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Publication numberUS20080000169 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/477,362
Publication dateJan 3, 2008
Filing dateJun 30, 2006
Priority dateJun 30, 2006
Publication number11477362, 477362, US 2008/0000169 A1, US 2008/000169 A1, US 20080000169 A1, US 20080000169A1, US 2008000169 A1, US 2008000169A1, US-A1-20080000169, US-A1-2008000169, US2008/0000169A1, US2008/000169A1, US20080000169 A1, US20080000169A1, US2008000169 A1, US2008000169A1
InventorsStephen Handley
Original AssigneeStephen Handley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gutter cover
US 20080000169 A1
Abstract
A gutter cover according to the present invention is an extruded plastic component having a cover segment sized to extend generally across an eavestrough and merge with a rounded transition edge, said rounded transition edge joining with an undercut angled section extending rearwardly and positioned partially below the cover segment. The undercut angled section joins with a perforated pass through allowing water to pass through said cover segment at a position below and inwardly of the rounded transition edge, perforated pass through merges with an integral resilient clip having a securing cavity sized for resiliently engaging an upper outer edge of an eavestrough or for engaging a securing flange of an eavestrough hook. The gutter cover can be used with many existing vinyl or metal eavestrough systems. A particular method for producing the gutter cover is also disclosed.
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Claims(17)
1. A gutter cover comprising an extruded plastic component having a cover segment sized to extend generally across an eavestrough and merge with a rounded transition edge, said rounded transition edge joining with an undercut angled section extending rearwardly and positioned partially below said cover segment; said undercut angled section joining with a perforated pass through allowing water to pass through said cover segment; said perforated pass through merging with an integral resilient clip having a securing cavity, said securing cavity being sized for resiliently engaging an upper edge of an eavestrough or for engaging a securing flange of an eavestrough hook.
2. A gutter cover as claimed in claim 1 wherein said securing cavity is sized to receive therein a folded or rolled metal edge of an eavestrough.
3. A gutter cover as claimed in claim 2 wherein said resilient clip includes an upper arm and a lower arm connected adjacent said perforated pass through, said arms defining an elongate split line at a forward end of said gutter cover with said arms resiliently separating at said split to effect securement of said gutter cover.
4. A gutter cover as claimed in claim 4 wherein said lower arm intermediate its length includes a notched portion forming an integral biased hinge allowing said lower arm to hinge downwardly during securement of said gutter cover.
5. A gutter cover as claimed in claim 3 including a ramp segment on said upper arm angled upwardly and outwardly.
6. A gutter cover as claimed in claim 5 wherein said cover segment includes a textured upper surface to slow and spread rivulets of water passing over said cover segment.
7. A gutter cover as claimed in claim 6 wherein said textured upper surface is produced by embossing.
8. A gutter cover as claimed in claim 6 wherein said textured upper surface is generally consistent across said cover segment.
9. A gutter cover as claimed in claim 8 wherein said resilient clip is positioned below and aligned with said rounded transition.
10. A method of manufacturing a gutter cover comprising extruding a semi circular like sheet substrate with a securing clip at one edge thereof; cooling said securing clip using a cooling fluid to extract heat therefrom, passing said sheet substrate through a first performer cooling structure to partially flatten the semi circular like sheet substrate, embossing a top surface of said gutter cover to one side of said clip to provide a textured upper surface across said gutter cover and further flattening said sheet substrate; passing said sheet substrate through a second performer to provide an angled segment displacing said clip downwardly while maintaining said textured upper surface; passing said sheet substrate through a calibrator to produce a rounded transition merging with said angled segment extending downwardly and rearwardly with said clip positioned below said rounded transition; said caliper discharging said gutter cover to cooling tank for further removal of heat and setting of said gutter cover; said set gutter cover including a tapered channel opening outwardly between said rounded transition and said securing clip and punching said channel to provide a perforated pass through portion at the pass of said channel.
11. A method as claimed in claim 10 including punching said channel to produce alternating trapezoidal ports with angled walls therebetween.
12. A method as claimed in claim 10 wherein said calibrator includes a vacuum source engaging a lower surface of said gutter cover and a water seal is provide on an upper surface of said gutter cover to maintain said textured surface.
