Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20080046087 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/923,814
Publication dateFeb 21, 2008
Filing dateOct 25, 2007
Priority dateSep 23, 2004
Also published asUS7909853, US20060064166
Publication number11923814, 923814, US 2008/0046087 A1, US 2008/046087 A1, US 20080046087 A1, US 20080046087A1, US 2008046087 A1, US 2008046087A1, US-A1-20080046087, US-A1-2008046087, US2008/0046087A1, US2008/046087A1, US20080046087 A1, US20080046087A1, US2008046087 A1, US2008046087A1
InventorsJames Zucherman, Ken Hsu, Henry Klyce, Charles Winslow, Scott Yerby, John Flynn, Steven Mitchell, John Markwart
Original AssigneeZucherman James F, Hsu Ken Y, Klyce Henry A, Winslow Charles J, Yerby Scott A, Flynn John J, Mitchell Steven T, Markwart John A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Interspinous process implant including a binder and method of implantation
US 20080046087 A1
Abstract
Systems in accordance with embodiments of the present invention can include an implant comprising a spacer for defining a minimum space between adjacent spinous processes, a distraction guide for piercing and distracting an interspinous ligament during implantation, and a binder for limiting or preventing flexion motion of the targeted motion segment. The binder can be secured to a brace associated with the implant during implantation by a capture device. In one embodiment, the capture device includes a fixed piece extending from the brace and a slidable piece associated with the fixed piece. A fastener can be rotated to pinch the binder between the slidable piece and a wall of the brace, securing the binder. A physician need not know the length of the binder prior to implantation, reducing the time required to perform a procedure.
Images(29)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(25)
1. A method, comprising:
disposing an elongated member substantially around a pair of adjacent spinous processes; and
rotating a distal end portion of a tool to couple a first end portion of the elongated member to a second end portion of the elongated member after the disposing.
2. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
adjusting, before the rotating, a length of the elongated member substantially around the pair of adjacent spinous processes such that an amount of flexion associated with the pair of adjacent spinous processes is limited.
3. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
adjusting, before the rotating, a tension of the elongated member substantially around the pair of adjacent spinous processes such that an amount of flexion associated with the pair of adjacent spinous processes is limited.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein the tool is a first tool, the method further comprising:
inserting, before the disposing, the elongated member into a patient's body via a second tool.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein the disposing include threading the elongated member between interspinous ligaments of the pair of adjacent spinous processes so that the pair of adjacent spinous processes are disposed within a loop defined by the elongated member.
6. The method of claim 1, wherein the rotating includes rotating a capture device such that the second end portion of the elongated member is coupled to a brace, the first end portion of the elongated member is fixedly coupled to the brace.
7. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
forming, before the inserting, an incision in the patient's body; and
inserting, before the disposing, the elongated member into the patient's body through the incision.
8. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
forming, before the inserting, an incision in the patient's body;
inserting, before the disposing, the elongated member into the patient's body through the incision; and
inserting, before the rotating, a distal end portion of the tool into the patient's body through the incision such that a proximal end portion of the tool is disposed outside of the patient's body.
9. The method of claim 1, wherein the tool is a first tool, further comprising:
forming, before the inserting, the incision in the patient's body;
inserting, before the disposing, the elongated member into the patient's body through the incision via a second tool; and
inserting, before the actuating, a distal end portion of the first tool into the patient's body through the incision such that a proximal end portion of the first tool is disposed outside of the patient's body.
10. A method, comprising:
inserting an elongated member into a patient's body through an incision in the body;
disposing, after the inserting, the elongated member substantially around a pair of adjacent spinous processes; and
actuating, after the disposing, a tool through the incision to couple a first end portion of the elongated member to a second end portion of the elongated member.
11. The method of claim 10, further comprising:
adjusting, before the actuating, a length of the elongated member substantially around the pair of adjacent spinous processes such that an amount of flexion associated with the pair of adjacent spinous processes is limited.
12. The method of claim 10, further comprising:
adjusting, before the actuating, a tension of the elongated member substantially around the pair of adjacent spinous processes such that an amount of flexion associated with the pair of adjacent spinous processes is limited.
13. The method of claim 10, wherein the disposing include threading the elongated member between interspinous ligaments of the pair of adjacent spinous processes so that the pair of adjacent spinous processes are disposed within a loop defined by the elongated member.
14. The method of claim 10, wherein the actuating includes rotating a distal end portion of the tool such that a capture device couples the second end portion of the elongated member to a brace, the first end portion of the elongated member is fixedly coupled to the brace.
15. The method of claim 10, further comprising:
forming, before the inserting, the incision in the patient's body; and
inserting, before the disposing, the elongated member into the patient's body through the incision.
16. The method of claim 10, further comprising:
forming, before the inserting, the incision in the patient's body;
inserting, before the disposing, the elongated member into the patient's body through the incision; and
inserting, before the actuating, a distal end portion of the tool into the patient's body through the incision such that a proximal end portion of the tool is disposed outside of the patient's body.
17. A kit, comprising:
a coupler;
an elongated member, a first end portion of the elongated member being fixedly coupled to the coupler; and
a tool configured to couple a second end portion of the elongated member to the coupler while the elongated member is disposed substantially around a pair of adjacent spinous processes.
18. The kit of claim 17, wherein:
the coupler includes a brace and a capture device;
the first end portion of the elongated member fixedly coupled to the brace, the second end portion of the elongated member removably coupleable to the brace via the capture device; and
the tool configured to rotate the capture device while the elongated member is disposed around the pair of adjacent spinous processes.
19. The kit of claim 17, wherein the tool is a first tool, the kit further comprising:
a second tool configured to insert the coupler and the elongated member into a patient's body through an incision.
20. The kit of claim 17, wherein the tool is a first tool, the kit further comprising:
a second tool configured to insert the coupler and the elongated member into a patient's body through an incision,
a distal end portion of the first tool is configured to be inserted into the patient's body through the incision and couple the second end portion of the elongated member to the coupler.
21. A method, comprising:
placing an elongated member around a pair of adjacent spinous processes in a patient's body, the elongated member having a distal end and a proximal end; and
coupling a distal portion of the elongated member to a proximal portion of the elongated member, via a tool, such that a displacement of the two adjacent spinous processes away from each other is limited.
22. The method of claim 21, further comprising:
adjusting a coupling member, the coupling member engaging the distal portion and the proximal portion of the elongated member, such that the displacement of the two adjacent spinous processes away from each other is further limited.
23. The method of claim 21, further comprising:
adjusting a coupling member via tool, the coupling member moveably engaged with the distal portion and the proximal portion of the elongated member, such that a displacement of the two adjacent spinous processes away from each other after the adjusting is greater than the displacement of the two adjacent spinous processes before the adjusting.
24. The method of claim 21, further comprising:
positioning a spacer between the pair of adjacent spinous processes.
25. The method of claim 21, further comprising:
positioning, before the coupling, a spacer between the pair of adjacent spinous processes, the spacer being coupled to the elongated member.
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/095,680, entitled “Interspinous Process Implant Including a Binder and Method of Implantation,” filed Mar. 31, 2005, which claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/612,465, entitled “Interspinous Process Implant Including a Binder and Method of Implantation,” filed Sep. 23, 2004; each of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.
  • [0002]
    This U.S. Patent Application incorporates by reference all of the following co-pending applications and issued patents:
  • [0003]
    U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/850,267 (now Publication No. 2005-0010293), entitled “Distractible Interspinous Process Implant and Method of Implantation,” filed May 20, 2004;
  • [0004]
    U.S. Pat. No. 6,419,676, entitled “Spine Distraction Implant and Method,” issued Jul. 16, 2002 to Zucherman, et al.;
  • [0005]
    U.S. Pat. No. 6,451,019, entitled “Supplemental Spine Fixation Device and Method,” issued Sep. 17, 2002 to Zucherman, et al.;
  • [0006]
    U.S. Pat. No. 6,582,433, entitled “Spine Fixation Device and Method,” issued Jun. 24, 2003 to Yun;
  • [0007]
    U.S. Pat. No. 6,652,527, entitled “Supplemental Spine Fixation Device and Method, issued Nov. 25, 2003 to Zucherman, et al.;
  • [0008]
    U.S. Pat. No. 6,695,842, entitled “Interspinous Process Distraction System and Method with Positionable Wing and Method,” issued Feb. 24, 2004 to Zucherman, et al.;
  • [0009]
    U.S. Pat. No. 6,699,246, entitled “Spine Distraction Implant,” issued Mar. 2, 2004 to Zucherman, et al.; and
  • [0010]
    U.S. Pat. No. 6,712,819, entitled “Mating Insertion Instruments for Spinal Implants and Methods of Use,” issued Mar. 30, 2004 to Zuchennan, et al.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0011]
    This invention relates to interspinous process implants. As the present society ages, it is anticipated that there will be an increase in adverse spinal conditions which are characteristic of older people. Certain biochemical changes can occur with aging, affecting tissue found throughout the body. In the spine, the structure of the intervertebral disks can be compromised, in part as the structure of the annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disk weakens due to degenerative effects. Spondylosis (also referred to as spinal osteoarthritis) is one example of a degenerative disorder that can cause loss of normal spinal structure and function. The degenerative process can impact the cervical, thoracic, and/or lumbar regions of the spine, affecting the intervertebral disks and the facet joints. Pain associated with degenerative disorders is often triggered by one or both of forward flexion and hyperextension. Spondylosis in the thoracic region of the spine can cause disk pain during flexion and facet pain during hyperextension. Spondylosis can affect the lumbar region of the spine, which carries most of the body's weight, and movement can stimulate pain fibers in the annulus fibrosus and facet joints.
