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Publication numberUS20080092732 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/287,718
Publication dateApr 24, 2008
Filing dateNov 28, 2005
Priority dateNov 28, 2005
Publication number11287718, 287718, US 2008/0092732 A1, US 2008/092732 A1, US 20080092732 A1, US 20080092732A1, US 2008092732 A1, US 2008092732A1, US-A1-20080092732, US-A1-2008092732, US2008/0092732A1, US2008/092732A1, US20080092732 A1, US20080092732A1, US2008092732 A1, US2008092732A1
InventorsBarry S. Becker, Erik L. Partridge, Jeffrey N. Jenkins
Original AssigneeBecker Barry S, Partridge Erik L, Jenkins Jeffrey N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Swing arm mounting system
US 20080092732 A1
Abstract
A swing arm system is disclosed for supporting a weapon on a platform such as a moving vehicle. Upper and lower arm assemblies are pivotally joined together by a connection including a pintle socket. A second pintle socket is provided at the free end of the swing arm assemblies. Friction locks are provided to limit travel and to stabilize the mounting system during operation.
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Claims(29)
1. A swing arm mounting arrangement, comprising:
a first swing arm having a pivot end and an opposed free end for supporting a weapon;
a second swing arm having a pivot end and a support end for securing the mounting arrangement to a platform;
a pivot connection joining the pivot ends of the first and the second swing arms;
a first pintle socket carried on the free end of the first swing arm; and
a second pintle socket carried on the pivot end of the first swing arm, whereby the weapon is adapted to be pivotably supported at either the first pintle socket or the second pintle socket of the first swing arm.
2. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 1 wherein the pivot connection comprises a unitary connector member having a first end defining a pintle socket, an opposed second end defining a pivot pin and an intermediate body portion having a generally non-circular cross-sectional shape.
3. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 2 wherein the intermediate body portion has a generally square cross-sectional shape.
4. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 1 wherein the free end of the first swing arm defines a cylindrical recess and said first pintle socket has a generally cylindrical exterior surface.
5. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 1 wherein the first swing arm comprises a housing having opposed enlarged ends and an intermediate housing portion.
6. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 5 wherein the pivot end of the first swing arm defines a passageway having a generally non-circular cross-section.
7. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 6 wherein the pivot connection comprises a unitary connector member having a first end defining a pintle socket, an opposed second end defining a pivot pin and an intermediate body portion having a generally non-circular cross-sectional shape.
8. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 7 wherein the pivot end of the first swing arm defines a passageway having a generally square cross-section.
9. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 1 wherein the intermediate body portion has a generally square cross-sectional shape.
10. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 1 wherein the support end of the second swing arm has a continuously closed upper surface.
11. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 1 wherein the pivot connection comprises a unitary connector member having a first end defining a pintle socket surrounded by an enlarged head portion covering at least a part of the pivot end of the first swing arm.
12. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 1 wherein the first pintle socket includes an enlarged head portion covering at least a part of the first swing arm free end.
13. A swing arm mounting arrangement, comprising:
a first swing arm having a pivot end and an opposed free end for supporting an article;
a second swing arm having a pivot end and a support end for securing the mounting arrangement to a support;
a pivot connection joining the pivot ends of the first and the second swing arms;
a first friction clamp carried on the pivot end of the second swing arm; and
a second friction clamp carried on the support end of the second swing arm, the first and second friction clamps being adapted to selectively limit movement of the first swing arm relative to the second swing arm and the second swing arm relative to the support, respectively.
14. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 13 further comprising a first and a second pintle socket carried on the free end and the pivot end of the first swing arm, respectively.
15. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 13 wherein the first and second friction clamps comprise a split collar defining an internal aperture, including first and second opposed portions movable toward and away from one another to clamp and release a member received in the internal aperture.
16. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 15 wherein the internal aperture has a generally circular cross-section.
17. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 15 wherein the first and the second friction clamps further comprise wings extending from the first and the second opposed portions to transmit clamping forces thereto.
18. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 13 wherein the pivot end and the support end of the second swing arm define downwardly opening cavities for receiving the first and the second friction clamps, respectively.
19. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 18 wherein the first and the second friction clamps include outer surfaces with generally non-circular cross-sectional shapes.