13. A method as claimed in claim in claim 12 including forming said securing clip to have an upper arm and a lower arm defining a securing cavity therebetween, said lower arm including an integral hinge intermediate the length of said lower arm for resilient displacement of said arm about said integral hinge to access said securing cavity.
14. A method as claimed in claim 13 including liquid cooling of each performer to cool said sheet substrate during passage through said performers.
15. A method as claimed in claim 14 wherein said calibrator is connected to said cooling tank that includes cooling water at a level above a discharge level of said substrate to allow weepage of water along said gutter cover within said calibrator to form said water seal.
16. A method as claimed in claim 10 including providing a cooling tube aligned with said securing clip and positioned therein immediately downstream of an extrusion die, said cooling tube removing heat from said clip sufficient to maintain the extruded shape of said clip.
17. A method as claimed in claim 16 wherein said cooling tube is open ended and discharges air along a length of said securing clip downstream of said extrusion die.
Description
    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates to a gutter cover and in particular, to a gutter cover that can be applied to a number of different types of eavestrough systems and is designed to produce a water sheeting effect as the rain water moves across the gutter cover.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    In many situations, eavestroughing systems are a significant maintenance problem with respect to the accumulation of seeds, sticks and leaves that fall from adjacent trees. It is known to retrofit such eavestrough systems with a perforated mesh of a metal or plastic which is basically supported in the eavestrough at or slightly below the edge of the eavestrough. Such perforated eavestrough covers are effective in some situations, however, the perforations allow some debris to pass therethrough and depending upon the particular environment, these perforated eavestrough covers are not satisfactory. Leaves and sticks can also become lodged in the perforations and cause further difficulties. Often such perforation covers reduce the problem associated with debris accumulation in the eavestrough but may require cleaning of the covers themselves from accumulated debris.
  • [0003]
    A different approach for eavestrough covers is to use a solid cover and provide the cover with a rounded transition section positioned adjacent the front edge of the eavestrough. Water due to surface tension, tends to follow the rounded transition whereas debris tends to be discharged off the eavestrough cover. Below the rounded transition is a series of gaps for allowing the water to enter the eavestrough. With these systems there are no perforations on the upper surface and thus, the accumulation of debris on the cover is significantly reduced.
  • [0004]
    The present invention relates to improvements in eavestrough solid covers and to disperse of rivulets of water which are formed on the roof. Such rivulets are effectively disbursed to form a sheet like water layer on the eavestrough cover. This sheet like layer more closely follows the rounded transition contour of the eavestrough cover and directs water into the eavestrough while separating debris from the water. In addition, the present invention is directed to a system which can be secured in a quick and effective retrofit manner to a number of different eavestrough systems of different materials.
  • [0005]
    The invention is also directed to an efficient method for producing the solid eavestrough gutter cover.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0006]
    An eavestrough gutter cover according to the present invention is made of an extruded plastic material and comprises a cover segment, a rounded transition edge, and an undercut angled section joining with a perforated pass through portion located beneath the covered segment. The perforated pass through portion allows water to freely pass therethrough. The perforated pass through portion includes an integral resilient clip sized for securing of the gutter cover to an eavestrough edge or to an upper fastening portion of an eavestrough hook.
  • [0007]
    The eavestrough gutter cover is designed for use on many plastic eavestrough systems that include what is referred to as a hidden hook. The hidden hook engages the inside front edge of the eavestrough and is effectively hidden from view by the eavestrough. These hooks typically include an upper flange for engaging an eavestrough cover and retaining an eavestrough cover. The present eavestrough gutter cover has the resilient clip for securing to such hooks. In addition, the resilient clip is somewhat oversized to define a significant recess therebehind. This recess is designed for accommodating the rolled or folded edge of a metal eavestrough. With aluminum eavestroughing systems, the gutter cover directly engages the inside rolled edge of the eavestrough.
  • [0008]
    In a preferred aspect of the eavestrough gutter cover, the resilient clip extends below the pass through portion.
