with replication server 130 or in any other suitable location. While the copy of the production data may be maintained on the volumes within storage system 110 designated as BCV, information, such as the identity of the BCV, may be stored within solid database 132. In addition, information that can be used to duplicate the application instance also can be stored as part of the replica.

To illustrate the types of information that may be included in a replica in some embodiments, FIG. 2 shows schematically a production environment 210 in which an application may operate in the computer system of FIG. 1. Production environment 210 includes an instance 212 of an application program. As mentioned above, the application program may be a database application program or any other suitable application program.

In the illustrated embodiment, instance 212 may be an instance of a database program executing on a suitable platform, such as production host 120 (FIG. 1). Regardless of the specific platform used to implement production host 120, instance 212 is allocated resources on that platform. One example of the type of resources that may be used by an instance of an application program is computer memory (illustrated as RAM 214 in FIG. 2) allocated to instance 212. However, the types of resources used by an instance are not limited to RAM or computer memory in general, as other types of resources may be used by an instance of an application, depending on the application and the platform on which it executes. Other examples of resources include CPU cycles and network bandwidth.

Any suitable method may be used to specify the amount of resources allocated to an instance. In the embodiment pictured in FIG. 2, resources are allocated to production application instance 212 when the instance is initialized.

The amount of resources that are allocated to an instance may be specified in any suitable way. For example, an application may have a set of parameters associated with it. Values for these parameters may specify the amount of resources allocated to an instance. In the embodiment pictured in FIG. 2, values for a set of parameters to be used to create an instance may be stored in initialization file 220. For example, an ORACLE® database may have a file called INIT<ORACLE_SID>.ora associated with it to hold values of its initialization parameters. As part of initialization of application instance 212, those values may be read from initialization file 220 and used to allocate resources or otherwise set operating characteristics of the instance.

In operation, multiple users may interact with production application instance 212. To depict the multiple users in a production environment, FIG. 2 shows multiple clients 230A, 230B, 230C, 230D, 230E and 230F. A user may interact with application instance 212 through one of the clients 230A, 230B, 230C, 230D, 230E and 230F. As pictured, each client is a desktop PC. However, the invention is not limited to use in connection with computer systems in which users access an application through desktop PCs. A client may be implemented with a laptop computer, a portable digital assistant or any other computing device.

FIG. 2 is a schematic illustration of a production environment. Each of the clients 230A, 230B, 230C, 230D, 230E and 230F is shown connected to application instance 212. Such a connection may be made through a network, such as network 160 (FIG. 1). However, the specific mechanism by which each client communicates with an application instance is not a limitation on the invention.

Regardless of the method by which each client 230A, 230B, 230C, 230D, 230E or 230F communicates with instance 212, exchanges between the clients 230A, 230B, 230C, 230D, 230E or 230F may cause instance 212 to access data. As pictured, the data is stored in logical objects 216A and 216B. Logical objects 216A and 216B may be mapped to physical storage locations in a storage system, such as storage system 110 (FIG. 1), as discussed above. Logical objects 216A and 216B, for example, may be data tables in a database or any other type of logical storage object, as the invention is not limited to use with any particular type of logical storage objects.

In production environment 210, an image of the data in each of the logical objects 216A and 216B may be created. The image may be created in response to commands from a network administrator or other user and may be maintained by the storage system as production data is written to the storage system. As one example, the image objects may be stored on one or more BCVs, as discussed above. Regardless of how the image is created, image object 218A contains a copy of the data in logical object 216A and image object 218B contains a copy of the data in logical object 216B.

In operation of a computer system containing production environment 212, it may be desirable to create a replica of the application. Such a replica may be created by storing information that enables recreation of the environment in which the application instance operates.

The invention may be used in conjunction with a replica in a format as is known in the art. However, the specific format in which the replica is stored is not a limitation n the invention, as the invention may be used with a replica in any suitable form. As one example, FIG. 3 illustrates a replica 310 that may be created in production environment 210 and stored in a format as known in the art. Replica 310 may be stored in any suitable computer-readable medium, with any suitable data organization. For example, replica 310 may be stored in solid database 132 (FIG. 1). Regardless of where and how stored, replica 310 contains information that can be used to duplicate an instance of the application program that created the production data.

In the embodiment illustrated, replica 310 includes a catalog 330. Catalog 330 is a data structure that has entries identifying the components of the replica. Such a data structure may be implemented in a file or in any other suitable way and in any suitable format.

Entries 336A and 336B identify logical objects containing data included in the image of the production data. In the embodiment illustrated, catalog 330 includes two objects, shown as image components 218A and 218B. Two logical objects are shown for simplicity, but any number of logical objects may be included in catalog 330.