  • [0012]
    Over time, loss of disk height can result in a degenerative cascade with deterioration of all components of the motion segment resulting in segment instability and ultimately in spinal stenosis (including, but not limited to, central canal and lateral stenosis). Spinal stenosis results in a reduction in foraminal area (i.e., the available space for the passage of nerves and blood vessels) which compresses the nerve roots and causes radicular pain. Another symptom of spinal stenosis is myelopathy. Extension and ipsilateral rotation further reduces the foraminal area and contributes to pain, nerve root compression and neural injury. During the process of deterioration, disks can become herniated and/or become internally torn and chronically painful. When symptoms seem to emanate from both anterior (disk) and posterior (facets and foramen) structures, patients cannot tolerate positions of extension or flexion.
  • [0013]
    A common procedure for handling pain associated with degenerative spinal disk disease is the use of devices for fusing together two or more adjacent vertebral bodies. The procedure is known by a number of terms, one of which is interbody fusion. Interbody fusion can be accomplished through the use of a number of devices and methods known in the art. These include screw arrangements, solid bone implant methodologies, and fusion devices which include a cage or other mechanism which is packed with bone and/or bone growth inducing substances. All of the above are implanted between adjacent vertebral bodies in order to fuse the vertebral bodies together, alleviating associated pain.
  • [0014]
    Depending on the degree of slip and other factors, a physician may fuse the vertebra “as is,” or fuse the vertebrae and also use a supplemental device. Supplemental devices are often associated with primary fusion devices and methods, and assist in the fusion process. Supplemental devices assist during the several month period when bone from the adjacent vertebral bodies is growing together through the primary fusion device in order to fuse the adjacent vertebral bodies. During this period it is advantageous to have the vertebral bodies held immobile with respect to each other so that sufficient bone growth can be established. Supplemental devices can include hook and rod arrangements, screw arrangements, and a number of other devices which include straps, wires, and bands, all of which are used to immobilize one portion of the spine relative to another. Supplemental devices have the disadvantage that they generally require extensive surgical procedures in addition to the extensive procedure surrounding the primary fusion implant. Such extensive surgical procedures include additional risks, including risk of causing damage to the spinal nerves during implantation. Spinal fusion can include highly invasive surgery requiring use of a general anesthetic, which itself includes additional risks. Risks further include the possibility of infection, and extensive trauma and damage to the bone of the vertebrae caused either by anchoring of the primary fusion device or the supplemental device. Finally, spinal fusion can result in an absolute loss of relative movement between vertebral bodies.
  • [0015]
    U.S. Pat. No. 5,496,318 to Howland, et al. teaches supplemental devices for the stabilization of the spine for use with surgical procedures to implant a primary fusion device. Howland '318 teaches an H-shaped spacer having two pieces held together by a belt, steel cable, or polytetrafluoroethane web material, one or both ends of which includes an attachment device fixedly connected with the respective end. Howland '318 teaches that the vertebra are preferably surgically modified to include a square notch to locate the fixation device in a preferred location. Howland '318 has the further disadvantage that the belt, cable or web material must be sized before implantation, increasing the procedure time to include sizing time and reducing the precision of the fit where both ends of the belt, cable or web material include attachment devices (and as such are incrementally sized).
  • [0016]
    U.S. Pat. No. 5,609,634 to Voydeville teaches a prosthesis including a semi-flexible interspinous block positioned between adjacent spinous processes and a ligament made from the same material. A physician must lace the ligament through the interspinous block and around the spinous processes in a figure of eight, through the interspinous block and around the spinous processes in an oval, and suture the ligament to itself to fix the interspinous block in place. Voydeville has the disadvantage of requiring significant displacement and/or removal of tissue associated with the spinous processes, potentially resulting in significant trauma and damage. Voydeville has the further disadvantage of requiring the physician to lace the interspinous ligament through the interspinous block. Such a procedure can require care and time, particularly because a physician's ability to view the area of interest is complicated by suffusion of blood in the area of interest.
  • [0017]
    It would be advantageous if a device and procedure for limiting flexion and extension of adjacent vertebral bodies were as simple and easy to perform as possible, and would preferably (though not necessarily) leave intact all bone, ligament, and other tissue which comprise and surround the spine. Accordingly, there is a need for procedures and implants which are minimally invasive and which can supplement or substitute for primary fusion devices and methods, or other spine fixation devices and methods. Accordingly, a need exists to develop spine implants that alleviate pain caused by spinal stenosis and other such conditions caused by damage to, or degeneration of, the spine. Such implants would distract (increase) or maintain the space between the vertebrae to increase the foraminal area and reduce pressure on the nerves and blood vessels of the spine, and limit or block flexion to reduce pain resulting from spondylosis and other such degenerative conditions.
  • [0018]
    A further need exists for development of a minimally invasive surgical implantation method for spine implants that preserves the physiology of the spine. A still further need exists for an implant that accommodates the distinct anatomical structures of the spine, minimizes further trauma to the spine, and obviates the need for invasive methods of surgical implantation. Additionally, a need exists to address adverse spinal conditions that are exacerbated by spinal extension and flexion.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0019]
    Further details of embodiments of the present invention are explained with the help of the attached drawings in which:
  • [0020]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an interspinous implant capable of limiting or blocking relative movement of adjacent spinous processes during extension of the spine.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 2A is a posterior view of the implant of FIG. 1 positioned between adjacent spinous processes.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 2B is a cross-sectional side view of a spacer of the interspinous implant of FIGS. 1 and 2A positioned between spinous processes.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 2C is a cross-sectional view of the spacer of FIG. 2B during flexion of the spine.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 3A is a side view of an embodiment of an implant in accordance with the present invention having a distraction guide, a spacer, a brace, and a binder associated with the brace and fixable in position by a capture device.
  • [0025]
    FIG. 3B is a side view of an alternative embodiment of an implant in accordance with the present invention including a brace wall having recesses for receiving lobes of a capture device.
  • [0026]
    FIG. 3C is a side view of still another embodiment of an implant in accordance with the present invention including a capture device having a spring-loaded cam for securing a binder against a brace wall.
  • [0027]
    FIG. 3D is a side view of a still further embodiment of an implant in accordance with the present invention including a capture device having dual spring-loaded cams for securing a binder in position.
  • [0028]
    FIG. 4A is an end view of the implant of FIG. 3A positioned between adjacent spinous processes.
  • [0029]
    FIG. 4B is an end view of the implant of FIG. 3A positioned between adjacent spinous processes.
  • [0030]
    FIG. 4C is an end view of the implant of FIG. 3A positioned between adjacent spinous processes wherein the spinous processes are surgically modified to receive a binder.
  • [0031]
    FIG. 5 is an end view of an alternative embodiment of an implant in accordance with the present invention having a binder that varies in shape along the binder's length.
  • [0032]
    FIG. 6A is an end view of the implant of FIG. 5 positioned between adjacent spinous processes.
  • [0033]
    FIG. 6B is an opposite end view of the implant of FIG. 6A.
  • [0034]
    FIG. 6C is an end view of still another embodiment of an implant in accordance with the present invention having a cord for a binder.
  • [0035]
    FIG. 7A is a side view of an embodiment of an implant in accordance with the present invention including a wing associated with the distraction guide to further limit or block movement of the implant.
  • [0036]
    FIG. 7B is a partial cross-sectional side view of an alternative embodiment of an implant in accordance with the present invention include an extendable wing associated with the distraction guide, the extendable wing being in a retracted position.
  • [0037]
    FIG. 7C is a partial cross-sectional side view of the implant of FIG. 7B wherein the extendable wing is in an extended position.
  • [0038]
    FIG. 7D is a partial cross-sectional side view of still another embodiment of an implant in accordance with the present invention including a spring-loaded wing associated with the distraction guide, the wing being in an extended position.
  • [0039]
    FIG. 7E is a partial cross-sectional side view of the implant of FIG. 7D wherein the spring-loaded wing is in a collapsed position.
  • [0040]
    FIG. 8 is a top view of two implants in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention positioned between the spinous processes of adjacent vertebrae, one of the implants having a binder arranged around the adjacent spinous processes.
  • [0041]
    FIG. 9A is a perspective view of a further embodiment of an implant in accordance with the present invention having a distraction guide, a spacer, a brace, and a binder associated with the brace and fixable in position by a capture device.
  • [0042]
    FIG. 9B is a perspective view the implant of FIG. 9A wherein the capture device is arranged to secure a binder between the capture device and the brace.
  • [0043]
    FIG. 9C is a side view of the implant of FIGS. 9A and 9B.
  • [0044]
    FIG. 10A is a cross-sectional top view of a binder loosely positioned within the capture device of the implant of FIGS. 9A and 9B.
  • [0045]
    FIG. 10B is a cross-sectional top view of the binder secured to the brace by the capture device of the implant of FIGS. 9A and 9B.
  • [0046]
    FIG. 10C is a cross-sectional top view of a binder loosely positioned within an alternative embodiment of a capture device of the implant of FIGS. 9A and 9B.
  • [0047]
    FIG. 10D is a cross-sectional top view of the binder and capture device of FIG. 10C wherein the binder is secured to the brace
  • [0048]
    FIG. 11 is an end view of the implant of FIGS. 9A and 9B positioned between adjacent spinous processes.
  • [0049]
    FIG. 12 is a flow chart of a method of inserting an implant according to an embodiment of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0050]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an implant as described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,695,842 to Zucherman, et al., incorporated herein by reference. The implant 100 has a main body 101. The main body 101 includes a spacer 102, a first wing 108, a lead-in tissue expander 106 (also referred to herein as a distraction guide) and an alignment track 103. The main body 101 is inserted between adjacent spinous processes. Preferably, the main body 101 remains (where desired) in place without attachment to the bone or ligaments.
  • [0051]
    The distraction guide 106 includes a tip from which the distraction guide 106 expands, the tip having a diameter sufficiently small such that the tip can pierce an opening in an interspinous ligament and/or can be inserted into a small initial dilated opening. The diameter and/or cross-sectional area of the distraction guide 106 then gradually increases until it is substantially similar to the diameter of the main body 101 and spacer 102. The tapered front end eases the ability of a physician to urge the implant 100 between adjacent spinous processes. When urging the main body 101 between adjacent spinous processes, the front end of the distraction guide 106 distracts the adjacent spinous processes and dilates the interspinous ligament so that a space between the adjacent spinous processes is approximately the diameter of the spacer 102.
