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Publication numberUS20080078538 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/528,865
Publication dateApr 3, 2008
Filing dateSep 28, 2006
Priority dateSep 28, 2006
Publication number11528865, 528865, US 2008/0078538 A1, US 2008/078538 A1, US 20080078538 A1, US 20080078538A1, US 2008078538 A1, US 2008078538A1, US-A1-20080078538, US-A1-2008078538, US2008/0078538A1, US2008/078538A1, US20080078538 A1, US20080078538A1, US2008078538 A1, US2008078538A1
InventorsAli Jalilevand, David Allen Nagel
Original AssigneeAli Jalilevand, David Allen Nagel
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heat exchanger plate having integrated turbulation feature
US 20080078538 A1
Abstract
A plate for a heat exchanger is disclosed, wherein surfaces of the plate have integrated turbulation features formed thereon.
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Claims(20)
1. A plate for a heat exchanger comprising:
an elongate first main body having a first surface, a second surface, and a lip extending laterally outwardly from a peripheral edge of the main body;
a plurality of spaced apart first beads formed on the second surface of the plate, wherein a depth of the lip is substantially similar to a depth of the first beads; and
a plurality of spaced apart second beads formed on the first surface of the plate.
2. The plate as defined in claim 1, further comprising a plurality of third beads formed on the first surface of the plate, wherein a depth of the third beads is larger than a depth of the second beads.
3. The plate as defined in claim 1, wherein the first beads and the second beads are integrally formed with the plate.
4. The plate as defined in claim 1, wherein the first beads are substantially wave shaped.
5. The plate as defined in claim 1, wherein the first beads are substantially dome shaped.
6. The plate as defined in claim 1, wherein the second beads are substantially trapezoid shaped.
7. The plate as defined in claim 1, further comprising an elongate second main body having a first surface, a second surface, and a lip extending laterally outwardly from a peripheral edge of the main body, a plurality of spaced apart first beads formed on the second surface of the plate, wherein a depth of the lip is substantially similar to a depth of the first beads, and a plurality of spaced apart second beads formed on the first surface of the plate, wherein the lip formed on the first main body is connected to the lip formed on the second main body to form a heat exchanger plate.
8. The plate as defined in claim 7, wherein a first plurality of flow passages is formed between the first main body and the second main body.
9. The plate as defined in claim 8, wherein the first main body and the second main body include a first aperture formed at first ends thereof and a second aperture formed at second ends thereof, wherein the first apertures and the second apertures are in fluid communication with a heat exchanger tank.
10. The plate as defined in claim 9, wherein the first main body and the second main body include at least one first channel in fluid communication with the first apertures and the first plurality of flow passages, and at least one second channel in fluid communication with the first plurality of flow passages and the second apertures.
11. A stack for a heat exchanger comprising:
a first plate having a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a laterally outwardly extending lip and a plurality of spaced apart first beads formed thereon, the first surface including a plurality of spaced apart second beads formed thereon, wherein a depth of the lip is substantially similar to a depth of the first beads; and
a second plate having a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a laterally outwardly extending lip and a plurality of spaced apart first beads formed thereon, the first surface including a plurality of spaced apart second beads formed thereon, wherein a depth of the lip is substantially similar to a depth of the first beads, wherein the lip of the first plate is connected to the lip of the second plate.
12. The stack as defined in claim 11, wherein a first plurality of flow passages is formed between the first plate and the second plate.
13. The stack as defined in claim 12, wherein the first plate and the second plate include a first aperture formed at first ends thereof and a second aperture formed at second ends thereof, wherein the first apertures and the second apertures are in fluid communication with a heat exchanger tank.
14. The stack as defined in claim 13, wherein the first plate and the second plate include at least one first channel in fluid communication with the first apertures and the first plurality of flow passages, and at least one second channel in fluid communication with the first plurality of flow passages and the second apertures.
15. The stack as defined in claim 11, wherein the first beads formed on the first plate and the second beads formed on the first plate are integrally formed on the first plate, and the first beads formed on the second plate and the second beads formed on the second plate are integrally formed on the second plate.
16. The stack as defined in claim 11, wherein the first beads formed on the first plate and the first beads formed on the second plate are substantially wave shaped.
17. The stack as defined in claim 11, wherein the first beads formed on the first plate and the first beads formed on the second plate are substantially dome shaped.
18. A stack for a heat exchanger comprising:
a plurality of plates having first surfaces and second surfaces, the second surfaces including a laterally outwardly extending lip and a plurality of spaced apart first beads formed thereon, the first surfaces including a plurality of spaced apart second beads formed thereon, wherein a depth of the lip is substantially similar to a depth of the first beads, wherein the lips of pairs of plates are connected and the second beads of the pairs of plates are connected, and wherein a first plurality of flow passages is formed between the first surfaces of adjacent plates, and a second plurality of flow passages is formed between the second surfaces of adjacent plates.
19. The stack as defined in claim 17, wherein the first beads formed on the first plates and the second beads formed on the first plates are integrally formed on the first plates, and the first beads formed on the second plates and the second beads formed on the second plates are integrally formed on the second plates.
20. The stack as defined in claim 18, wherein the first plates and the second plates include a first aperture formed at first ends thereof and -a second aperture formed at second ends thereof, wherein the first apertures and the second apertures are in fluid communication with a heat exchanger tank, and wherein the first plates and the second plates include at least one first channel in fluid communication with the first apertures and the first plurality of flow passages, and at least one second channel in fluid communication with the first plurality of flow passages and the second apertures.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a plate for a heat exchanger tank and more particularly to a plate for a heat exchanger tank having integrated fluid turbulation features.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Heat exchanger tanks are designed to transport a heat transfer fluid, such as in a motor vehicle for example. Typically, opposed plates carry the fluid such as oil, for example, in passageways formed therebetween. It is known to provide corrugated fins between pairs of plates, wherein the fins act as a turbulator to increase the heat transfer coefficient of the heat exchanger.

