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Publication numberUS20080072945 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/849,692
Publication dateMar 27, 2008
Filing dateSep 4, 2007
Priority dateAug 4, 2006
Publication number11849692, 849692, US 2008/0072945 A1, US 2008/072945 A1, US 20080072945 A1, US 20080072945A1, US 2008072945 A1, US 2008072945A1, US-A1-20080072945, US-A1-2008072945, US2008/0072945A1, US2008/072945A1, US20080072945 A1, US20080072945A1, US2008072945 A1, US2008072945A1
InventorsDavid Grand Pre, Jon Long, Damian Riddoch
Original AssigneeRsga International, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable Shelter with Lighting System
US 20080072945 A1
Abstract
A portable shelter including a shelter body and a lighting system secured to the shelter body. The lighting system includes a lighting system body, at least one light emitter carried by the lighting system body, a power source supplying power to at least one light emitter, and a control circuit controlling at least one light emitter. A remote controller is in wireless communication with the control circuit to control at least one light emitter. Another portable shelter includes a shelter body, at least one lighting cartridge having a cartridge body and at least one light emitter carried by the cartridge body, a power source supplying power to at least one light emitter, and at least one lighting base secured to the shelter body. The lighting base is configured to receive and removably secure the lighting cartridge.
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Claims(25)
1. A portable shelter comprising:
a shelter body;
at least one lighting system secured to the shelter body, the lighting system comprising:
a lighting system body;
at least one light emitter carried by the lighting system body;
a power source supplying power to at least one light emitter; and
a control circuit controlling at least one light emitter.
2. The portable shelter of claim 1, wherein the lighting system is embedded in the shelter body and configured to illuminate the interior of the shelter body.
3. The portable shelter of claim 1, wherein the lighting system is embedded in the shelter body and configured to illuminate an area exterior of the shelter body.
4. The portable shelter of claim 1, further comprising a remote controller in wireless communication with the control circuit to control at least one light emitter.
5. The portable shelter of claim 1, wherein the lighting system further comprises a reflective surface carried by the lighting system body and configured to enhance light from at least one light emitter.
6. The portable shelter of claim 1, wherein the lighting system further comprises a lens carried by the lighting system body and configured to enhance light from at least one light emitter.
7. A portable shelter comprising:
a shelter body;
at least one lighting cartridge comprising a cartridge body and at least one light emitter carried by the cartridge body;
a power source supplying power to at least one light emitter; and
at least one lighting base secured to the shelter body, the lighting base configured to receive and removably secure the lighting cartridge.
8. The portable shelter of claims 7, wherein the lighting base is configured to house the power source.
9. The portable shelter of claim 7, wherein the lighting cartridge further comprises a power connector disposed on the cartridge body and configured to mate with a corresponding lighting base power connector within a receptacle defined by the lighting base as the lighting cartridge is placed within the receptacle to establish an electric power connection to the lighting cartridge.
10. The portable shelter of claim 7, wherein the lighting cartridge further comprises a power connector disposed on the cartridge body and configured to mate with a corresponding power source power connector.
11. The portable shelter of claim 7, wherein the lighting cartridge further comprises a reflective surface carried by the cartridge body and configured to enhance light from at least one light emitter.
12. The portable shelter of claim 7, wherein the lighting cartridge further comprises a lens carried by the cartridge body and configured to enhance light from at least one light emitter.
13. The portable shelter of claim 7, further comprising a control circuit controlling at least one light emitter.
14. The portable shelter of claim 13, further comprising a remote controller in wireless communication with the control circuit to control at least one light emitter.
15. The portable shelter of claim 14, wherein the remote controller is at least partially embedded in the shelter body.
16. The portable shelter of claim 7, further comprising an audible device in communication with the control circuit.
17. The portable shelter of claim 16, wherein the audible device comprises a programmable alarm clock.
18. The portable shelter of claim 7, further comprising a switch secured to the shelter body and in communication with the lighting cartridge.
19. The portable shelter of claim 7, wherein the base comprises at least one magnet to retain the lighting cartridge, the lighting cartridge having a magnetically attractable surface configured to mate with the at least one magnet.
20. The portable shelter of claim 19, wherein at least one magnet delivers power to the lighting cartridge.
21. The portable shelter of claim 7, wherein the lighting cartridge is secured to the base by hook and loop fasteners.
22. The portable shelter of claim 21, wherein power is delivered to the lighting cartridge through the hook and loop fasteners.
23. The portable shelter of claim 7, wherein at least one light emitter is activated by moving the light cartridge relative to the lighting base.
24. The portable shelter of claim 7, wherein the cartridge body comprises:
a cartridge body base; and
a bezel housing rotatably and telescopically secured to the cartridge body base and carrying at least one light emitter.
25. The portable shelter of claim 24, wherein the bezel housing is configured as a switch to activate at least one light emitter.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This U.S. patent application claims priority as a continuation-in-part under 35 U.S.C. 120 to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/499,843, filed on Aug. 4, 2006, the entire contents of the which are hereby incorporated by reference.