  • [0052]
    The shape of the spacer 102 is such that for purposes of insertion between the spinous processes, the spinous processes need not be altered or cut away in order to accommodate the spacer 102. Additionally, associated ligaments need not be cut away and there is little or no damage to the adjacent or surrounding tissues. As shown in FIG. 1, the spacer 102 is elliptically shaped in cross-section, and can swivel about a central body (also referred to herein as a shaft) extending from the first wing 108 so that the spacer 102 can self-align relative to the uneven surfaces of the spinous processes. Self-alignment can ensure that compressive loads are distributed across the surface of the bone. As contemplated in Zucherman '842, the spacer 102 can have, for example, a diameter of six millimeters, eight millimeters, ten millimeters, twelve millimeters and fourteen millimeters. These diameters refer to the height by which the spacer distracts and maintains apart the spinous process. For an elliptically shaped spacer, the selected height (i.e., diameter) is the minor dimension measurement across the ellipse. The major dimension is transverse to the alignment of the spinous process, one above the other.
  • [0053]
    The first wing 108 has a lower portion 113 and an upper portion 112. As shown in FIG. 1, the upper portion 112 is shaped to accommodate the anatomical form or contour of spinous processes (and/or laminae) of the L4 (for an L4-L5 placement) or L5 (for an L5-S1 placement) vertebra. The same shape or variations of this shape can be used to accommodate other motion segments. The lower portion 113 can also be rounded to accommodate the spinous processes. The lower portion 113 and upper portion 112 of the first wing 108 act as a stop mechanism when the implant 100 is inserted between adjacent spinous processes. The implant 100 cannot be inserted beyond the surfaces of the first wing 108. Additionally, once the implant 100 is inserted, the first wing 108 can prevent side-to-side, or posterior-to-anterior movement of the implant 100.
  • [0054]
    The implant 100 further includes an adjustable wing 150 (also referred to herein as a second wing). The adjustable wing 150 has a lower portion 152 and an upper portion 153. Similar to the first wing 108, the adjustable wing 150 is designed to accommodate the anatomical form or contour of the spinous processes and/or lamina. The adjustable wing 150 is secured to the main body 101 with a fastener 154. The adjustable wing 150 also has an alignment tab 158. When the adjustable wing 150 is initially placed on the main body 101, the alignment tab 158 engages the alignment track 103. The alignment tab 158 slides within the alignment track 103 and helps to maintain the adjustable wing 150 substantially parallel with the first wing 108. When the main body 101 is inserted into the patient and the adjustable wing 150 has been attached, the adjustable wing 150 also can prevent side-to-side, or posterior-to-anterior movement.
  • [0055]
    FIG. 2A illustrates an implant 100 positioned between adjacent spinous processes extending from vertebrae of the lumbar region. The implant 100 is positioned between inferior articular processes 10 associated with the upper vertebrae and superior articular processes 12 associated with the lower vertebrae. The supraspinous ligament 6 connects the upper and lower spinous processes 2,4. The implant 100 can be positioned without severing or otherwise destructively disturbing the supraspinous ligament 6.
  • [0056]
    Referring to FIG. 2B, the spacer 102 of the implant 100 of FIG. 2A is shown in cross-section. The spacer 102 defines a minimum space between adjacent spinous processes 2,4. During extension the spacer 102 limits or blocks relative movement between the adjacent spinous processes 2,4, limiting or blocking the collapse of the space between the spinous processes 2,4. Such support can alleviate symptoms of degenerative disorders by preventing a reduction of the foraminal area and compression of the nerve roots, or by avoiding aggravation of a herniated disk, or by relieving other problems. However, as shown in FIG. 2C, the implant 100 permits flexion, which in some degenerative disorders (for example in cases of spinal stenosis) can relieve some symptoms. As can be seen, during flexion the spacer 102 can float between the spinous processes, held in position by the interspinous ligament 8, and/or other tissues and structures associated with the spine. The ability to float between the spinous processes 2,4 also permits varying degrees of rotation, as well as flexion. Implants as described in Zucherman '842 thus have the advantage that they permit a greater degree of movement when compared with primary and supplementary spinal fusion devices.
  • [0057]
    In some circumstances, for example where a patient develops spondylosis or other degenerative disorder that makes both flexion and extension painful and uncomfortable, it can be desired that the spinous processes be further immobilized, while providing the same ease of implantation as provided with implants described above. Referring to FIG. 3A, an embodiment of an implant 300 in accordance with the present invention is shown. The implant 300 includes a distraction guide 306, a spacer 302, and a brace 308. As shown, the spacer 302 is rotatable about a central body 301 extending from the brace 302, although in other embodiments the spacer 302 can be fixed is position. A binder 330 can be fixedly connected with the brace 308 at a proximal end 332 of the binder 330. The binder 330 is flexible, or semi-flexible, and can be positioned around adjacent spinous processes so that the binder 308 engages the spinous processes during flexion of the spine. Once positioned around adjacent spinous processes, tension of the binder 330 can be set when the binder 330 is secured to the brace 308 so that relative movement of the adjacent spinous processes during flexion is limited or prevented, as desired.
  • [0058]
    As can be seen in FIG. 3A, in an embodiment the brace 308 can include a first end having a slot 341 through which the proximal end 332 of the binder 330 can be threaded and subsequently sutured, knotted or otherwise bound so that the proximal end 332 of the binder 330 cannot be drawn through the slot 341. In other embodiments (not shown), the proximal end 332 can be looped or can include a connector, such as a clasp or other device, and can be fixed to the brace 308 via a fastener that engages the connector. One of ordinary skill in the art can appreciate the myriad different ways in which the proximal end 332 of the binder 330 can be associated with the brace 308 so that tension can be applied to the binder 330, and implants in accordance with the present invention are not intended to be limited to those schemes described in detail herein.
  • [0059]
    The brace 308 can include a height along the spine greater than a height of the spacer 302 so that movement along a longitudinal axis L in the direction of insertion is limited or blocked by the brace 308 when the brace 308 contacts the lateral surfaces of the spinous processes. In this way, the brace 308 can function similarly to the wing 108 of the above described implant 100. In other embodiments, the brace 308 can have a height greater or smaller than as shown. Once the binder 330 is positioned around the spinous processes and secured, movement of the implant 300 relative to the spinous processes is limited by the binder 330 along the longitudinal axis as well as along the spinous processes (i.e., anterior-to-posterior movement).
  • [0060]
    A free end of the binder 330 can be secured to the brace 308 by a capture device 320 associated with the brace 308. The brace 308 can include a flange 310 from which the capture device 320 can extend. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 3A, the capture device 320 comprises a rotatable cam 321 having a fastener 322 and one or more cut-outs 324. A tool can be mated with the cut-outs 324 and rotated to pivot the rotatable cam 321. When the cam 321 is rotated, the eccentric shape of the cam 321 causes a gap to close between the cam 321 and a wall 314 of the brace 330 from which the flange 310 extends. When the binder 330 is positioned between the cam 321 and the wall 314, the rotation of the cam 321 can pinch the binder 330 between the cam 321 and the wall 314, defining a secured end 336 of the binder 330. Optionally, the fastener 322 can be screwed (i.e., rotated) so that the fastener 322 is further seated, tightening against the cam 321 to fix the cam 321 in position. Further, optionally, one or both of the wall 314 and the rotatable cam 321 can include knurls, or some other texture (e.g., teeth) to prevent slippage (i.e., the slipping of the binder 330 between the cam 321 and the wall 314). The brace 308 can further include a guide 312, such as a channel or slot (a slot as shown) at a second end of the brace 308 to align the binder 330 with the capture device 320.
  • [0061]
    The binder 330 can comprise a strap, ribbon, tether, cord, or some other flexible (or semi-flexible), and preferably threadable structure. The binder 330 can be made from a biocompatible material. In an embodiment, the binder 330 can be made from a braided polyester suture material. Braided polyester suture materials include, for example, Ethibond, Ethiflex, Mersilene, and Dacron, and are nonabsorbable, having high tensile strength, low tissue reactivity and improved handling. In other embodiments, the binder 330 can be made from stainless steel (i.e., surgical steel), which can be braided into a tether or woven into a strap, for example. In still other embodiments, the binder 330 can be made from some other material (or combination of materials) having similar properties.
  • [0062]
    The distraction guide 306 can optionally include a slot, bore, cut-out or other cavity 309 formed in the distraction guide 306 through which the binder 330 can be threaded or positioned. Such a cavity can allow on-axis positioning of the binder 330 (i.e., the binder can be substantially aligned with the longitudinal axis L of the implant 300). Further, capturing the binder 330 within a slot or bore can prevent or limit shifting of the distraction guide 306 relative to the binder 330 to further secure the implant 300 between the spinous processes.
  • [0063]
    As will be readily apparent to one of skill in the art, implants in accordance with the present invention provide significant benefits to a physician by simplifying an implantation procedure and reducing procedure time, while providing an implant that can limit or block flexion and extension of the spine. A physician can position an implant between adjacent spinous processes and can position a binder 330 connected with the brace 308 around the spinous processes without requiring the physician to measure an appropriate length of the binder 330 prior to implantation. The capture device 320 allows the binder 330 to be secured to the brace 308 anywhere along a portion of the binder 330, the portion being between a distal end 334 of the binder 330 and the proximal end 332. The physician can secure the binder 330 to the brace 308 to achieve the desired range of movement (if any) of the spinous processes during flexion.