Entry 334 identifies parameters of the production instance of the application that manipulated the production data. In the embodiment of FIG. 3, the parameters are stored in a file. As shown, that file is a copy 220′ of the INIT file 220 (FIG. 2). If parameters of an application instance are stored in formats other than a file, the replica may likewise contain a copy of those other formats. The copy of the parameters may be stored in the same format that those parameters are used to establish a production instance, but the invention is not limited in that respect, as that the replica could include the parameters in a different form from which they are used in the production environment.

The replica may include other files containing parameters or other information required to establish an environment in which the data in the image may be accessed. Accordingly, FIG. 3 shows files 320A and 320B may be included in replica 310 to hold such information. When such files are included, catalog 330 may include corresponding entries to identify those files.

Additionally, catalog 330 may contain entry 332 identifying a log. During the process of creating an image of a database separate from the production data, the production application instance may execute transactions affecting the production data that are not reflected in the image. The application may keep a log of these transactions. In the embodiment illustrated, the log is implemented as log file 332 (which may be stored in solid database 132 or in any other suitable location), although it can be implemented in other ways.

FIG. 3 depicts just one example of the items that may form a replica, as different or additional items may be included in a replica.

Regardless of the specific construction of the replica, the replica may be used to establish a mount environment 420 as illustrated in FIG. 4. Mount environment 420 includes mount application instance 412 through which data that is part of a replica may be accessed. In the illustrated embodiment, mount application instance 412 is a separate instance of the same application program that created the production data and is used to access the image objects 418A and 418B, which are images of the logical objects of data created from production data.

Once created, mount environment 420 may allow operations on image objects 418A and 418B for any desired purpose. As shown in FIG. 4, a user may interact with mount application instance 412 through a client 430. Here, client 430 is illustrated as a desktop PC, which may be connected to mount host 150 (FIG. 1) over network 160 (FIG. 1). While a desktop PC may act as a client, the nature of the client used to interact with mount application instance 412 is not a limitation on the invention and any suitable device may be used. Also, while a single client is depicted in FIG. 4, the number of clients in the mount environment is not a limitation on the invention.

Mount environment 420 may be created on any suitable computer or computers. In the computer system of FIG. 1, mount environment 420 may be created on mount host 150. However, this embodiment is for illustration only, as it is not necessary that the mount environment be created on a device that is connected to the same local area network as the storage system 110 or production host 120.

Once mount environment 420 is created, a user may interact with mount application instance 412 in much the same way that a user would interact with production application instance 212 to perform operations on a database. However, because the operations are performed on a copy of the production data, the interactions typically involve primarily operations that read data from the database.

Any desired operations may be performed in mount environment 420. For example, mount application instance 412 may access image objects 418A and 418B to generate reports on an output device, such as a printer 450, and/or to make a backup copy of the database on a storage device with removable media, such as tape drive 460. These are examples of operations that may be desirable to perform in a computer system operating a database and can be performed on a copy of a database. By performing these operations in mount environment 420, they do not interfere with or slow operation of production application instance 212 (FIG. 2).

As part of the initialization of mount application instance 412, resources may be allocated to that instance. As show, in the example of FIG. 4, initialization file 220′ is available for initialization of mount application instance 412. As with initialization file 220 (FIG. 2), initialization file 220′ stores values of parameters used to control allocation of resources to an instance of the application program as it is initialized. Initialization file 220′ also may contain values of parameters that control other operating characteristics of the instance. Parameters that enable or disable certain features or functionality of an application are referred to herein as “application switches” and initialization file 220′ may contain values that set one or more application switches.

The values in initialization file 220′ may be obtained in any suitable way. In this example, initialization file 220′ is a copy of initialization file 220 (FIG. 2) stored as part of replica 310 (FIG. 3).

Conventionally, a copy of the initialization file used to create a production instance is used to configure the instance of the application when mounting the replica. Using a copy of the initialization file from the production instance allows creation of a duplicate environment in an automated way. Duplicating the production environment reduces the chances that operations performed in the mount environment will produce different results than if performed in the production environment.

Applicants have appreciated that it is not always desirable for mount environment 420 to be a duplicate of production environment 210 (FIG. 2). Fewer users may access mount application instance 412 than access production application instance 212 (FIG. 2). Also, operations performed in a mount environment may not be as time critical as those performed in the production environment. For example, a user may tolerate a delay of hours in producing a report. Likewise, if a backup of a database is to be created once a day, a user may tolerate a delay of a full day while the computer system creates a backup copy on removable storage media. In contrast, such delays often cannot be tolerated in a production environment.

To ensure that an application performs quickly and accurately in a production environment, the production environment is often configured with a large amount of resources allocated to the production instance. These resources, for example, may include computer memory, number of processes that may be generated by the application, or number of CPU cycles that are available for the application instance, etc. Accordingly, production host 120 (FIG. 1) likely includes a large amount of resources.

