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Publication numberUS20080087316 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/546,928
Publication dateApr 17, 2008
Filing dateOct 12, 2006
Priority dateOct 12, 2006
Also published asUS20150176870, WO2008045964A2, WO2008045964A3
Publication number11546928, 546928, US 2008/0087316 A1, US 2008/087316 A1, US 20080087316 A1, US 20080087316A1, US 2008087316 A1, US 2008087316A1, US-A1-20080087316, US-A1-2008087316, US2008/0087316A1, US2008/087316A1, US20080087316 A1, US20080087316A1, US2008087316 A1, US2008087316A1
InventorsMasa Inaba, Jay Christopher Clark, Brian Comiskey
Original AssigneeMasa Inaba, Jay Christopher Clark, Brian Comiskey
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Thermoelectric device with internal sensor
US 20080087316 A1
Abstract
A thermoelectric system which comprises two substrates spaced apart from each other to form a gap and a plurality of electrically-connected semiconductor elements disposed between the substrates in the gap. The thermoelectric system further comprises at least one sensor and a seal which extends between the substrates and encloses the sensor and at least one of the plurality of semiconductor elements. The sensor is disposed between the substrates at an interior location spaced from the peripheral edge of at least one of the substrates. Additionally, at least one of the semiconductor elements is disposed between the sensor and the peripheral edge.
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Claims(22)
1. A thermoelectric device comprising:
a first and a second substrate spaced apart from each other to form a gap;
a plurality of semiconductor elements disposed between the first and second substrates within the gap, the plurality of semiconductor elements comprising a first group of semiconductor elements having a first set of electrical properties and a second group of semiconductor elements having a second set of electrical properties;
a first set of electrical conductors disposed between the plurality of semiconductors and the first substrate and a second set of electrical conductors disposed between the plurality of semiconductors and the second substrate, the first set of electrical conductors and the second set of electrical conductors arranged so the plurality of semiconductor elements are electrically coupled to each other in series with the first and second groups of semiconductor elements in an alternating arrangement;
at least one sensor disposed between the first and second substrates at a location spaced from a peripheral edge of the first and second substrates; and
a seal extending around the peripheral edge of the first and second substrates.
2. The thermoelectric system of claim 1, wherein the sensor is a temperature sensor.
3. The thermoelectric system of claim 1, wherein the sensor comprises a thermistor.
4. The thermoelectric system of claim 1, wherein the sensor comprises a thermocouple.
5. The thermoelectric system of claim 1, wherein the substrates have a substantially rectangular shape.
6. The thermoelectric system of claim 1, wherein the sensor is disposed, with respect to the peripheral edge, at substantially the center of one of the substrates
7. The thermoelectric system of claim 1, wherein the sensor is disposed between two of the plurality of semiconductor elements.
8. The thermoelectric system of claim 1, further comprising at least one heat transfer member coupled to at least one of the substrates.
9. The thermoelectric system of claim 8, wherein the heat transfer member comprises a plurality of fins.
10. The thermoelectric system of claim 1, wherein the seal completely encloses all of the plurality of semiconductor elements positioned between the substrates.
11. A thermoelectric system comprising:
a pair of opposing substrates, each substrate having a peripheral edge and a face that generally opposes a face of the other opposing substrate;
a plurality semiconductor elements are positioned between the opposing faces of the opposing substrates, the plurality of semiconductor elements comprises at least two groups of dissimilar semiconductor elements, the plurality of semiconductor elements electrically coupled in series by conductor elements arranged so the two groups of dissimilar semiconductor elements are connected in an alternating pattern;
a sensor positioned between the pair of opposing substrates at a location spaced from the peripheral edges of the opposing substrates; and
a seal extending around the plurality of semiconductor elements.
