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Publication numberUS20080066214 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/900,472
Publication dateMar 20, 2008
Filing dateSep 12, 2007
Priority dateSep 18, 2006
Also published asWO2008036194A2, WO2008036194A3
Publication number11900472, 900472, US 2008/0066214 A1, US 2008/066214 A1, US 20080066214 A1, US 20080066214A1, US 2008066214 A1, US 2008066214A1, US-A1-20080066214, US-A1-2008066214, US2008/0066214A1, US2008/066214A1, US20080066214 A1, US20080066214A1, US2008066214 A1, US2008066214A1
InventorsDenis Patrick O'Hare
Original AssigneeO'hare Denis Patrick
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Environment control system for the head and neck
US 20080066214 A1
Abstract
A system of head and neck garments and components that allows the wearer to control the environment around the wearer's head and neck is disclosed. The system requires that the wearer carry minimal additional gear while providing the wearer with the ability to cool, warm, waterproof, camouflage, and protect his or her head and neck areas against sun, wind, rain, snow, insects, blowing sand, etc.
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Claims(20)
1. An environment control system for the head and neck, comprising:
a climate control flap having an upper edge, a lower edge, a left edge, and a right edge;
the climate control flap further having an outside surface and an inside surface wherein the outside surface is joined to the inside surface by the upper edge, the lower edge, the left edge, and the right edge;
a means of attaching the climate control flap to a hat such that the climate control flap hangs generally downwards from the hat and wherein the upper edge is in proximity to the hat, the lower edge is in proximity to the nape of the neck of a wearer of the hat, the left edge is in proximity to the left cheek of a wearer of the hat, the right edge is in proximity to the right cheek of a wearer of the hat, the inside surface faces inwardly towards the neck and head of a wearer of the hat, and the outside surface faces outwardly away from the neck and head of a wearer of the hat;
a plurality of pockets integrated within the climate control flap between the outside surface and the inside surface, the plurality of pockets accepting cooling agents or warming agents; and
a plurality of vertically oriented stays attached to the climate control flap.
2. The environment control system of claim 1, further comprising:
a vertical attachment means positioned on the climate control flap to facilitate attachment of a face protector.
3. The environment control system of claim 2, further comprising:
a face protector having a means of removably attaching to the climate control flap.
4. The environment control system of claim 1, further comprising:
a horizontal attachment means positioned on the climate control flap to facilitate attachment of an all-weather flap.
5. The environment control system of claim 4, further comprising:
an all-weather flap having a means of removably attaching to the climate control flap.
6. The environment control system of claim 3, further comprising:
a horizontal attachment means positioned on the climate control flap to facilitate attachment of an all-weather flap; and
an all-weather flap having a means of removably attaching to the climate control flap.
7. The environment control system of claim 6, further comprising:
a plurality of pairs of eyelets in the climate control flap having a drawstring and an adjustable clasp; and
a belt loop attached to the outside surface of the climate control flap in proximity to the upper edge and forming a loop through which an adjustable hat band can be placed.
8. The environment control system of claim 5, further comprising:
the all-weather flap having a hat cover removably attached to the all-weather flap and positioned so as to at least partially cover the hat; and
the hat cover having an elastic area and a drawstring that facilitate adjustment of the all-weather flap.
9. An environment control system for the head and neck, comprising:
a climate control flap having an upper edge, a lower edge, a left edge, and a right edge;
the climate control flap further having an outside surface and an inside surface wherein the outside surface is joined to the inside surface by the upper edge, the lower edge, the left edge, and the right edge;
a means of attaching the climate control flap to a hat such that the climate control flap hangs generally downwards from the hat and wherein the upper edge is in proximity to the hat, the lower edge is in proximity to the nape of the neck of a wearer of the hat, the left edge is in proximity to the left cheek of a wearer of the hat, the right edge is in proximity to the right cheek of a wearer of the hat, the inside surface faces inwardly towards the neck and head of a wearer of the hat, and the outside surface faces outwardly away from the neck and head of a wearer of the hat;