Applicants have appreciated that it may not be desirable to require the mount host 150 (FIG. 1) to contain the same amount of resources as production host 120 (FIG. 1). Further, even if mount host 150 (FIG. 1) has the same amount of resources as production host 150 (FIG. 1), it may not be desirable to allocate the same amount of resources to the mount instance that are allocated to the production instance. For example, a user may desire to mount multiple replicas of the same or different databases simultaneously on the same mount host. Simultaneous mounting of multiple replicas may not be possible if each instance must be allocated the amount of resources required for their production counterparts, as the aggregate usage of one or more resources may exceed the total amount of resources on mount host 150.

Accordingly, one embodiment of the invention provides a mechanism to control the amount of resources allocated for a mount application instance. Such a mechanism can be used to configure the mount application instance to consume less of one or more resources than the production application instance on which it is based. In some embodiments, control over these parameters is integrated into the computer system in a way that allows automated mounting of a replica, although all embodiments are not limited in this respect.

In the embodiment of FIG. 4, parameters stored in an override file 470 may be used to control, in whole or in part, the resources allocated to mount application instance 412 such that values in override file 470 may override the values for the corresponding parameters in the initialization file 220′, thereby altering those values from the production environment.

Override file 470 may contain values for only a subset of the parameters controlling initialization of mount application instance 412, or for all of the parameters. As the initialization parameters are used in the initialization process, if a value of a parameter is specified in override file 470, that value is used. If no value for a parameter is specified in override file 470, the value for the parameter in the copy 220′ of the initialization file used in the production environment is used. Accordingly, initialization file 220′ and override file 470 combine to specify values of parameters that control characteristics of mount application instance 412. Regardless of the source of the value for a parameter, mount application instance 412 thereafter may be created using that value of a parameter.

Override file 470 may be created in any suitable way. For example, a system administrator or other user may specify values of certain parameters and store them in override file 470.

Different or additional ways may be used to specify values of parameters that control characteristics of mount application instance 412 or otherwise specify characteristics of mount environment 420. For example, the override values need not be stored in a file. A user may enter override values through a user interface on client 430, and such values could be stored in RAM or other suitable computer-readable medium in any suitable form until used for initialization of mount application instance 412.

Further, the override parameters need not be stored separately from initialization file 220′. Override values could be stored by directly changing the values for one or more parameters in the initialization file 220′. Such a change could be made manually, such as by a user opening an editing program on client 430 and altering the values stored in initialization file 220′. Alternatively, the process could be performed under control of a computer-executable program that receives override values specified by a user and automatically alters the values stored in initialization file 220′. It should be appreciated that changes to the initialization parameters stored in initialization file 220′ need not be made within the same file structure, as a new file can be created by copying values of some parameters from initialization file 220′ and incorporating some override values.

As should be appreciated from the foregoing, the override values can be consolidated with values from the production environment in any suitable way, as the invention is not limited to any particular technique. Regardless of how the override values of the parameters are specified, once initialized with these values, mount application instance 412 may be used in any desired manner.

As discussed above, in one embodiment, the resources are controlled to enable mounting multiple replicas on the same mount host. FIG. 5 shows multiple replicas mounted on the same mount host 520. In the embodiment of FIG. 5, application instance 512 1 and application instance 512 2 execute on mount host 520. Application instance 512 1 interacts with image objects 518A1 and 518B1. Application instance 512 2 interacts with image objects 518A2 and 518B2. Image objects 518A1 and 518B1 may be a portion of a replica of a first database and image objects 518A2 and 518B2 may be a portion of a replica of a second database. Allocating a smaller amount of resources to each application instance than its production counterpart can facilitate mounting multiple replicas on mount host 520 simultaneously. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5, smaller amounts of RAM 514 1 and RAM 514 2 are allocated to application instances 512 1 and application instance 512 2, respectively, than to their production counterparts.

As mentioned above, memory is not the only type of resource whose allocation may be modified for the mount environment to differ from the production environment, as aspects of the invention can be used for any resource allocated to an instance of a mount application. Further, allocation of resources is not the only characteristic of a mount environment that can be controlled to differ from the production environment when creating a mount environment. FIG. 6 provides an example of parameters and values that may be specified as part of override file 470 (FIG. 4), or otherwise, to alter the mount environment from the production environment.

FIG. 6 shows an embodiment of an override file 620. In the pictured embodiment, multiple parameters for which override values can be specified are shown. The parameters of FIG. 6 serve as an example only and different or additional parameters may be controlled. Further, in mounting a replica, values may be specified for only a portion of the parameters that can be controlled In the example of FIG. 6, a consistent syntax is used to specify override values for parameters. Each line contains a command that specifies an override value for one parameter. On each line, an identifier of the parameter appears first. Following an “=” sign, the override value of the parameter is specified.