One known method of making such a construction is to physically insert a corrugated fin between the plates after the plates have been manufactured. This has proved to be a difficult process since the corrugated fins are extremely thin and subject to deformation and damage during the insertion process. Further, inserting the fins can be a time consuming and costly process.

It is also known to provide beaded plates for heat exchangers, wherein the beads define a plurality of passageways between adjacent plates for the passage of a fluid therethrough. An example of the beaded plates is disclosed in commonly owned U.S. Pat. No. 6,364,006, hereby incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. The beaded plates increase the surface area of conductive material available for heat transfer and cause turbulence of the fluid carried between the plates. Prior art plates include a plurality of beads formed thereon. The beads of the plates contact each other and are bonded together to force the flow of fluid therearound. The beads are aligned in rows, wherein a first row has an A pattern and the adjacent row has a B pattern. The rows are repeated in an A-B pattern, in which the beads in the A rows are aligned longitudinally or downstream from each other and the beads in the B rows are aligned longitudinally or downstream from each other.

Although the above heat exchangers have worked well, it is desirable to eliminate the use of a turbulator between plates of a heat exchanger. It is also desirable to provide beaded plates for a heat exchanger wherein a turbulation of fluid flowing on both sides of the plate is caused to enhance heat transfer between the fluids.

It is therefore considered desirable to produce a beaded plate for a heat exchanger tank, wherein the walls of the plate include integrated fluid turbulation features formed thereon for maximizing a turbulation of fluids flowing through the tank on both sides of the plate.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Harmonious with the present invention, a beaded plate for a heat exchanger tank, wherein the walls of the plate include integrated fluid turbulation features formed thereon for maximizing a turbulation of fluids flowing through the tank on both sides of the plate, has surprisingly been discovered.

In one embodiment, a plate for a heat exchanger comprises: an elongate first main body having a first surface, a second surface, and a lip extending laterally outwardly from a peripheral edge of the main body; a plurality of spaced apart first beads formed on the second surface of the plate, wherein a depth of the lip is larger than a depth of the first beads; and a plurality of spaced apart second beads formed on the first surface of the plate.

In another embodiment, a stack for a heat exchanger comprises: a first plate having a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a laterally outwardly extending lip and a plurality of spaced apart first beads formed thereon, the first surface including a plurality of spaced apart second beads formed thereon, wherein a depth of the lip is larger than a depth of the first beads; and a second plate having a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a laterally outwardly extending lip and a plurality of spaced apart first beads formed thereon, the first surface including a plurality of spaced apart second beads formed thereon, wherein a depth of the lip is larger than a depth of the first beads, wherein the lip of the first plate is connected to the lip of the second plate.

