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Publication numberUS20080110791 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/793,270
PCT numberPCT/EP2005/054479
Publication dateMay 15, 2008
Filing dateSep 9, 2005
Priority dateDec 23, 2004
Also published asCA2592551A1, EP1674408A1, WO2006069814A1
Publication number11793270, 793270, PCT/2005/54479, PCT/EP/2005/054479, PCT/EP/2005/54479, PCT/EP/5/054479, PCT/EP/5/54479, PCT/EP2005/054479, PCT/EP2005/54479, PCT/EP2005054479, PCT/EP200554479, PCT/EP5/054479, PCT/EP5/54479, PCT/EP5054479, PCT/EP554479, US 2008/0110791 A1, US 2008/110791 A1, US 20080110791 A1, US 20080110791A1, US 2008110791 A1, US 2008110791A1, US-A1-20080110791, US-A1-2008110791, US2008/0110791A1, US2008/110791A1, US20080110791 A1, US20080110791A1, US2008110791 A1, US2008110791A1
InventorsErich Specker
Original AssigneeErich Specker
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Blister Packaging
US 20080110791 A1
Abstract
The invention relates to a blister packaging (1) comprising a blister film section (5) provided with recesses (10) for receiving cups of a blister film (2), a bottom section (6) provided with output holes (11) which are protected by a protective cover (21), respectively and a safety section (7) which is used in the form of a child safety device, is arranged between the blister film section (5) and the bottom section (6) and closes the output holes (11). The safety section (7) comprises sliding elements (12) which are in-series located and separated from each other by incisions (16) or perforation lines, wherein said elements are individually slidable, respectively in a predetermined sliding direction (e) from a locking position to an open position and the sliding elements are arranged in such a way that only one output hole (11) is open in each open position.
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Claims(20)
1. A blister packaging (1) for a blister sheet (2) containing a carrier foil (4) having a plurality of cups (3) to receive packaging items (40), having a blister section (5) which has cutouts (10) to receive the cups (3) of the blister foil (2), a base section (6) having open or closed output openings (11), through which the packed product (40) can be removed and, for the purpose of child safety, a safety section (7) which is arranged between blister section (5) and base section (6) and which blocks the output openings (11), characterized in that the safety section (7) has sliding elements (12) which are arranged one after another, which in each case can be slid from a blocked position (SS) into an open position (OS) in a predefined sliding direction (e), individually or in groups, and the sliding elements being arranged in such a way that only one output opening (11) is exposed in each case in each open position.
2. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that the sliding elements (12) are in each case separated from one another by incisions (16) or perforation lines.
3. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that the sliding elements (12) are in each case separated from one another by incisions and held in the blocked position (SS) in the safety section (7) by perforation lines, preferably in the form of a few retaining points.
4. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that the sliding elements (12) are arranged in at least one row, and in that an empty position (14) for receiving a first sliding element (12) in the open position (OS) is provided at the start of the row.
5. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 4, characterized in that the empty position is a cutout (14) in the safety section (7) corresponding approximately to the first sliding element (12).
6. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that the sliding elements (12) are arranged in a straight row.
7. The blister packaging as claimed in one claim 1, characterized in that, in order to define an accurate order, the sliding elements (12) are arranged to be offset from one another in such a way that the sliding directions (e) of adjacent sliding elements (12) from the blocked position (SS) into the open position (OS) run at right angles to one another.
8. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that the row of sliding elements (12, 12B, 12C) is arranged in an orthogonally meandering way.
9. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 7, characterized in that the sliding elements comprise a matrix having sliding elements (12) arranged in at least two immediately adjacent columns and in a plurality of rows, the height of the rows being the same in each case and in each line, two different widths of the columns being provided alternately, each second line having identical sliding elements (12D, 12E).
10. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that one, preferably each, sliding element (12) has a sliding aid for sliding the sliding element (12) by a sliding distance.
11. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 10, characterized in that the sliding aid is a cutout which is arranged in the region of the separating line between the sliding elements (12).
12. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that an additional sliding aid is provided to slide the sliding element (12) by an additional sliding distance (ZVS).
13. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 4, characterized in that, in the region of the empty position (14), the base section (6) has an additional opening (20) in order to permit the first sliding element (12) to be slid again by an additional sliding distance.
14. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that the output openings (11) of the base section (6) are in each case secured by protective covers (21), the protective cover (21) being joined to the base section (6) in one piece and delimited by an intended rupture line (22).
15. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 13, characterized in that cutouts (23) for gripping and tearing away the protective covers are provided in the base section (6) in the region of the protective covers (21).
16. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that an additional section (24) is arranged between the safety section (7) and the blister film section (5).
17. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that a covering section (8) is provided for covering the blister section (5) and for protecting the cups.
18. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that a covering section (9) is provided in order to cover the base section (6).
19. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that the blister packaging consists of a single blank (25), the packaging sections (6, 7, 8, 9, 24) being separated from one another by fold lines (26).
20. The blister packaging as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that a blister sheet (2) is provided, which is held adhesively in the blister packaging (1).
Description