  • [0009]
    In a further aspect of the invention, the resilient clip includes an upwardly and outwardly angled return ramp formed to one side of the pass through portion.
  • [0010]
    In yet a further aspect of the invention, the ramp terminates at a position below the rounded transition edge and at a forward position inwardly of the rounded transition edge.
  • [0011]
    In a further aspect of the invention, the covered segment includes a textured upper surface adjacent the rounded transition edge that serves to slow water runoff, break up rivulets, and improve flow of water runoff around the transition edge for collection and discharge through the pass through portion of the gutter cover.
  • [0012]
    In yet a further aspect of the invention, the covered segment includes in a generally central position across the width thereof, an integral hinge allowing the cover segment when installed to have an angled section joining a horizontal section with the horizontal section separating the angled section from the rounded transition edge. This serves to further slow the water prior to the water encountering the transition edge. The slowing of the water and the textured upper surface will also serve to spread any rivulets of water.
  • [0013]
    In yet a further aspect of the invention, the resilient clip includes an oversized recess located behind a narrow forward slot that when forced open includes a memory function urging the resilient clip to return towards the narrow forward slot position and thus secure the resilient clip to a component inserted therein.
  • [0014]
    The resilient clip is preferably installed on metal eavestrough by first inserting an end portion of the clip onto the eavestrough and then progressively insert the edge of the eavestrough into the clip along the length of the gutter cover.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0015]
    Preferred embodiments of the invention are shown in the drawings, wherein:
  • [0016]
    FIG. 1 is a sectional view showing the eavestrough cover secured above a plastic eavestroughing system;
  • [0017]
    FIG. 2 is a partial perspective view from underneath showing the gutter cover and the trapezoidal ports and “C” clip fastening arrangement;
  • [0018]
    FIG. 3 is a partial perspective view of the eavestrough gutter cover and the textured upper surface thereof;
  • [0019]
    FIG. 4 is a partial perspective view of the extension die;
  • [0020]
    FIG. 5 is a partial perspective view of the gutter cover as outputted from the extension die;
  • [0021]
    FIG. 6 is a partial perspective view of the gutter cover passing through a first preformer;
  • [0022]
    FIG. 7 is a partial perspective view of the gutter cover downstream of the first preformer being embossed;
  • [0023]
    FIG. 8 is a partial perspective view of the gutter cover passing through a second preformer with an angled transition added adjacent the “C” clip;
  • [0024]
    FIG. 9 is a partial perspective view of the gutter cover passing through a calibrator completing the forming of the transition segment adjacent the “C” clip;
  • [0025]
    FIG. 10 is a partial sectional view through the calibrator cooling tank;
  • [0026]
    FIG. 11 is a partial perspective view of the gutter cover after the calibrator; and
  • [0027]
    FIG. 12 illustrates the final punching operation.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0028]
    The gutter cover 2 shown in FIG. 1 has a cover segment 4 which extends across the top of the eavestrough and partially extends under the shingles of the roof as shown at 5. The rounded transition 6 merges with the cover 4 at a forward edge of the eavestrough 100 with the undercut angled section 8 located beneath the rounded transition 6. Water passes over the cover segment 4 as it leaves the roof 9 and effectively spreads out and slows on the cover segment 4. The water then follows the rounded transition whereas debris such as leaves and sticks will merely fall outside of the eavestrough. The undercut angled section 8 directs the water downwardly and rearwardly.
  • [0029]
    The perforated pass through portion 10 is provided at the base of the undercut angled section 8 and allows the water to leave the gutter cover and enter the eavestrough 100. The perforated pass through as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 have a series of alternating trapezoidal sections 15 such that the walls 17 between adjacent perforations 15 are at an angle. In this way, water that passes along the undercut angled section 8 will encounter a perforation and will have a tendency to pass through the eavestrough gutter cover and into the eavestrough. The water either encounters the top edge of a perforation 15 or leaves the angled wall 17.