a plurality of vertically oriented stays attached to the climate control flap;
a horizontal attachment means positioned on the climate control flap to facilitate attachment of an all-weather flap;
an all-weather flap having a means of removably attaching to the climate control flap.
10. The environment control system of claim 9 wherein the climate control flap has a plurality of pockets integrated within the climate control flap between the outside surface and the inside surface, the plurality of pockets accepting cooling agents or warming agents.
11. The environment control system of claim 10, further comprising:
a plurality of pairs of eyelets in the climate control flap having a drawstring and an adjustable clasp; and
a belt loop attached to the outside surface of the climate control flap in proximity to the upper edge and forming a loop through which an adjustable hat band can be placed.
12. The environment control system of claim 10, wherein the all-weather flap has a hat cover removably attached to the all-weather flap and positioned so as to at least partially cover the hat.
13. The environment control system of claim 12 wherein the hat cover has a storage tab.
14. The environment control system of claim 9, further comprising:
a vertical attachment means positioned on the climate control flap to facilitate attachment of a face protector; and
a face protector having a means of removably attaching to the climate control flap.
15. An environment control system for the head and neck, comprising:
a climate control flap having an upper edge, a lower edge, a left edge, and a right edge;
the climate control flap further having an outside surface and an inside surface wherein the outside surface is joined to the inside surface by the upper edge, the lower edge, the left edge, and the right edge;
a means of attaching the climate control flap to a hat such that the climate control flap hangs generally downwards from the hat and wherein the upper edge is in proximity to the hat, the lower edge is in proximity to the nape of the neck of a wearer of the hat, the left edge is in proximity to the left cheek of a wearer of the hat, the right edge is in proximity to the right cheek of a wearer of the hat, the inside surface faces inwardly towards the neck and head of a wearer of the hat, and the outside surface faces outwardly away from the neck and head of a wearer of the hat;
a plurality of vertically oriented stays attached to the climate control flap;
a vertical attachment means positioned on the climate control flap to facilitate attachment of a face protector; and
a face protector having a means of removably attaching to the climate control flap.
16. The environment control system of claim 15 wherein the climate control flap has a plurality of pockets integrated within the climate control flap between the outside surface and the inside surface, the plurality of pockets accepting cooling agents or warming agents.
17. The environment control system of claim 16, further comprising:
a plurality of pairs of eyelets in the climate control flap having a drawstring and an adjustable clasp; and
a belt loop attached to the outside surface of the climate control flap in proximity to the upper edge and forming a loop through which an adjustable hat band can be placed.
18. The environment control system of claim 17, further comprising:
a horizontal attachment means positioned on the climate control flap to facilitate attachment of an all-weather flap; and
an all-weather flap having a means of removably attaching to the climate control flap.
19. The environment control system of claim 18, further comprising:
the all-weather flap having a hat cover removably attached to the all-weather flap and positioned so as to at least partially cover the hat.
20. The environment control system of claim 19 wherein the hat cover has a storage tab.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/795,278, entitled “All-in-one Climate Control Hat/Flap and Accessories (CCH)” and filed on Sep. 18, 2006, which is specifically incorporated herein by reference for all that it discloses and teaches.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The invention relates generally to articles of manufacture worn about the head and neck and more particularly to a system of components worn about the head and neck that allow the wearer to better control his or her environment.