The invention relates to a blister packaging for a blister sheet according to the preamble of claim 1. Such blister sheets are primarily used for packing drugs in the form of tablets, capsules, coated pills, etc. The blister sheets comprise a carrier foil provided with cups to receive packaging items and a pressure-sensitive flat covering foil. To remove the packaging items, the latter is pressed through the covering foil which, for example, consists of aluminum. It is regularly easy for children to press drugs out of the blister film.

Numerous blister packagings are already known which tackle the problems of child safety. A comparable blister packaging of the generic type is described, for example, by WO 03/076303. The blister packaging has two flat sections which hold a blister sheet firmly. A sliding safety section blocks one or more output openings for the packaging item. By means of pulling the safety section out from the side, the output openings can be exposed. The functional principle of a blister packaging according to WO 03/076303 can be understood relatively easily. Furthermore, this packaging is also less suitable for applications in which it is necessary to comply with the maintenance of a specific order of drugs.

WO 2004/052749 describes a blister packaging having an integrated safety section, which blocks the output openings when in a rest position. The safety section has cutouts corresponding to the output openings. This blister packaging is less suitable in particular because, as a result of sliding the safety section into the open position, all the output openings are exposed at the same time.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,675,972 B2 describes a blister packaging which has strips that can be slid individually and are each provided with an opening. With the aid of a pencil, the blocking strip is guided along a cutout of elongated form and the blocking strip is slid in such a way that the output opening and the opening in the strip lie one above the other. This blister packaging is relatively difficult to handle. Thus, even with this packaging, no accurate order for the removal of drugs can be ensured.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to avoid the disadvantages of the known, in particular to provide a blister packaging of the type mentioned at the beginning which meets high demands with regard to child safety. Moreover, the packaging is intended to be suitable to ensure a specific order of drug removal (what is known as compliance). Then, the blister packaging should also be simple to produce and capable of being processed in an automatic packaging line.

According to the invention, these objects are achieved by a blister packaging having the features of claim 1.

The blister packaging substantially comprises three packaging sections: a blister section, a base section and a safety section arranged between them. The blister section has cutouts to receive cups of a blister sheet. Such a blister sheet substantially comprises a carrier foil, which has a plurality of cups to receive packaging item, and a flat covering foil closing the cups. Such a covering foil can consist of aluminum, for example. A blister sheet is preferably to be inserted into the blister packaging in such a way that the blister sheet is held firmly in the manner of a sandwich between the blister section and the base section. The base section has open or closed output openings, through which the packaging item can be removed. These output openings correspond to the cutouts for the cups of the blister section and have approximately the same dimension. The packaging sections are preferably flat and preferably composed of board or laminated board. Between the blister section and the base section there is arranged a safety section, which blocks the output openings in the base section. The covering tail of the blister sheet can rest directly on the safety section. The safety section has advantageously directly adjacent sliding elements which are arranged one after another, which in each case advantageously can be slid from a blocked position into an open position in a predefined sliding direction, individually or in groups, and the sliding elements being arranged to in such a way that only one output opening is exposed in each case in each open position. A sliding element is in each case advantageously assigned to an output opening or cup. The sliding elements are preferably approximately rectangular. A blister packaging of this type ensures that a plurality of packaging items cannot be removed simultaneously in any open position. Since the sliding elements arrangement is at least partly covered by the base section, the functional principle for blocking and unblocking cannot readily be detected; this applies in particular to children.

Advantageously, the sliding elements are in each case separated from one another by incisions or perforation lines. The sliding elements can therefore be formed in a simple way, with the aid of cutting and/or perforating methods, from a safety section which is preferably in one piece. It is particularly advantageous if at least one part of such a separating line is not covered by the base section or can be reached through the output opening. The separating line can be straight. However, the separating line particularly advantageously has a curved section which is arranged within the output opening.