  • [0064]
    The capture device 320 and brace 308 can have alternative designs to that shown in FIG. 3A. A side view of an implant 400 in accordance with an alternative embodiment of the present invention is shown in FIG. 3B, the implant 400 including a capture device 420 comprising a cam 421 positioned within a ring 426 having one or more lobes 423 corresponding with one or more recesses 413 in a wall 414 of the brace 408. The binder 330 is positioned between the capture device 420 and the brace 408. Once the binder 330 is positioned as desired, the fastener 422 and cam 421 can be rotated using an appropriate tool, with the cam 421 forcing the lobes 423 of the ring 426 to mate with the recesses 413 of the brace 408, preventing the ring 426 from shifting in position and defining a secure end 336 of the binder 330. Rotating the fastener 422 rotates and optionally tightens down the cam 421. Such a capture device 420 can provide a physician a visual indication that the binder 330 is properly secured to the brace 408, as well as preventing slippage.
  • [0065]
    Referring to FIGS. 3C and 3D, in still other embodiments, the implant can include a capture device comprising a spring-loaded mechanism. FIG. 3C illustrates an implant 500 including a capture device 520 comprising a single spring-loaded cam 521 pivotally connected with the flange 310 and biased to rotate in one direction. The distance between the pivot point of the cam 510 and the wall 314 is sufficiently narrow that the rotation of the cam 521 in the direction of bias is blocked (or nearly blocked) by the wall 314. The eccentricity of the cam 521 is large enough that a maximum gap between the wall 314 and the cam 521 is sufficiently wide as to allow the binder 330 to be threaded between the cam 521 and the wall 314. A physician can position the binder 330 between the cam 521 and the wall 514 by overcoming the spring-force of the spring-loaded cam 521. Once the binder 330 is position as desired, the physician need only allow the bias force of the spring-loaded cam 520 to force the cam 521 against the wall 314, so that the cam 521 pinches and secures the binder 330 between the cam 521 and the wall 314. Optionally, one or both of the cam 521 and the wall 314 can be knurled or otherwise textured to limit or prevent slippage. Further, the wall 314 can optionally include a recess (not shown) to receive the cam 521 so that the binder 330 is pinched within the recess (similar to the lobe and recess arrangement of FIG. 3B), thereby further limiting slippage.
  • [0066]
    FIG. 3D illustrates an implant 600 including a capture device 620 comprising dual spring-loaded cams 621, the dual spring-loaded cams 621 being pivotally connected with the flange 310. The dual spring-loaded cams 621 are biased in opposition to one another so that the cams 621 abut one another, similar to cam cleats commonly used for securing rope lines on boats. During surgery, the binder 330 can be loosely positioned around the adjacent spinous processes and threaded between the cams 621. Tension can be applied to the binder 330, as desired, by drawing the binder 330 through the cams 621. The force of the binder 330 being pulled through the cams 621 can overcome the bias force to allow the binder 330 to be tightened, while releasing the binder 330 can define a secure end 336 of the binder 330 as the cams 621 swivel together. As above, one or both of the cams 621 can be knurled or otherwise textured to limit or prevent slippage.
  • [0067]
    Embodiments of implants have been described in FIGS. 3A-3D with some level of specificity; however, implants in accordance with the present invention should not be construed as being limited to such embodiments. Any number of different capture devices can be employed to fix a binder to a brace by defining a secure end of the binder, and such capture devices should not be construed as being limited to capture devices including cams, as described above. The capture device need only be a device that allows a physician to fit a binder having a generic size, or estimated size, around adjacent spinous processes with a desired level of precision in tension.
  • [0068]
    FIGS. 4A and 4B are an opposite end views of the implant of FIG. 3A positioned between adjacent spinous processes extending from vertebrae of the lumbar region. The contours of a space between adjacent spinous processes can vary between patients, and between motion segments. A rotatable spacer 302 can rotate to best accommodate the shape of the space so that the implant 300 can be positioned as desired along the spinous processes. For example, it can be desirable to position the spacer 302 as close to the vertebral bodies as possible (or as close to the vertebral bodies as practicable) to provide improved support. Once the implant 300 is positioned as desired, the binder 330 can be threaded through interspinous ligaments associated with motion segments (i.e., pairs of adjacent vertebrae and associated structures and tissues) above and below the targeted motion segment so that the binder 330 is arranged around the upper and lower spinous processes 2,4. The binder 330 can then be threaded through the slot 312 of the brace 308 and positioned between the capture device 320 and the brace wall 314. A first tool (not shown) can be inserted into the incision formed to insert the implant 300 between the spinous processes 2,4. Though not shown, the spacer 302 can include a notch, similar to a notch 190 of the spacer 102 of FIG. 1, and the brace 308 can include recesses, similar to recesses 192 of the first wing 108 of FIG. 1, that can be engaged by the first tool for grasping and releasing the implant 300 during insertion. (See U.S. Pat. No. 6,712,819, which is incorporated herein by reference.) Alternatively, some other technique for grasping and releasing the implant 300 can be employed. Once the implant 300 is positioned and the binder 330 is arranged as desired, a second tool (not shown), such as a forked tool having spaced apart tines, can engage the cam 321 of the capture device 320 to rotate the cam 321, thereby securing the binder 330 to the brace 308. A hex wrench can tighten down the fastener 322 if desired. Alternatively, a single tool can be employed to perform both the function of insertion of the implant 300 and rotation of the cam 321, as depicted in the above referenced patent. Optionally, the binder 330 can then be trimmed so that the distal end 334 of the binder 330 does not extend undesirably away from the brace 308. As can be seen, the spacer 302 is rotated relative to the distraction guide 306 and the brace 308. Because the spacer 302 can rotate relative to the distraction guide 306 and the brace 308, the brace 308 can be positioned so that the binder 330 can be arranged around the upper and lower spinous processes 2,4 without twisting the binder 330. The binder 330 is positioned around the lower spinous process 4, threaded or positioned at least partially within a slot 309 of the distraction guide 306, and positioned around the upper spinous process 2 so that the binder 330 can be secured to the brace 308, as described above.
  • [0069]
    Implants in accordance with the present invention can enable a physician to limit or block flexion and extension in a targeted motion segment while minifying invasiveness of an implantation procedure (relative to implantation procedures of the prior art). However, such implants can also be used where more extensive implantation procedures are desired. For example, as shown in FIG. 4C, it can be desired that the adjacent spinous processes 2,4 be surgically modified to receive the binder 330, thereby insuring that the binder 330 does not shift or slide relative to the spinous processes 2,4. The binder 330 is threaded directly through the respective spinous processes 2,4 rather than through the interspinous ligaments of adjacent motion segments. The amount of bone removed from the spinous processes 2,4 can be reduced where a cord or tether is used as a binder 330 rather than a strap. While such applications fall within the contemplated scope of implants and methods of implantation of the present invention, such application may not realize the full benefit that can be achieved using such implants due to the modification of the bone.
  • [0070]
    Still another embodiment of an implant 700 in accordance with the present invention is shown in the end view of FIG. 5. In such an embodiment the binder 430 can comprise a first portion 431 formed as a strap for arrangement around one of the upper and lower spinous processes 2,4, and that tapers to a second portion 433 formed as a cord. The distraction guide 406 can include a bore 409 or other cavity for receiving the second portion 433. As can be seen in FIG. 6A, once the binder 430 is threaded through the distraction guide 406, a pad 436 of biocompatible material can be associated with the binder 430, for example by slidably threading the binder 430 through a portion of the pad 436, and the pad 436 can be arranged between the binder 430 and the respective spinous process 2 so that a load applied by the binder 430 is distributed across a portion of the surface of the spinous process 2. Referring to FIG. 6B, once the binder 430 is arranged as desired relative to the adjacent spinous processes 2,4, the binder 330 can be secured by the brace 708. The brace 708 as shown is still another embodiment of a brace for use with implants of the present invention. In such an embodiment, the brace 708 includes a capture device 720 comprising a clip including a spring-loaded button 721 having a first hole therethrough and a shell 723 in which the button 721 is disposed, the shell 723 having a second hole. A physician depresses the button 721 so that the first and second holes align. The binder 430 can then be threaded through the holes, and the button 721 can be released so that the spring forces the holes to misalign, pinching the binder 430 and defining a secure end of the binder 430.
  • [0071]
    FIG. 6C is an end view of a still further embodiment of an implant 800 in accordance with the present invention. In such an embodiment the binder 530 can comprise a cord. An upper pad 536 and a lower pad 538 can be slidably associated with the binder 530 and arranged so that a load applied by the binder 530 is distributed across a portion of the upper and lower spinous processes 2,4. As can be seen, such an embodiment can include a brace 808 having a substantially different shape than braces previously described. It should be noted that the brace 808 of FIG. 6C is shown, in part, to impress upon one of ordinary skill in the art that a brace and capture device for use with implants of the present invention can include myriad different shapes, mechanisms and arrangements, and that the present invention is meant to include all such variations. As shown, the footprint of the brace 808 is reduced by shaping the wall 814 of the brace 808 to taper at an upper end to form a guide 812 for aligning the binder 530 and to taper at a lower end to an eyelet 841 for capturing a proximal end 532 of the binder 530. The brace 808 includes a height from eyelet 841 to guide 812 such that movement of the implant 800 in the direction of insertion is blocked or limited by the brace 808.
  • [0072]
    Use of a binder to limit or prevent flexion can provide an additional benefit of limiting movement along the longitudinal axis L (shown in FIG. 3A). However, implants in accordance with the present invention can optionally further include a second wing for limiting or blocking movement in the direction opposite insertion. Inclusion of such a structure can ensure that the implant remains in position, for example where the binder slips out of a slot of the distraction guide, or where the binder becomes unsecured.
