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Publication numberUS20080092285 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/542,350
Publication dateApr 24, 2008
Filing dateOct 2, 2006
Priority dateOct 2, 2006
Publication number11542350, 542350, US 2008/0092285 A1, US 2008/092285 A1, US 20080092285 A1, US 20080092285A1, US 2008092285 A1, US 2008092285A1, US-A1-20080092285, US-A1-2008092285, US2008/0092285A1, US2008/092285A1, US20080092285 A1, US20080092285A1, US2008092285 A1, US2008092285A1
InventorsFrank Harry Petersen
Original AssigneeFrank Harry Petersen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable immersible pool chair
US 20080092285 A1
Abstract
An adjustable chair supported by hollow tubing rests in the water of a swimming pool, spa or other walled aquatic body. The support arms rest on the coping or deck around the aquatic body while legs below the chair rest the chair against the wall to hold the chair away from the side of the pool. Vents and drains in the hollow tubing allow water into, and out of, the tubing to make the chair stable in water yet lightweight for portability. Couplers with multiple fastening points allow adjustment of the chair height, distance from the wall, and disassembly of the chair for cleaning and storage.
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Claims(20)
1. A recreational pool apparatus comprising:
a rigid vertical hollow member, said rigid vertical hollow member coupled at the top in a near perpendicular orientation to an upper near horizontal hollow member,
said upper near horizontal hollow member terminating with an upper non-slip grip member,
said rigid vertical hollow member coupled at the bottom in a near perpendicular orientation to a lower near horizontal hollow member,
said lower near horizontal hollow member terminating with a lower non-slip grip member,
said upper near horizontal hollow member, being near parallel to said lower near horizontal hollow member,
said rigid vertical hollow member coupled between said upper near horizontal hollow member and said lower near horizontal hollow member to an acutely angled hollow branched seat support member, and
a near horizontal platform coupled to the opposing end of said acutely angled hollow branched seat support member.
2. The recreational pool apparatus of claim 1 further comprising a plurality of egress and ingress ports.
3. The recreational pool apparatus of claim 1 wherein said near horizontal platform comprises a seat for sitting.
4. The recreational pool apparatus of claim 1 further comprising:
a plurality of hollow couplers, and
a plurality of fastening points.
5. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said rigid vertical hollow member is detachably adjustably coupled to said upper near horizontal hollow member.
6. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said rigid vertical hollow member is detachably adjustably coupled to said lower near horizontal hollow member.
7. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said rigid vertical hollow member is detachably adjustably coupled to said acutely angled hollow branched seat support.
8. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said acutely angled hollow branched seat support is detachably adjustably coupled to said near horizontal platform.
9. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said upper near horizontal hollow member further comprises a hollow coupler between said rigid vertical hollow member and said upper non-slip grip member.
10. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said lower near horizontal hollow member further comprises a hollow coupler between said rigid vertical hollow member and said lower non-slip grip member.
11. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said upper non-slip grip member is a suction cup.
12. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said lower non-slip grip member is a suction cup.
13. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said upper near horizontal hollow member further comprises handgrips.
14. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said upper near horizontal hollow member further comprises a permanent coupling means.
15. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising an accessory attachment member.
16. The recreational pool apparatus of claim 1 wherein said near horizontal platform further comprises a seat for sitting.
17. The apparatus of claim 16 wherein said accessory attachment member supports a personal article.
18. An recreational pool apparatus comprising:
a plurality of rigid vertical hollow members,
said rigid vertical hollow members coupled at the top near perpendicularly to a plurality of upper near horizontal hollow members,
said upper near horizontal hollow members terminating with a plurality of upper non-slip grip members,
said rigid vertical hollow members coupled at the bottom near perpendicularly to a plurality of lower near horizontal hollow members,
said lower near horizontal hollow members being near parallel to said upper near horizontal hollow members,
said lower near horizontal hollow members terminating with a plurality of lower non-slip grip members,
a plurality of acutely angled hollow article support members coupled to said rigid vertical hollow members,
said acutely angled hollow article support members terminating with a mounting point to receive and support an article, and
a plurality of egress and ingress ports.
19. The recreational pool apparatus of claim 18 further comprising:
a plurality of hollow couplers,
a plurality of fastening points, and
an accessory attachment member.
20. A recreational pool apparatus comprising:
a rigid vertical hollow member, said rigid vertical hollow member coupled at the top in a near perpendicular orientation to an upper near horizontal hollow member,
said upper near horizontal hollow member terminating with an upper non-slip grip member,
said rigid vertical hollow member coupled at the bottom in a near perpendicular orientation to a lower near horizontal hollow member,
said lower near horizontal hollow member terminating with a lower non-slip grip member,
said upper near horizontal hollow member, being near parallel to said lower near horizontal hollow member,
said rigid vertical hollow member coupled between said upper near horizontal hollow member and said lower near horizontal hollow member to a variably angled hollow seat support member,
a near horizontal platform rotationally coupled to the opposing end of said variably angled hollow seat support member, a plurality of egress and ingress ports, a plurality of hollow couplers, a plurality of fastening points, and an accessory attachment member.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to an adjustable chair formed of tubular material, suitable for hanging inside a pool from the coping of a pool for recreational use, partaking of casual refreshment as well as engaging in conversation with persons on the deck beside the pool. Other embodiments of the present invention permit its use from a single user for seating, to a single user with a table, use with multiple users, or use with other accessories.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

