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Publication numberUS20080113706 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/595,541
Publication dateMay 15, 2008
Filing dateNov 10, 2006
Priority dateNov 10, 2006
Also published asWO2008055285A1
Publication number11595541, 595541, US 2008/0113706 A1, US 2008/113706 A1, US 20080113706 A1, US 20080113706A1, US 2008113706 A1, US 2008113706A1, US-A1-20080113706, US-A1-2008113706, US2008/0113706A1, US2008/113706A1, US20080113706 A1, US20080113706A1, US2008113706 A1, US2008113706A1
InventorsTerry O'Halloran
Original AssigneeStargames Corporation Party Limited
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multilevel betting structure on complex wagering alternatives in electronic wagering systems
US 20080113706 A1
Abstract
A wagering system for a wagering game uses at least one live random outcome game piece in the play of the wagering game. A gaming table is used with the at least one game piece to determine a random outcome. At least two player interface wagering systems with a visual display are provided on each player interface wagering system. Each player interface wagering system is in communication link with a game server that processes game data and determines wager outcomes. Each player interface wagering system has at least two selectable wagering input displays that may be separately selected and displayed by a player wagering at each player interface. Each of the at least two selectable wagering input displays identifies different sets of wagers that may be placed by the player on the random outcomes of the wagering game.
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Claims(20)
1. A wagering system for a wagering game using at least one live random outcome game piece in the play of the wagering game comprising:
a gaming table on which the at least one game piece is used to determine a random outcome;
at least two player interface wagering systems with a visual display provided on each player interface wagering systems;
each player interface wagering system in communication link with a game server that processes game data and determines wager outcomes;
each player interface wagering system having at least two selectable wagering input displays that may be separately selected and displayed by a player wagering at each player interface;
each of the at least two selectable wagering input displays identifying different sets of wagers that may be placed by the player on the random outcomes of the wagering game; and
each of the at least two selectable wagering input displays displaying at least two separate wagers that a player may enter in the random outcomes of the wagering game.
2. The wagering system of claim 1 wherein each of the at least two wagering input displays at least four separate wagers that a player may enter in the random outcomes of the wagering game.
3. The wagering system of claim 2 wherein each player interface wagering system has at least three selectable wagering input displays that may be separately selected and displayed by a player wagering at each player interface.
4. The wagering system of claim 2 wherein a player at a player interface wagering system may tailor at least one selectable wagering input display by entering or deleting wagers that are allowed in play of the random outcome wagering game.
5. The wagering game of claim 2 wherein the at least one game piece comprises a six-sided die.
6. The wagering game of claim 2 wherein the at least one game piece comprises two six-sided dice.
7. The wagering game of claim 1 wherein the at least one game piece comprises a roulette ball and a roulette wheel.
8. The wagering system of claim 6 wherein a first selectable wagering input display comprises at least a pass line wager and a pass line odds wager, and at least two more wagers.
9. The wagering system of claim 8 wherein a second selectable wagering input display comprises at least pass line wager and a pass line odds wager, field bet, come bet, and numbers on a line wager, and at least two more wagers.
10. The wagering system of claim 8 wherein at least one of the first selectable wagering input display and the second selectable wagering input display do not display horn high wagers and a third selectable wagering input display does display horn high wagers.
11. The wagering system of claim 8 wherein at least one of the first selectable wagering input display and the second selectable wagering input display do not display hardways wagers and a third selectable wagering input display does display hardways wagers.
12. The wagering system of claim 8 wherein player input can be made by a combination of touchscreen input and button/keyboard input.
13. The wagering system of claim 1 wherein a dealer input panel is used by a dealer to manually input random outcomes to the game server to indicate outcomes for the game processor to use in determining wager outcomes.
14. The wagering system of claim 2 wherein a dealer input panel is used by a dealer to manually input random outcomes to the game server to indicate outcomes for the game processor to use in determining wager outcomes.
15. The wagering system of claim 6 wherein a dealer input panel is used by a dealer to manually input random outcomes to the game server to indicate outcomes for the game processor to use in determining wager outcomes and a stick is provided to the dealer to move dice.
16. The wagering system of claim 7 wherein a dealer input panel is used by a dealer to manually input random outcomes to the game server to indicate outcomes for the game processor to use in determining wager outcomes.
17. A method of playing a wagering game on the wagering system of claim 1 wherein after players have placed their wagers, the dealer manually locks out further wagers before the random outcome game piece complete determination of a random event.
18. A method of playing a wagering game on the wagering system of claim 6 wherein after players have placed their wagers, the dealer manually locks out further wagers before the random outcome game piece complete determination of a random event.
19. A method of playing a wagering game on the wagering system of claim 7 wherein after players have placed their wagers, the dealer manually locks out further wagers before the random outcome game piece complete determination of a random event.
20. The method of claim 17 wherein a player modifies at least one second selectable wagering input display to form a personalized player wagering screen and that player places a wager on the wagering game using the personalized wagering screen.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to the field of wagering, electronic systems supporting wagering, and wagering on games with relatively complex alternatives in the selection of wagers.