BACKGROUND

Hats, scarves, facemasks, and other head and neck garments have been utilized by mankind for millennia. Originally, head and neck garments were primarily functional items that served to protect the wearer from the vagaries of a changing environment—from the pre-dawn chill, to the blistering noon-day sun, to the evening downpour. Later, style and design became important considerations in such garments as well. However, regardless of whether a garment is worn because of its ‘look’ or because of its utility and functionality, the person wearing the garment often finds that he or she must constantly add, remove, change, or replace head and neck garments as weather conditions and other environmental factors change. For example, a standard baseball-style cap can be extremely useful to reduce the glare and sunburn that can be caused by bright sunshine. However, if clouds suddenly move in and an unexpected rain shower occurs, the baseball cap may have no waterproofing or other features which would allow it to protect the wearer from the rain. Similarly, a waterproof hat is little help once a rain ends and swarms of mosquitoes appear.

Currently, such changing environmental conditions require the savvy outdoors-person to carry a number of different head and neck garments. For example, a hunter may need a baseball cap to keep the sun out of his eyes in the morning and a head-net to keep the pestering insects at bay after noon. Climbing up and down the mountains pursuing game can cause a lot of heat to build-up and the hunter needs something to help keep him cool, so he might don a neck pouch containing a cooling gel packet. Then, later in the evening, a warm scarf and knit hat may be necessary to protect the hunter's head and neck as a cold front moves into the area.

Clearly, constantly carting around even the small sampling of head and neck garments mentioned above is impractical. Thus, there is a need for a garment system that allows a garment wearer to control the environment around his or her head and neck without carrying a large number of differing head and neck garments at all times.

SUMMARY

Embodiments described and claimed herein address the foregoing problems by providing a complete system of head and neck garments that allows the wearer to control the environment around his or her head and neck. The system requires that the wearer carry minimal additional gear while providing the wearer with the ability to cool, warm, waterproof, camouflage, and protect his or her head and neck areas against wind, rain, snow, insects, blowing sand, etc.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The aforementioned and other features and objects of the present invention and the manner of attaining them will become more apparent and the invention itself will be best understood by reference to the following description of a preferred embodiment and other embodiments taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 illustrates a left side perspective view of an exemplary embodiment of an environment control system for the head and neck as it could be worn by a person.

FIG. 2 provides a left side perspective view of an exemplary embodiment of a climate control flap component of an environment control system for the head and neck as it could be worn by a person.

FIG. 3 illustrates a front view of an exemplary embodiment of a climate control flap component of an environment control system for the head and neck.

FIG. 4 illustrates a rear view of an exemplary embodiment of a climate control flap component of an environment control system for the head and neck.

FIG. 5 illustrates a front view of an exemplary embodiment of an all-weather flap component of an environment control system for the head and neck.

FIG. 6 illustrates a left side perspective view of an exemplary embodiment of an all weather flap component of an environment control system for the head and neck.

FIG. 7 illustrates a rear view of an exemplary embodiment of a face protector component of an environment control system for the head and neck.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

In one embodiment, an environment control system (hereafter, “ECS”) can be utilized with a standard baseball-style cap. The cap is modified in order to allow attachment of the various components of an ECS. In alternate embodiments, an ECS can be utilized with a variety of other hat types and styles. Furthermore, an ECS can include one or more hats (of similar or varying styles) as component(s) of the system or an ECS can be added to an existing hat. The term “hat” as used herein can refer to any piece of headgear or other item that is worn, suspended, or otherwise held in close proximity to a person's head. Examples include, but are not limited to, baseball caps, cowboy hats, straw hats, helmets, visors, etc. In addition, the term “cap” can be interchangeably used for the term “hat”, and vice versa.

FIG. 1 illustrates an exemplary embodiment of an ECS 100. The illustration shows three primary components: a climate control flap (hereafter, “CCF”) 110, an all-weather flap (hereafter, “AWF”) 130, and a face protector (hereafter, “FP”) 150. Also shown in FIG. 1 are a baseball-style cap 170 and a person 190 wearing components of an ECS. As mentioned above, the cap 170 can be included in an ECS 100.

A CCF 110 can be attached to a cap 170 by a myriad of means, including, but not limited to: hook-and-loop material (e.g., those sold under the trademark VELCRO®), snaps, buttons, zippers, magnets, ties, etc. As shown in the embodiment of FIG. 1, the top edge of the CCF 110 can be placed inside the cap 170. In alternate embodiments, only the attaching means (such as two flaps extending out from the top of a CCF 110, each flap having a zipper to attach to corresponding zippers on the cap 170) actually contacts the cap 170.

In addition to the attachment means described above, a CCF 110 can have a belt loop 111. In the embodiment utilizing a baseball-style cap, the cap 170 has an adjustment band 171. The adjustment band 171 can be threaded through the belt loop 111 to provide an additional means of attachment and minimize movement of the CCF 110 relative to the cap 170.

As shown in the left side perspective view in FIG. 1, the CCF 110 has a left horizontal attachment means 112. A right horizontal attachment means is also contemplated, but not sown in FIG. 1. The horizontal attachment means 112 shown in FIG. 1 is a hook-and-loop material, other attachment means are contemplated. The CCF's 110 horizontal attachment means 112 is placed so as to accept the AWF's 130 horizontal attachment means 132. The AWF's 130 left side horizontal attachment means 132 is shown using dashed lines as the exemplary hook-and-loop attachment means is on the inside front face of the AWF 130 and so is not visible on the rear surface of the AWF 130, as displayed in FIG. 1. Furthermore, the AWF's 130 left side horizontal attachment means 132 has a twin right side horizontal attachment means, not shown.