While poolside deck chairs are available in many forms, chairs for use in a pool are of limited configurations and often are for specialized uses. The difficulty is finding a portable, yet comfortable pool chair. One form of chair has a single leg, a flat seat and is weighted or affixed to the bottom of the pool. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,441,433 by Stanley, Aug. 15, 1995 is a single vertical leg seat with a ‘gripper’ foot to prevent the seat from slipping on the pool floor. Similarly, U.S. Pat. No. 6,209,147 by Wheaton, Apr. 3, 2001, and U.S. Pat. No. 6,571,403 also by Wheaton, Jun. 3, 2003, are pool accessory attachment systems. They incorporate an upright pedestal support assembly with a twist-lock mounting system for securing seats, chairs, etc., to the bottom of the pool or the deck respectively. As the bases are not movable, this type of equipment requires installation efforts not suitable to the recreational user desiring ease of installation and transport. These types also suffer the drawback that they are not suitable for a person desiring to sit inside the pool anywhere around the perimeter and enjoy deck-side refreshments or company. Nor are the chair heights easily adjustable for the user of a different torso height or leg height than the previous user. Furthermore, single vertical leg seats must be made of metal to support swaying and rocking motions as are common in a pool.

Another form of pool chair is the lounge chair supported by floats. U.S. Pat. No. 4,384,857 by Hoy, Jr., May 24, 1983, is an adjustably submersible buoyant chair using polymeric tubing, such as polyvinyl chloride. In one embodiment (FIG. 6 of U.S. Pat. No. 4,384,857), the structure is strictly for reclining, so the user cannot sit upright at the side of the pool. The user is subject to bobbing in the water from wave action. Furthermore, the user wishing to submerge the chair must wait patiently for the valve to bleed out air to submerge the chair. Another embodiment (FIGS. 7 and 8) allows the user to sit upright, but he is again floating freely (i.e., bobbing) in the water and if desiring to stay stationary at the wall, he must hold onto a stationary object, but is still subject to the bobbing action of waves. Alternatively, a person might wear a flotation device as a seat (“saddle”), such as U.S. Pat. No. 5,443,409 by Adamson, Aug. 22, 1995. Made of buoyant polystyrene, U.S. Pat. No. 5,443,409 wraps the flotation device around the user's lower torso to free the user's arms and legs. However, the user is still subject to bobbing and drifting about in the water. Such a pool chair is therefore unsatisfactory for leisurely sitting in the pool to face the deck while enjoying deck-side refreshments or company, without holding onto the deck and being bobbed about by pool activity.

An alternative to the floating chair is to hang the chair from the side of the pool. U.S. Pat. No. 5,000,288 by Gordon, Mar. 19, 1991, is a maintenance seat for a swimming pool. A pair of C-shaped grips attach to the top edge of the pool, while a connecting tether serves as a seat. The tether enables a person to sit within a swimming pool while cleaning the waterline zone of the sidewall of the pool. While lightweight and portable, sitting on a tether is neither comfortable nor is it adjustable for recreational use. It is therefore unsatisfactory for leisurely sitting in the pool to enjoy deck-side refreshments or company. The fixed length of the tether restricts the user from raising herself above the waves or moving herself away from the wall. Another version is U.S. Pat. No. 4,312,536 by Lloyd, Jan. 26, 1982, which uses a tube bent into a cantilever U-frame to support a flexible material forming the backrest and seat combination. The vertical hangers are minimally adjustable and secured to the deck so the user can adjust depth of the seat. However, the user cannot adjust her pitch (angle) to the wall, nor can she replace the seat form with something more comfortable. Also, the cantilever frame is susceptible to repetitive flexure fatigue.