12. The thermoelectric system of claim 10, wherein the sensor is configured to detect temperature.
13. The thermoelectric system of claim 10, wherein the sensor comprises a thermistor.
14. The thermoelectric system of claim 10, wherein the sensor comprises a thermocouple.
15. The thermoelectric system of claim 10, wherein the seal is composed of silicone rubber.
16. The thermoelectric system of claim 10, wherein the substrates have a substantially rectangular shape.
17. A climate controlled seat assembly, comprising:
a seat cushion having an outer surface comprising a first side for supporting an occupant in a sitting position and a second side;
an air passage extending from the second side into the seat cushion and is configured to deliver air to the first side of the seat cushion;
a climate control system in fluid communication with the air passage, the climate control system including a thermoelectric device configured to heat and cool air deliver to the air passage, the thermoelectric device including a pair of opposing substrates, a plurality of semiconductor and connection elements disposed between the opposing substrates, a sensor disposed between the pair of opposing substrates, and a seal extending around the plurality of semiconductor and connection elements and the sensor.
18. The thermoelectric system of claim 15, wherein the sensor is configured to detect temperature.
19. The thermoelectric system of claim 16, wherein the sensor comprises a thermistor.
20. The thermoelectric system of claim 15, wherein the thermoelectric device further comprises at least one heat transfer member coupled to one of the opposing substrates.
21. The thermoelectric system of claim 15, wherein the thermoelectric device further comprises at least one heat transfer member coupled to each of the opposing substrates.
22. A thermoelectric system comprising:
a pair of opposing substrates, each substrate having a peripheral edge and a face that generally opposes a face of the other opposing substrate;
a plurality semiconductor elements disposed between the opposing substrates, the plurality of semiconductor elements comprising at least two groups of dissimilar semiconductor elements that are alternately electrically coupled to each other in series;
a sensor positioned between the pair of opposing substrates at a location spaced from the peripheral edges of the opposing substrates; and
means for sealing from moisture the plurality of semiconductor elements and the sensor positioned between the pair of opposing substrates.
Description
    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates generally to thermoelectric devices and, more particularly, to a Peltier circuit.
  • [0003]
    2. Description of the Related Art
  • [0004]
    A Peltier circuit is a thermoelectric device comprising two sides. When voltage is applied in one direction, one side creates heat while the other side absorbs heat. Switching polarity of the circuit creates the opposite effect. In a typical arrangement, the Peltier circuit comprises a closed circuit that includes dissimilar materials. As a DC voltage is applied to the closed circuit, a temperature change is produced at the junction of the dissimilar materials. Heat is either emitted or absorbed at the junction depending on the direction of current flow. The Peltier circuit can include several such junctions connected electrically in series. The junctions can be sandwiched between two ceramic plates, which form the cold side and the hot side of the device. The cold side can be thermally coupled to an object to be cooled and the hot side can be thermally coupled to a heat sink which dissipates heat to the environment.
  • [0005]
    U.S. Patent Publication No. 2006-0130490 (filed Jan. 31, 2005 and published Jun. 22, 2006) discloses a vehicle seat ventilation system that utilizes a Peltier circuit to provide heated and/or cooled air to a vehicle seat for enhancing passenger comfort. Specifically, air can be passed over the cold and/or hot side of the Peltier circuit to heat or cool the air, which is then directed to the vehicle seat. Use of a Peltier circuit is particularly advantageous in this application because the Peltier circuit is compact and allows a single device to provide heated and cooled air to the vehicle seat. That is, the air may be directed over a single surface of the Peltier circuit, and the voltage can be reversed throughout the circuit depending on whether heated or cooled air is desired.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0006]
    U.S. Patent Publication No. 2006-0130490 discloses a climate control system that can include a Peltier circuit for cooling and/or heating air supplied to a vehicle seat. A temperature sensor is used to measure the temperature of the air directed to the vehicle seat. Data from the temperature sensor can be used to control the amount and direction of voltage through the Peltier circuit. The temperature sensor should be reliable and provide accurate measurements. Accordingly, it would be desirable to provide a Peltier circuit with an improved arrangement for protecting the temperature sensor.
  • [0007]
    Accordingly, one aspect of the present invention comprises a thermoelectric device that includes a first and a second substrate spaced apart from each other to form a gap. A plurality of semiconductor elements are disposed between the first and second substrates within the gap. The plurality of semiconductor elements comprise a first group of semiconductor elements having a first set of electrical properties and a second group of semiconductor elements having a second set of electrical properties. A first set of electrical conductors is disposed between the plurality of semiconductors and the first substrate and a second set of electrical conductors are disposed between the plurality of semiconductors and the second substrate. The first set of electrical conductors and the second set of electrical conductors are arranged so the plurality of semiconductor elements are electrically coupled to each other in series with the first and second groups of semiconductor elements in an alternating arrangement. At least one sensor is disposed between the first and second substrates at a location spaced from a peripheral edge of the first and second substrates. A seal extends around the peripheral edge of the first and second substrates.