20. A swing arm mounting arrangement, comprising:
a first swing arm having a pivot end and an opposed free end for supporting an article;
a second swing arm having a pivot end and a support end for securing the mounting arrangement to a support;
a pivot connection joining the pivot ends of the first and the second swing arms;
a first pintle socket carried on the free end of the first swing arm;
a second pintle socket carried on the pivot end of the first swing arm;
a first friction clamp carried on the pivot end of the second swing arm for limiting movement of the first swing arm relative to the second swing arm; and
a second friction clamp carried on the support end of the second swing arm for limiting movement of the second swing arm relative to the support;
whereby the article is adapted to be supported at either the first pintle socket or the second pintle socket of the first swing arm.
21. A swing arm mounting arrangement, comprising:
a first swing arm having a pivot end and an opposed free end for rotatably supporting an article;
a second swing arm having a pivot end and a support end for rotatably supporting the mounting arrangement to a support;
a pivot connection rotatably joining the pivot ends of the first and the second swing arms; and
at least one friction clamp carried on the second swing arm for limiting movement of the second swing arm.
22. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 21 further comprising a first and a second pintle socket carried on the free end and the pivot end of the first swing arm, respectively.
23. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 21 wherein the at least one friction clamp comprises a split collar defining an internal aperture, including first and second opposed portions movable toward and away from one another to clamp and release a member received in the internal aperture.
24. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 23 wherein the internal aperture has a generally circular cross-section.
25. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 23 wherein the at least one friction clamp further comprises wings extending from the first and the second opposed portions to transmit clamping forces thereto.
26. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 21 wherein the second swing arm defines a downwardly opening cavity for receiving the at least one friction clamp.
27. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 26 wherein the at least one friction clamp includes outer surfaces with generally non-circular cross-sectional shapes.
28. A swing arm mounting arrangement, comprising:
a first swing arm having a pivot end and an opposed free end for rotatably engaging an article;
a second swing arm having a pivot end and a support end for rotatably engaging a support;
a pivot connection rotatably engaging the pivot ends of the first and the second swing arms;
a first pintle socket carried on the free end of the first swing arm for supporting the article in a first position;
a second pintle socket carried on the pivot end of the first swing arm for supporting the article in a second position; and
at least one friction clamp carried on the second swing arm for selectively restricting movement of the second swing arm.
29. The swing arm mounting arrangement of claim 1 further comprising a travel lock arm extending between the weapon and the first swing arm to restrict rotational movement of the weapon relative to the first swing arm.
Description
    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates to a weapon mount and, in particular, to a system for mounting a weapon to a platform such as a vehicle.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE RELATED ART
  • [0002]
    In combat situations, it is important that a gunner be relieved of the added stress of bearing the weight and recoil of the weapon so that the gunner can focus on operating the weapon effectively. Over the years, significant advances have been made in weapon mounts, as can be seen for example in U.S. Pat. No. 6,283,428. This patent discloses a swing arm system having upper and lower swing arms pivotally joined together and having a free end for supporting a weapon. While this swing arm system has performed successfully under battlefield conditions, improvements are still desired.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    In one example, the present invention provides a novel and improved swing arm mounting system which includes a first swing arm having a pivot end and an opposed free end and a second swing arm having a pivot end and a support end. Also included is a pivot connection joining the pivot ends of the first and the second swing arms, a first pintle socket carried on the free end of the first swing arm, and a second pintle socket carried on the pivot end of the first swing arm.
  • [0004]
    In another example, the present invention provides a novel and improved swing arm mounting system which includes a first swing arm having a pivot end and an opposed free end and a second swing arm having a pivot end and a support end. Also included is a pivot connection joining the pivot ends of the first and the second swing arms, a first pintle socket carried on the free end of the first swing arm, a first friction clamp carried on the pivot end of the second swing arm, and a second friction clamp carried on the support end of the second swing arm.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0005]
    In the drawings, which comprise a portion of this disclosure:
  • [0006]
    FIG. 1 is a schematic top plan view showing a swing arm mounting system supporting a weapon;
  • [0007]
    FIG. 2 is a side elevational view thereof;
  • [0008]
    FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the swing arm mounting system;
  • [0009]
    FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view of the swing arm mounting system;
  • [0010]
    FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the upper arm assembly thereof;
  • [0011]
    FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the lower arm assembly thereof;
  • [0012]
    FIG. 7 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken along the line 7-7 of FIG. 6;
  • [0013]
    FIG. 8 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken along the line 8-8 of FIG. 6; and
  • [0014]
    FIGS. 9 and 10 show an alternative swing arm mounting system.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0015]
    The invention disclosed herein is, of course, susceptible of embodiment in many different forms. Shown in the drawings and described below in detail is a preferred embodiment of the invention. It is to be understood, however, that the present disclosure is an exemplification of the principles of the invention and does not limit the invention to the illustrated embodiments.