TECHNICAL FIELD

This invention relates to portable shelters with lighting systems.

BACKGROUND

Portable shelters are typically structures that cover or provide protection from an environment. Typical examples of portable shelters include, but are not limited to, tents, awnings, awnings and/or tents attached to cars, etc. Since shelters cover or provide protection from environmental elements, they tend to be dark inside. Due to their portability, portable shelters usually lack any convenient lighting systems.

SUMMARY

In one aspect, a portable shelter includes a shelter body and a lighting system secured to the shelter body. The lighting system includes a lighting system body, at least one light emitter carried by the lighting system body, a power source supplying power to at least one light emitter, and a control circuit controlling at least one light emitter. A remote controller is in wireless communication with the control circuit to control at least one light emitter. The lighting system illuminates an interior and/or an external of the shelter body.

Implementations of this aspect of the disclosure may include one or more of the following features. In some examples, the lighting system is embedded in the shelter body and configured to illuminate the interior of the shelter body. In some instances, the lighting system is configured to illuminate an area exterior of the shelter body. The remote controller may be at least partially embedded in the shelter body.

The lighting system may also include a reflective surface carried by the lighting system body and configured to enhance light from at least one light emitter. A lens is carried by the lighting system body, in some examples, and configured to enhance light from at least one light emitter. The lens is adjustable to defuse and focus light from at least one light emitter.

The lighting system body includes a main housing and a base. The base is secured to the shelter body and is configured to receive the main housing. The main housing is removably secured to the base. The base defines a receptacle configured to receive the main housing. The base may be embedded in the shelter body. In some instances, the base is configured to house the power source. The main housing is configured to house at least one light emitter.

In another aspect, a portable shelter includes a shelter body, at least one lighting cartridge having a cartridge body and at least one light emitter carried by the cartridge body, a power source supplying power to at least one light emitter, and at least one lighting base secured to the shelter body. The lighting base is configured to receive and removably secure the lighting cartridge. When the portable shelter includes multiple lighting cartridges and/or lighting bases, different lighting cartridges may be interchanged with different lighting bases in various locations (e.g. to interchange lighting cartridges having different colored light emitters).

Implementations of this aspect of the disclosure may include one or more of the following features. The lighting cartridge, in some instances, includes a power connector disposed on an outer surface of the cartridge body. The power connector is configured to mate with a corresponding lighting base power connector within a receptacle defined by lighting base as the lighting cartridge is placed within the receptacle to establish an electric power connection to the lighting cartridge. In other instances, the lighting cartridge power connector is configured to mate with a corresponding power source power connector. In one example, at least one light emitter is activated by moving the light cartridge relative to the lighting base.

In some implementations, the portable shelter includes a control circuit that controls at least one light emitter. The portable shelter may also include a remote controller in wireless communication with the control circuit to control at least one light emitter. The remote controller is at least partially embedded in the shelter body, in some examples.

In some examples, the lighting cartridge includes a reflective surface and a lens, both carried by the cartridge body and configured to enhance light from at least one light emitter. The lens is adjustable to defuse and focus light from at least one light emitter.

In some implementations, the base includes at least one magnet to retain the lighting cartridge, which has a magnetically attractable surface configured to mate with the at least one magnet. In some examples, at least one magnet delivers power to the lighting cartridge.

In other implementations, the lighting cartridge is secured to the base by hook and loop fasteners. In some examples, power is delivered to the lighting cartridge through the hook and loop fasteners.

The lighting cartridge may be configured to articulate, thereby providing a wide sweepable lighting range. In some implementations, the lighting cartridge includes a cartridge body base and a bezel housing rotatably and telescopically secured to the cartridge body base. The bezel housing carries at least one light emitter. In some examples, the bezel housing is configured to move along three axes of motion. The bezel housing may also be configured as a switch. In some instances, the bezel housing includes a lens configured to focus light emitted by at least one light emitter.