In another embodiment, a stack for a heat exchanger comprises: a plurality of plates having first surfaces and second surfaces, the second surfaces including a laterally outwardly extending lip and a plurality of spaced apart first beads formed thereon, the first surfaces including a plurality of spaced apart second beads formed thereon, wherein a depth of the lip is larger than a depth of the first beads, wherein the lips of pairs of plates are connected and the second beads of the pairs of plates are connected, and wherein a first plurality of flow passages is formed between the first surfaces of adjacent plates, and a second plurality of flow passages is formed between the second surfaces of adjacent plates.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The above, as well as other objects and advantages of the invention, will become readily apparent to those skilled in the art from reading the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment of the invention when considered in the light of the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a beaded plate for a heat exchanger in accordance with an embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of the beaded plate for a heat exchanger illustrated in FIG. 1 taken along line 2-2;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of a stack of beaded plates illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of a beaded plate for a heat exchanger in accordance with another embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of the beaded plate for a heat exchanger illustrated in FIG. 4 taken along line 4-4.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

The following detailed description and appended drawings describe and illustrate various exemplary embodiments of the invention. The description and drawings serve to enable one skilled in the art to make and use the invention, and are not intended to limit the scope of the invention in any manner.

FIGS. 1 and 2 show a beaded plate 10 for a heat exchanger (not shown) in accordance with an embodiment of the invention. The plate 10 is formed from a metal material such as aluminum or an aluminum alloy, for example. The plate 10 extends longitudinally from a first end 12 to a second end 14, and includes a first surface 11 and an opposed second surface 13. A main body portion 16 of the plate is disposed between the first end 12 and the second end 14, and has a substantially rectangular shape in plan.

The first end 12 of the plate 10 includes a raised lip 18 surrounding an aperture 20. The raised lip 18 forms a circular shaped channel (not shown) in the second side 13 of the plate 10. A plurality of raised portions 21 is formed in the first end 12. The raised portions 21 form channels (not shown) in the second side 13 of the plate 10. The channels extend from the channel opposite the raised lip 18 to the main body portion 16. It is understood that more or fewer channels can be formed in the first end 12 as desired.

The second end 14 of the plate 10 includes a raised lip 22 surrounding an aperture 24. The raised lip 22 forms a circular shaped channel (not shown) in the second side 13 of the plate 10. A plurality of raised portions 25 is formed in the second end 14. The raised portions 25 form channels (not shown) in the second side 13 of the plate 10. The channels extend from the main body portion 16 to the channel opposite the raised lip 22. It is understood that additional or fewer channels can be formed in the second end 14 as desired.

As more clearly shown in FIG. 2, the second surface 13 of the plate 10 includes a laterally outwardly extending lip 26 having a depth d0 that extends outwardly from a peripheral edge of the plate 10. The plate 10 also includes a plurality of spaced apart first beads 32 extending laterally outwardly from the second surface 13. The first beads 32 are generally dome shaped and have a predetermined radius such as 1.5 millimeters, for example. It is understood that a larger or smaller radius can be used. The first beads 32 have a depth d1. In the embodiment shown, the depth d0 of the lip 26 is substantially similar to the depth d1 of the first beads 32, although other depths can be used as desired.

The plate 10 also includes a plurality of spaced apart second beads 36 extending laterally outwardly from the first surface 11 of the plate 10. The second beads 36 are generally trapezoid shaped and have a predetermined width such as five millimeters, for example. It is understood that a larger or smaller width can be used. The second beads 36 have a depth d2. In the embodiment shown, the depth d2 of the second beads 36 is larger than the depth d1 of the first beads 32, although other depths can be used. A distal end 40 of the second beads 36 is generally flat. It is understood that the second beads 36 can be dome shaped or have other shapes as desired.

The plate 10 includes a plurality of spaced apart third beads 42 that are substantially ovoid or football shaped, and extend laterally outwardly from the first surface 11. The third beads 42 have a depth (not depicted) extending from the first surface 11 and terminating in a substantially flat distal end 45. It is understood that the distal end 45 of the third beads 42 can be curved as desired. In the embodiment shown, the depth of the third beads 42 is larger than the depth d2 of the second beads 36.

In the embodiment shown, the first beads 32, the second beads 36, and the third beads 42 are formed in a pattern of a plurality of rows. It is understood that the beads 32, 36, 42 can be formed in other configurations as desired. Each row contains a plurality of a predetermined number of the first beads 32, the second beads 36, and the third beads 42, wherein the number of the second beads 36 and the third beads 42 in certain rows is zero (0). The rows of the beads 32, 36, 42 are spaced longitudinally on the main body portion 16 of the plate 10 a predetermined distance.