An adaptation of the hanging chair applies to above ground pools, which have relatively narrow walls, and allow vertical ladders with L-shape hangers to aid swimmers entrance and exit from the pool. Pins or fasteners prevent the ladder from falling inward. Such a device is shown by U.S. Pat. No. 4,418,792 by Cerone, Dec. 6, 1983, which affixes the pool ladder to the deck while the horizontal members serve as both steps and seats, with handgrips on the side rail to aid the disabled user. However, this device is large and unwieldy, so its portability and storage are not easy. If the ladder is large enough, hangers are not necessary, as the large base of the ladder will keep it in place. U.S. Pat. No. 6,000,494 by Wilson, Dec. 14, 1999, is a set of portable swimming pool steps for such a purpose. However, steps are made for entering and exiting a pool. They may have temporary use as a chair, but that is not the intended purpose, while discomfort and inconvenience often ensue for the user as well. Use of a ladder as a chair is therefore unsatisfactory for leisurely sitting in the pool and as the steps face towards the pool center, the user cannot face the deck to enjoy refreshments or company on the deck.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,837,869 by Simmon, Jun. 13, 1989, has a generally horizontal seat and a generally vertical back. Both the seat and the back are made of framed webbing. One fixed length U-shaped arm extends horizontally from the mid-section of the chair and rests on the on the surface of the coping to support the chair. Another fixed length U-shaped arm rests against the wall of the pool to hold the chair at a positive angle to the water surface and hold the seat of the chair away from the side of the pool. Although portable, neither the seat nor the frame is adjustable for the user's orientation or comfort in the water. After approaching the seat, the user has to twist around from approaching the chair and move backwards into the seat. The user is fixed in position facing into the pool, and the webbing is not comfortable to all persons. Also the user cannot adjust her distance from the wall, or her elevation in the water so she is cannot raise herself above the waves or move herself away from the wall. Such a chair is unsatisfactory for leisurely sitting in the pool above the wave action, and facing the deck to enjoy refreshments or company on the deck.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,307,527 by Schober, May 3, 1994, describes a portable pool chair constructed of tubular members partially submerged in a swimming pool from the coping. The chair is upright in the pool with the seat fixed in position facing the pool from between the tubular members. After approaching the seat, the user has to twist around from approaching the chair and move backwards into the seat. Like other fixed frame chairs, the user is forced to sit facing into the pool and neither the seat nor the frame is adjustable for the user's comfort in the water. The chair lacks standoffs from the wall, so it is subject to the pitch (angle) of the coping. The user cannot adjust her distance or pitch from the wall, or her height in the water. Furthermore, the stretched fabric seat is not comfortable to all persons. Also, the narrow spacing between the tubular members limits movement and comfort of the user. On a larger scale, U.S. Pat. No. 5,333,322 by Weir, Aug. 2, 1994, is a sturdy version of a pool-facing chair attached to the coping. A modular pre-formed seat and console assembly is shown set in place with singular or plural seating and accompanied by hydrojet attachments, umbrella, etc. The seat assembly may include handrails and is permanently attached to the deck and wall by various means. Either way, such seats are not conducive to facing the deck to enjoy refreshments or company on the deck.

Addressing in part the need for adjustability in height of the seat, U.S. Pat. No. 5,857,226 by Sommer, Jan. 12, 1999, is a lawn chair adapted with dual hangers for hanging the chair in the pool from the coping. The hangers are adjustable to allow lowering the chair by different depths into the water, but the seat is stationary between the arm rests and faces towards the water. After approaching the seat, the user has to twist around from approaching the chair and move backwards into the seat. Furthermore, the webbing is not comfortable to all persons and the narrow spacing between the arms limits movement and comfort of the user. Such a seat is not conducive to facing the deck to enjoy refreshments or company on the deck.