Particularly advantageously, the sliding elements are in each case separated from one another by incisions and held in the blocked position in the safety section by perforation lines. These perforation lines serve as intended rupture points and preferably have a few retaining points which connect the sliding elements to the safety section. This ensures that the sliding elements can be separated from one another easily when slid. Then, a plurality of sliding elements cannot be slid together inadvertently. By virtue of the perforation lines, the sliding elements are held relatively firmly in the blocked position and can be slid only as a result of action by the user.

The sliding elements can be arranged in at least one row, an empty position for receiving a first sliding element being provided at the start of the row. The sliding elements are preferably substantially rectangular. By means of sliding the first sliding element from the blocked position into the empty position, an open position can be reached particularly simply.

The empty position can be a cutout in the safety section corresponding approximately to the first sliding element in the row. The width of the cutout preferably corresponds to the width of the sliding element, which means that a guide for sliding the sliding element is formed in an advantageous way. The length of the cutout is advantageously the same as or larger than the dimension of the output opening in the sliding direction, which is assigned to the sliding element at the start of the row. Of course, it would also be conceivable to provide the empty position in a section other than the safety section.

According to a further embodiment, the sliding elements are arranged in a straight row. Thus, the sliding elements have the same sliding direction. In this case it is advantageous if the sliding elements have approximately the same width, which means that a guide channel for sliding the sliding elements is defined in an advantageous way. In this embodiment, it is possible to slide a plurality of sliding elements or groups of sliding elements simultaneously. However, even here it is always ensured that, in each open position, only one output opening is exposed. Of course, a safety section can have a plurality of rows of sliding elements. It is possible then to imagine connecting straight rows of sliding elements to one another. Instead of straight rows, arrangements can also be imagined in which the sliding elements are arranged in a curved row. In particular, the sliding elements could be arranged on a circular arc.

In order to define an accurate order, the sliding elements are arranged to be offset from one another in such a way that the sliding directions of adjacent sliding elements run at right angles to one another. Such an arrangement ensures that a plurality of sliding elements can never be slid simultaneously. Thus, a first sliding element or one arranged at the start of a row must therefore be slid from the blocked position into an open position, preferably into an appropriately formed empty position. Only then is it possible for the user to slide the following, second sliding element from the blocked position into the open position. In the open position, the second sliding element is approximately in that position which corresponded to the blocked position of the first sliding element. Because of the comparatively complex arrangement, the child safety is improved further.

The sliding elements can be arranged in a row which has an orthogonal meandering configuration. Arranged between the loops is a separating section joined in one piece to the base section. The meandering pattern advantageously has a first and second sliding element, the second sliding element being elongated in relation to the first sliding element in order to form an interspace between the loops of the meandering pattern. An empty position for receiving the first sliding element in the open position is preferably arranged at the start of the meandering pattern.

Alternatively, the sliding elements can be arranged in a matrix with at least two columns and a plurality of rows. The two columns lie directly beside each other. The columns and rows are preferably formed by perforation lines and/or incisions. The cells of the column-row arrangement of the matrix correspond to the individual sliding elements. The height of the rows is preferably approximately the same. In each row, two different widths of the columns are provided alternately. In this case, each second row has identical sliding elements. The matrix preferably also has an empty position at the start of one of the rows to receive a first sliding element when slid into the open position.

A sliding element can have a sliding aid for sliding the sliding element. Such sliding aids make handling easier when being slid from the blocked position into the open position by a sliding distance. For this purpose, it is possible to imagine ribs and/or concavities, for example, in/on which a user can act simply. To this end, a user will normally use a fingernail as an aid; the use of tools can also be imagined. Since the sliding aid is to be accessible through the output opening, the sliding aid should advantageously be arranged on the sliding element in such a way that it is located at least partly within the output opening when in the blocked position.

It is particularly advantageous if the sliding aid is a cutout which is arranged in the region of a separating line between the individual sliding elements, in particular in the form of a perforation line or preferably an incision. It is particularly advantageous if the cutout is oriented from the separating line in the sliding direction. Such a cutout can have the form of a circular segment, for example. In this way, a user can exert a sliding force particularly simply on the corresponding sliding element.