The syntax of FIG. 6 is for illustration only. Values for parameters could be specified in an XML file or any other suitable syntax.

The parameters indicated in FIG. 6 represent parameters that are appropriate for use with an ORACLE® database. The specific parameters for which override values may be specified and an appropriate range of values for each parameter will depend on the specific application program from which an application instance is to be created.

In this example, some of the parameters control resource usage. For example, line 624 sets the value of a parameter used to set the size of a database cache. Setting a database cache size is one way that memory within the mount host is allocated to the mount application instance. Other types of resources may also be allocated based on values in override file 620. For example, line 622 sets a value of a parameter “aq_tm_processes” and line 626 sets a value of a parameter “job_queue_processes.” Each of these lines sets a limit on the number of processes that may exist simultaneously. Limiting processes is one way that processor resources may be allocated. Similarly, line 628 sets a value for a parameter “open_cursors.” Limiting the number of open cursors is yet another way that resources may be allocated to an instance of an application program.

Not all of the characteristics set in override value file 620 allocate resources. Any operating characteristic that can be controlled may be set with an override value specified in override file 620. For example, line 630 sets an operating switch associated with the application program. More specifically, line 630 sets a parameter “query_rewrite_enabled” to false. The instance of the application program created with such a parameter setting is configured to prevent queries from being rewritten. As another example, line 640 sets a value of a parameter indicating the location at which certain output is to be stored.

Thus, the use of an override file such as override file 620 allows multiple parameters of different types to be selectively set upon the creation of an application instance. In one embodiment, if no value for a parameter is included in override file 620, a mount environment is established with that parameter having the same value that it had in the production environment. In other embodiments, parameters whose values are not overridden may be set to a default value or set in any other suitable way.

The parameters depicted in FIG. 6 correspond to operating parameters conventionally set in an initialization file associated with an ORACLE® database. The inventors have observed that the parameters listed, if given override values, do not interfere with the operation of the replica of a database, even if the override values differ from those in a production environment. In one embodiment, the parameters listed may be the only parameters for which override values are specified, and a computer system mounting a replica may be programmed to ignore an attempt to alter any parameter other than those listed to ensure that a user cannot unintentionally modify a parameter in a way that may interfere with proper execution of the mount instance. However, it should be appreciated that this feature is optional, and that other embodiments need not be limited to a predefined set of parameters.

FIG. 7 illustrates another embodiment of an override file 720. In the embodiment of FIG. 7, override file 720 contains parameters that are not traditionally set as part of the initialization of an application instance. The parameters listed are undocumented parameters that may be set at the direction of customer service personnel representing the supplier of the application program. Such undocumented codes are frequently included in complex software programs as an aid for problem identification and resolution.

In this embodiment, override file 720 follows the syntax of the override file 620, though such syntax is not required. Each line includes an identification of a parameter and a value assigned to that parameter.

Because, in most instances, the undocumented parameters identified in override file 720 will not be expressly set when initializing a production instance, the values set in override file 720 will override whatever default values exist for these parameters if no value is set in the production environment. Nonetheless, the override mechanism used when mounting a replica may be used to appropriately configure the mount application instance.

The number and types of parameters that may be set as part of the parameter override process depends on the specific application program in use. Table I lists a set of undocumented parameters for an ORACLE® database, but different or additional parameters may be set for other application programs.