The AWF's 130 left side vertical attachment means 133 is shown using dashed lines as the exemplary hook-and-loop attachment means is also on the inside front face of the AWF 130, and so is not otherwise visible in FIG. 1. The AWF's 130 left side vertical attachment means 133 has a twin right side vertical attachment means, not shown. Furthermore, the AWF's 130 vertical attachment means 133 attaches to the corresponding CCF's 110 vertical attachment means 113.

The CCF 110 has a drawstring 115 and a push-button clasp 114. The drawstring 115 serves multiple purposes. As shown in FIG. 1, the drawstring 115 is attached to the bottom pair of three eyelet pairs. This configuration allows the person 190 wearing the ECS 100 to draw up the sides of the CCF 110 to form a channel-like opening between the person's 190 neck and the CCF 110. This “air-channel” provides airflow and facilitates the cooling effect that can be garnered from the CCF 110. Alternatively, the drawstring 115 can be attached to the middle or upper eyelet pairs in order to draw the CCF 110 closer to the wearer's neck, which is helpful when the wearer wishes to minimize drafts and increase the warming effect of the ECS 100. The push-button clasp 114 is used to quickly and easily loosen or tighten the drawstring 115. It is contemplated that alternate embodiments could employ other types of clasps or means of securing and loosening the drawstring 115.

The CCF 110 can be manufactured using a number of different materials. In one embodiment, a breathable yet water-retaining material is used. Such a material has the dual benefits of allowing perspiration to escape while helping to retain cool water to enhance the cooling benefits of the ECS. In addition to holding water, the material can be infused with water-retaining crystals such as cross-linked polyacrylamide crystals or any of a number of other non-harmful cooling chemicals or materials. Another example of water-retaining/cooling materials that can be utilized is natural jute fiber. Such materials, when wetted, help to cool the wearer by utilizing the cooling effects of evaporation. As shown in FIG. 1, the CCF 110 has square pockets 119 sewn into the fabric or core component material in order to contain and evenly distribute cooling agents throughout the body of the CCF 110. In an alternate embodiment, the CCF 110 may contain warming agents instead of cooling agents. The ECS 100 shown in FIG. 1 contemplates the utilization of various component and materials in its manufacture, including those which facilitate warming and cooling, which are currently known in the art as well as those which become known.

The exemplary AWF 130 shown in FIG. 1 has an integrated weather-proof/water-resistant hat cover 134. As shown in FIG. 1, the hat cover 134 is shaped so as to cover a baseball-style cap. It is contemplated that alternative hat cover shapes would be utilized in order to cover alternative hat styles and shapes. The material utilized in manufacturing the hat cover can be any of a number of materials, depending on the properties desired in the hat cover 134. For example, if water-resistance and breathability are desired a material such as that sold under the trademark Gortex® can be used. If more warmth is desired, a layer of insulation such as that sold under the trademark Thinsulate® can be included. Additionally, warming chemicals or agents can be incorporated in alternate embodiments for increased warmth.

The materials used to construct the CCF 110, the AWF 130, and the FP 150 can be selected based on the advantages and disadvantages they offer. Further, the materials can be colored as desired. For certain applications, camouflage colorings may be desired. For others, such as in very hot, sunny locations, all white colorings may be used. The ECS 100 is not limited to certain colors or fabric/material combinations.

The hat cover 134 has at least two additional subcomponents: the elastic or stretchable portion 135 at the front of the hat cover 134 and the adjustable attachment means or drawstring 136, in the embodiment shown in FIG. 1. Alternate embodiments are contemplated utilizing alternative means of attaching and adjusting the hat cover 134 to the cap 170 and the CCF 110. In the embodiment in FIG. 1, the stretchable portion 135 at the front of the hat cover 134 combined with the drawstring 136 allows the person 190 wearing the ECS 100 to tighten the AWF component separately from the other components. Furthermore, the wearer has the ability to remove the AWF completely if it is not needed.