The power source in each aspect may include a battery, rechargeable battery, at least one solar energy cell and/or a hand powered generator. In some instances, the base is configured to house the power source. In other instances, the main housing is configured to house the power source. In yet more instances, the power source is carried by the shelter body separate from the base and the main housing.

In each aspect, the portable shelter may include an audible device carried by the shelter body. In some instances, the audible device is carried by the main housing or lighting cartridge body. The audible device may include a programmable alarm clock. The audible device is programmable with auditory content, in some examples, providing custom audio playback. In some instances, the audible device is in communication with the control circuit and controllable with the remote controller. In other instances, the audible device is in wireless communication with the remote controller.

The details of one or more implementations of the disclosure are set fourth in the accompanying drawings and the description below. Other features, objects, and advantages will be apparent from the description and drawings, and from the claims.

DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a portable shelter incorporating a lighting system.

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of a lighting system.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a back housing.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a front housing.

FIG. 5 is a side view of a front housing.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a heat sink.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a power connector.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a base.

FIG. 9 is a schematic view of a control circuit used to control a lighting system.

FIGS. 10-12 are perspective views of a lighting system.

FIGS. 13-14 are exploded views of a lighting system.

FIG. 15 is a perspective view of a lighting system.

Like reference symbols in the various drawings indicate like elements.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Referring to FIG. 1, a portable shelter 2 includes a shelter body 100 and at least one lighting system 200 secured to the shelter body 100 (e.g. an interior 110 of the shelter body 100). The lighting system 200 may be secured to the shelter body 100 by sewing, a strap, hook and loop fasteners, adhesives, and magnets. The lighting system 200 includes a lighting system body 210, at least one light emitter 220 (e.g. a light emitting diode (LED)) carried by the lighting system body 210, a power source 300 supplying power to at least one light emitter 220, and a control circuit 250 controlling at least one light emitter 220. The control circuit 250 may be carried by the lighting system body 210 or the shelter body 100 (e.g. embedded in a lining). In some implementations, the shelter body 100 is a tent, as illustrated in FIG. 1, and may also include other temporary shelters, gazebos, shades, awnings, and awnings attached to vehicles. The lighting system 200 is embedded or integrated in the shelter body 100 and configured, in some examples, to illuminate the interior 110 of the shelter body 100. In additional examples, the lighting system 200 is configured to illuminate an area exterior of the shelter body 100. The light emitted by the lighting system 200 may be red, white or any other color. Examples of light emitters 220 include light emitting diodes, illuminable gels, and electroluminescent wire. In some examples, the light emitters 220 include optical fibers. This lighting system 200 can be installed in the shelter body 100 either at the time of manufacture or as an after market system.

The lighting system 200 is controllable at the light system body 210, 30 (e.g. via a switch, dial, or motion detector) and/or by a remote controller 260. The remote controller 260 can be located anywhere around or in the shelter body 100 (e.g. on a shelter wall 102, as shown, or floor 104, proximate to the entry 101, or proximate to the lighting system 200) or hanging from a tether. The remote controller 260 may be in wireless communication with the control circuit 250 (e.g. infrared or radio frequency) to control at least one light emitter 220. For example, when the portable shelter 2 includes multiple lighting systems 200, the remote controller 260 may control each light emitter 220 of each lighting systems 200. Each lighting systems 200 may include a switch to control each light emitter 220 or over-ride the remote controller 260. In some instances, the remote controller 260 is at least partially embedded in the shelter body 100 for aesthetics or robust attachment.

In some implementations, the remote controller 260 is a switch in communication with and controlling at least one light emitter 220. The remote controller 260 may be secured to a part of the shelter body 100, including a portal 101 of the shelter body 100.

The control circuit 250 and wiring 355 may be woven into fabric of the shelter body 100, or held in place within a seam or by a releasable fastener. In some instances, the lighting system 200 is mounted on a surface of the shelter body 100 using adhesives, snaps, hook and loop fasteners, magnets, or any other type of mounting device known. The remote controller 260 may be incorporated into the portable shelter 2 using the same techniques as described for the control circuit 250 and wiring 355.