  • [0016]
    For ease of description, swing arm mounting systems embodying the present invention are described herein in their usual assembled position as shown in the accompanying drawings, and terms such as upper, lower, horizontal, longitudinal, etc., may be used herein with reference to this usual position. However, the swing arm mounting systems may be manufactured, transported, sold or used in orientations other than that described and shown herein.
  • [0017]
    Referring now to the drawings, and initially to FIGS. 1-3, a swing arm mounting system is generally indicated by the number 10. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, a weapon 12 (for example, an M60 general-purpose machine gun or an M240 light machine gun) is mounted to a free end of the swing arm mounting assembly, and is made ready for operational use. As will be described herein, the swing arm mounting system 10 is readily adaptable for different modes of operation and can be converted from one mode of operation to another using simple procedures which can be easily carried out under battlefield conditions to provide various firing positions.
  • [0018]
    As can be seen in FIGS. 1-3, a support base 14 provides cantilever and rotational support for the swing arms and the weapon 12 mounted thereon. As can be seen in FIG. 3, a stub connector 16 is secured to support base 14 by welding, screw fasteners or other conventional expedients. The support base 14, in turn, is secured to a platform such as a High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV), boat or other platform.
  • [0019]
    As will be seen herein, stub connector 16 provides rotational and cantilever support when received in a lower arm assembly 20 of the swing arm mounting system 10. An upper arm assembly 22 receives a pintle 24 which is joined to a clevis 26. As can be seen in FIG. 2, clevis 26 is secured to weapon 12. The upper and the lower swing arm assemblies 22, 20 are joined together at a center knuckle joint generally indicated at 30. Center knuckle joint 30 provides multiple advantages for the operation of the swing arm mounting system. Adjustment knobs 36, 38 operate internal friction clamps or locks disposed within the lower arm assembly 20. At least one, but preferably two, friction locks are used. As will be seen herein, these friction locks provide stabilization during weapons operation. The friction locks also set travel limits when the swing arm mounting system is converted from a double swing arm configuration shown in FIGS. 1-3 to a single swing arm configuration where the swing arm assemblies 20, 22 are “doubled up” so as to overlie one another. In the “doubled up” configuration, the pintle supporting the weapon 12 is mounted either at the center knuckle joint 30 or at the free end of upper swing arm assembly 22, which is positioned to overlie support base 14.
  • [0020]
    Referring to FIG. 5, upper arm assembly 22 includes a housing 42 having a first and second enlarged end portions 44, 46 and an intermediate portion 48. Preferably, end portions 44, 46 are nonidentical, with end portion 44 providing connection to the center knuckle joint and end portion 46 comprising a pintle socket 52 removably carried at free end 42.
  • [0021]
    Referring to FIG. 6, lower arm assembly 20 includes first and second enlarged end portions 56, 58 and an intermediate portion 62. Preferably, end portions 56, 58 are hollow so as to receive components to be described herein. Further, end portions 56, 58 are enclosed at their upper ends to prevent infiltration of contaminants such as sand and dust. Referring to FIG. 6, end portion 56 has a continuous upper surface 66, while end portion 58 has an upper surface 68 which is substantially continuous except for defining a central aperture 72 for receiving components associated with upper arm assembly 22. Upper arm assembly 22 completely encloses aperture 72 and shrouds this portion of the swing arm mounting system to provide multiple levels of protection against infiltration of contaminants.
  • [0022]
    Referring now to FIGS. 4-8 and initially to FIG. 4, upper arm assembly 22 telescopically receives pintle socket 52 in a cylindrical aperture 78 formed at the enlarged end 46 of housing 42. Pintle socket 52 has a generally cylindrical body portion 82 and an enlarged head 84. Apertures 86 are formed in body portion 82 to receive retaining pin 88. Apertures 92 are formed in enlarged end 46 of housing 42 to receive pin 88 and are aligned with apertures 86 when the pintle socket 52 is fully seated in housing 42. Bolts 96 and lock washers 98 secure pintle socket 52 to housing 42 and further cooperate to restrain pintle socket 52 against rotation.