The FP 150 shown in the embodiment in FIG. 1 has three features: the main structural material 151, the upper attachment means 152, and the vertical attachment means 153. The main structural material 151 shown in this embodiment is an insect screen or netting. The main structural material 151 used to manufacture the FP 150 can be “see-through”, “rip-stop” nylon or other suitable material that can protect the person's 190 face from insects, sand, sun, blowing snow, etc., while still allowing the person 190 to see through the material. Other embodiments are contemplated in which the main structural material 151 is clear plastic, tinted plastic, etc.

The FP 150 has an upper attachment means 152 which provides a means for attaching the FP to the cap 170. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, a hook-and-loop material is used to attach the FP 150 to the underside of the bill of the baseball-style cap 170; this means of attaching requires that a complimentary hook-and-loop material be affixed to the underside of the bill of the cap 170 so that the upper attachment means 152 can attach thereto. Other embodiments utilizing alternative attachment means are contemplated. Similarly, the FP 150 has vertical attachment means 153 which also utilize hook-and-loop material in the embodiment shown in FIG. 1 to attach the sides of the FP 150 to the sides of the CCF 110 using the CCF's 110 vertical attachment means 113. The FP's 150 vertical attachment means 153 are shown using dashed lines as the hook-and-loop material is on the rear-facing surface of the FP 150. Further, only the left side of the FP is shown in FIG. 1. However, there is another vertical attachment means 153 on the right side of the FP 150 that is not shown. Because the CCF's 110 vertical attachment means 113 are wider than those of the AWF 130 and the FP 150, both the AWF 130 and the FP 150 can be attached to the CCF 110 at the same time.

FIG. 2 shows a close-up view of the ECS 200. The CCF 210 component is displayed in detail without the AWF 130 or the FP 150 from FIG. 1. A CCF 210 can be attached to a cap 270 by a myriad of means. Although not explicitly shown in FIG. 2, the CCF 210 is attached to the cap 270 by means of two hook-and-loop tabs “Velcro-ed” to the inside of the sweat-band of the cap 270. Other means of attaching the CCF 210 to the cap 270 are contemplated.

In addition to the attachment means described above, the CCF 210 can have a belt loop 211. In the embodiment utilizing a baseball-style cap, the cap 270 has an adjustment band 271. The adjustment band 271 can be threaded through the belt loop 211 to provide an additional means of attachment and minimize movement of the CCF 210 relative to the cap 270.

As shown in the left side perspective view in FIG. 2, the CCF 210 has a left horizontal attachment means 212. A right horizontal attachment means is also contemplated, but not shown in FIG. 2. The horizontal attachment means 212 shown in FIG. 2 is a hook-and-loop material, other attachment means are contemplated. The CCF's 210 horizontal attachment means 212 is placed so as to accept horizontal attachment means from the AWF. Furthermore, the CCF 210 has vertical attachment means 213 that are placed to accept vertical attachment means from both the AWF and the FP. Once again, both a left vertical attachment means 213 and a right vertical attachment means are contemplated, although only the left vertical attachment means 213 is visible in FIG. 2.

The CCF 210 has a drawstring 215 and a push-button clasp 214, as described under FIG. 1, above. Furthermore, the description of the material used to manufacture the CCF 210 is the same as that given under FIG. 1, above. FIG. 2 also shows the pockets 219 which, when filled with cooling chemicals or agents enhance the cooling characteristics of the CCF 210. In another embodiment, the pockets 219 could be filled with warming chemicals or agents to enhance the warming characteristics of the CCF 210 in cold weather.

The cap 270 shown in FIG. 2 also has a FP storage tab 257 added to it in order to facilitate the storage of the FP when not in use. The storage tab 257 provides a means of securing the FP (shown in FIG. 7 as FP 750) out of the way when it is not in use. Storage is accomplished by folding the FP 750 over the top of the head and attaching the storage tab 755 on the FP 750 as shown in FIG. 7 to a corresponding FP storage tab 257 on the rear of the cap 270, as shown in FIG. 2. Given the exemplary hook-and-loop attachment means and using the baseball-style cap as an example, the FP 750 would be folded over the top of the cap and attached via the storage tab 755 to a corresponding hook-and-loop material FP storage tab 257.