  • [0008]
    Another aspect of the present invention comprises a thermoelectric system that includes a pair of opposing substrates, each substrate having a peripheral edge and a face that generally opposes a face of the other opposing substrate. A plurality of semiconductor elements is positioned between the opposing faces. The plurality of semiconductor elements includes at least two dissimilar semiconductor elements, the plurality of semiconductor elements electrically coupled in series by conductor elements arranged so the two dissimilar elements are connected in an alternating pattern. A sensor is positioned between the pair of opposing substrates at a location spaced from the peripheral edges of the opposing substrates. A seal extends around the plurality of semiconductor elements
  • [0009]
    Another aspect of the present invention comprises a climate controlled seat assembly that includes a seat cushion having an outer surface comprising a first side for supporting an occupant in a sitting position and a second side. An air passage extends from the second side into the seat cushion and is configured to deliver air to the first side of the seat cushion. A climate control system is in fluid communication with the air passage. The climate control system includes a thermoelectric device configured to heat and cool air deliver to the air passage. The thermoelectric device includes a pair of opposing substrates. A plurality of semiconductor and connection elements are disposed between the opposing substrates. A sensor is disposed between the pair of opposing substrates. A seal extends around the plurality of semiconductor and connection elements and the sensor.
  • [0010]
    Yet another aspect of the present invention comprises a thermoelectric system that includes a pair of opposing substrates, each substrate having a peripheral edge and a face that generally opposes a face of the other opposing substrate. A plurality of semiconductor elements are disposed between the substrates elements. The plurality of semiconductor elements comprises at least two groups of dissimilar semiconductor elements that are alternately electrically coupled to each other in series. A sensor is positioned between the pair of opposing substrates at a location spaced from the peripheral edges of the opposing substrates. The system also includes means for sealing from moisture the plurality of semiconductor elements and the sensor positioned between the pair of opposing substrates.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0011]
    FIG. 1A is an exploded side perspective view of an embodiment of a thermoelectric apparatus;
  • [0012]
    FIG. 1B is a side perspective view of the assembled thermoelectric apparatus of FIG. 1A;
  • [0013]
    FIG. 2A is a side view of the thermoelectric apparatus of FIG. 1A;
  • [0014]
    FIG. 2B is an enlarged view of the portion labeled 2B-2B in FIG. 2A;
  • [0015]
    FIG. 2C is a cross-section view taken through line 2C-2C of FIG. 2A with certain portions of the thermoelectric apparatus removed;
  • [0016]
    FIG. 2D is a modified embodiment of FIG. 2C;
  • [0017]
    FIG. 2E is a modified embodiment of FIG. 2C;
  • [0018]
    FIG. 3 is a schematic illustration of a ventilation system that includes the thermoelectric apparatus of FIG. 1A;
  • [0019]
    FIG. 4 is a schematic illustration of a conditioned assembly that includes the thermoelectric apparatus of FIG. 1A; and
  • [0020]
    FIG. 5 is a schematic illustration of another embodiment of a conditioned assembly that includes the thermoelectric apparatus of FIG. 1A.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0021]
    FIGS. 1A, 1B, 2A, and 2B illustrate an embodiment of a thermoelectric device 10. FIG. 1A is an exploded view of the thermoelectric device 10 with its various components separated vertically for ease of inspection. FIG. 1B is a side perspective view of the assembled thermoelectric device 10. FIG. 2A is a side view of the thermoelectric device 10 with portions (as explained below) removed. FIG. 2B is an enlarged view of a portion of FIG. 2A.