Referring to FIG. 2, in some examples lighting system body 210 includes a main housing 30 (also referred to as a cartridge) and a base 14. The main housing 30 is removably secured to the base 14, which in some instances, defines a receptacle 15 configured to receive the main housing 30. The base 14 is secured to the shelter body 100. The main housing 30 is configured to house at least one light emitter 220. In some instances, the base 14 is configured to house the power source 300. In other instances, the main housing 30 is configured to house the power source 300. In yet more instances, the power source 300 is carried by the shelter body 100 separate from the base 14 and the main housing 30.

In the example shown in FIG. 2, the lighting system body 210 includes of a back housing 8, a front housing 10 secured to the back housing 8 to form a main housing 30. The lighting system body 210 also includes a heat sink 12 secured between back and front housings 8 and 10, respectively, a power connector 13 received by the main housing 30, and a base 14 configured to receive the back housing 8. In some implementations, the lighting system body 210 is manufactured as one entire unit. In other implementations, the front housing 10 is removable, allowing easy servicing of the light emitters 220, for example, as when an LED 220 burns out or to replace an LED 220 with a different color light or wattage.

Referring to FIGS. 3-5, the back housing 8 defines two openings 16 configured to receive to two tabs 18 extending from the front housing 10. A slot 17 defined in the back housing 8 is configured to receive the power connector 13, which delivers power to at least one light emitter 220. The front housing 10 incorporates at least one opening 19 for at least one light emitter 220 housed by the main housing 30.

Referring to FIG. 6, to prevent heat damage, a heat sink 12 may be incorporated in the lightly system body 210 and secured between the back housing 8 and the front housing 10. The heat sink 12 provides heat dissipation for the light emitter 220. The heat sink 12 defines two openings 21 configured to receive the tabs 18 of the front housing 10.

In some instances, a metal lighting system body 210 may be used to dissipate heat. In other instances, the lightly system body 210 may be made of plastic or rubber (e.g. silicon).

FIG. 7 illustrates an example of the power connector 13. As shown, the power connector 13 is a bipolar plug. The power connector 13 may be unidirectional to guide orientation of the connector 13 during insertion into the back housing 8. The power connector 13 shown uses an indentation 20 to ensure that it is not inserted incorrectly.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the base 14. The base 14 is configured to receive the back housing 8 which is removably secured. In the example shown, the back housing 8 is retained against the base 14 by snapping the back housing 8 into a pair of retaining tabs 22 configured to receive the back housing 8. In some instances, the base 14 defines one or more openings 24 which can be used to fasten the base 14 to a surface of the shelter body 100. In some examples, the base 14 is fastened to a surface of the shelter body 100 using an adhesive, hook and loop fasteners, or other mechanical fasteners.

FIG. 9 illustrates an example of the control circuit 250 used to control the lighting system 200. In some examples, the control circuit 250 incorporates a three way switch that can be controlled at two different locations such as at an opening of the shelter body 100 and proximate to the lightly system body 210. In examples using a remote controller 260, the remote controller 260 is either wired to the control circuit 250 or in wire communication with the control circuit 250 to control at least one light emitter 220.

Referring again to FIG. 2, in some examples, the lighting system 200 includes a reflective surface 40 carried by the lighting system body and configured to enhance light from at least one light emitter 220. In the example shown, the reflective surface 40 is disposed between the heat sink 12 and the front housing 10. In some implementations, the lighting system 200 also includes a lens 50 carried by the lighting system body and configured to enhance light from at least one light emitter 220. In the example shown, the lens 50 is disposed on the front housing 10. The lens 50 may be adjustable to defuse and/or focus light from at least one light emitter 220.

FIGS. 10-12 illustrate an example of servicing the lighting system 200. FIG. 10 shows an example of the lighting system 200 disassembled. The base 14 is fixed to the shelter body 100 and the removable main housing 30 can be interchanged with another main housing 30 (e.g. with different light emitters 220). To assemble the lighting system 200, the main housing 30, which carries the light emitter 220 in this example, is inserted into the receptacle 15 (e.g. a socket) of the base 14, as shown in FIG. 11. Then, as shown in FIG. 12, the power connector 13 is inserted into the main housing 30. In some examples, the main housing 30 is snapped into the socket 15. In other examples, the main housing 30 is secured in the socket 14 by turning. When the portable shelter 2 includes multiple lighting cartridges 30 and/or lighting bases 14, different lighting cartridges 30 may be interchanged with different lighting bases 14 in various locations (e.g. to interchange lighting cartridges 30 having different colored light emitters 220). In one example, at least one light emitter is activated by moving the light cartridge relative to the lighting base.