An embodiment of a CCF 310 is shown in FIG. 3 from a front view wherein the inside of the CCF 310 is shown in detail. The inside surface of the CCF 310 faces the back of the wearer's head and neck during use. The CCF 310 has a drawstring 315 and a push-button clasp 314, as described under FIG. 1, above. Furthermore, the description of the material used to manufacture the CCF 310 is the same as that given under FIG. 1, above. FIG. 3 also shows the pockets 319 which, when filled with cooling chemicals or agents, enhance the cooling characteristics of the CCF 310.

The eyelets briefly discussed above are shown in more detail in FIG. 3. In the embodiment in FIG. 3, three pairs of eyelets are shown. More or fewer pairs of eyelets could be utilized in alternate embodiments. The top pair of eyelets 316 and 366 can be utilized to tighten the CCF 310 closely to the face. The middle pair of eyelets 317 and 367 allows a slightly more relaxed fit, while the bottom pair of eyelets 318 and 368 provides the user with the ability to create a cooling “air-channel” against the back of the neck, as described under FIG. 1, above.

Three vertical stays are embedded within the embodiment of the CCF 310 shown in FIG. 3: the right stay 320, the middle stay 321, and the left stay 322. The number of stays could be fewer or greater in alternate embodiments. The stays can be constructed of any suitable material that is lightweight, flexible, and semi-rigid. In one embodiment, plastic “zip-ties” are contemplated; in another, nylon, bendable stays are used. The stays keep the CCF 310 from bunching up around the back of the neck for the most effective cooling around the neck, lower head, and ears.

In the top center area of the CCF 310 is an elastic band or stretchable area 324. The stretchable area 324 allows the CCF 310 to easily adjust to wearers with different size heads. Further, the stretchable area 324 provides for a comfortable and snug fit.

At the very top of the CCF 310 are two horizontal attachment tabs 325 and 326. The tabs extend beyond the top of the CCF's 310 main body and are flexible so they can be folded over and attached inside the sweat-band of a hat. The attachment means are not visible in this embodiment; they reside on the outside surface of the tabs and so may be seen in FIG. 4. In order to attach the CCF 310 to a standard baseball-style cap, the cap's sweat-band is unfolded from the inside rim of the hat. Then, corresponding hook-and-loop materials are attached to the inside of the sweat-band (using glue, stitches, or any other suitable means) such that the two horizontal attachment tabs 325 and 326 can be attached to the sweat-band. The sweat-band and tabs can then be folded together and the sweat-band returned to its original folded condition inside the rim of the hat. The attachment means (shown in FIG. 4 as attachment means 427 and 428) securely hold the tabs in place against the sweat-band, in turn securing the entire CCF 310 to the hat. Other embodiments are contemplated wherein the tabs utilize snaps, buttons, zippers, or any other means to attach the CCF 310 to the hat. In addition, the tabs themselves are not necessary and could be replaced by alternate means of attachment without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

An embodiment of a CCF 410 is shown in FIG. 4 from a rear view wherein the outside of the CCF 410 is shown in detail. The outside surface of the CCF 410 faces out and away from the back of the wearer's head and neck during use. The CCF 410 has a drawstring 415 and a push-button clasp 414, as described under FIG. 1, above. Furthermore, the description of the material used to manufacture the CCF 410 is the same as that given under FIG. 1, above. FIG. 4 also shows the pockets 419 which, when filled with cooling chemicals or agents, enhance the cooling characteristics of the CCF 410.

The eyelets, which include a top pair 416 and 466, a middle pair 417 and 467, and a bottom pair 418 and 468 in the CCF 410, are as described under FIG. 3, above. The two horizontal attachment tabs 425 and 426 are shown in FIG. 4. The attachment means 427 and 428 are shown in this exemplary embodiment as hook-and-loop material. Other means of attaching the CCF 410 are contemplated. In order to attach the CCF 410 to a standard baseball-style cap, the cap's sweat-band is unfolded from the inside rim of the hat. Then, corresponding hook-and-loop materials are attached (using glue, stitches, or any other suitable means) to the sweat-band such that the two horizontal attachment tabs 425 and 426 can be folded into the sweat-band when it is returned to its original folded position inside the rim of the hat. The attachment means 427 and 428 securely hold the tabs in place against the sweat-band, in turn securing the entire CCF 410 to a hat. The belt loop 411 is shown in detail in FIG. 4. It is placed such that the adjustable band on a standard baseball-style cap fits through the belt loop 411 and helps to secure the CCF 410 to the cap.