  • [0073]
    Referring to FIG. 7A, an implant in accordance with an embodiment can include a second wing 450 connected with the distraction guide 406 of the implant 900 by a fastener 454. The second wing 450 is similar to the second wing 150 described above in reference to FIG. 1. The second wing 450 can include an alignment tab 458 allowing a position of the second wing 450 to be adjusted along a longitudinal axis L of the implant 900, and a fastener 454 (for example a hex headed bolt) for affixing the second wing 450 to the implant 900 in the position along the longitudinal axis L desired. The distraction guide 406 can include an alignment groove (not shown) corresponding to the alignment tab 458. The alignment tab 458 fits within, and is movable along, the alignment groove so that a contact surface 455 of the second wing 450 can be arranged as desired. As shown, the second wing 450 includes a substantially planar contact surface arranged so that the contact surface 455 of the second wing 450 is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis L. However, in other embodiments, the contact surface 455 need not be planar, and can be shaped and oriented to roughly correspond with a contact surface of the upper and lower spinous processes. Likewise, a contact surface 315 of the binder 308 can be shaped and oriented to roughly correspond with a contact surface of the upper and lower spinous processes. As shown, the upper portion 453 and the lower portion 452 of the second wing 450 do not extend from the distraction guide 406 as substantially as the upper portion 153 and lower portion 152 of the second wing 150 of FIG. 1. As such, the second wing 450 includes a height H along the spine smaller than that of the second wing 150 of FIG. 1. It has been observed that benefits can be gained by including a wing 450, though the wing 450 does not extend from the distraction guide 406 as significantly as shown in FIG. 1 (i.e., the wing 450 includes “nubs” extending above and/or below the height of the spacer 302). Such wings 450 will also be referred to herein as winglets. Including a second wing 450 having an overall height along the spine smaller than that of FIG. 1 can limit movement along the longitudinal axis without interfering with (or being interfered by) the arrangement of the binder 330.
  • [0074]
    In other embodiments, implants in accordance with the present invention can include a second wing (or an upper portion and/or lower portion) extendable from the distraction guide. In this way an implant and a device for limiting or blocking movement along a longitudinal axis of the implant can be included in a single piece, possibly simplifying implantation. Referring to FIGS. 7B and 7C, implants 1000 in accordance with the present invention can include a distraction guide 506 having a selectably extendable upper portion 553 and lower portion 552 disposed within a cavity of the distraction guide 506. The upper and lower portions 553,552 can be extended by actuating a nut, knob or other mechanism operably associated with a gear 556 so that the gear 556 rotates. The teeth of the gear 556 engage teeth of the upper and lower portions 553,552, causing the upper and lower portions 553,552 to extend sufficiently that the upper and lower portions 553,552 form winglets for preventing motion of the implant 1000 in a direction opposite insertion (shown in FIG. 7C). Rotating the gear 556 in an opposite direction can retract the upper and lower portions 553,552.
  • [0075]
    In an alternative embodiment, implants 1100 in accordance with the present invention can include spring-loaded upper and/or lower portions 653,652 such as shown in FIGS. 7D and 7E. In such an embodiment the upper and lower portions 653,652 can be fin-shaped, having sloping forward surfaces 655,654 and being spring-biased to an extended position, as shown in FIG. 7D. As the implant 1100 is positioned between adjacent spinous processes, the spinous processes and/or related tissues can contact the forward surface 655,654 of the upper and lower portions 653,652, causing the upper and lower portions 653,652 to pivot about respective hinge points 657,656 and collapse into cavities disposed within the distraction guide 606, as shown in FIG. 7E. Once the implant 1100 clears the obstruction, the upper and lower portions 653,652 re-extend out of the distraction guide 650. A slot and pin mechanism 660,661 or other mechanism can lock the upper and lower portion 653,652 in place once extended, disallowing over-extension of the upper and lower portion 653,652 in the direction of bias. The extended upper and lower portions 653,652 limit or block movement of the implant 1100 in an a direction opposite insertion.
  • [0076]
    In still further embodiments, implants in accordance with the present invention can optionally employ some other additional mechanism for limiting or blocking motion along the longitudinal axis of the implant. Mechanisms shown and described in FIGS. 7A-7E are merely provided as examples of possible mechanisms for use with such implants, and are not intended to be limiting.
  • [0077]
    FIG. 8 is a top-down view of still another embodiment of an implant in accordance with the present invention including a brace 708 arranged at an angle along the spinous process relative to the longitudinal axis L of the implant 1200. The brace 708 is arranged at such an angle to roughly correspond to a general shape of the adjacent spinous processes. Such a general shape can commonly be found in spinous processes extending from vertebrae of the cervical and thoracic region, for example. The implant 1200 further includes a second wing 752 extending from distraction guide 706 at an angle roughly corresponding to a general shape of the adjacent spinous processes. Identical implants 1200, one above the other, are shown. The lower implant 1200 includes a binder 330 arranged around the adjacent spinous processes (only the upper spinous process is shown) and positioned in a slot 309 of the distraction guide 706. The binder 330 includes a capture device 320 for securing the binder 330 to the brace 708, and a channel formed by guides 712 on the brace 708 for aligning the binder 330 with the capture device 320. Unlike previously illustrated embodiments, the brace wall includes a recess 717 to accommodate rotation of the rotatable spacer 302. Alternatively, the implants can include fixed spacers, for example integrally formed with the brace 708 and the distraction guide 706.
  • [0078]
    FIGS. 9A and 9B are perspective views, and FIG. 9C is a side view of a still further embodiment of an implant in accordance with the present invention. The implant 1300 includes a distraction guide 806, a rotatable spacer 302, and a brace 908. As above, a binder 330 can be fixedly connected with the brace 908 at a proximal end 332 of the binder 330. Once positioned around adjacent spinous processes, tension of the binder 330 can be set when the binder 330 is secured to the brace 908 so that relative movement of the adjacent spinous processes during flexion is limited or prevented, as desired.
  • [0079]
    As can be seen in FIG. 9A, the brace 908 can include a first end having an eyelet 941 through which the proximal end 332 of the binder 330 can be threaded and subsequently sutured, knotted or otherwise bound, or alternatively looped through the eyelet 941 and secured to itself (e.g., using a clasp) so that the proximal end 332 of the binder 330 cannot be drawn through the eyelet 941. One of ordinary skill in the art can appreciate the myriad different ways in which the proximal end 332 of the binder 330 can be associated with the brace 908 so that tension can be applied to the binder 330. As in previous embodiments, a free end of the binder 330 can be secured to the brace 908 by a capture device 820 associated with the brace 908. The capture device 820 of FIGS. 9A-11 is arranged at a second end of the brace 908 opposite the eyelet 941, rather than approximately centered along the brace wall 914. The brace 908 can optionally include a locking pin hole 915 that can be engaged by a locking pin of an insertion instrument (not shown), for example as described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,712,819 to Zucherman, et al., incorporated herein by reference. Further, similar to implants described in Zucherman '819, the brace wall 914 can optionally include one or more holes 916 (shown in FIG. 11) adapted to receive alignment pins of such an insertion instrument, and the spacer 402 can include a spacer engagement hole 403 adapted to receive a spacer engagement pin of such an insertion instrument. When a spacer engagement pin engages the spacer engagement hole 403, rotation of the spacer 402 can be limited or blocked. Once the spacer engagement pin is released from the spacer engagement hole 403, the spacer 402 can rotate and/or swivel about a central body 917 without impedance from the spacer engagement pin. Such an arrangement can provide a physician additional control over the positioning of the implant 1300, although in other embodiments the spacer 402 need not include an engagement hole 403. Arranging the captured device 820 at a second end of the brace 908 can allow an insertion instrument, having a configuration as described in Zucherman '819 or having some other configuration, to releasably engage the implant 1300 to assist in implantation without interference from the capture device 820.
  • [0080]
    The distraction guide 806 of the implant 1300 can be wedge-shaped, as described above, or approximately conical, as shown in FIGS. 9A-9C, and can include a slot 809 disposed through the distraction guide 806 and adapted to receive the binder 330 during implantation. Also as described above, the rotatable spacer 402 can be elliptical in cross-section, or otherwise shaped, and can rotate relative to the distraction guide 806 to roughly conform with a contour of a space between the targeted adjacent spinous processes.
  • [0081]
    The capture device 820 is shown in cross-section in FIGS. 10A and 10B. The capture device 820 can comprise, for example, two pieces slidably associated with one another by an adjustable fastener 822 (as shown, the adjustable fastener is a hex screw). A fixed piece 821 of the capture device can extend from the brace wall 914. The fixed piece 821 can include a beveled surface 823 that can function as a ramp. A slidable piece 827 of the capture device can be slidably associated with the fixed piece 821, and can likewise included a beveled surface 829 positioned in opposition to the beveled surface 823 of the fixed piece 821. As shown, the slidable piece 827 is associated with the fixed piece 821 via an adjustable fastener 822. The fastener 822 can be positioned within slots 890,892 of the fixed piece 821 and the slidable piece 827 and can include a threaded shaft 880, a head 882, and a nut 884. The head 882 of the fastener 822 can engage an anterior surface 894 of the fixed piece 821 and the nut 884 can be threaded onto the threaded shaft 880 so that the nut 884 can engage a posterior surface 896 of the slidable piece 827. The slidable piece 827 is free to slide along the beveled surface 823 of the fixed piece 821 until both the nut 884 engages the posterior surface 896 and the head 882 engages the anterior surface 894, blocking further movement in one direction. The distance between the anterior surface 894 and the posterior surface 896 increases or decreases as the slidable piece 827 slides along the beveled surface 823 and a distance between a capture surface 898 of the slidable piece 827 and the brace wall 914 likewise increases or decreases. The maximum distance the slidable piece 827 can travel can be defined by the distance between the nut 884 and the head 882. A physician can adjust the maximum distance by rotating the nut 884 so that the nut 884 travels closer to, or farther from the head 882 along the threaded shaft 880, possibly urging the capture surface 898 toward the brace wall 914. Thus, when the implant 1300 is positioned between spinous processes, the physician can set the maximum distance so that the free end of the binder 330 can be threaded between the capture surface 898 and the brace wall 914. As shown in FIG. 10B, the physician can then adjust the fastener 822 so that the posterior surface 896 and the anterior surface 894 are urged together, the maximum distance decreases and the distance between the capture surface 898 and the brace wall 914 decreases, thereby pinching the binder 330 between the capture surface 898 and the brace wall 914 and defining a secure end of the binder 330. In some embodiments, one or both of the capture surface 898 and the brace wall 914 can include texture so that the binder 330 is further prevented from sliding when the binder 330 is placed under increasing tension (e.g., during flexion).