Since the sliding distance is limited by the output opening, it may be advantageous to slide a sliding element by an additional sliding distance. To this end, the sliding element can have an additional sliding aid. An indentation or a short incision could be provided as an additional sliding aid. This additional sliding aid is in each case advantageously arranged between separating lines of the sliding elements in such a way that, after the sliding element has been slid by a sliding distance, the additional sliding aid is positioned within an output opening and can thus be reached by a user. In this way, in particular the child safety can be increased once more. Instead of an additional sliding aid, it would be conceivable to widen the output openings in the sliding direction, which would lengthen the sliding distance.

Advantageously, in the region of the empty position, the base section has an additional opening in order to permit the first sliding element or the one arranged at the start of a row to be slid again by an additional sliding distance into the empty position.

The output openings of the base section can in each case be secured by protective covers, the protective covers being joined to the base section in one piece and delimited by an intended rupture line. For a manipulation on a sliding element, it is therefore firstly necessary for the appropriate protective cover to be removed. The output openings closed in this way form an additional safeguard in relation to child safety.

Particularly advantageously, cutouts for gripping and tearing away the protective covers are provided in the base section in the region of the protective covers. Such a cutout can again, for example, have the form of a circular segment. It is particularly advantageous if the cutouts for gripping and tearing away the protective covers are arranged at the lower end of the protective cover in relation to the sliding direction. In this way, disadvantageous location of this cutout over, for example, a cutout of the sliding element serving as a sliding aid is avoided.

In a further embodiment of the blister packaging, an additional section is arranged between the safety section and the blister section. This additional section has cutouts which correspond approximately to the cutouts of the blister section. The additional section makes it possible for the sliding elements to slide better. In this way, the sensitive covering film of the blister film is likewise better protected. A further advantage of an additional section is the simpler adhesive bonding.

A blister packaging can have a covering section to cover the blister section and to protect the cups. In addition or alternatively, a further covering section could be provided in order to cover the base section.

A blister packaging can consist of a single blank, the packaging sections such as blister section, safety section and possibly securing section and/or covering sections being separated from one another by fold lines. In this way, a blister packaging can be produced relatively simply and economically.

Preferably provided in the blister packaging is a blister film, which is held adhesively in the blister packaging. For this purpose, the packaging sections, in particular the blister section, the safety section, the base section and, if need be, the additional section are advantageously adhesively bonded to one another in such a way that the ability of the sliding elements to be slid remains ensured.

Further individual features and advantages of the invention emerge from the following description of the exemplary embodiments and from the drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 shows a perspective illustration of a blister packaging according to the invention,

FIG. 2 shows a cross section through the blister packaging according to FIG. 1 (section A-A),

FIG. 3 a shows a partial cross section through the blister packaging according to FIG. 1 (section B-B),

FIG. 3 b shows a cross section through a blister packaging according to FIG. 3 a at the start of a sliding operation for a sliding element arranged in the blocked position at the start of a row,

FIG. 3 c shows a cross section through the blister packaging according to FIG. 3 a with a sliding element in the open position,

FIG. 4 shows a blank for the blister packaging according to FIG. 1,

FIG. 5 shows a blank for a further embodiment of a blister packaging,

FIG. 6 shows a plan view of the base section of a blister packaging with the base section partly broken away,

FIG. 7 shows a plan view of a safety section for a further embodiment of a blister packaging,

FIG. 8 shows a plan view of a safety section for a further embodiment of a blister packaging,

FIG. 9 shows a plan view of a safety section for a further embodiment of a blister packaging,

FIG. 10 shows a blank for a blister packaging having a safety section according to FIG. 9,

FIG. 11 a shows a partial detail of a rear view of a blister packaging according to FIG. 9 with the base section party broken open and with a first sliding element slid,

FIG. 11 b shows a partial detail of a rear view of a blister packaging according to FIG. 9 with a sliding element slid further,

FIG. 12 shows a plan view of a safety section for a further embodiment of a blister packaging, and

FIG. 13 shows a blank for a blister packaging having a safety section according to FIG. 12.

FIG. 1 illustrates a blister packaging designated overall by 1, into which a blister sheet is inserted. This blister sheet has cups 3, which are led through cutouts 10 in a blister section 5. The blister packaging is advantageously configured in such a way that commercially available blister films can be used. As further emerges from FIG. 1, the blister packaging 1 has a covering section 8, which is joined to a base section 6 in an articulated manner in order to protect the cups 3. Then, in order to protect the base section 6, a further covering section 9 is provided, which is intended to lie flat on the base section 6 as a result of being folded over.