TABLE I
_trace_files_public _disable_kcbhxor_osd
_latch_recovery_alignment _disable_system_state
_spin_count _single_process
_latch_miss_stat_sid _cpu_count
_max_sleep_holding_latch _number_cached_attributes
_max_exponential_sleep _watchpoint_on
_use_vector_post _ksdxw_num_sgw
_latch_class_0 _ksdxw_num_pgw
_latch_class_1 _ksdxw_stack_depth
_latch_class_2 _ksdxw_cini_flg
_latch_class_3 _ksdxw_nbufs
_latch_class_4 _enable_kgh_policy
_latch_class_5 _NUMA_pool_size
_latch_class_6 _enable_NUMA_optimization
_latch_class_7 _shared_pool_reserved_pct
_latch_classes _shared_pool_reserved_min_alloc
_session_idle_bit_latches _large_pool_min_alloc
_ksu_diag_kill_time _use_ism
_num_longop_child_latches _lock_sga_areas
_test_ksusigskip _NUMA_instance_mapping
_kghdsidx_count _lm_activate_lms_threshold
_realfree_heap_max_size _lm_lmd_waittime
_realfree_heap_free_threshold _lm_lms_waittime
_realfree_heap_mode _lm_procs
_use_realfree_heap _lm_ress
_test_param_1 _lm_locks
_test_param_2 _lm_master_weight
_test_param_3 _active_standby_fast_reconfiguration
_test_param_4 _lm_enq_rcfg
_test_param_5 _lm_dynamic_remastering
_test_param_6 _lm_xids
_instance_type _lm_res_part
_dbg_proc_startup _lm_drm_window
_messages _lm_num_pcmhv_latches
_enqueue_locks _lm_node_join_opt
_enqueue_hash _lm_non_fault_tolerant
_enqueue_debug_multi_instance _lm_cache_res_cleanup
_enqueue_hash_chain_latches _lm_cache_res_type
_ksi_trace _lm_cache_lvl0_cleanup
_trace_processes _lm_send_buffers
_trace_archive _lm_rcv_buffer_size
_trace_events _lm_direct_sends
_trace_buffers _ogms_home
_trace_flush_processes _lm_sync_timeout
_trace_file_size _lm_ticket_active_sendback
_trace_options _lm_rcfg_timeout
_nchar_imp_cnv _lm_enq_lock_freelist
_disable_file_locks _lm_enqeue_freelist
_disable_odm _lm_dd_interval
_open_files_limit _dlmtrace
_enable_list_io _lm_tx_delta
_db_file_direct_io_count _lm_proc_freeze_timeout
_ioslave_issue_count _lm_validate_resource_type
_ioslave_batch_count _lm_file_affinity
_io_slaves_disabled _lm_share_lock_opt
_lgwr_io_slaves _lm_res_hash_bucket
_arch_io_slaves _lm_msg_batch_size
_backup_disk_io_slaves _lm_tickets
_backup_io_pool_size _lm_msg_cache_thresholds
_high_server_threshold _lm_msg_cleanup_interval
_low_server_threshold _lm_send_queue_length
_yield_check_interval _lm_send_queue_batching
_first_spare_parameter _lm_process_batching
_second_spare_parameter _lm_sq_batch_factor
_third_spare_parameter _abort_recovery_on_join
_fourth_spare_parameter _send_ast_to_foreground
_fifth_spare_parameter _send_close_with_block
_sixth_spare_parameter _gcs_fast_reconfig
_seventh_spare_parameter _cr_grant_global_role
_ksmg_granule_size _cr_grant_local_role
_ksmg_granule_locking_status _reliable_block_sends
_object_statistics _skip_assume_msg
_diag_daemon _gcs_resources
_dump_system_state_scope _gcs_latches
_lm_lms _pcm_shadow_locks
_lm_dynamic_lms _side_channel_batch_size
_lm_max_lms _side_channel_batch_timeout
_lm_min_lms _trace_pin_time
_recovery_claim_batch_size _db_cache_advice_sample_factor
_master_direct_sends _db_cache_advice_batch_size
_cgs_send_timeout _db_mttr_advice
_imr_active _db_mttr_sim_target
_imr_max_reconfig_delay _db_mttr_sample_factor
_imr_splitbrain_res_wait _db_mttr_partitions
_lm_dynamic_load _db_mttr_sim_trace_size
_scn_scheme _db_mttr_trace_to_alert
_disable_latch_free_SCN_writes_via_32cas _minimum_giga_scn
_disable_latch_free_SCN_writes_via_64cas _compatible_no_recovery
_controlfile_enqueue_timeout _db_block_check_for debug
_db_block_buffers _db_always_check_system_ts
_db_block_cache_protect _log_checkpoint_recovery_check
_dbwr_tracing _two_pass
_disable_multiple_block_sizes _log_archive_buffers
_small_table_threshold _log_archive_buffer_size
_db_block_cache_num_umap _log_archive_callout
_db_block_lru_latches _log_archive_net_timeout
_db_block_granule_interval _log_archive_delta_sync_wait
_db_block_max_scan_pct _lgwr_max_ns_wt
_db_writer_scan_depth_pct _ns_max_flush_wt
_db_large_dirty_queue _lgwr_ns_sim_err
_db_writer_max_writes _lgwr_ns_nl_min
_db_writer_chunk_writes _lgwr_ns_nl_max