  • [0022]
    With initial reference to FIGS. 1A and 1B, the thermoelectric device 10 can include a plurality of dissimilar conductive elements 22, 24. As will be explained in more detail below, pairs of dissimilar conductive elements 22, 24 can be coupled together by a series 28 of opposing conductor tabs 28, which are, in turn, disposed between a pair of opposing substrates 32. In the illustrated embodiment, each substrate 32 is thermally coupled to a heat transfer member 38 through a thermal conductive element 34. A sensor 50 can be positioned between the opposing substrates 32 and a seal 60 can be provided between the opposing substrates 32 to protect the sensor 50 and the elements between the substrates 32.
  • [0023]
    FIGS. 2A and 2B are side views of the thermoelectric device with the seal 60 omitted to allow inspection of the components 22, 24, 28 between the substrates 32. In one embodiment, the dissimilar conductors 22, 24 comprise alternating N-type semiconductor elements 22 and P-type semiconductor elements 24. The N-type semiconductor elements 22 and P-type semiconductor elements 24 can be composed of a bismuth-tellurium alloy (Bi2Te3). Other doped or non-doped metals can also be used. The end of each of the N-type semiconductor elements 22 and P-type semiconductor elements 24 can be coated with a diffusion barrier (not shown). The diffusion barrier can inhibit flow of electrons out of the semiconductor elements 22, 24. The diffusion barrier can comprise any of a number of materials, such as, for example, nickel, a titanium/tungsten alloy, and/or molybdenum.
  • [0024]
    As can be seen in FIG. 2A, pairs of dissimilar semiconductor elements 22, 24 can be coupled at their tops and bottoms with the conductor elements or tabs 28. Semiconductor elements 22, 24 of the same type are not disposed on the same conductor tab 28. That is, each conductor tab 28 is coupled to only one N-type semiconductor element 22 and only one P-type semiconductor elements 24. In addition, the upper and lower conductor tabs 28 are configured such that the semiconductor elements 22, 24 are disposed in an alternating series. In this manner, the semiconductor elements are electrically connected in series with each other but, with respect to thermal energy, are in parallel with each other.
  • [0025]
    With continued reference to FIG. 2A, a first N-type semiconductor element 22 can be coupled at its top to a first conductor tab 28 which can also be coupled to a first the P-type semiconductor element 24 to the right of the first N-type semiconductor element 22. At the bottom of the first N-type semiconductor element 22, a second conductor tab 28 can be coupled to the first N-type semiconductor element 22 and can be coupled to a second P-type semiconductor element 24 to be disposed to the left of the first N-type thermoelectric element 22. With reference back to FIG. 1A, the conductor tabs 2 a are arranged on the conductor element 28 configured such that all the semiconductor elements 22, 24 are connected in series with each other. It should be appreciated that the conductor tabs 28 can comprise a plurality of discrete elements coupled to the substrate 32 or an intermediate member. In a modified embodiment, the tabs 28 can be formed by tracing or otherwise forming a layer of conductive material on the substrate and/or an intermediate element.
  • [0026]
    With continued reference to FIG. 2A, the sensor 50 can be disposed on either substrate 32 between the semiconductor elements 22, 24. As will be explained below, the sensor 50 can be position on the substrate 32 between the conductor tabs 28. In dashed lines, FIG. 2A illustrates a sensor 52 in a modified location in which the sensor 52 is positioned on one of the conductor tabs 28.
  • [0027]
    As mentioned above, heat transfer assemblies 38 can be positioned on the top and bottom sides of the thermoelectric device 10. The thermoelectric device 10 is capable of operating without the heat transfer assemblies 38, however, the presence of such assemblies 38 increases the efficiency of heat transfer from the thermoelectric device 10 to the ambient atmosphere or a fluid in contact with the thermoelectric device 10.
  • [0028]
    With reference to FIGS. 2A and 2B, an electrically-conducting solder (not shown) can be used to mount the N-type semiconductor elements 22 and P-type semiconductor elements 24 to of the conductor tabs 28. In one embodiment, the conducting solder can comprise compound of tin and antimony, although other metals or non-metals can be used. In one example, bismuth can also be alloyed with tin to create the solder. Other methods of affixing the semiconductor elements 22, 24 to the conductor tabs 28 can be used, provided an electrical connection is permitted between the semiconductor elements 22, 24 and the conductor tabs 28. In turn, the conductor tabs 28 can suitably be mounted to the substrate 32 via an adhesive.