Addressing in part the need by which way the user may seat herself, U.S. Pat. No. 4,903,926 by McNarry, et al., Feb. 27, 1990, is a detachable immersible support for supporting articles in a swimming pool. The frame is comprised of a down leg, a horizontal leg and an up leg. One end of the frame is adapted to be fastened to the coping on the pool or the ground next to the coping. The top of the up leg contains a support means to receive and support an article, such as a seat, table, umbrella or basketball net. The frame is not movable as the frame is fastened in place and neither the seat nor the frame are adjustable for the user's comfort in the water. Despite being able to turn in any direction, the user is fixed in elevation and location in the pool. She cannot adjust her distance from the wall, or her height in the water so she is subject to the height of the water in the pool and to waves traversing the pool. Furthermore, the seat is an unpadded, nonadjustable flat platform, which is not comfortable to all persons. Such a seat is not conducive to facing the deck to enjoy refreshments or company on the deck. In use, the vertically supported seat is subject to flexing and requires a secondary V-shape bracket for support. Also, the cantilever horizontal leg is subject to repeated flexing over use and portends fatigue failure.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,860,171 by Hicks, Jan. 19, 1999, is a suspended swimming pool accessory frame bolted to the deck around the pool. A plurality of cantilever supported mounting points on U.S. Pat. No. 5,860,171 permits the simultaneous use of a table, and one or more seats. Although the height of each seat and the table may be adjustable, the distance of the chairs and table are not adjustable from the wall, the unit is not portable, nor is the unit easily removable from the pool. Thus, the user cannot adjust her leg room or move the seat to a more comfortable location. Furthermore, the seat is a flat unpadded platform and lacks a foot rest, neither of which is comfortable to all persons. Such a seat is not conducive to facing the deck to enjoy refreshments or company on the deck. However, a cantilever seat design is subject to flexing under use and fatigue failure.

Another method of adjusting the user's elevation in the water is U.S. Pat. No. 6,311,343 by Wisniewski, Nov. 6, 2001, which is an adjustable lounge chair. Hangers hold the chair in the pool from the coping, while telescoping legs rest on the bottom of the pool to permit the user to adjust his or her level of submersion in the pool and seat back inclination. However, the user is still limited in her motion within the arms of the seat so the user is again forced into a fixed position of facing the pool without access to or viewing of the deck behind her. As the seat is made of unpadded polyester or vinyl straps or webbing, the user's comfort in seat length and width is dependent on the size of the market user. Thus, the chair is not comfortable to all persons. Furthermore, the lower telescoping portion is mechanically complicated and is subject to a greater likelihood of failure. Another problem is that the legs slip on the pool floor as the user moves in the chair. Such a seat is not conducive to facing the deck to enjoy refreshments or company on the deck.

Another alternative is U.S. Pat. No. 6,637,045, by Larsen, Oct. 28, 2003, which is a three-piece folding pool chair. The structure has an upper and a lower folding frame, much like a three-piece folding ladder. The user unfolds the upper section to rest on the coping. The middle section unfolds perpendicularly into the water as the back of the chair and the lower section is perpendicular to the middle section to form a cantilever seat in the water. The backrest and seat portions each include a selectively coupleable cushion member for comfort. While the user can adjust the middle section for height of the seat frame, the user must sit facing into the pool, with her back to the deck, without easy access to or viewing of the deck behind her. Such a seat is not conducive to facing the deck to enjoy refreshments or company on the deck. Furthermore, a cantilever seat is subject to flexing under use and fatigue failure.

One way to prevent flexure fatigue failure is through dual support tubing. For instance, U.S. Pat. No. 4,893,363 by Huff, Jan. 16, 1990, is a table for above ground pools. A pair of “J-shaped” tubular members are joined together with the upper “L-like” ends hanging over the pool wall while the 45-degree lower ends double back “d-like” horizontally to support a tray. Footings align the tray to the pitch of the pool wall. However, once assembled, the tray holder is not adaptable to other places along the pool wall unlike the design location.

To add further support to the table for use on the outer side, U.S. Pat. No. 6,474,244 by Karpinski, Nov. 05, 2002, braces the upper end brackets with retention legs that double-back under the T-rail of the retaining wall. However, such designs lacks robustness for use as a seat, and in fact, each table lacks an integrated seat.