When assembled, a pair of plates are brazed together to form a heat exchange plate 50, as shown in FIG. 3. One of the plates 10 is oriented as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, and the other of the plates is inverted from the orientation of FIGS. 1 and 2 to permit corresponding lips 26 to abut one another. The lips 26 of the pair of the plates 10 are brazed together. Thus, the first surfaces 11 of the pairs of plates 10 are exposed. The first surfaces 11 of the pair of brazed plates 10 are then brazed together at the raised lips 18, 22, the second beads 36, and the third beads 42 to form a stack 44. A gap 45 is formed between the first surfaces 11 of adjacent heat exchanger plates 50.

The first apertures 20 of the heath exchanger plates 50 in the stack 44 are aligned and cooperate to form a first conduit (not shown). The second apertures 24 of the plates 10 in the stack 44 are aligned and cooperate to form a second conduit (not shown). A first plurality of flow passages (not shown) is formed in the heat exchange plates 50 between the second surfaces 13 of brazed adjacent plates 10. A second plurality of flow passages is formed within the gaps 45 formed by the first surfaces 11 of adjacent plates 10. The second plurality of flow passages formed by the gaps 45 between adjacent heat exchanger plates 50 is in fluid communication with a pair of flow headers (not shown).

A first mounting plate 54 is disposed on and brazed to the plate 10 at a first end of the stack 44. A second mounting plate 56 is disposed on and brazed to the plate 10 at a second end of the stack 44. The first mounting plate 54 includes a first aperture (not shown) that is aligned with the first conduit and a second aperture (not shown) that is aligned with the second conduit. The stack 44 includes a fluid inlet conduit 66 in fluid communication with the first conduit and a fluid outlet conduit 68 in communication with the second conduit.

In use a first fluid (not shown) such as radiator fluid or oil, for example, flows through the fluid inlet conduit 66 into the first conduit. The first fluid flows through the channels 21 and into the first plurality of flow passages formed in the heat exchanger plates 50 between the second surfaces 13 of brazed adjacent plates 10. As the first fluid travels through the first plurality of flow passages, the first fluid flows around the first beads 32, which cause the first fluid to be turbulated. Thereafter, the first fluid flows through the channels 25 into the second fluid conduit and out of the stack 44 through the fluid outlet conduit 68.

A second fluid (not shown) such as a coolant, for example, is caused to flow through the gaps 45. As the second fluid flows through the gaps 45, the second fluid flows across the first surfaces 11 including the first beads 32, which cause the second fluid to be turbulated. Additionally, heat is transferred from the first fluid to the second fluid. It is understood that heat can also be transferred from the second fluid to the first fluid.

The turbulation caused by the first beads 32 to the first fluid and the second fluid minimizes a need for a separate turbulating fin to be disposed between the plates 10. Accordingly, a cost of materials and a weight are minimized.

It should be appreciated that the plates 10 could be used for heat exchangers in other applications besides motor vehicles.

FIGS. 4 and 5 show a beaded plate 110 for a heat exchanger (not shown) in accordance with an embodiment of the invention. The plate 110 is formed from a metal material such as aluminum or an aluminum alloy, for example. The plate 110 extends longitudinally from a first end 112 to a second end 114, and includes a first surface 111 and an opposed second surface 113. A main body portion 116 of the plate is disposed between the first end 112 and the second end 114, and has a substantially rectangular shape in plan.

The first end 112 of the plate 110 includes a raised lip 118 surrounding an aperture 120. The raised lip 118 forms a circular shaped channel (not shown) in the second side 113 of the plate 110. A plurality of raised portions 121 is formed in the first end 112. The raised portions plate form channels (not shown) in the second side 113 of the plate 110. The channels extend from the channel opposite the raised lip 118 to the main body portion 116. It is understood that more or fewer channels can be formed in the first end 112 as desired.

The second end 114 of the plate 110 includes a raised lip 122 surrounding an aperture 124. The raised lip 122 forms a circular shaped channel (not shown) in the second side 113 of the plate 110. A plurality of raised portions 125 is formed in the second end 114. The raised portions 125 form channels (not shown) in the second side 113 of the plate 110. The channels extend from the main body portion 116 to the channel opposite the raised lip 122. It is understood that additional or fewer channels can be formed in the second end 114 as desired.