As emerges from the cross section (section A-A) of the blister packaging 1 according to FIG. 2, a blister sheet 2 substantially comprises a carrier foil 4 and a covering foil 13. In order to press out a packaging item 40, firstly a protective cover 21 must be removed from the base section 6. A sliding element designated by 12 blocks the output opening. Said element must be slid from the blocked position into an open position in order to expose the output opening. In FIG. 2, a packaging item removal operation is illustrated in simplified form. As a result of removing the protective cover designated by 21′, the output opening designated by 11 is open. As can be seen, on the right-hand side a sliding element is illustrated in the open position; the output opening 11 is therefore exposed. Thus, by acting on the cup 3, a packaging item 40′ can be pressed through the covering foil 13, for example consisting of aluminum.

The blister sheet 2, as can be seen, is inserted in the manner of a sandwich between the blister section 5 and the base section 6, a safety section 7 being arranged between them. The safety section 7, the blister section 5 and the base section 6 are advantageously adhesively bonded to one another, it being necessary to ensure satisfactory sliding of the sliding elements.

From the cross section (section B-B) according to FIG. 3 a, it emerges that the sliding elements 12 are arranged immediately beside one another in a row when in the blocked position. The sliding elements are separated from one another by an incision. As can be seen, at least part of this incision, that is to say the section 32, is positioned within the output opening 11. In front of the first sliding element 12 or the one arranged at the start of the row there is arranged an empty position in the form of a cutout 14. In addition, FIG. 3 a shows a cutout 23, which is used for the purpose of gripping and tearing away the protective cover 21. A protective cover is merely a secondary securing means in the present exemplary embodiment, since it can also be removed relatively simply by children.

FIG. 3 b reveals that, in order to slide the sliding element 12 in a sliding direction designated by e into the cutout 14, a user must grip the sliding element 12 through the output opening 11. To this end, for example the user can insert a fingernail into the incision section 32 exposed by the output opening 11 and then exert a sliding force in the e direction and thus, as shown in FIG. 3 c, slide the sliding element 12 into the open position. In FIG. 3 c, the sliding element 12 is in the open position, in which the packaging item can be pressed through the covering foil 13. In order to remove the next item 40, the procedure would be carried out in the same way—as described by using FIGS. 3 a and 3 b. To this end, for example, the second sliding element 12 in the row would have to be slid into the empty position 15 left behind by the first sliding element 12.

FIG. 4 shows a blank 25 for a blister packaging. The blank 25 contains a safety section 7, a blister section 5 and a base section 6 and also covering sections 8 and 9 arranged on the base section 6. The packaging sections are in each case separated from one another by fold lines 26 and are advantageously composed of board or laminated board. Of course, a plastics material can also be imagined.

The blister section 5 has two rows each having five cutouts 10 for the cups of the blister sheet 2. The outline of the blister sheet 2 it indicated here by a dashed line. The cutouts 10 in the blister section are circular. Of course, the cutouts can be adapted in accordance with the packaging item. For example, for capsules elongated cutouts 10 would of course be provided (this would of course also apply at least to the output openings 11 in the base section 6). The output openings 11 in the base section 6 have approximately the same dimensions as the cutouts 10. However, the dimensions are minimally larger (e.g. 0.5 to 1 mm).

In the safety section 7 arranged beside the blister section 5, sliding elements 12 are provided. The sliding elements 12 are arranged in two straight rows each having five elements arranged beside one another, corresponding to the cutouts 10 and output openings 11. The sliding elements 12, the cutouts 10 and the output openings 11 are positioned in the packaging sections in such a way that, as a result of folding over the safety section 7 onto the plane of the blister section 5 and then folding over the base section 6 onto the safety section 7, these elements (10, 11, 12) lie one above another. Instead of a straight arrangement, for example annular sliding element arrangements are also conceivable.