  • [0029]
    The substrates 32 are preferably configured to provide electrical insulation while providing for heat conduction. In one embodiment, the substrates 32 can be constructed of a ceramic material such as, for example, alumina (ceramic) or silicon. Various other types of materials may be used, such an epoxy. In such an embodiment, the substrates 32 are preferably sufficiently rigid to maintain the shape of the thermoelectric device 10. In other embodiments, flexible substrates can be used. When flexible substrates are used, the thermoelectric device can be constructed in various shapes and have the ability to bend from one shape to another. As mentioned above, the substrates 32 can act an electrical insulator. The typical thickness for a substrate can be between 50 and 500 micrometers, though other thicknesses can be used. In the illustrated embodiment, the substrates 32 can be sufficiently large to cover completely the semiconductor elements 22, 24 and conductor tabs 28. The conductor tabs 28 can be coupled to the electrically-insulating substrate 32 through solder, epoxy, or any other mounting mechanism.
  • [0030]
    With continued reference to FIGS. 2A and 2B, the heat transfer layer 34 can be disposed between the substrate 32 and the heat transfer member 38. Accordingly, in the illustrated embodiment, the heat transfer layer 34 can be disposed on the outside of each of the substrates 32. In one embodiment, the heat transfer layer 34 can be a plate composed of copper or another material that has high thermal conductivity. The heat transfer layer 34 can be between 10 and 400 micrometers thick, although thinner or thicker layers can be used. The heat transfer member 38 can be coupled to the heat transfer layer by a layer of heat-conducting solder 36. In the illustrated embodiment, the heat transfer member 38 can comprise a material of high thermal conductivity (e.g., copper), which is shaped into a plurality of fins. Other materials or shapes can also be used, such as copper alloys or circular members. Additionally, the heat transfer between the heat transfer member 38 and the surrounding environment can be enhanced by providing a fluid transfer device (e.g., a fan) to move fluid (e.g., air) over and/or through the heat transfer member 38.
  • [0031]
    When a current is passed through the N-type semiconductor elements 22 in series with the P-type semiconductor elements 24, one junction 28 on one side of the semiconductor elements 22, 24 is heated and the junction 28 on the other side of the thermoelectric elements 22, 24 is cooled. That is, when a voltage is applied in one direction in series through the semiconductor elements 22, 24, alternating junctions 28 of the N-type semiconductor elements 22 and P-type semiconductor elements 24 will heat and cool respectively. With reference to FIG. 2A, because the junctions 28 of the semiconductor elements 22, 24 are located alternately on the top and bottom of the device 10, when a voltage is applied in one direction through the semiconductor elements 22, 24 the top of the thermoelectric device 10 heats and the bottom of the thermoelectric device 10 cools. When the current direction is reversed, the top of the thermoelectric device 10 is cooled and the bottom is heated. Current can be applied to the device 10 through electrical connectors 40, which can be electrically coupled one of the junctions 28.
  • [0032]
    As described above, the sensor 50 can be disposed between the semiconductor elements 22, 24. The sensor 50 can be configured to determine any of a number of states of operation of the thermoelectric device 10. In the illustrated embodiment, the sensor 50 can be a temperature sensor, such as a thermistor. As an example, a thermistor with an internal resistance of about 1000Ω can be used. Other resistances and other sensors that detect different operating states of the device 10 can also be used, including, but not limited to, thermocouples and resistance thermometers. The sensor 50 can determine the temperature of the thermoelectric device 10 at a point located among the semiconductor elements 22, 24. The sensor 50 can be disposed on a conductor tab 28 (e.g., element 52) between an N-type semiconductor element 22 and a P-type semiconductor element 24, or can be disposed between any two conductor elements 22, 24 while mounted or placed on the substrate 32. In a modified embodiment, the sensor 50 can be disposed between a semiconductor element 22, 24 and the edge of the substrate 32.