  • [0023]
    At the opposite end of housing 42, enlarged end 44 defines a passageway 102 having a generally non-circular cross-sectional shape. In the preferred embodiment, passageway 102 has a generally square cross-sectional shape. A connector member generally indicated at 106 has an enlarged head 108, a shoulder portion 110 having a non-circular shape and a pin portion 112. In a preferred embodiment, shoulder portion 110 has a generally square cross-sectional shape and is sized for telescopic insertion in passageway 102. When connector member 106 is fully seated in the enlarged end portion 44 of housing 42, enlarged head 108 engages the upper end of enlarged housing end portion 44. Apertures 116, 118, formed in shoulder 110, are aligned with one another so as to receive retaining pin 120. A screw 96 and washer 98 secure connector member 106 to the end portion 44 of housing 42.
  • [0024]
    A travel lock arm 124 is secured to housing 42 by screw 126 which passes through the housing, a washer 128 and a nut fastener 130. Travel lock arm 124 pivots about screw 126 when its free end 134 is raised and lowered. A locking pin 138 is received in free end 134 and is held captive by dowel pin 140. With the free end 134 rotated to its raised position above the upper surface of housing 42, retaining pin 138 is inserted in a block on the underside of the gun mount for weapon 12, and can be used when the swing arm assembly is configured in either the single arm mode or the double arm mode. For example, see FIGS. 9 and 10 wherein the travel lock arm 124 secures the weapon 12 to restrict rotational movement of the weapon 12 relative to the upper swing arm 22.
  • [0025]
    The lower swing arm assembly 20, as mentioned, includes a housing with enlarged hollow end portions 56, 58. Clamp members 142, 144 are received in the underside of end portions 56, 58, respectively. Clamp members 142, 144 include split collar clamp portions 146, 148, respectively. Wings 150, 152 extend from the split collar portions to apply a compressive clamping force. Apertures 154, 156 receive screw fasteners 158, 160 which pass through the lower swing arm housing. Bushings 164, washers 168, 170 and threaded nut fasteners 172, 174 mount adjustment knobs 36, 38 on screw fasteners 158, 160, respectively. Apertures 176 are formed in clamp member 142 and cooperate with apertures 178 to receive retaining pin 180. A dowel pin 181 holds retaining pin 180 captively attached to the lower swing arm assembly.
  • [0026]
    Referring to FIGS. 7 and 8, as the adjustment knob 38 is advanced along screw fastener 160, compressive force is applied through bushing 166 to the free ends of wings 152, thereby applying a closing force to split collar portion 148, which in turn applies a compressive force to pin portion 112 received in an aperture 182 formed in split collar portion 148. Screws 96 and associated washers secure clamp members 142, 144 within the housing of lower swing arm assembly 20. As can be seen for example in FIG. 8, clamping member 144 has an irregular non-circular cross-section and is received in end portion 58 with a relatively tight fit, which prevents clamp member 144 from rotating within the lower arm housing. The opposite end portion 56 and clamp member 142 are similarly configured. In addition, as can be seen in FIG. 4, the split collar portions 146, 148 of clamp members 142, 144 have a series of spaced-apart longitudinally extending grooves in their outer surfaces, to further enhance engagement with the interior walls of the lower arm housing. The clamping member at end portion 56 engages stub connector 16 to clamp the lower swing arm assembly against rotation, while the clamping member at end portion 58 engages the lower end of connector member 106, effectively clamping one end of upper arm assembly 22 against rotation.
  • [0027]
    A washer or bearing member 188 is located between upper and lower arm assemblies 22, 20 and is held in place by pin portion 112 of connector member 106. A washer 192 and retainer clip 194 engage the lower free end of connector member 106 to hold upper and lower swing arm assemblies together, completing the central knuckle joint.
  • [0028]
    In use, an operator, by merely rotating adjustment knobs 36, 38 can loosen the swing arm assembly to allow reconfiguration in a single swing arm mode or a double swing arm mode, change the angle between the upper and lower swing arm assemblies (see FIG. 1, for example) or allow the swing arm assembly to rotate about stub connector 16. By tightening the adjustment knobs 36, 38, the swing arm assembly is quickly and easily locked in position. As will now be appreciated, the upper and lower swing arm assemblies, when locked in place, are substantially free of wobble or shake, despite recoil forces associated with full automatic firing of weapon 12.