  • [0030]
    The integral resilient clip 14 is located at a front edge of the eavestrough cover 2 and is designed for engaging a rearwardly extending flange 101 of the plastic hidden eavestrough hook 102 as shown in FIG. 1. Adjacent a front edge of the gutter cover and above the resilient clip 14 is the ramp edge 18. The ramp edge 18 is preferably parallel outwardly angled relative tot he angled section 8 of the final product. This provides easier access for the eventual pending operation. This serves to partially stiffen the upper arm 24 of the resilient clip and to also act as a last barrier for any water which has not been discharged through the perforated pass through portion 10. As can be appreciated, due to surface tension and a capillary action, water will pass around the rounded transition 6 and this desirable property allows the redirection of water towards the perforated section 10. This same surface tension can result in some water clearing the perforated pass through portion 10. The ramp edge 18 further slows any water and acts as a final deterrent whereby water is directed to the perforated pass through 10.
  • [0031]
    The lower arm 26 of the resilient clip includes a weakened portion 29 forming an integral hinge point 28. This runs the length of the eavestrough cover. The resilient clip 14 is designed to have sufficient strength for engaging and being retained by the hidden eavestrough hook 102 where these eavestrough hooks are spaced every several feet along the front edge of the eavestrough. In addition, the resilient clip is designed to be inserted over a folded or rolled inside edge of a metal eavestrough such as a rolled aluminum eavestrough. As shown in FIG. 1, the resilient clip 14 is oversized for engaging a rolled edge of a metal eavestrough, such as aluminum eavestrough commonly used in new construction installation and for retrofit applications. The resilient clip 14 is relatively strong and for insertion on the metal eavestrough, it is more convenient to initially insert the clip at one end of the eavestrough cover and progressively apply the clip to the edge by moving along the eavestrough cover. The clip is forced open and includes an integral return bias due to memory of the clip.
  • [0032]
    The cover segment 4 includes a textured upper surface 29 (FIG. 3) formed during the forming process of the gutter cover. An embossing operation applies a textured surface which is recognizable by touch but is relatively minimal. The textured surface varies approximately 2.8 to 3.6 microns.
  • [0033]
    It has been found that a typical roofing system is designed to direct water away from the edge of the roof and often the rain water strikes the gutter cover in rivulets. These rivulets have a significant flow and the water is somewhat concentrated in the rivulets as it strikes the gutter cover. This flow of rainwater off the roof also tends to bring with it leaves, seeds and other debris. It is important with the eavestrough gutter cover to provide a system where debris does not accumulate in the eavestrough, however, this must be balanced with the ability of the system to effectively direct the water towards the eavestrough system. It has been found that the texturing of the upper surface of the gutter cover acts to disperse the rivulets and cause a sheeting action of the water across the gutter cover. This serves to improve the properties of the water flowing around the rounded transition 6 and also serves to slow the water as it travels across the cover. In some conditions, certain debris may remain on the gutter cover temporarily, however, it will blow off or flow off, depending upon the particular circumstances. Thus, it is desirable to slow the water flow and improve the redirection of the water flow around the rounded transition and rearwardly and downwardly towards the eavestrough. At the base of the angled section 8, it is desirable for the water to not encounter any portion of the plastic cover so it can enter the eavestrough located below this perforated portion. The angling of the perforation walls and the minimal size of any connecting walls 17 assures more water enters the eavestrough.
  • [0034]
    It has been found that this gutter cover is effective with many different eavestroughing systems including conventional rolled metal eavestroughing systems as well as plastic/vinyl systems. In many eavestroughing systems about a house, there may be a particular area where leaf accumulation within the eavestrough is a problem. The solid vinyl gutter cover in the present invention can easily be applied to the sections of the eavestrough having such problems.
  • [0035]
    The gutter cover sections are sold in lengths of 1.8 inch increments and can easily be cut to the required length. Any obstructions such as hooks, for example, in a metal eavestrough, can be accommodated merely by cutting out a portion of the clip of the gutter cover. At corners, it is preferable to provide a 45 degree miter. The thin gauge of the plastic gutter cover makes it very easy to cut either with a saw or with a razor knife.