  • [0082]
    The slidable piece 827 can optionally further include a guide 912 extending from the slidable piece 827 so that the guide 912 overlaps a portion of the brace 908. The guide 912 can extend, for example, a distance roughly similar to the maximum distance between the capture surface 898 and the brace wall 914, and can help ensure that the binder 330 is captured between the capture surface 898 and the brace wall 914. In other embodiments, the capture device 820 of FIGS. 9A-10B can include some other shape or configuration and still fall within the contemplated scope of the invention. For example, the fastener need not include a nut. In one embodiment, shown in FIGS. 10C and 10D, the fastener 922 can include a threaded shaft 980 associated with a sleeve 984. As one of the threaded shaft 980 and the sleeve 984 is rotated, the distance between a head 982 of the threaded shaft 980 and the head 985 of the sleeve 984 can decrease or increase. In still other embodiments, the fastener need not include a threaded shaft, but rather can include a smooth shaft having a retaining clip frictionally associated with the smooth shaft. One of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate the myriad different devices that can be employed to selectively close a gap between a capture surface 898 and the brace wall 914.
  • [0083]
    FIG. 11 is an end view of the implant 1300 of FIGS. 9A-10D positioned between adjacent spinous processes. As shown, the binder 530 is a cord, but in other embodiments can have some other geometry. As described above in reference to previous embodiments, where a cord, a tether, or the like is used as a binder, a pad 536 can be arranged along a contact surface of the respective spinous process so that a load applied to the contact surface by the tension in the binder 530 can be distributed across a portion of the contact surface wider than the binder 530, thereby reducing stress on the portion. The capture device 820 is arranged so that the slidable piece 827 is posteriorly located relative to the fixed piece 821. A fastener 822 can be accessed by the physician using a substantially posterior approach.
  • [0084]
    A method of surgically implanting an implant 1300 in accordance with an embodiment as described above in FIGS. 9A-11 of the present invention is shown as a block diagram in FIG. 12. The method can include forming an incision at the target motion segment, and enlarging the incision to access the target motion segment (Step 100). The interspinous ligament between targeted adjacent spinous processes can then be distracted by piercing or displacing the interspinous ligament with the distraction guide 106 (Step 102) and urging the implant 1300 between the adjacent spinous processes (Step 104). As the interspinous ligament is displaced, the spacer 302 can be positioned between the spinous processes such that the spacer 302 can rotate to assume a preferred position between the spinous processes (Step 106). Once the implant 1300 is positioned, the binder 330 can be threaded between interspinous ligaments of adjacent motion segments so that the targeted adjacent spinous processes are disposed within a loop formed by the binder 330 (Step 108). The physician can then thread the binder 330 between the capture surface 898 of the capture device 820 and the brace wall 914 (Step 110). Once a desired tension of the binder 330 is applied (Step 112), the physician can adjust the fastener 822 of the capture device 820 so that the binder 330 is secured between the captured surface 898 and the brace wall 914 (Step 114). The incision can subsequently be closed (Step 116).
  • Materials For Use in Implants of The Present Invention
  • [0085]
    In some embodiments, the implant can be fabricated from medical grade metals such as titanium, stainless steel, cobalt chrome, and alloys thereof, or other suitable implant material having similar high strength and biocompatible properties. Additionally, the implant can be at least partially fabricated from a shape memory metal, for example Nitinol, which is a combination of titanium and nickel. Such materials are typically radiopaque, and appear during x-ray imaging, and other types of imaging. Implants in accordance with the present invention, and/or portions thereof can also be fabricated from somewhat flexible and/or deflectable material. In these embodiments, the implant and/or portions thereof can be fabricated in whole or in part from medical grade biocompatible polymers, copolymers, blends, and composites of polymers. A copolymer is a polymer derived from more than one species of monomer. A polymer composite is a heterogeneous combination of two or more materials, wherein the constituents are not miscible, and therefore exhibit an interface between one another. A polymer blend is a macroscopically homogeneous mixture of two or more different species of polymer. Many polymers, copolymers, blends, and composites of polymers are radiolucent and do not appear during x-ray or other types of imaging. Implants comprising such materials can provide a physician with a less obstructed view of the spine under imaging, than with an implant comprising radiopaque materials entirely. However, the implant need not comprise any radiolucent materials.
  • [0086]
    One group of biocompatible polymers is the polyaryletherketone group which has several members including polyetheretherketone (PEEK), and polyetherketoneketone (PEKK). PEEK is proven as a durable material for implants, and meets the criterion of biocompatibility. Medical grade PEEK is available from Victrex Corporation of Lancashire, Great Britain under the product name PEEK-OPTIMA. Medical grade PEKK is available from Oxford Performance Materials under the name OXPEKK, and also from CoorsTek under the name BioPEKK. These medical grade materials are also available as reinforced polymer resins, such reinforced resins displaying even greater material strength. In an embodiment, the implant can be fabricated from PEEK 450 G, which is an unfilled PEEK approved for medical implantation available from Victrex. Other sources of this material include Gharda located in Panoli, India. PEEK 450 G has the following approximate properties:
    Property Value
    Density 1.3 g/cc
    Rockwell M 99
    Rockwell R 126
    Tensile Strength 97 MPa
    Modulus of Elasticity 3.5 GPa
    Flexural Modulus 4.1 GPa
  • [0087]
    PEEK 450 G has appropriate physical and mechanical properties and is suitable for carrying and spreading a physical load between the adjacent spinous processes. The implant and/or portions thereof can be formed by extrusion, injection, compression molding and/or machining techniques.
  • [0088]
    It should be noted that the material selected can also be filled. Fillers can be added to a polymer, copolymer, polymer blend, or polymer composite to reinforce a polymeric material. Fillers are added to modify properties such as mechanical, optical, and thermal properties. For example, carbon fibers can be added to reinforce polymers mechanically to enhance strength for certain uses, such as for load bearing devices. In some embodiments, other grades of PEEK are available and contemplated for use in implants in accordance with the present invention, such as 30% glass-filled or 30% carbon-filled grades, provided such materials are cleared for use in implantable devices by the FDA, or other regulatory body. Glass-filled PEEK reduces the expansion rate and increases the flexural modulus of PEEK relative to unfilled PEEK. The resulting product is known to be ideal for improved strength, stiffness, or stability. Carbon-filled PEEK is known to have enhanced compressive strength and stiffness, and a lower expansion rate relative to unfilled PEEK. Carbon-filled PEEK also offers wear resistance and load carrying capability.
  • [0089]
    As will be appreciated, other suitable similarly biocompatible thermoplastic or thermoplastic polycondensate materials that resist fatigue, have good memory, are flexible, and/or deflectable, have very low moisture absorption, and good wear and/or abrasion resistance, can be used without departing from the scope of the invention. As mentioned, the implant can be comprised of polyetherketoneketone (PEKK). Other material that can be used include polyetherketone (PEK), polyetherketoneetherketoneketone (PEKEKK), polyetheretherketoneketone (PEEKK), and generally a polyaryletheretherketone. Further, other polyketones can be used as well as other thermoplastics. Reference to appropriate polymers that can be used in the implant can be made to the following documents, all of which are incorporated herein by reference. These documents include: PCT Publication WO 02/02158 A1, dated Jan. 10, 2002, entitled “Bio-Compatible Polymeric Materials;” PCT Publication WO 02/00275 A1, dated Jan. 3, 2002, entitled “Bio-Compatible Polymeric Materials;” and, PCT Publication WO 02/00270 A1, dated Jan. 3, 2002, entitled “Bio-Compatible Polymeric Materials.” Other materials such as Bionate®, polycarbonate urethane, available from the Polymer Technology Group, Berkeley, Calif., may also be appropriate because of the good oxidative stability, biocompatibility, mechanical strength and abrasion resistance. Other thermoplastic materials and other high molecular weight polymers can be used.
  • [0090]
    As described above, the binder can be made from a biocompatible material. In an embodiment, the binder can be made from a braided polyester suture material. Braided polyester suture materials include, for example, Ethibond, Ethiflex, Mersilene, and Dacron, and are nonabsorbable, having high tensile strength, low tissue reactivity and improved handling. In other embodiments, the binder can be made from stainless steel (i.e., surgical steel), which can be braided into a tether or woven into a strap, for example. In still other embodiments, the binder can be made from some other material (or combination of materials) having similar properties.