  • [0029]
    As can be seen in FIG. 3, stub connector 16 has a groove formed in its midsection. This groove receives retaining pin 180. By loosening pressure on adjustment knob 36 and removing retaining pin 180, the entire swing arm assembly can be quickly and easily disengaged from support base 14, allowing, for example, weapon 12 to be redeployed at another location. By removing retaining pin 88 located at the free end of upper swing arm assembly 22, the pintle 24 attached to weapon 12 can be removed, allowing weapon 12 to be installed, for example, at the opposite end of the upper swing arm, with the swing arm system being arranged in a single swing arm configuration. Alternatively, if desired, an operator can leave weapon 12 attached at the free end of the upper swing arm assembly and move both upper and lower swing arm assemblies so as to overlie one another to achieve yet another operational configuration of the swing arm system.
  • [0030]
    Referring now to FIGS. 9 and 10, an alternative mounting system for a weapon 12 is shown. Included is a mounting beam 200 which supports the weapon via a rotational mounting to an insert 202 received in a pintle recess carried at either end of upper arm 22. Referring to FIG. 10, mounting beam 200 preferably comprises part of a structure which includes a shelf for holding an ammunition box, a bail or handle 206, and a tab 208. Preferably, the structure is attached directly to weapon 12 with bolts or fasteners 204 and forms an integral assembly with the weapon. If desired, tab 208 can comprise a portion of mounting beam 200, and the structure including the shelf and handle can be omitted. The travel lock arm 124 (see FIGS. 4 and 5) is attached to tab 208, preferably with a removable rotational mounting such as a removable locking pin. When secured between the upper swing arm 22 and the weapon 12, the travel lock arm 124 restricts rotational movement of the weapon 12 relative to the upper swing arm 22 (for example, during transport). In FIG. 9, the swing arm assembly is configured in a single arm mode and in FIG. 10, the swing arm assembly is configured in a double arm mode.
  • [0031]
    It will appreciated that any of the above different operating modes of the swing arm system can be achieved by simply loosening tension on adjustment knobs 36, 38, readjusting the upper and lower swing arm assemblies and reapplying clamping pressure with the adjustment knobs. In addition, an operator can quickly and easily move weapon 12 from one end of the upper swing arm assembly to the other simply by removing and reinstalling the retaining pins 88, 120.
  • [0032]
    The foregoing description and the accompanying drawings are illustrative of the present invention. Still other variations in arrangements of parts are possible without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention.
Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7610842 *Feb 21, 2007Nov 3, 2009Kiesler Police Supply, Inc.Weapon mounting system
US7963205 *Mar 27, 2008Jun 21, 2011Kiesler Police Supply, Inc.Tri-mount cradle system
US8757043 *Jul 25, 2013Jun 24, 2014H & H Tool Shop, LlcWeapon mounting system for firearms
US8757044 *Jul 25, 2013Jun 24, 2014H & H Tool Shop, LlcWeapon mounting system for firearms
US8978538 *Aug 28, 2013Mar 17, 2015Chris SchallerSecondary weapon mount
US9316457Mar 14, 2014Apr 19, 2016H & H Tool Shop, LlcWeapon mounting system for firearms
US20140116237 *Jul 25, 2013May 1, 2014Mark Edward HagedornWeapon mounting system for firearms
USD772999 *Oct 9, 2014Nov 29, 2016Ronnie BarrettFirearm
USD774616Oct 9, 2014Dec 20, 2016Ronnie BarrettHandguard for a firearm
DE102009022358B3 *May 22, 2009Jun 17, 2010Krauss-Maffei Wegmann Gmbh & Co. KgCarriage for light weapon arranged at armored vehicle launched bridge, has parallelogram arms pivotably supported at vehicle around vertical axis, and holder provided with slide limiting angle region in each position of holder
WO2014064664A2 *Oct 30, 2013May 1, 2014H & H Tool Shop, LlcWeapon mounting system for firearms
WO2014064664A3 *Oct 30, 2013Jan 29, 2015H & H Tool Shop, LlcWeapon mounting system for firearms
WO2014064665A1 *Oct 30, 2013May 1, 2014H & H Tool Shop, LlcWeapon mounting system for firearms
WO2014167239A1 *Apr 8, 2014Oct 16, 2014CoseBalance arm for a precision rifle
Classifications
U.S. Classification89/37.03
International ClassificationF41A23/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41A27/06, F41A23/20
European ClassificationF41A23/20, F41A27/06
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 25, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: MILITARY SYSTEMS GROUP, INC., TENNESSEE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BECKER, BARRY S.;PARTRIDGE, ERIK L.;JENKINS, JEFFREY N.;REEL/FRAME:020856/0959
Effective date: 20051025