  • [0036]
    FIG. 4 shows the extrusion die 150 used to initially extrude the eavestrough cover 2. The die 150 includes a semi circular gap 152 whereby the gutter cover is extruded in a shape corresponding to about two thirds of a circular pipe. This partial circular shape allows better balancing of the extrusion process and thus allows faster extrusion of the solid gutter cover. After the initial extrusion, the gutter cover goes through a series of steps to apply the textured surface and to effectively impart the desired shape to the gutter cover. These progressively alter the semi circular type shape to the generally flat final shape of FIG. 12. One of the significant problems associated with extruding of the gutter cover is the ability to maintain the shape of the resilient clip 14.
  • [0037]
    As shown in FIG. 4, a cooling pipe 160 is associated with the gutter cover immediately downstream of the extrusion die 150 and this cooling pipe serves to maintain the separation and shape of the upper arm 24 and lower arm 26 and the clip 14. This pipe 160 removes heat from the extruded product as it is positioned within the resilient clip and serves to maintain this initial shape. This cooling pipe extends a certain distance downstream of the die until sufficient heat has been removed that the arms of the resilient clip are still resilient but the tendency of the clip to collapse on itself has been removed. An air flow is provided through the pipe and discharged out the end of pipe 160 into the length of the clip.
  • [0038]
    The gutter cover subsequently passes through a series of steps including first and second performers to partially flatten the eavestrough cover and progressively form the transition edge. FIGS. 4 through 12 illustrate the process.
  • [0039]
    The semi-circular shape of the product extruded from die 150 is required to go through a number of transitional steps to produce the product as finally shown in FIG. 12. The “C” clip 14 has a tendency to collapse upon itself and the cooling pipe 160 effectively separates the upper arm 24 from the lower arm 26 and maintains the shape of the clip. The product as it exits the die 150, depending upon the particular material, may be at a temperature of approximately 350 F. and the plastic is very soft and somewhat flowing. The cooling pipe 160 starts to remove heat from the “C” clip while maintaining the desired shape thereof. In addition, as the product exits the die, additional air may be provided to partially cool the remaining portion of the gutter cover as shown by the air outlet 165.
  • [0040]
    FIG. 6 shows the gutter cover passing through a first preformer 170 where the semi-circular product is partially flattened but remains in an arc shape. The preformer 170 has a particular slot 172 which acts as a guide for the desired shape and the preformer 170 is water cooled. The preformer does have a significant clearance with respect to the product but it does impart the general shape as shown in FIG. 6. Heat is continuing to be removed from the product between the extrusion die 150 and the preformer 170. Downstream of the first preformer is an embossing arrangement comprising a support roller 180 provided on the lower surface of the gutter cover and a textured embossing roller 182 engaging the upper surface of the gutter cover. The embossing roller 182 effectively embosses a large portion of the upper surface of the gutter cover but does not engage the resilient clip 14.
  • [0041]
    The purpose of the embossing roller is to texture the upper surface to effect dispersion of the water and evening of the water flow across the surface of the gutter cover. The textured surface also improves water adhesion as water passes around the rounded transition for discharge through the trapezoidal ports. Preferably, the textured surface stops at the trapezoidal ports. The embossing roller and the support roller 180 are both water cooled and are quite effective in removing heat from the gutter cover. The more significant problem is trying to remove heat from the resilient clip and keep it within a reasonable temperature range relative to the cooler portion of the gutter cover contacted by the embossing roller and support roller. The product leaving the embossing roller may be in the order of 150 F. to 200 F.
  • [0042]
    Although the gutter cover has passed through the embossing rollers, the gutter cover is relatively flat and it is necessary to form the transition edge of the gutter cover. A second preformer 190 is shown in FIG. 8 and forms the angled section 8 and what will become the rounded transition 6. Again the preformer 190 is water cooled and the product defining slot 192 is slightly oversized relative to the gutter cover. This is important as the embossed surface 19 is to be maintained.
  • [0043]
    In FIG. 9, the calibrator 200 is shown which is used to impart the final shape and dimensions to the product. The calibrator 200 includes a vacuum arrangement engaging the lower surface of the gutter cover but the top surface is not subject to a vacuum which would provide more accuracy with respect to the gutter cover. Such a top vacuum would draw the surface 19 into engagement with a calibrator 200 and seriously reduce the embossed surface 19 provided on the upper surface of the gutter cover.