Referring to FIGS. 10 and 13, the lighting cartridge 30, in some instances, includes a power connector 31 disposed on an outer surface of the cartridge body 8, 10, 30. The power connector 31 is configured to mate with a corresponding lighting base power connector 33 within a receptacle 15 defined by lighting base 14 as the lighting cartridge 30 is placed within the receptacle to establish an electric power connection to the lighting cartridge 30. In other instances, the lighting cartridge power connector 33 is configured to mate with a corresponding power source power connector 13.

Referring to FIG. 14, in some implementations, the base 14 includes at least one magnet 36 to retain the lighting cartridge 30, which has a magnetically attractable surface configured to mate with the at least one magnet. The magnets 36 may be seeded in the base 14 and in some examples slightly recessed. In some examples, at least one magnet 36 is connected to the power source and delivers power to the lighting cartridge 30. Electrical contacts 37 on the lighting cartridge 30 magnetically mate with corresponding magnets 36 of the base 14 to receive power.

In other implementations, the lighting cartridge 30 is secured to the base 14 by hook and loop fasteners (36 a, 37 a) in a similar manner as the example in FIG. 14. In some examples, power is delivered to the lighting cartridge 30 through the hook and loop fasteners (36 a, 37 a). Other engageable fasteners may be used as well.

Referring to FIG. 15, the lighting cartridge 30 may be configured to articulate, thereby providing a wide sweepable lighting range. In some implementations, the lighting cartridge 30 includes a cartridge body base 8 and a bezel housing 38 rotatably and telescopically secured to the cartridge body base 8. The bezel housing 38 carries at least one light emitter 220. In some examples, the bezel housing 38 is configured to move along three axes of motion. The bezel housing 38 may also be configured as a switch. In one example, the lightly system 200 is controlled by twisting the bezel housing 38. In another example, the lightly system 200 is controlled by depressing the bezel housing 38 like a button. In some instances, the bezel housing 38 includes a lens 40 configured to focus light emitted by at least one light emitter 220.

Examples of the power supply 300 include a rechargeable battery (e.g. chargeable with a standard A/C plug and/or a 12V power source such as car or RV), at least one solar energy cell, and a hand powered generator.

In some examples, the portable shelter 2 includes an audible device 60 carried by the shelter body 100. In some instances, the audible device 60 is carried by the main housing 30 or lighting cartridge body 30. The audible device 60 may include a programmable alarm clock, allowing a user to set an alarm or timer. The audible device 60 is programmable with auditory content, in some examples, providing custom audio playback. For example, a user can download and play music, ring tones, alarm tones, etc. In some instances, the audible device 60 is in communication with the control circuit 260 and controllable with the remote controller 260. In other instances, the audible device 60 is in wireless communication with the remote controller 260. Wireless remote activation of the audio device 60 and/or lighting system 200 may be used as a safety procedure, to find/identify the portable shelter 2 (e.g. at a campground), inter alia. In one example, the audio device 60 and/or lighting system 200 are activated when the remote controller 260 is within a certain range (e.g. 10 feet).

A number of implementations have been described. Nevertheless, it will be understood that various modifications may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the disclosure. Accordingly, other implementations are within the scope of the following claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8082937 *Oct 12, 2010Dec 27, 2011Tarter Kevin JTent electrical system
US8084990Jul 16, 2010Dec 27, 2011Tarter Kevin JCamping kit
US8698455Oct 3, 2011Apr 15, 2014The Coleman Company, Inc.Camping devices powered by a common battery pack
US20120318315 *Aug 24, 2012Dec 20, 2012The Coleman Company, Inc.Tent electrical system
Classifications
U.S. Classification135/91, 135/96
International ClassificationE04H15/02, E04H15/10
Cooperative ClassificationF21Y2101/02, E04H15/10, F21V33/006
European ClassificationE04H15/10
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 17, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: RSGA INTERNATIONAL, INC., UTAH
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:GRAND PRE, DAVID M.;LONG, JON DARIN;RIDDOCH, DAMIAN;REEL/FRAME:020253/0001
Effective date: 20071212
Jan 10, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: RSGA INTERNATIONAL, INC., UTAH
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:GRAND PRE, DAVID M.;LONG, JON DARIN;RIDDOCH, DAMIAN;REEL/FRAME:020345/0660
Effective date: 20071212
Apr 25, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: RSGA, INC., UTAH
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:RSGA INTERNATIONAL, INC.;REEL/FRAME:020856/0610
Effective date: 20080424