  • [0033]
    With reference back to FIGS. 1A and 1B, the seal 60 is shown surrounding the thermoelectric device 10 between the substrates 32. In general, the seal 60 is disposed between the two substrates 32, and surround the plurality of semiconductor elements 22, 24. FIG. 2C is a top plan view of a bottom half of a thermoelectric device 10. As can be seen, the semiconductor elements 22, 24 can be disposed on the conductor tabs 28 in an alternating pattern. The sensor 50 can be placed on one of the substrates 32 between an N-type thermoelectric element 22 and a P-type thermoelectric element 24. The wire 52 of the internal sensor 50 can extend through the seal 60.
  • [0034]
    The sensor 50 can have a wire 52 or other communication medium which extends through the seal 60. The seal 60 can be constructed of any material sufficient to inhibit moisture or other contaminants from entering the thermoelectric device 10. In some embodiments, the seal 60 can comprise putty. In other embodiments, plastics or epoxy can be used. In one particular embodiment, RTV, a commercially available silicone rubber sealant, can be used. In one embodiment, the seal 60 can extend completely around the perimeter of thermoelectric device 10 to completely enclose the thermoelectric elements 22, 24 and sensor 50 positioned between the substrate 32. In certain embodiments, the seal 60 can extend at least partially between the substrates 32 and in between the thermoelectric elements 22, 24.
  • [0035]
    With reference now to FIG. 2D, another embodiment of the thermoelectric device 10 is illustrated. Unless otherwise described, the components in FIG. 2D are substantially identical to those of FIG. 2C an a prime (′) has been added to the number. FIG. 2D illustrates a thermoelectric device 10′ having a sensor 70 that has a substrate footprint greater than the preferred distance between two thermoelectric elements 22′, 24′. Accordingly, some of the thermoelectric elements 22′, 24′ have been removed to accommodate the sensor 50′. The sensor 50′ can be disposed at any location where a thermoelectric element 22′, 24′ is disposed between the sensor 50′ and an edge of the substrate 32′. In the illustrated embodiment, the sensor 50′ provides information through a set of connecting traces 72 etched on the substrate 50′. In other embodiments, the wire 52 described above can be used. The thermoelectric elements 22′, 24′ ordinarily disposed at the location of the connecting traces 72 are removed. In the illustrated embodiment, the connecting traces 72 are composed of a metal, such as copper. Other electrically-conductive materials can also be used, such as gold. In the illustrated embodiment, the connecting traces 72 are in communication with the sensor 50′, which is disposed in substantially the center of the substrate 32′. The connecting traces 72 extend from the sensor 50′ toward the edge of the substrate 32′.
  • [0036]
    With reference now to FIG. 2D, another embodiment of the thermoelectric device 10 is illustrated. Unless otherwise described, the components in FIG. 2D are substantially identical to those of FIGS. 2C and a prime (′) has been added to the number. In the illustrated embodiment, the sensor 70 is disposed between the substrates 32′ and conductor elements 28. As illustrated, the connecting traces 72 preferably extend from the sensor 70 towards an edge of the substrate 32′ between the conductor elements 28.
  • [0037]
    With reference now to FIG. 2E, another embodiment of the thermoelectric device 10 is illustrated. Unless otherwise described, the components in FIG. 2D are substantially identical to those of FIG. 2C a double prime (″) has been added to the number. FIG. 2E illustrates a thermoelectric device 10 having a sensor 70 that has a substrate footprint greater than the preferred distance between two thermoelectric elements 22′, 24′. Accordingly, some of the thermoelectric elements (not shown) and/or conductor element 28″ have been removed to accommodate the sensor 70. The sensor 70 can be disposed at any location where a thermoelectric element (not shown) is disposed between the sensor 70 and an edge of the substrate 32′,. In the illustrated embodiment, the sensor 70 provides information through a set of connecting traces 72 etched on the substrate 32′. In other embodiments, the wire 52 described above can be used. The thermoelectric elements (not shown) ordinarily disposed at the location of the connecting traces 72 are removed. In the illustrated embodiment, the connecting traces 72 are composed of a metal, such as copper. Other electrically-conductive materials can also be used, such as gold. In the illustrated embodiment, the connecting traces 72 are in communication with the sensor 70, which is disposed in substantially the center of the substrate 32″. The connecting traces 72 extend from the sensor 50″ toward the edge of the substrate 32′.