_db_block_med_priority_batch_size _lgwr_async_io
_db_block_hi_priority_batch_size _lgwr_delay_write
_db_writer_histogram_statistics _log_io_size
_dbwr_async_io _log_switch_timeout
_dbwr_scan_interval _log_buffers_debug
_db_block_prefetch_quota _log_buffers_corrupt
_db_block_max_dirty_target _log_debug_multi_instance
_db_block_numa _log_simultaneous_copies
_db_percent_hot_default _disable_logging
_db_percent_hot_keep _db_file_noncontig_mblock_read_count
_db_percent_hot_recycle _omf
_db_aging_hot_criteria _hard_protection
_db_aging_stay_count _allow_error_simulation
_db_aging_cool_count _kcl_use_cr
_db_aging_touch_time _kcl_local_file_time
_db_aging_freeze_cr _recovery_asserts
_db_block_hash_buckets _gc_integrity_checks
_db_block_hash_latches _keep_recovery_buffers
_db_handles _gc_defer_time
_db_handles_cached _gc_latches
_wait_for_sync _kcl_debug
_db_block_cache_clone _kcl_index_split
_db_block_trace_protect _kcl_commit
_db_block_max_cr_dba _fairness_threshold
_trace_buffer_flushes _interconnect_checksum
_trace_multi_block_reads _defer_multiple_waiters
_trace_cr_buffer_creates _cr_server_log_flush
_write_clones _ping_level
_trace_buffer_gets _kcl_name_table_latches
_check_block_after_checksum _async_recovery_reads
_recovery_percentage _async_recovery_claims
_bwr_for_flushed_pi _avoid_prepare
_send_requests_to_PI _passwordfile_enqueue_timeout
_kcl_undo_locks _dynamic_rls_policies
_kcl_undo_grouping _app_ctx_vers
_kcl_recovery_read_batch _distributed_recovery_connection_hold_time
_kcl_conservative_log_flush _pmon_load_constants
_adaptive_direct_read _dispatcher_rate_ttl
_disable_incremental_checkpoints _dispatcher_rate_scale
_dump_MTTR_to_trace _plsql_dump_buffer_events
_log_blocks_during_backup _job_queue_interval
_allow_resetlogs_corruption _optimizer_percent_parallel
_allow_terminal_recovery_corruption _optimizer_search_limit
_allow_read_only_corruption _parallel_default_max_instances
_tts_allow_nchar_mismatch _system_trig_enabled
_disable_recoverable_recovery _kkfi_trace
_log_committime_block_cleanout _kolfuseslf
_ktc_latches _px_trace
_allocate_creation_order _parallel_server_idle_time
_log_space_errors _parallel_server_sleep_time
_bump_highwater_mark_count _dynamic_stats_threshold
_last_allocation_period _parallel_fake_class_pct
_inst_locking_period _px_load_publish_interval
_allocation_update_interval _parallel_execution_message_align
_ktu_latches _PX_use_large_pool
_rollback_segment_initial _parallel_min_message_pool
_rollback_segment_count _tq_dump_period
_offline_rollback_segments _affinity_on
_corrupted_rollback_segments _enable_default_affinity
_enable_block_level_transaction_recovery _dss_cache_flush
_cleanup_rollback_entries _hash_multiblock_io_count
_smu_error_simulation_site _cursor_db_buffers_pinned
_smu_error_simulation_type _old_connect_by_enabled
_collect_undo_stats _table_lookup_prefetch_size
_smu_debug_mode _multi_join_key_table_lookup
_verify_undo_quota _table_lookup_prefetch_thresh
_discrete_transactions_enabled _adaptive_fetch_enabled
_row_cr _disable_sun_rsm
_smon_internal_errlimit _ipc_test_failover
_smon_consume_post _ipc_test_mult_nets
_transaction_recovery_servers _ipc_fail_network
_parallel_recovery_stopat _trace_instance_termination
_release_insert_threshold _oracle_trace_events
_walk_insert_threshold _oracle_trace_facility_version
_use_seq_process_cache _no_objects
_reuse_index_loop _domain_index_batch_size
_kdbl_enable_post_allocation _domain_index_dml_batch_size
_ignore_desc_in_index _insert_enable_hwm_brokered
_keep_remote_column_size _all_shared_dblinks
_row_cache_cursors _close_cached_open_cursors
_kgl_multi_instance_lock _init_sql_file
_kgl_multi_instance_pin _sort_multiblock_read_count
_kgl_multi_instance_invalidation _sort_space_for_write_buffers
_kgl_latch_count _shrunk_aggs_enabled
_kgl_bucket_count _shrunk_aggs_disable_threshold
_library_cache_advice _gby_onekey_enabled
_kglsim_maxmem_percent _optimizer_undo_changes
_optimizer_mode_force _sql_connect_capability_table
_explain_rewrite_mode _query_cost_rewrite