The sliding elements 12 arranged one after another are substantially rectangular. They are in each case separated from one another by an incision 16. The incision 16 has a curved section 32 oriented in the e direction and arranged in the middle, which for example can be gripped with the aid of a fingernail and in this way a sliding element 12 can be separated and slid. For this purpose, it must be possible for the section 32 in the blister packaging to be reached through the output opening 11. In each case at the sides, the sliding elements 12 are separated from the safety section 7 by perforation lines. Particularly advantageous for this purpose would be cutting lines which join the sliding elements 12 to the safety section 7 by means of a few retaining points. The start of the row of sliding elements 12 is formed by an empty position in the form of a cutout 14. As can be seen, the width of the cutout 14 corresponds to that of the sliding elements 12.

The output openings 11 according to FIG. 4 are secured by protective cover 21, which is separated from the base section by an intended rupture line 22. At the lower end of a protective cover, in each case a cutout 23 in the form of a circular segment is provided, with the aid of which the protective cover 12 can be gripped and torn away simply.

A further exemplary embodiment of a blank 25 for a blister packaging is shown in FIG. 5. This blank 25 has an additional packaging section 24, which has cutouts 30 that are formed in the same way as the cutouts 10 of the blister section 5. As distinct from the blank according to FIG. 4, the empty position or cutout 14 for receiving a sliding element when slid into the open position is not arranged in the safety section 7 but in the additional section 24. For improved sliding of the sliding element 12 at the start of the straight row, the first sliding element is formed in such a way that there is an overlap between sliding element and empty position 14 in the folded-over position. Therefore, once the additional section 24 and the safety section 7 are lying flat on each other, the front end of the first sliding element 12 projects into the empty position 14. As can be seen, the front end can be pointed in the shape of a trapezium (in the e direction). Such an additional section 24 could, however, also be advantageous in conjunction with a blister packaging made from a blank according to FIG. 4, in particular with regard to the adhesive bonding, in which blank the empty positions or cutouts for receiving a sliding element are arranged in the safety section.

The packaging sections are put together with a blister sheet 2 in such a way that the blister sheet is retained between the blister section 5 and the additional section 24, and the safety section 7 lies between the additional section 24 and the base section 6.

In order to illustrate the functional principle of the blister packaging 1, a rear view with the base section 6 partly broken out is illustrated in FIG. 6. On the left, a row of sliding elements 12 can be seen. The cutouts (10) located under the safety section and intended to receive the cups are indicated by a dashed line. However, the dashed circles also correspond approximately to the outline of the output openings of the base section. On the right-hand side, an open output opening 11 is shown at the start of the row. Here, therefore, a protective cover has already been torn away and removed (for comparison, see the following output openings, for example, which are still secured by a protective cover 21). Through the open output opening 11, the part 32 of the incision 16 which is curved in the e direction and which separates the first sliding element from the second can be seen (at least to some extent). To slide the first sliding element 12, a user will advantageously act on the sliding element 12 via the section 32 and then slide it. This can be done, for example (as shown in FIG. 3 b) with a fingernail. As can be seen, the sliding distance of the sliding element is limited by the output opening 11. In order to slide the first sliding element again, it would therefore be necessary for an additional opening to be provided in the base section in the region of the empty position (in this regard, see also the following FIGS. 10 to 13). The length of an empty position 14 (measured in the e direction) should correspond at least approximately to the dimensions of the output opening 11 (in the e direction).

In FIGS. 7 to 9 and 12, various exemplary embodiments of arrangements of sliding elements in a safety section 7 are illustrated.

FIG. 7 shows an arrangement of sliding elements 12 in a straight row. As distinct from the preceding figures—instead of a curved section of the incision between the sliding elements—a cutout 17 is provided. The cutout 17 has the form of a circular segment and permits the sliding elements to be slid easily. Of course, other sliding aids can also be imagined, for example relatively small elevations could be provided in the sliding section in order to be gripped simply. In particular, concavities and/or ribs on the sliding element are conceivable.

FIG. 8 shows an arrangement in a U shape. The U shape is substantially formed from two straight rows of sliding elements 12, which are joined to each other via a sliding element 12A that can be slid transversely with respect to the main sliding direction e. Consequently, the first five sliding elements 12 can therefore be slid in the e direction, the sliding element 12A can be slid transversely with respect to the e direction and the following four sliding elements 12 can be slid in the direction opposite to the e direction.

The arrangements according to FIG. 7 or FIG. 8 make it possible for a user to slide a plurality of sliding elements or groups of sliding elements together. By means of appropriate identification of the blister packaging, for example numbering the protective covers or the sliding elements, the user can be instructed with regard to the envisaged order.