  • [0038]
    With reference now to FIG. 3, a climate control system 99 for a seat assembly 100 is shown in combination with a pair of thermoelectric devices 10 a, 10 b, which can be arranged as described above. In the illustrated embodiment, the seat assembly 100 is similar to a standard automotive seat. However, it should be appreciated that certain features and aspects of the climate control system 99 and seat assembly 100 described herein can also be used in a variety of other applications and environments. For example, certain features and aspects of the system 99 and assembly 100 may be adapted for use in other vehicles, such as, for example, an airplane, a wheel chair, a boat, or the like. Further, certain features and aspects of the system 99 and assembly 100 can also be adapted for use in stationary environments, such as, for example, a chair, a sofa, a theater seat, a mattress, and an office seat that is used in a place of business and/or residence.
  • [0039]
    The seat assembly 100 can comprise a seat portion 102 and a back portion 104. The seat portion 102 and back portion 104 can each comprise a cushion 106 a, 106 b and a plurality of channels 108 a, 108 b disposed within and/or extending through the cushions 106 a, 106 b. Each of the channels 108 a, 108 b can be placed in fluid communication with the climate control system 99 through a conduit 10 a, 10 b. The conduits 10 a, 10 b, in turn, are in communication with separate climate control devices 112 a, 112 b. In the illustrated embodiment, the channels 108 a associated with the seat portion 102 are in communication with a different climate control device 112 a than the channels 108 b in the back portion. However, in other embodiments, a single climate control device can be in fluid communication with the channels 108 a, 108 b the seat portion 102 and back portion 104. In other embodiments, multiple climate control devices can be associated with either the seat portion 102 and/or the back portion 104. In some embodiments, the channels 108 a, 108 b and/or conduits 110 a, 110 b can include resistive heating elements (not shown).
  • [0040]
    In the illustrated embodiment, the climate control devices 112 a, 112 b can each comprise the thermoelectric device 10 a, 10 b, which can be configured as described above, and a fluid transfer device 130 a, 130 b. The fluid transfer device 130 a, 130 b can be a radial or axial fan, or other device for transferring a fluid. The thermoelectric device 10 a, 10 b can be disposed between the fluid transfer device 130 a, 130 b and the conduits 110 a, 110 b. As described above, the thermoelectric device 10 a, 10 b can be configured to selectively heat or cool the fluid (e.g., air) delivered by the fluid transfer device 130 a, 130 b to the seat portion 102 and back portion 104. The fluid transfer device 130 a, 130 b can be configured to transfer air to the channels 108 a, 108 b that is drawn past only one side of the thermoelectric device 10 a, 10 b. Accordingly, the climate control devices 112 a, 112 b can be configured to alternately supply heated or cooled air 122 a, 122 b through the plurality of conduits 110 a, 110 b to the seat 100. The fluid transfer device 130 a, 130 b can also be used to withdraw air through the conduits 110 a, 110 b.
  • [0041]
    In the illustrated embodiments, each of the thermoelectric devices 10 a, 10 b include a pair of heat transfer members 38 (not shown in FIG. 3) as described above. The heat transfer members 38 form a waste heat exchanger and a generally opposing main heat exchanger, which can be thermally exposed to the air transferred by the fluid transfer device 130 a, 130 b. Depending upon the mode of operation, heat can be transferred to the air through the main heat exchanger or withdrawn from the air through the main heat exchanger.
  • [0042]
    The climate control devices 112 a, 112 b can be controlled and operatively connected by an electronic control device 114 a, 114 b. The electronic control devices 114 a, 114 b can receive signals from a plurality of input sources 116, 118, 120. In the illustrated embodiment, three input sources are shown, but more or fewer can be used. The electronic control devices 114 a, 114 b can be operatively connected with each other through an information connection 124. The electronic control devices 114 a, 114 b can be configured change the operating state of the climate control devices 112 a, 112 b in response to a control signal or setting. For example, the electronic control devices 114 a, 114 b can alter the speed at which fluid is transferred by the fluid transfer devices 130 a, 130 b or the operating state of the thermoelectric devices 10 a, 10 b to heat or cool the fluid. The sensor 50 (not shown in FIG. 3) disposed in the thermoelectric devices 10 a, 10 b can impart information through the wire 52 a, 52 b to the electronic control devices 114 a, 114 b, thereby allowing the devices 114 a, 114 b to determine accurately the operating temperature of the climate control devices 112 a, 112 b. The electronic control devices 114 a, 114 b can adjust the operation of the climate control devices 112 a, 112 b based at least in part on information provided by the sensor 50. For example, the electronic control devices 114 a, 114 b can change the direction or strength of current in the thermoelectric devices 10 a, 10 b, change the speed of operation of the fluid transfer device 130 a, 130 b, and/or shut down the devices 10 a, 10 b if there is a malfunction.