_query_rewrite_or_error _query_rewrite_2
_sort_elimination_cost_ratio _query_rewrite_1
_sql_connect_capability_override _query_rewrite_fudge
_always_anti_join _query_rewrite_expression
_always_star_transformation _query_rewrite_jgmigrate
_b_tree_bitmap_plans _query_rewrite_fpc
_column_elimination_off _query_rewrite_drj
_cpu_to_io _query_rewrite_maxdisjunct
_optimizer_cost_model _query_rewrite_vop_cleanup
_optimizer_undo_cost_change _full_pwise_join_enabled
_optimizer_system_stats_usage _partial_pwise_join_enabled
_new_sort_cost_estimate _slave_mapping_enabled
_complex_view_merging _slave_mapping_group_size
_unnest_subquery _local_communication_costing_enabled
_eliminate_common_subexpr _local_communication_ratio
_pred_move_around _parallelism_cost_fudge_factor
_push_join_predicate _left_nested_loops_random
_push_join_union_view _improved_row_length_enabled
_fast_full_scan_enabled _px_index_sampling
_optim_enhance_nnull_detection _index_join_enabled
_idl_conventional_index_maintenance _use_nosegment_indexes
_enable_cscn_caching _enable_type_dep_selectivity
_parallel_broadcast_enabled _sqlexec_progression_cost
_px_broadcast_fudge_factor _improved_outerjoin_card
_px_kxib_tracing _optimizer_adjust_for_nulls
_px_granule_size _optimizer_degree
_px_async_getgranule _optimizer_choose_permutation
_px_min_granules_per_slave _use_column_stats_for_function
_px_max_granules_per_slave _subquery_pruning_cost_factor
_px_no_stealing _subquery_pruning_reduction
_parallel_adaptive_max_users _subquery_pruning_enabled
_parallel_load_balancing _subquery_pruning_mv_enabled
_parallel_load_bal_unit _parallel_txn_global
_pdml_slaves_diff_part _or_expand_nvl_predicate
_pdml_gim_sampling _like_with_bind_as_equality
_pdml_gim_staggered _table_scan_cost_plus_one
_px_dynamic_opt _sortmerge_inequality_join_off
_px_dynamic_sample_size _cost_equality_semi_join
_predicate_elimination_enabled _default_non_equality_sel_check
_groupby_nopushdown_cut_ratio _new_initial_join_orders
_groupby_orderby_combine _oneside_colstat_for_equijoins
_temp_tran_block_threshold _column_tracking_level
_temp_tran_cache _optim_peek_user_binds
_ordered_semijoin _mv_refresh_selections
_always_semi_join _cursor_plan_enabled
_ordered_nested_loop _minimal_stats_aggregation
_nested_loop_fudge _mv_refresh_eut
_project_view_columns _mav_refresh_consistent_read
_no_or_expansion _mav_refresh_opt
_system_index_caching _mav_refresh_unionall_tables
_serial_direct_read _mv_refresh_delta_fraction
_enable_multitable_sampling _force_temptables_for_gsets
_ncmb_readahead_enabled _pga_max_size
_ncmb_readahead_tracing _smm_auto_min_io_size
_index_prefetch_factor _smm_auto_max_io_size
_smm_control _smm_auto_cost_enabled
_smm_trace _olap_allocate_errorlog_header
_smm_min_size _olap_allocate_errorlog_format
_smm_max_size _olap_poutlog_echo_to_eventlog
_smm_px_max_size _olap_eif_export_lob_size
_smm_bound
_smm_advice_log_size
_smm_advice_enabled
_gs_anti_semi_join_allowed
_mv_refresh_use_stats
_optim_new_default_join_sel
_use_new_explain_plan
_ldr_io_size
_unnest_notexists_sq
_optimizer_dyn_smp_blks
_pre_rewrite_push_pred
_optimizer_new_join_card_computation
_mav_refresh_double_count_prevented
_pct_refresh_double_count_prevented
_mv_refresh_new_setup_disabled
_load_without_compile
_precompute_gid_values
_union_rewrite_for_gs
_nested_mav_fast_oncommit_enabled
_generalized_pruning_enabled
_rowsource_execution_statistics
_bitmap_or_improvement_enabled
_intrapart_pdml_enabled
_optim_adjust_for_part_skews
_force_datefold_trunc
_two_pass_reverse_polish_enabled
_aq_tm_scanlimit
_olap_continuous_trace_file
_olap_parallel_update_threshold
_olap_aggregate_buffer_size
_olap_aggregate_min_buffer_size
_olap_aggregate_child_fragment_size
_olap_aggregate_child_max_size
_olap_aggregate_work_per_thread
_olap_aggregate_min_thread_status
_olap_aggregate_statlen_thresh
_olap_aggregate_worklist_max
_olap_aggregate_max_thread_tuples
_olap_aggregate_store_probability
_olap_aggregate_function_merge_threshold
_olap_aggregate_function_cache_enabled
_olap_dimsave_restore_cache_values