What is needed is a lightweight in-pool chair that is portable, easy to submerge, stable in use, suitable for sitting to face any direction, sufficiently adjustable for both the seat and the frame for the user's comfort in the water and comfortable in seating and use to enjoy refreshments and company at the deck. Furthermore, a design adaptable to smaller people, larger people and for multiple uses is greatly beneficial. Additionally, ease of transportability, cleaning and storage are important concerns, especially where leaving the chair in the pool all year is not desired (as for portability) and when leaving the chair in the pool all year is not possible. Also, the seat support should be neither vertical nor cantilever as the former is susceptible to wobble while the latter is subject to flexure fatigue failure.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention overcomes all these difficulties. First, unlike the prior art, the present invention is easy to install and lacks the restriction of a permanent installation. The user is not required to adjust vents and drains. The user merely lowers the lightweight invention into the pool. Ports in various locations of the hollow tubing quickly allow the ingress of water and the egress of air so the present invention submerges itself while the user orients the upper arms to rest on the coping around the pool. When the user has finished enjoyment of the present invention, she can raise it from the pool. The ports permit the ingress of air and the egress of water. The lightness of the present invention allows it to be easily carried out of the pool to another place or storage.

Second, the present invention is easy to access and easy to use as it lacks the restriction of a backrest forcing the user to face only towards the pool. The user may lower herself into the water from the pool deck above the present invention, or enter the pool elsewhere and walk or swim to it. Sitting on the present invention is no more difficult that sitting on a counter stool by merely sitting down. The user does not have to twist around from approaching the chair or swim backwards into the seat. Furthermore, the user may seat herself on the present invention in any orientation of facing the pool deck, turning to either side, or sitting to face the pool.

Third, the present invention is stable in use and lacks the restrictions of being inherently heavier than water or inherently lighter than water. Firstly, the present invention fills with water when placed in the pool so when not in use it is not heavier than the water inside it. Secondly, the present invention improves its stability because the user's weight presses the upper non-slip grip pads to the pool deck which decreases the effect of the native buoyancy of the tubular material and increases the frictional force of the upper non-slip grip pads. Thirdly, the present invention improves its stability because the user's weight presses the lower non-slip feet to the pool wall which increases the frictional force of the lower non-slip feet which increases the stability of the present invention against motion of the user, pool currents, and adjacent activity in the pool. Thus, the present invention is not subject to slippage or drift by movement of the user or others.

Fourth, the present invention lacks the restriction of suiting only one person because it is easily and quickly adaptable to different users. Firstly, each user can select one of many lengths for personal comfort of height above the pool deck. Secondly, the user can easily change the length of the acutely angled seat support member to adjust both her height above the water and her distance from the wall. Thirdly, the user can adjust the depth of the footrest for longer or shorter leg comfort. Taken in combination, these three adjustable features make the present invention adaptable to person of virtually all statures, whether she or he is long or short in the torso or the legs.

Fifth, the seat is changeable so the seat is not limited to the uncomfortable adaptations of mono-directionally facing lounge chairs or uncomfortable unpadded platforms without or without backs. One person may use a comfortable padded backless seat, such as a bicycle seat, while another person could alternately use a different padded or unpadded seat, with or without a back, as each person's comfort may direct.

Sixth, the present invention is well adapted for portability, cleaning and storage as it lacks the restrictions of heaviness or bulkiness. Firstly, the present invention uses lightweight hollow tubes that make the present invention portable. Secondly, the hollow couplers allow the user to rotate or collapse the arms, legs and seat, or remove any one or more of them for easy cleaning and storage. Thirdly, although easy to disassemble, the small size and lightweight qualities of the present invention make storage of the present invention easy in either the vertical position (as by hanging it on or over a wall) or in the horizontal position (as by laying it across the garage rafters.) Thus, the user does not have to be concerned about the ease of removal or storage and degradation during the off-season.

Seventh, the present invention is uncomplicated and lacks the inherent failure problem of mechanical linkages. The tubular portions are easily connected by inexpensive commercial methods based on the material used. For instance, extruded or molded polymeric material, such as polyvinyl chloride is inexpensively and widely available and easily assembled by gluing. Metal tubular materials are also possible, such as aluminum, or for very robust uses, stainless steel, galvanized steel, or chrome steel are possible and may be connected by through-hole pins, or compressive couplers.

Eighth, the present invention is easily constructed to accommodate almost any person's weight and so lacks the restriction of use to particular body forms. While lounge chairs are made in specific sizes, polymeric tubular materials are widely available in small sizes such as one-half inch for children's sizes, and one-and-a half or two-inch diameters for adults. Additionally, variations are possible using multiple support members.

Ninth, the present invention is adaptable to multiple uses and so lacks the restriction of being usable only for the seating of persons. For instance, the footrest section could be removed to allow installation of a seat and table configuration, or two or more hollow vertical members may be used to easily accommodate heavier configurations of two or more seats.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the present invention in use, immersed in a pool. The arms are placed over the coping and the feet are resting against the pool wall.