  • [0044]
    FIG. 10 shows a section through the calibrator with a series of vacuum ports 210 provided on the lower surface of the calibrator while the top surface of the gutter cover is not subject to a vacuum. The calibrator 200 connects to and forms part of the cooling tank 230 having a water level 232 slightly above the upper surface of the gutter cover. Some leakage of water along the upper surface of the gutter cover is shown as 234, however, the movement of the gutter cover through the calibrator avoids any water on the upper surface at the inlet to the calibrator. The gutter cutter is discharged to the tank below the water level and the product is finally cooled. The final shaping does impart a hinged line 240 which allows bending of the cover adjacent a roof side edge necessary to form a transition between the angled roof and a more flat surface of the gutter cover used to slow the water.
  • [0045]
    FIG. 11 shows the final shape of the gutter cover with the exception that the trapezoidal ports 15 have not been formed in the cover. At the base of the undercut angled section 8, a punch 300 can enter through the gap 302 to effect the formation of the ports provided at the base of the angled section 8. The gap 302 tapers inwardly but has a sufficiently large mouth to allow the punch 302 to enter the gap and effect the formation of the ports. Typically, two punches are used at a time for forming two ports with the gutter cover progressively moving through a punching station. Preferably, one of these punches is not operated at a position where the gutter cover is to be cut. Typically, the gutter cover is provided in a certain length, such as three or four feet, and at a cut position, one of the trapezoidal ports 14 is not punched and this provides an end section to each of the two gutter cover pieces.
  • [0046]
    As outlined above, a significant problem encountered in manufacturing this product is effecting heat removal in a controlled manner to reduce or eliminate distortion. The embossing rollers remove a large amount of heat while the clip area remains at a higher temperature. Additional cooling air is directed to the clip portion which is not in contact with the embossing rollers. The process reduces the temperature differential across the width of the gutter cover to avoid warpage.
  • [0047]
    The gutter cover is progressively altered in shape by first and second performers that are water cooled. As can be appreciated, once the textured surface has been applied to the gutter cover any precise sizing of the gutter cover downstream of the embosser, such as common in double sided vacuum arrangements, would remove this desired textured surface. In the final forming shape carried out at the calibrator 200, the calibrator is associated with a water tank 230 and there is some water weepage along the calibrator to provide the necessary seal for vacuum forming. A vacuum source is provided at the bottom of the die, however, the top surface does not have vacuum ports supplied thereto in order to maintain the textured surface. Thus, the water in the tank 230 is above the surface of the gutter cover. The water level in the tank is adjusted to maintain the seal of the final calibrator with the gutter cover while avoiding water flow through the die. The water on the upper surface of the gutter cover in the die effectively provides the vacuum seal. In this way, the part can be sized and shaped to its final shape and shown in the drawings while maintaining the textured upper surface.
  • [0048]
    The final part after leaving the final sizing die is passed through a water bath and effectively cooled. The gutter cover then continues to be punched and cut in a cutting and punch station. Typically, two perforations are cut at the same time and thus, a gutter cover of a length of 1.8 inch increments has a series of punching steps as it moves through the device. Two punches are used at a cut transition, one of the punches does not strike. This provides a solid section and this solid section is then cut to provide a strong end portion.
  • [0049]
    As can be appreciated, the present method extrudes a generally semi circular type product with a resilient clip at one end thereof. This product is then partially straightened and embossed on a substantial portion of the width of the product as part of the manufacturing process. The angled section is then imparted to the product with the clip at an exposed end thereof. Subsequent steps are taken to effect final forming of the product through a die in a manner to impart a reversed transition of the angled section while defining a progressively opening gap in an undercut portion. This progressively opening portion is located below the rounded transition and is necessary to allow effective punching of the gutter cover to form the perforated pass through section. The punches used to form the perforated section are of a trapezoidal shape with these trapezoidal shapes partially overlapping to form angled bridging sections. These angled bridging sections are maintained to a minimum and are disposed at alternate angles whereby water flow around the rounded transition will encounter a perforation.