  • [0091]
    The foregoing description of the present invention have been presented for purposes of illustration and description. It is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise forms disclosed. Many modifications and variations will be apparent to practitioners skilled in this art. The embodiments were chosen and described in order to best explain the principles of the invention and its practical application, thereby enabling others skilled in the art to understand the invention for various embodiments and with various modifications as are suited to the particular use contemplated. It is intended that the scope of the invention be defined by the following claims and their equivalents.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2472103 *Mar 13, 1945Jun 7, 1949Josef H GiesenModified bone screw holder for surgical drills
US2677369 *Mar 26, 1952May 4, 1954Fred L KnowlesApparatus for treatment of the spinal column
US3648691 *Feb 24, 1970Mar 14, 1972Univ Colorado State Res FoundMethod of applying vertebral appliance
US4011602 *Oct 6, 1975Mar 15, 1977Battelle Memorial InstitutePorous expandable device for attachment to bone tissue
US4257409 *Apr 9, 1979Mar 24, 1981Kazimierz BacalDevice for treatment of spinal curvature
US4509517 *Sep 30, 1982Apr 9, 1985Zibelin Henry SKidney stone instrument
US4573454 *May 17, 1984Mar 4, 1986Hoffman Gregory ASpinal fixation apparatus
US4592341 *May 7, 1985Jun 3, 1986Olympus Optical Co., Ltd.Method and apparatus for guiding prosthesis
US4827918 *Aug 14, 1986May 9, 1989Sven OlerudFixing instrument for use in spinal surgery
US4997432 *Mar 14, 1989Mar 5, 1991Waldemar Link Gmbh & Co.Surgical instrument set
US5011484 *Oct 10, 1989Apr 30, 1991Breard Francis HSurgical implant for restricting the relative movement of vertebrae
US5092866 *Feb 2, 1990Mar 3, 1992Breard Francis HFlexible inter-vertebral stabilizer as well as process and apparatus for determining or verifying its tension before installation on the spinal column
US5097820 *Oct 19, 1990Mar 24, 1992Shulman David HArticulating mouth-prop device for use in the diagnosis and/or treatment of patients suffering from trismus or other medical or dental problems or for other purposes
US5201734 *May 14, 1991Apr 13, 1993Zimmer, Inc.Spinal locking sleeve assembly
US5306275 *Dec 31, 1992Apr 26, 1994Bryan Donald WLumbar spine fixation apparatus and method
US5415661 *Mar 24, 1993May 16, 1995University Of MiamiImplantable spinal assist device
US5484440 *Aug 18, 1994Jan 16, 1996Zimmer, Inc.Bone screw and screwdriver
US5489307 *Sep 1, 1994Feb 6, 1996Spine-Tech, Inc.Spinal stabilization surgical method
US5496318 *Aug 18, 1993Mar 5, 1996Advanced Spine Fixation Systems, Inc.Interspinous segmental spine fixation device
US5599279 *Jan 29, 1996Feb 4, 1997Gus J. SlotmanSurgical instruments and method useful for endoscopic spinal procedures
US5609634 *Jun 30, 1993Mar 11, 1997Voydeville; GillesIntervertebral prosthesis making possible rotatory stabilization and flexion/extension stabilization
US5609636 *Jan 11, 1996Mar 11, 1997Spine-Tech, Inc.Spinal implant
US5628756 *Jul 29, 1996May 13, 1997Smith & Nephew Richards Inc.Knotted cable attachment apparatus formed of braided polymeric fibers
US5772661 *Feb 27, 1995Jun 30, 1998Michelson; Gary KarlinMethods and instrumentation for the surgical correction of human thoracic and lumbar spinal disease from the antero-lateral aspect of the spine
US5860977 *Oct 27, 1997Jan 19, 1999Saint Francis Medical Technologies, LlcSpine distraction implant and method
US5888224 *Sep 5, 1997Mar 30, 1999Synthesis (U.S.A.)Implant for intervertebral space
US5893890 *Jul 25, 1997Apr 13, 1999Perumala CorporationRotating, locking intervertebral disk stabilizer and applicator
US6022376 *Mar 16, 1998Feb 8, 2000Raymedica, Inc.Percutaneous prosthetic spinal disc nucleus and method of manufacture
US6042582 *May 20, 1998Mar 28, 2000Ray; Charles D.Instrumentation and method for facilitating insertion of spinal implant
US6048342 *Oct 27, 1998Apr 11, 2000St. Francis Medical Technologies, Inc.Spine distraction implant
US6059829 *Mar 8, 1995May 9, 2000SyntheseIntervertebral implant
US6068630 *Oct 20, 1998May 30, 2000St. Francis Medical Technologies, Inc.Spine distraction implant
US6171339 *May 19, 1998Jan 9, 2001Sulzer Spine-Tech Inc.Multi-lumen spinal implant guide and method
US6174311 *Oct 28, 1998Jan 16, 2001Sdgi Holdings, Inc.Interbody fusion grafts and instrumentation
US6224607 *Jan 25, 2000May 1, 2001Gary K. MichelsonInstrumentation and method for creating an intervertebral space for receiving an implant
US6224631 *Mar 20, 1998May 1, 2001Sulzer Spine-Tech Inc.Intervertebral implant with reduced contact area and method
US6241729 *Oct 27, 1998Jun 5, 2001Sdgi Holdings, Inc.Method and instrumentation for posterior interbody fusion
US6352537 *Sep 17, 1998Mar 5, 2002Electro-Biology, Inc.Method and apparatus for spinal fixation
US6364883 *Feb 23, 2001Apr 2, 2002Albert N. SantilliSpinous process clamp for spinal fusion and method of operation
US6402750 *Apr 4, 2000Jun 11, 2002Spinlabs, LlcDevices and methods for the treatment of spinal disorders
US6514256 *Mar 15, 2001Feb 4, 2003St. Francis Medical Technologies, Inc.Spine distraction implant and method
US6554833 *Jul 16, 2001Apr 29, 2003Expanding Orthopedics, Inc.Expandable orthopedic device
US6565570 *Mar 14, 2001May 20, 2003Electro-Biology, Inc.Bone plate and retractor assembly
US6582433 *Apr 9, 2001Jun 24, 2003St. Francis Medical Technologies, Inc.Spine fixation device and method
US6676665 *Aug 13, 2001Jan 13, 2004Sdgi Holdings, Inc.Surgical instrumentation and method for treatment of the spine
US6695842 *Oct 26, 2001Feb 24, 2004St. Francis Medical Technologies, Inc.Interspinous process distraction system and method with positionable wing and method
US6709435 *Mar 28, 2002Mar 23, 2004A-Spine Holding Group Corp.Three-hooked device for fixing spinal column
US6723126 *Nov 1, 2002Apr 20, 2004Sdgi Holdings, Inc.Laterally expandable cage
US6733534 *Jan 29, 2002May 11, 2004Sdgi Holdings, Inc.System and method for spine spacing
US6752832 *Dec 26, 2001Jun 22, 2004Ulrich Gmbh & Co., KgVertebral implant and setting tool therefor
US6857343 *Sep 30, 2003Feb 22, 2005Codman & Shurtleff, Inc.Spring-loaded threaded fastener holder
US7041136 *Apr 23, 2003May 9, 2006Facet Solutions, Inc.Facet joint replacement
US7048736 *May 17, 2002May 23, 2006Sdgi Holdings, Inc.Device for fixation of spinous processes
US7163558 *Nov 28, 2002Jan 16, 2007Abbott SpineIntervertebral implant with elastically deformable wedge
US7189234 *Oct 31, 2001Mar 13, 2007St. Francis Medical Technologies, Inc.Interspinous process implant sizer and distractor with a split head and size indicator and method
US7201751 *Apr 26, 2001Apr 10, 2007St. Francis Medical Technologies, Inc.Supplemental spine fixation device
US7335203 *Feb 9, 2004Feb 26, 2008Kyphon Inc.System and method for immobilizing adjacent spinous processes
US7377942 *Aug 6, 2003May 27, 2008Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc.Posterior elements motion restoring device
US7527324 *Sep 5, 2008May 5, 2009Clonan Richard SUniversal rail system for vehicles
US20020082600 *Aug 29, 2001Jun 27, 2002Shaolian Samuel M.Formable orthopedic fixation system
US20030040746 *Jul 19, 2002Feb 27, 2003Mitchell Margaret E.Spinal stabilization system and method
US20030045940 *Aug 23, 2002Mar 6, 2003Robert EberleinArtificial intervertebral disc
US20030065330 *Aug 29, 2002Apr 3, 2003St. Francis Medical Technologies, Inc.Deflectable spacer for use as an interspinous process implant and method
US20040059318 *Sep 19, 2003Mar 25, 2004Sdgi Holdings, Inc.Instrument and method for surgical extraction
US20040087947 *Aug 28, 2002May 6, 2004Roy LimMinimally invasive expanding spacer and method
US20040097931 *Oct 14, 2003May 20, 2004Steve MitchellInterspinous process and sacrum implant and method
US20040106927 *Mar 1, 2002Jun 3, 2004Ruffner Brian M.Vertebral distractor
US20050010293 *May 20, 2004Jan 13, 2005Zucherman James F.Distractible interspinous process implant and method of implantation
US20050049708 *Oct 15, 2004Mar 3, 2005Atkinson Robert E.Devices and methods for the treatment of spinal disorders
US20050090824 *Oct 22, 2004Apr 28, 2005Endius IncorporatedMethod and surgical tool for inserting a longitudinal member
US20050113842 *Jan 30, 2004May 26, 2005Rudolf BertagnoliInstrumentation and methods for preparation of an intervertebral space
US20060015181 *Jul 19, 2004Jan 19, 2006Biomet Merck France (50% Interest)Interspinous vertebral implant
US20060024159 *Jul 28, 2004Feb 2, 2006General Electric CompanyAirfoil shape and sidewall flowpath surfaces for a turbine nozzle
US20060064165 *Mar 31, 2005Mar 23, 2006St. Francis Medical Technologies, Inc.Interspinous process implant including a binder and method of implantation
US20060084983 *Oct 20, 2004Apr 20, 2006The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversitySystems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US20060084985 *Dec 6, 2004Apr 20, 2006The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversitySystems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US20060084987 *Jan 10, 2005Apr 20, 2006Kim Daniel HSystems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US20060084988 *Mar 10, 2005Apr 20, 2006The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversitySystems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US20060085069 *Feb 4, 2005Apr 20, 2006The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversitySystems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US20060085070 *Jul 26, 2005Apr 20, 2006Vertiflex, Inc.Systems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US20060085074 *Sep 19, 2005Apr 20, 2006Kamshad RaiszadehMedical device systems for the spine
US20060089654 *Oct 25, 2005Apr 27, 2006Lins Robert EInterspinous distraction devices and associated methods of insertion
US20060089719 *Oct 21, 2004Apr 27, 2006Trieu Hai HIn situ formation of intervertebral disc implants
US20060106381 *Feb 4, 2005May 18, 2006Ferree Bret AMethods and apparatus for treating spinal stenosis
US20060106397 *Dec 2, 2005May 18, 2006Lins Robert EInterspinous distraction devices and associated methods of insertion