FIG. 2 with FIGS. 2A, 2B, and 2C is a perspective view of the present invention showing the features of the best mode and alternate embodiment features.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing an alternate dual-duty embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view showing an alternate multiple-duty embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view showing an alternative embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION AND PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Referring now to the drawings, FIG. 1 shows the best mode of the present invention immersed in a pool ready for use. The user could sit comfortably in the pool, above the wave level, facing the deck, all the while partaking in conversation with deck-side persons, as well as partaking of refreshments placed within a comfortable reach of the user. Alternatively, the user could sit comfortably in the pool, above the wave level, facing the pool and yet engage in activity in the pool or passively participate in the activity (e.g., observation).

FIG. 2 shows the specific and elaborate features of the best mode of the present invention. The rigid vertical hollow member 10 provides a backbone of strength and stability to the present invention. At the top of the rigid vertical hollow member 10 are the arms of the upper near horizontal hollow member 20 for supporting the rigid vertical hollow member 10 and the rest of the present invention. At each end of the upper near horizontal hollow member 20 are the non-slip grip members 30.

The upper non-slip grip members 30 help hold the upper end of the present invention stable during user motion, currents and surrounding activity in the pool. Alternatively the upper non-slip grip members 30 may be removed and replaced by suction cups 130 to adhere to smooth surfaces. Furthermore, a permanent coupling means 140, such as bolted flanges, may be used instead to hold the present invention in place along the pool wall.

At the bottom end of the rigid vertical hollow member 10 are the legs of the lower near horizontal hollow member 40. The lower near horizontal hollow member 40 serves to hold the present invention away from the pool wall and acts as a footrest. At each end of the lower near horizontal hollow member 40 are the lower non-slip grip members 50 which provide stability for the present invention during user motion, currents and surrounding activity in the pool. Alternatively the non-slip grip members 50 may be removed and replaced by suction cups 130 to adhere to smooth surfaces. Furthermore, a permanent coupling means 140, such as bolted flanges, may be used to hold the present invention in place along the pool wall as shown in FIG. 2A.

Connected to the rigid vertical hollow member 10 between the upper near horizontal hollow member 20 and the lower near horizontal hollow member 40 is the acutely angled hollow branched seat support 60 for adjustment and support of the near horizontal platform 70 and support of the user. The acutely angled hollow branched seat support 60 provides (1) a heavy-duty support system regardless of the user, and (2) an acute angled connection to the rigid vertical hollow member 10 so that the near horizontal platform 70 is two-dimensionally adjustable for firstly, a comfortable fit for the short or long-legged user from the pool wall and secondly, a vertical adjustment of the near horizontal platform 70 for height of the user with respect to the water level. By being acutely angled and branched, the acutely angled hollow branched seat support 60 is not subject to wobble or flexure, which prolongs the life and increases the safety and comfort of the present invention.

In the preferred embodiment, the near horizontal platform 70 is a padded seat 150 as shown in FIG. 2B, although the near horizontal platform 70 is easily changeable to use unpadded seats as comfort or wear needs direct.

Located at various positions in the arms of the upper near horizontal hollow member 20 are ports 80 to allow the egress of air and ingress of water as the present invention submerges into the water, or egress of water and ingress of air as the present invention drains after being removed from the water. The legs of the lower near horizontal hollow member 40 also have ports 80 to allow the ingress of water as the present invention submerges into the water and the egress of water as the present invention drains after being removed from the water. Ports 80 located along the lengths of the rigid vertical hollow member 10 and the acutely angled hollow branched seat support 60 also allows for the similar ingress and egress of air and water during submergence and draining of water after use.

An additional feature of the present invention is the hollow couplers 90 with a plurality of fastening points 100. The rigid vertical hollow member 10 has a hollow coupler 90 at the top for adjustably coupling the upper near horizontal hollow member 20, and another hollow coupler 90 at the bottom for adjustably coupling the lower near horizontal hollow member 40. In this way the length of the rigid vertical hollow member 10 is adjusted for the height of the user's torso, length of the user's legs, or both.

Another hollow coupler 90 with a plurality of fastening points 100 adjustably couples the near horizontal platform 70 at the end of the acutely angled hollow branched seat support 60 to provide for the user's personal accommodation to height above the pool water and distance from the pool wall.