In order to ensure an accurate order, however, the sliding elements must be arranged specifically. Such arrangements are illustrated in FIGS. 9 and 12. The sliding elements according to FIG. 9 are arranged in a row which has an orthogonal meandering configuration. In this case, the meandering pattern contains two types of sliding elements: a sliding element 12B and a sliding element 12C which is elongated with respect to the former. The elongated sliding element 12C is lengthened by the height H of an interspace 33 which is formed by a loop of the meandering shape. At the start of a first sliding element 12B there is arranged an empty position in the form of the cutout 14, which receives the first sliding element in the open position. As can be seen, the respective sliding directions e identified by an arrow run at right angles to one another. Simultaneous sliding of a plurality of sliding elements is ruled out. In FIG. 9, an additional short section 18 oriented approximately in a curve in the e direction is illustrated as an additional sliding aid (in this regard, see in particular the following FIGS. 10 to 11B). In FIG. 10, a blank 25 having a safety section 7 according to FIG. 9 is illustrated. As can be seen, underneath a first protective cover 21 or output opening 11, an additional opening 20 is provided. The opening 20 here is likewise secured or closed by a protective cover 21. However, securing by means of a protective cover is not absolutely necessary. Of course, this like-wise applies in relation to the protective covers of the output openings 11. The opening 20 is assigned to the empty position cutout 14 of the safety section 7. Furthermore, the blank 25 has an additional section 24 (cf. FIG. 5).

By using FIGS. 11 a and 11 b, by way of example the action of sliding a first sliding element 12B arranged at the start of a row from a blocked position into an open position is shown. The other sliding elements can be slid in substantially the same way. In FIG. 11 a, the sliding element 12B has been slid by a sliding distance VS in the sliding direction e into the cutout 14. This sliding distance is limited and determined by the dimension of the output opening 11. For this purpose, a user must exert a sliding force on the sliding element 12B. Of course, the user had previously removed the appropriate protective cover from the output opening 1 a. Since the width of the following, second sliding element (this width is identified by a B in FIG. 10) is greater than the distance VS, the sliding element 12B must be slid by a further displacement distance ZVS.

To this end, through the opening 20, action is exerted on the curved section 18, for example with a fingernail, in such a way that the sliding element can be slid further in the e direction by a ZVS distance. In FIG. 11 b, the sliding element 12B is illustrated in the corresponding end position. Of course, instead of the curved section 18, other additional sliding aids could be used. For example, relatively small cutouts can be imagined. In addition, concavities and/or ribs on the sliding element can be imagined.

In FIG. 13, a blank 25 having a safety section 7 according to FIG. 12 is then illustrated. As can be seen, the sliding elements 12D and 12E illustrated here must also be slid in each case by an additional or further sliding distance with the aid of an additional sliding aid 18.

FIG. 12 shows an alternative sliding element arrangement having sliding elements 12D and 12E. As in FIG. 9, the respective sliding directions e of sliding elements arranged one after another run at right angles to one another. The sliding elements 12D and 12E are arranged in a matrix having two columns and five rows. As can be seen, at least in a rest position, a sliding element 12D and a sliding element 12E are arranged for each row, the column width and the corresponding sliding elements 12A/12B being different. As can be seen, the sliding elements 12D and 12E are then arranged in the matrix in such a way that each second row has identical sliding elements. At the start of a first row there is arranged an empty position in the form of a cutout 14, which receives the first sliding elements 12D when slid from the blocked position into the open position. Such an arrangement is particularly compact and space-saving.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7896161 *Jan 15, 2008Mar 1, 2011Anderson Packaging, Inc.Child-resistant, senior friendly carded package and method of assembly
US8328018 *Nov 4, 2010Dec 11, 2012Andersonbrecon Inc.Child-resistant carded blister package and method of manufucture
US8820529Jul 30, 2009Sep 2, 2014Boehringer Ingelheim International GmbhFilm container
US20120111761 *Nov 4, 2010May 10, 2012Anderson Packaging, Inc.Child-Resistant Carded Blister Package and Method of Manufucture
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/531
International ClassificationB65D83/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2215/04, B65D83/0463, B65D75/327
European ClassificationB65D75/32D3, B65D83/04C2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 15, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: DIVIDELLA AG, SWITZERLAND
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SPECKER, ERICH;REEL/FRAME:019510/0996
Effective date: 20070426