Both the left and the right horizontal attachment means 412 and 482 are shown in FIG. 4. The horizontal attachment means 412 and 482 are located on the CCF 410 such that the AWF's corresponding horizontal attachment means 532 and 592 (as shown in FIG. 5) line-up with those on the CCF 410 when the AWF is placed onto the CCF 410. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, a hook-and-loop material is used as the attachment means, other means of attaching the AWF to the CCF 410 are contemplated. Similarly, both the left and the right vertical attachment means 413 and 483 are shown in FIG. 4. The vertical attachment means 413 and 483 are located on the CCF 410 such that the AWF's corresponding vertical attachment means 533 and 593 (as shown in FIG. 5) line-up with those on the CCF 410 when the AWF is placed onto the CCF 410. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, a hook-and-loop material is used as the attachment means, other means of attaching the AWF to the CCF 410 are contemplated.

In addition to acting as a point of attachment for the AWF, the vertical attachment means 413 and 483 also receive the corresponding vertical attachment means on the FP and thereby help to hold the FP in place.

FIG. 5 shows an exemplary implementation of the AWF 530. Note that the hat cover 134 from FIG. 1 is not utilized in this implementation of the AWF 530. Instead, only that portion of the AWF 530 that covers the back of the wearer's head and neck is included. Both the left and the right horizontal attachment means 532 and 592 are shown as are both the left and the right vertical attachment means 533 and 593. As described under FIG. 4, above, the attachment means shown in the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5 are the hook-and-loop materials. Other means of attachment are contemplated.

In the top center of the AWF 530 is an elastic band or stretchable area 537. The stretchable area 537 allows the AWF 530 to easily adjust to wearers with different size heads. Further, the stretchable area 537 provides for a comfortable and snug fit.

Yet another exemplary implementation of the AWF 630 is illustrated in FIG. 6. A left side view of the AWF 630 is shown. The AWF 630 has an integrated weather-proof/water-resistant hat cover 634. As shown in FIG. 6, the hat cover 634 is shaped so as to cover a baseball-style cap. It is contemplated that alternative hat cover shapes would be utilized in order to cover alternative hat styles and shapes. The material utilized in manufacturing the hat cover can be any of a number of materials, depending on the properties desired in the hat cover 634. Similarly, any desired colored and/or patterned materials can be used.

The AWF 630 attaches to the CCF 110 via the left horizontal attachment means 632 and the left vertical attachment means 633. Both attachment means are illustrated using dashed lines as they are on the inside, front-facing surface of the AWF 630 and so are not directly visible in the current view. The CCF 110 has a left horizontal attachment means 112 placed so as to accept the AWF's 630 left horizontal attachment means 632. The AWF's 630 left vertical attachment means 633 attaches to the corresponding CCF's 110 left vertical attachment means 113. Both the CCF 110 and the AWF 630 also have corresponding right vertical and horizontal attachment means (not shown) that are mirrors of the left attachment means.

The hat cover 634 has at least three additional subcomponents shown in the embodiment in FIG. 6: the elastic or stretchable portion 635 at the front of the hat cover 634, the adjustable attachment means or drawstring 636, and the FP storage tab 656. In the embodiment in FIG. 6, the stretchable portion 635 at the front of the hat cover 634 combined with the drawstring 636 allows the person wearing an ECS to adjust and tighten the AWF component separately from the other components. Furthermore, the wearer has the ability to remove the AWF 630 completely if it is not needed. Alternate embodiments are contemplated utilizing alternative means of attaching and adjusting the hat cover 634 over the hat.

The FP storage tab 656 shown in the embodiment in FIG. 6 is a hook-and-loop material; alternate materials and means of storing the FP are contemplated. FIG. 6 does not show a FP. Nevertheless, the FP storage tab 656 is shown and would be used by the wearer to store the FP when it is not in use. The wearer would simply relocate the FP from its normal position in front of the wearer's face by swinging it back over the hat cover 634 and then fold the FP and secure it to the FP storage tab 656 via a similar hook-and-loop material on the FP, as shown in FIG. 7 as a storage tab 755.