Another feature of the present invention is use of the hollow couplers 90 with a plurality of fastening points 100 to decouple the upper near horizontal hollow member 20, the lower near horizontal hollow member 40, the acutely angled hollow branched seat support 60 and the near horizontal platform 70 for disassembly, cleaning and easy storage. Furthermore, as shown in FIG. 2C, the hollow couplers 90 with a plurality of fastening points 100 may be used with either or both of the upper near horizontal hollow member 20 and the lower near horizontal hollow member 40 to adjust their length for proper angular alignment of the present invention to the difference between the overhang of the coping and the pool wall.

An accessory attachment 110 may be coupled to the upper near horizontal hollow member 20 to permit the present invention to support a personal article, such as a beverage, meal or sun umbrella. Also, the accessory attachment 110 could project over the deck, or rotate over the pool and serve as a close and convenient tray.

In another embodiment, the upper near horizontal hollow member 20 has one or more handgrips 120 for the user to grasp while getting on or off the chair, or for use while seated.

Referring now to FIG. 3, showing a dual-duty embodiment of the present invention. This dual-duty embodiment differs from the preferred embodiment of FIG. 1 in that the stem of the near horizontal platform 70 further comprises a branched arm that terminates in a second near horizontal platform 75 for use as a service tray such as for beverages or meals.

Referring now to FIG. 4, showing the multiple-duty embodiment of the present invention. The multiple-duty embodiment has two or more rigid vertical hollow members 310 to accommodate greater weigh and function. Each rigid vertical hollow member 310 may be coupled to at least one acutely angled hollow branched article supports 360 and are attached at the bottom to the lower near horizontal hollow member 340. Hollow couplers 390 and a plurality of fastening points 400 at the end of each acutely angled hollow branched article support 360 provide for attachment, adjustment, and removal of multiple articles 370, and 375, such as multiple and independently adjustable seats, a seat and table, etc.

As with the preferred embodiment, the rigid vertical hollow members 310 are lengthwise adjustable with hollow couplers 390 and a plurality of fastening points 400 for a comfortable height. Accessory attachments 410 may be attached to the upper near horizontal hollow member 320 to permit the multiple-duty embodiment of the present invention to support one or more personal items, such as an umbrella, a beverage holder, or support a meal tray.

Referring now to FIG. 5, showing an alternative embodiment of the present invention. This embodiment includes the two rigid vertical hollow members 510 of the multiple-duty embodiment to accommodate greater weight and function, with a modification of the single-duty embodiment. This embodiment replaces the acutely angled hollow branched article support of those embodiments with a variably angled hollow article support 560, which is instead rotationally coupled to the lower near horizontal hollow member 540. The near horizontal platform 570 is also rotationally adjustable and detachable with its own hollow couplers 590 and a plurality of fastening points 500. As with the other embodiments, upper and lower near horizontal hollow members 520, and 540 respectively include the upper and lower non-slip grip members 530 and 550 respectively. Likewise, the rigid vertical hollow members 510 are lengthwise adjustable with hollow couplers 590 and a plurality of fastening points 500 for a comfortable height. Ports 580 allow the egress of air and ingress of water as this embodiment submerges into the water, or the egress of water and ingress of air as the present invention drains after being removed from the water.

Accessory attachment 610 may be attached to the upper near horizontal hollow member 520 to permit this embodiment to support one or more personal items, such as a beverage holder, meal tray or other article. As with the other embodiments, this embodiment may be outfitted with handgrips, padded seat, or various securing attachments to the deck.

The embodiments shown and discussed are merely representational of the preferred and various alternative embodiments without limitation to further embodiments of the claimed present invention.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8783765 *Mar 20, 2012Jul 22, 2014Karen MatusSelf-supporting poolside child seat
US20110099708 *Oct 29, 2009May 5, 2011Seth FreedmanPortable poolside chair
US20130031712 *Aug 3, 2011Feb 7, 2013Edward GossettIn Swimming Pool Chair with Adjustable Angle and Height
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/496
International ClassificationE04H4/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47C15/004, E04H4/14
European ClassificationE04H4/14, A47C15/00P
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 13, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: CENTRE NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE SCIENTIFIQUE, FRAN
Owner name: ECOLE NATIONALE SUPERIEURE DE MECANIQUE ET DES MIC
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:ABADIE, JOEL;CHAILLET, NICOLAS;LEXCELLENT, CHRISTIAN;REEL/FRAME:017477/0643
Effective date: 20060112