US20060111728 *Oct 5, 2005May 25, 2006Abdou M SDevices and methods for inter-vertebral orthopedic device placement
US20070005064 *Jun 27, 2005Jan 4, 2007Sdgi HoldingsIntervertebral prosthetic device for spinal stabilization and method of implanting same
US20070032790 *Aug 5, 2005Feb 8, 2007Felix AschmannApparatus for treating spinal stenosis
US20070043362 *Jun 16, 2006Feb 22, 2007Malandain Hugues FPercutaneous spinal implants and methods
US20070100340 *Oct 27, 2005May 3, 2007Sdgi Holdings, Inc.Intervertebral prosthetic device for spinal stabilization and method of implanting same
US20070112354 *May 26, 2004May 17, 2007Pentax CorporationSurgical instruments
US20070123861 *Nov 10, 2005May 31, 2007Sdgi Holdings, Inc.Intervertebral prosthetic device for spinal stabilization and method of implanting same
US20080021460 *Jul 20, 2006Jan 24, 2008Warsaw Orthopedic Inc.Apparatus for insertion between anatomical structures and a procedure utilizing same
US20080114357 *Nov 15, 2006May 15, 2008Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc.Inter-transverse process spacer device and method for use in correcting a spinal deformity
US20080114358 *Nov 13, 2006May 15, 2008Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc.Intervertebral Prosthetic Assembly for Spinal Stabilization and Method of Implanting Same
US20080114456 *Nov 15, 2006May 15, 2008Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc.Spinal implant system
US20090062915 *Aug 27, 2007Mar 5, 2009Andrew KohmSpinous-process implants and methods of using the same
US20090105773 *Oct 23, 2007Apr 23, 2009Warsaw Orthopedic, Inc.Method and apparatus for insertion of an interspinous process device
US20100121379 *Jan 20, 2010May 13, 2010U.S. Spinal Technologies, LlcPedicle and non-pedicle based interspinous and lateral spacers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8012207Mar 10, 2005Sep 6, 2011Vertiflex, Inc.Systems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US8062032 *Oct 23, 2008Nov 22, 2011Intrinsic Medical, LlcApparatus, system, and method for maxillo-mandibular fixation
US8123782Sep 5, 2008Feb 28, 2012Vertiflex, Inc.Interspinous spacer
US8123807Dec 6, 2004Feb 28, 2012Vertiflex, Inc.Systems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US8128662Oct 18, 2006Mar 6, 2012Vertiflex, Inc.Minimally invasive tooling for delivery of interspinous spacer
US8152837Dec 20, 2005Apr 10, 2012The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversitySystems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US8167944Oct 20, 2004May 1, 2012The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversitySystems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US8273108Jul 8, 2008Sep 25, 2012Vertiflex, Inc.Interspinous spacer
US8277488Jul 24, 2008Oct 2, 2012Vertiflex, Inc.Interspinous spacer
US8292922Apr 16, 2008Oct 23, 2012Vertiflex, Inc.Interspinous spacer
US8317864Feb 4, 2005Nov 27, 2012The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversitySystems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US8409282Jul 26, 2005Apr 2, 2013Vertiflex, Inc.Systems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US8425559Nov 7, 2006Apr 23, 2013Vertiflex, Inc.Systems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US8425560Mar 9, 2011Apr 23, 2013Farzad MassoudiSpinal implant device with fixation plates and lag screws and method of implanting
US8496689Feb 23, 2011Jul 30, 2013Farzad MassoudiSpinal implant device with fusion cage and fixation plates and method of implanting
US8613747Dec 18, 2008Dec 24, 2013Vertiflex, Inc.Spacer insertion instrument
US8628574Jul 27, 2010Jan 14, 2014Vertiflex, Inc.Systems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US8740948Dec 15, 2010Jun 3, 2014Vertiflex, Inc.Spinal spacer for cervical and other vertebra, and associated systems and methods
US8845726Jan 22, 2009Sep 30, 2014Vertiflex, Inc.Dilator
US8864828Jan 15, 2009Oct 21, 2014Vertiflex, Inc.Interspinous spacer
US8900271May 1, 2012Dec 2, 2014The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversitySystems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US8945183Mar 9, 2009Feb 3, 2015Vertiflex, Inc.Interspinous process spacer instrument system with deployment indicator
US9023084Dec 6, 2004May 5, 2015The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversitySystems and methods for stabilizing the motion or adjusting the position of the spine
US9039742Apr 9, 2012May 26, 2015The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversitySystems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US9084639Jun 26, 2013Jul 21, 2015Farzad MassoudiSpinal implant device with fusion cage and fixation plates and method of implanting
US9119680Feb 27, 2012Sep 1, 2015Vertiflex, Inc.Interspinous spacer
US9125692Feb 25, 2013Sep 8, 2015The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversitySystems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US9155570Sep 14, 2012Oct 13, 2015Vertiflex, Inc.Interspinous spacer
US9155572Mar 6, 2012Oct 13, 2015Vertiflex, Inc.Minimally invasive tooling for delivery of interspinous spacer
US9161783Sep 14, 2012Oct 20, 2015Vertiflex, Inc.Interspinous spacer
US9186186Apr 18, 2014Nov 17, 2015Vertiflex, Inc.Spinal spacer for cervical and other vertebra, and associated systems and methods
US9211146Feb 27, 2012Dec 15, 2015The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversitySystems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US9247968Mar 31, 2010Feb 2, 2016Lanx, Inc.Spinous process implants and associated methods
US9283005Feb 25, 2013Mar 15, 2016Vertiflex, Inc.Systems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US9314279Oct 23, 2012Apr 19, 2016The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversitySystems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US9393055Nov 25, 2013Jul 19, 2016Vertiflex, Inc.Spacer insertion instrument
US9445843Jan 13, 2014Sep 20, 2016The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversitySystems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US9532812Sep 16, 2014Jan 3, 2017Vertiflex, Inc.Interspinous spacer
US9566086Sep 25, 2014Feb 14, 2017VeriFlex, Inc.Dilator
US9572603Sep 14, 2012Feb 21, 2017Vertiflex, Inc.Interspinous spacer
US9675303Mar 15, 2013Jun 13, 2017Vertiflex, Inc.Visualization systems, instruments and methods of using the same in spinal decompression procedures
US9724136Dec 28, 2015Aug 8, 2017Zimmer Biomet Spine, Inc.Spinous process implants and associated methods
US9743960Jan 11, 2016Aug 29, 2017Zimmer Biomet Spine, Inc.Interspinous implants and methods
US20060084983 *Oct 20, 2004Apr 20, 2006The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversitySystems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US20060085070 *Jul 26, 2005Apr 20, 2006Vertiflex, Inc.Systems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US20060122620 *Dec 6, 2004Jun 8, 2006The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversitySystems and methods for stabilizing the motion or adjusting the position of the spine
US20070173832 *Nov 7, 2006Jul 26, 2007Vertiflex, Inc.Systems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US20070276370 *Oct 18, 2006Nov 29, 2007Vertiflex, Inc.Minimally invasive tooling for delivery of interspinous spacer
US20080287997 *Jul 8, 2008Nov 20, 2008Moti AltaracInterspinous spacer
US20080294263 *Jul 24, 2008Nov 27, 2008Moti AltaracInterspinous spacer
US20080319550 *Sep 5, 2008Dec 25, 2008Moti AltaracInterspinous spacer
US20090125030 *Jan 22, 2009May 14, 2009Shawn TebbeDilator
US20090138046 *Jan 15, 2009May 28, 2009Moti AltaracInterspinous spacer
US20090138055 *Dec 18, 2008May 28, 2009Moti AltaracSpacer insertion instrument
US20090222043 *Mar 9, 2009Sep 3, 2009Moti AltaracInterspinous process spacer instrument system with deployment indicator
US20100105001 *Oct 23, 2008Apr 29, 2010Bulloch Scott EApparatus, system, and method for maxillo-mandibular fixation
US20110106160 *Jul 27, 2010May 5, 2011The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversitySystems and methods for posterior dynamic stabilization of the spine
US20120123547 *Jan 14, 2010May 17, 2012Ulrich HolzwarthIntervertebral disc strain-relief support
WO2011047157A1Oct 14, 2010Apr 21, 2011Latitude Holdings, LlcSpinous process fixation plate and minimally invasive method for placement
Classifications
U.S. Classification623/17.16, 606/99
International ClassificationA61B17/58, A61F2/44
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/7065, A61B17/7068
European ClassificationA61B17/70P4, A61B17/70P8
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 21, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: KYPHON INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:ST. FRANCIS MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:020393/0260
Effective date: 20071128
Owner name: KYPHON INC.,CALIFORNIA
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:ST. FRANCIS MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:020393/0260
Effective date: 20071128
Apr 2, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: ST. FRANCIS MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:ZUCHERMAN, JAMES F.;HSU, KEN Y.;REEL/FRAME:020744/0524
Effective date: 20051215
Owner name: ST. FRANCIS MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:KLYCE, HENRY A.;WINSLOW, CHARLES J.;FLYNN, JOHN J.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:020744/0494;SIGNING DATES FROM 20050714 TO 20050902
May 9, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: MEDTRONIC SPINE LLC, CALIFORNIA
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:KYPHON INC;REEL/FRAME:020993/0042
Effective date: 20080118
Owner name: MEDTRONIC SPINE LLC,CALIFORNIA
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:KYPHON INC;REEL/FRAME:020993/0042
Effective date: 20080118
Jun 9, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: KYPHON SARL, SWITZERLAND
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MEDTRONIC SPINE LLC;REEL/FRAME:021070/0278
Effective date: 20080325
Owner name: KYPHON SARL,SWITZERLAND
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MEDTRONIC SPINE LLC;REEL/FRAME:021070/0278
Effective date: 20080325