The FP 750 shown in the embodiment in FIG. 7 has four key features: the main structural material 751, the upper attachment means 752, the vertical attachment means 753 and 754, and the storage tab 755. The main structural material 751 shown in this embodiment is an insect screen or netting. The material used to manufacture the FP 750 can be “see-through”, “rip-stop” nylon or some other suitable material that can protect the wearer's face from insects, sand, sun, blowing snow, etc., while still allowing the wearer to see through the material. Other embodiments are contemplated in which the main structural material 751 is clear plastic, tinted plastic, etc.

The FP 750 has an upper attachment means 752 which provides a means for attaching the FP 750 to a hat. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 7, a hook-and-loop material is used to attach the FP 750 to the underside of the bill of a baseball-style cap. A corresponding hook-and-loop material must also be affixed to the underside of the cap's bill with glue, stitches, or some other means. Other embodiments of the FP 750 utilizing alternative attachment means are contemplated. FIG. 7 illustrates the FP 750 from a rear view, showing the surface of the FP 750 that faces inward towards the wearer's face. The upper attachment means 752 is shown using dashed lines because it is on the outward facing surface of the FP 750 and would not normally be visible from the rear view. The same is true for the storage tab 755: it is on the outward facing surface of the FP 750, so would not normally be visible in the current view.

The storage tab 755 provides a means of securing the FP 750 out of the way when it is not in use. Storage is accomplished by folding the FP 750 over the top of the head and attaching the storage tab 755 to a corresponding attachment means on the rear of the hat. Given the exemplary hook-and-loop attachment means and using the baseball-style hat as an example, the FP 750 would be folded over the top of the hat and attached via the storage tab 755 to a corresponding hook-and-loop material previously affixed to the hat directly above the adjustment band 171, on the back center of the hat, as shown in FIG. 2 as FP storage tab 257.

The FP 750 has vertical attachment means 753 and 754 which also utilize hook-and-loop material in the embodiment shown in FIG. 7 to attach the sides of the FP 750 to the sides of the CCF 110 using the CCF's 110 vertical attachment means 113. Both the left and right sides of the FP 750 are shown in FIG. 7. However, in FIG. 1, only one side of the CCF 110 is shown. Thus, only one vertical attachment means 113 is shown on the CCF 110 in FIG. 1. Nevertheless, there is another vertical attachment means on the other side of the CCF 110 so that both the left and right vertical attachment means 753 and 754 can be attached to the left and right vertical attachment means of the CCF 110 in FIG. 1. Because the CCF's 110 vertical attachment means 113 are wider than those of the AWF 130 and the FP 750, both the AWF 130 and the FP 750 can be attached to the CCF 110 at the same time.

The above specification, examples and data provide a description of the structure and use of exemplary embodiments of the described articles of manufacture and methods. Many embodiments can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7971278Jun 17, 2009Jul 5, 2011Klamerus Jr RichardHat cover and frame
US7987522 *Mar 27, 2009Aug 2, 2011Morgan Clyde SSystems and methods for providing modular camouflage
US8359664 *Aug 1, 2011Jan 29, 2013Morgan Clyde SSystems and methods for providing modular camouflage
US20110094013 *Oct 22, 2010Apr 28, 2011Johnathan ZumwaltSun shield device
US20120017353 *Aug 1, 2011Jan 26, 2012Morgan Clyde SSystems and methods for providing modular camouflage
WO2012163767A1 *May 23, 2012Dec 6, 2012Eugen GeserUv protection
WO2013184459A1 *May 29, 2013Dec 12, 2013Woo Frankie ESunshade cap with multiple retractable sunshield members
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/172, 2/209.11, 2/173, 2/243.1, 2/206
International ClassificationA41D27/00, A42B1/06, A42B1/24, A42B1/00, A42B1/18
Cooperative ClassificationA41D13/1153, A42B1/067, A42B1/008, A42B1/241
European ClassificationA42B1/06C2, A41D13/11B10, A42B1/24A, A42B1/00F