  • [0043]
    With reference now to FIG. 4, an assembly 200 is shown in combination with a thermoelectric device 210, which can be arranged according to the embodiment described above. In the illustrated embodiment, the assembly 200 defines a cavity 201, which can be enclosed (e.g., via a removable or retractable door or top). In a modified embodiment, the assembly 200 can device one or more holders 202 for containers (e.g., a cup holder). In either embodiment, the assembly 200 preferably includes one or more conductive elements or material 204 that surrounds at least partially cavities 201, 202 so as to cool (or heat) articles positioned therein.
  • [0044]
    The conductive material or elements 204 can be conductively coupled to the one side of the thermoelectric device 210 while the other side of the device 210 can be conductively coupled to a heat exchanger 212 positioned within a duct 206. A fluid transfer device 208 can be used to pump air through the heat exchanger 212. In this manner, the thermoelectric device 210 can be used to withdraw heat from the cup holder 203 or cavity 201 to cool a container or article positioned therein and/or transfer heat to the cup holder 203 or cavity 201 to heat a container positioned
  • [0045]
    FIG. 5 illustrates a modified embodiment of the assembly 230. As described above, the assembly can include a cavity 301, which can be enclosed (e.g., via a removable or retractable door or top). In a modified embodiment, the assembly 300 can include one or more holders 303 for containers (e.g., a cup holder). Insulation 304 can be provided to insulate the cavity 301 or cup holder 303. In this embodiment, the thermoelectric device 310 has a first side coupled to a first heat exchanger 313 and a second side coupled to a second heat exchanger 312. Each heat exchanger 313, 312 is positioned within a duct 314, 306. Each duct 313, 306 can be in communication with a fluid transfer device 308 or share a common fluid transfer device (not illustrated). The air on the first side of the device 313 is directed into the cavity 201, 202. In this manner, conditioned (e.g., hot or cold) air can be directed into the assembly 300 to cool and/or heat objects and article positioned therein. As shown by the dashed lines, in one embodiment, the air delivered to the cavity 301, 302 can be re-circulated to the fluid transfer device 308 through a recirculation passage 316.
  • [0046]
    Various components are described as being “operatively connected” to the control unit. It should be appreciated that this is a broad term that includes physical connections (e.g., electrical wires or hard wire circuits) and non-physical connections (e.g., radio or infrared signals). It should also be appreciated that “operatively connected” includes direct connections and indirect connections (e.g., through additional intermediate device(s)).
  • [0047]
    Although this invention has been disclosed in the context of certain preferred embodiments and examples, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the present invention extends beyond the specifically disclosed embodiments to other alternative embodiments and/or uses of the invention and obvious modifications and equivalents thereof. In addition, while the number of variations of the invention have been shown and described in detail, other modifications, which are within the scope of this invention, will be readily apparent to those of skill in the art based upon this disclosure. It is also contemplated that various combinations or subcombinations of the specific features and aspects of the embodiments may be made and still fall within the scope of the invention. Accordingly, it should be understood that various features and aspects of the disclosed embodiments can be combined with, or substituted for, one another in order to perform varying modes of the disclosed invention. Thus, it is intended that the scope of the present invention herein disclosed should not be limited by the particular disclosed embodiments described above, but should be determined only by a fair reading of the claims.
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Classifications
U.S. Classification136/204, 219/632
International ClassificationH01L35/28, H05B6/10
Cooperative ClassificationF25B21/02, H01L35/32, B60N2/5692
European ClassificationH01L35/32, B60N2/56E4
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