FIG. 8 is a flowchart of a process for mounting a replica in accordance with one embodiment. The processing illustrated in FIG. 8 may be performed under control of replication management software executing on a replication server 130 (or on any other suitable device) in response to a user command or in any other suitable way.

The process of FIG. 8 begins at block 810, wherein the image objects that are part of the replica are made visible to software on the mount host. The processing at block 810 may be performed in any suitable way. In an embodiment in which replication management software includes a replication agent resident on a mount host that is adapted to interact with an application program, making the image available to the mount host may involve sending to the agent an identification of the logical volumes within storage system 110 that contain the objects in the replica. Such an indication may be obtained from catalog 330 or in any other suitable way.

The process then proceeds to block 812, wherein a mapping for accessing image 15 objects is recreated. As described above, a computer system including an application interfacing with a storage system may include one or more mapping layers that maps logical identifiers used in an application to logical volumes in the storage system. To access a replica of a database, a comparable mapping is mounted so that, as a mount application instance executes on the mount server, it can use the same mapping as used in the production instance to access data in the image. If there are multiple mapping layers, the processing at block 812 may be performed in steps, with each step recreating a successively higher layer of the mapping. Processing at block 812 performs the processing to recreate the mapping in any suitable way.

At block 814, a mount application instance is initialized. As described above, override file 470 may be provided and contain values for one or more parameters. In the illustrated embodiment, the mount application instance uses parameter values that are the same as the values used for the production instance, unless overridden. Any suitable approach may be used for overriding parameter values. In one embodiment, a replication management agent may invoke an application program, which creates an instance of that application program as the mount application instance. That instance may be initialized based on one or more parameter files identified when the application is invoked. In some embodiments, the replication management agent may construct a parameter file representing a combination of the parameters in an initialization file 220′ (FIG. 2) and override values in override file 470 (FIG. 4). The replication management agent may provide this file as the file containing the initialization values for the mount application program instance. However, any suitable approach for initializing an application instance may be used, as the invention is not limited to any particular implementation technique.

The process proceeds to block 816. At block 816, the application is recovered. In embodiments in which the replica includes a log of changes to the production data that should be part of the image but are not reflected in image objects in storage system 110, recovering the application may include adjusting the data in the image objects to reflect changes captured in the log. In the pictured embodiment, processing at block 816 may be performed in the same manner used when mounting a replica with values that have not been overridden, but any suitable processing techniques may be used.

Once a mount instance is created and is associated with the image objects of the replica, processing proceeds to block 818. At block 818, the database may be opened, meaning that clients connected to the mount host may access the data in the database. Opening the mount database may be performed as in any suitable way.

It should be appreciated that some or all of the steps depicted in FIG. 8 may be omitted. For example, it may be desirable in some embodiments to allow a user to manually open the database. In such embodiments, processing in block 818 may be omitted.

The above-described embodiments of the present invention can be implemented in any of numerous ways. For example, the embodiments may be implemented using hardware, software or a combination thereof. When implemented in software, the software code can be executed on any suitable processor or collection of processors, whether provided in a single computer or distributed among multiple computers. It should be appreciated that any component or collection of components that perform the functions described above can be generically considered as one or more controllers that control the above-discussed functions. The one or more controllers can be implemented in numerous ways, such as with dedicated hardware, or with general purpose hardware (e.g., one or more processors) that is programmed using microcode or software to perform the functions recited above.

In this respect, it should be appreciated that one implementation of the embodiments of the present invention comprises at least one computer-readable medium (e.g., a computer memory, a floppy disk, a compact disk, a tape, etc.) encoded with a computer program (i.e., a plurality of instructions), which, when executed on a processor, performs the above-discussed functions of the embodiments of the present invention.

The computer-readable medium can be transportable such that the program stored thereon can be loaded onto any computer environment resource to implement the aspects of the present invention discussed herein. In addition, it should be appreciated that the reference to a computer program which, when executed, performs the above-discussed functions, is not limited to an application program running on a host computer. Rather, the term computer program is used herein in a generic sense to reference any type of computer code (e.g., software or microcode) that can be employed to program a processor to implement the above-discussed aspects of the present invention.

It should be appreciated that in accordance with several embodiments of the present invention wherein processes are implemented in a computer readable medium, the computer implemented processes may, during the course of their execution, receive input manually (e.g., from a user).

The phraseology and terminology used herein is for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting. The use of “including,” “comprising,” “having,” “containing”, “involving”, and variations thereof, is meant to encompass the items listed thereafter and additional items.

Having described several embodiments of the invention in detail, various modifications and improvements will readily occur to those skilled in the art. Such modifications and improvements are intended to be within the spirit and scope of the invention. Accordingly, the foregoing description is by way of example only, and is not intended as limiting. The invention is limited only as defined by the following claims and the equivalents thereto.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification1/1, 707/999.204
International ClassificationG06F17/30
Cooperative ClassificationG06F11/1662, G06F11/2094, G06F17/30575
European ClassificationG06F17/30C, G06F11/16D2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 8, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: EMC CORPORATION, MASSACHUSETTS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MANKAD, UDGITH A.;BALCZUNAS, CHRISTOPHE A.D.;REEL/FRAME:017986/0893
Effective date: 20060607