As more clearly shown in FIG. 5, the second surface 113 of the plate 110 includes a laterally outwardly extending lip 126 having a depth d10 that extends outwardly from a peripheral edge of the plate 110. The plate 110 also includes a plurality of spaced apart first beads 132 extending laterally outwardly from the second surface 113. In a preferred embodiment, the first beads 132 are general wave shaped. The first beads 132 have a depth d11. In the embodiment shown, the depth d10 of the lip 126 is substantially similar to the depth d11 of the first beads 132, although other depths can be used as desired.

The plate 110 also includes a plurality of spaced apart second beads 136 extending laterally outwardly from the first surface 111 of the plate 110. The second beads 136 are generally trapezoid shaped and have a predetermined width such as five millimeters, for example. It is understood that a larger or smaller width can be used. The second beads 136 have a depth d12. In the embodiment shown, the depth d12 of the second beads 136 is larger than the depth d11 of the first beads 132, although other depths can be used. A distal end 140 of the second beads 136 is generally flat. It is understood that the second beads 136 can be dome shaped or have other shapes as desired.

The plate 110 includes a plurality of spaced apart third beads 142 that are substantially ovoid or football shaped, and extend laterally outwardly from the first surface 111. The third beads 142 have a depth (not depicted) extending from the first surface 111 and terminating in a substantially flat distal end 145. It is understood that the distal end 145 of the third beads 142 can be curved as desired. In the embodiment shown, the depth of the third beads 142 is larger than the depth d12 of the second beads 136.

In the embodiment shown, the first beads 132, the second beads 136, and the third beads 142 are formed in a pattern of a plurality of rows. It is understood that the beads 132, 136, 142 can be formed in other configurations as desired. Each row contains a plurality of a predetermined number of the first beads 132, the second beads 136, and the third beads 142, wherein the number of the second beads 136 and the third beads 142 in certain rows is zero (0). The rows of the beads 132, 136, 142 are spaced longitudinally on the main body portion 116 of the plate 110 a predetermined distance.

When assembled, a pair of plates 110 are brazed together to form a heat exchange plate (not shown) as discussed above. One of the plates 110 is oriented as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, and the other of the plates is inverted from the orientation of FIGS. 4 and 5 to permit corresponding lips 126 to abut one another. The lips 126 of the pair of the plates 110 are brazed together. Thus, the first surfaces 111 of the pairs of plates 110 are exposed. The first surfaces 111 of the pair of brazed plates 110 are then brazed together at the raised lips 118, 122, the second beads 136, and the third beads 142 to form a stack (not shown). A gap (not shown) is formed between the first surfaces 111 of adjacent heat exchanger plates.

The first apertures 120 of the heath exchanger plates in the stack are aligned and cooperate to form a first conduit (not shown). The second apertures 124 of the plates 110 in the stack are aligned and cooperate to form a second conduit (not shown). A first plurality of flow passages (not shown) is formed in the heat exchange plates between the second surfaces 113 of brazed adjacent plates 110. A second plurality of flow passages (not shown) is formed within the gaps formed by the first surfaces 111 of adjacent plates 110. The second plurality of flow passages formed by the gaps between adjacent heat exchanger plates is in fluid communication with a pair of flow headers (not shown).

Use of the plates 110 is substantially similar to use of the plates 10 as discussed above for FIGS. 1-3. The turbulation caused by the first beads 132 to the first fluid and the second fluid minimizes a need for a separate turbulating fin to be disposed between the plates 110. Accordingly, a cost of materials and a weight are minimized.

It should be appreciated that the plates 110 could be used for heat exchangers in other applications besides motor vehicles.

From the foregoing description, one ordinarily skilled in the art can easily ascertain the essential characteristics of this invention and, without departing from the spirit and scope thereof, can make various changes and modifications to the invention to adapt it to various usages and conditions.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US20110174299 *Jul 12, 2010Jul 21, 2011Lennox Industries, IncorporatedHeat exchanger having an interference rib
EP2295834A2 *Jun 16, 2009Mar 16, 2011Korea Delphi Automotive Systems CorporationOil cooler for transmission
WO2012059683A1 *Oct 31, 2011May 10, 2012Mersen France Py SasHeat exchanger having welded plates, and plate forming a component of such a heat exchanger
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/170, 165/109.1, 165/148
International ClassificationF28F3/12
Cooperative ClassificationF28F3/046, F28D2021/0089, F28D1/0333, F28F13/12
European ClassificationF28D1/03F4B, F28F3/04B4, F28F13/12
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