  • [0050]
    It has been found that the particular gutter cover works effectively and can be manufactured in a cost effective manner.
  • [0051]
    The formation of the spring clip and the large cavity between the upper and lower arms is possible due to effective heat removal immediate downstream of the extrusion die. Heat is typically removed from this clipped portion by means of the initial copper pipe as well as the direction of air to this section. The heat from the remaining portion of the gutter cover is removed by contact with the embossing rollers and contact with the various performers, all of which are water cooled.
  • [0052]
    In the discussion of the angled walls of the perforated section, the angled walls improve the amount of water entering the trough. These angled walls 17 also have the purpose of acting as a brace or support edge for the front clip and serve to connect the front clip to the remaining portion of the cover. This bracing serves to provide sufficient strength to maintain the shape of the cover and avoid sagging between eavestrough hooks which may be present or effective support between the front edge of the eavestrough and where the cover is supported beneath the shingles. As can be appreciated, the bracing strength is balanced against the ability of the system to direct water into the eavestrough.
  • [0053]
    Although various preferred embodiments of the present invention have been described herein in detail, it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art, that variations may be made thereto without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the appended claims.
Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7730672 *Nov 26, 2007Jun 8, 2010Knudson Gary AIntegrated debris-shielding cover, flashing & mounting system for rain gutter
US7891143 *Oct 1, 2008Feb 22, 2011Gramling Karl JGutter retaining system
US8037641 *Jun 19, 2009Oct 18, 2011Grater Gutter Guard LLCGutter guard
US8069617May 19, 2009Dec 6, 2011Wootton Thomas ADebris deflection devices
US8176687 *Feb 8, 2010May 15, 2012Roque Alonso Ramon RGutter system and associated methods
US20070119104 *Oct 18, 2006May 31, 2007Walter PijanowskiCovered rain gutter system
US20080120920 *Nov 26, 2007May 29, 2008Knudson Gary AIntegrated Debris-Shielding Cover, Flashing & Mounting System For Rain Gutter
US20090025303 *Oct 1, 2008Jan 29, 2009Gramling Karl JGutter Retaining System
US20090288349 *May 19, 2009Nov 26, 2009Thomas A. WoottonDebris Deflection Devices
US20090320381 *Jun 19, 2009Dec 31, 2009Grater Gutter Guard LLCGutter guard
US20100251626 *Feb 8, 2010Oct 7, 2010Roque Alonso Ramon RGutter system and associated methods
US20110126477 *Nov 24, 2010Jun 2, 2011All Clear Gutters, Llc.Roof gutter system with removable cover
US20130145699 *Dec 8, 2011Jun 13, 2013John R. OlthoffGutter protector
USD615632Sep 15, 2009May 11, 2010Thomas A. WoottonRain gutter cover
USD621481Sep 15, 2009Aug 10, 2010Wootton Thomas ARain gutter cover
USD621484Sep 15, 2009Aug 10, 2010Wootton Thomas ARain gutter cover
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/12
International ClassificationE04D13/00
Cooperative ClassificationB29C47/003, B29C47/0038, B29C47/0054, E04D13/076, B29K2995/0072, B29C2793/0027, B29C47/0066
European ClassificationB29C47/00L12, B29C47/00L, E04D13/076
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 30, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: GSW BUILDING PRODUCTS INC., CANADA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HANDLEY, STEPHEN;REEL/FRAME:018025/0943
Effective date: 20060629
Mar 17, 2009ASAssignment
Owner name: EURAMAX CANADA, INC., CANADA
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:GSW BUILDING PRODUCTS INC.;REEL/FRAME:022427/0399
Effective date: 20070730
May 11, 2009ASAssignment
Owner name: GENERAL ELECTRIC CAPITAL CORPORATION, AS COLLATERA
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:EURAMAX INTERNATIONAL, INC.;EURAMAX HOLDINGS LIMITED;AMERIMAX BUILDINGPRODUCTS, INC.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:022659/0468
Effective date: 20090430
Mar 24, 2011ASAssignment
Owner name: EURAMAX CANADA, INC., CANADA
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Effective date: 20110318