2. Background of the Art

There are a few games at casinos and on the internet in which the availability of a significant variety of wagers may intimidate new players from the game. For example, roulette has at least 13 different types of wagers, without counting individual numbers or similar compilations of numbers (e.g., adjacent numbers, lines of numbers, boxes of numbers, etc.) as different types of wagers. Craps also has at least 8 different wagering options are not printed on the table layout. The fact that players will not play the game or are limited in the scope of their wagers because of the intimidation factor lowers the profits of casinos.

With the advent of electronic wagering systems, on fully automatic video systems, partially combined live facilities and electronic wagering, or completely live systems with electronic wagering, the games can be played more quickly, but the intimidation factor remains present for some players.

General Rules for Play of Craps:

Each player places at least one of the various wagers indicated below before the dice are thrown by the shooter. A shooter (the person throwing the dice) must have at least one minimum wager (on the “pass” or “don't pass” line) on the table, although a partner may throw the dice for someone else placing the wager. As the pair of dice provides 36 possible outcomes for a single roll of one standard pair of dice, there are 36 possible outcomes on each and every roll of the dice in the standard game of craps.

The Standard Wagers Include:

PASS LINE Wager:

The player will lose this wager on a shooter opening throw totaling 2, 3, or 12, and will lose all money wagered on this area. The player will win on a shooter opening throw totaling 7 or 11, and will win on a 1 to 1 payout basis. The effect of the above two rules is that the player either wins or loses on an opening throw of 2, 3, 7, 11, or 12. If these values do not appear on the opening roll, then a POINT is established. The possible POINT numbers are therefore as follows: 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10. Assuming that the opening throw established a POINT, players with a wager on the pass line would win if the shooter on any subsequent throw obtained the same sum total of the POINT, establishing a PASS, before throwing a 7. In summary, the shooter's first throw (or “come out” roll) only yields the total number to be used for the POINT, wins with a 7 or 11, or loses with craps (i.e., a 2, 3 or 12).

Players who wagered on the PASS LINE, may make an additional wager after the POINT is established, and before any subsequent throw of the dice. This is called TAKING the odds, and the odds and payouts for this additional wager are as follows:

POINT PAYOUT
6 or 8 6 to 5
5 or 9 3 to 2
 4 or 10 2 to 1

The taking of the odds is considered by some to be one of the best wagers in the casino for a player, with a house hold of only about 0.8% of the total money wagered.

Again, a player who wagered on the pass line, and made this additional wager as well, would now be looking for the shooter to obtain a total number on any subsequent throw equal to the established POINT. If this occurs, the player would receive a payout of 1 to 1 on the original pass line wager, and receive the odds as stated above for the additional TAKING of the odds wager. However, if after establishing the POINT, the shooter throws a 7 on any subsequent throw prior to the shooter making the POINT as described above, players would lose all money wagered on the pass line, as well as all additional money wagered on this particular established POINT (i.e., the TAKING of the odds wager described above).

Once either the POINT is made, or the shooter's throw totals 7 after the POINT is established, all bets would be settled, and this would signify the end of that portion of play for that particular established POINT. The shooter on the next throw would be looking again to establish a “new” POINT for the players.

DON'T PASS LINE Wager:

This phase of the craps game (and wagering associated therewith) for the players is essentially directed to the opposite events when compared with the PASS LINE and associated wagering as described above. The only major difference (again realizing that pass line is essentially the opposite of don't pass line) is that players wagering on the DON'T PASS LINE do not win if the shooter's opening throw is a 12, whereas PASS LINE players do in fact lose if the shooter's opening throw is a 12. A wager placed by the player on this area of the table would take on a payout similar to the PASS LINE, and would be 1 to 1 if the shooter's opening throw (before the establishment of the point) is a 2 or 3 (sometimes the 12 is excluded from the Don't Pass wager to provide additional house advantage). However, if the shooter's opening throw is a 7 or 11, then the player would lose all of his or her wager on this area of the table. Once again, an opening throw of 12 would mean nothing to the players who have wagered on the DON'T PASS LINE, if there is a DON'T PASS BAR 12 rule in effect, which there almost always is (or a BAR 2 rule), as the probabilities would favor the player without the BAR provision.

Working in a similar (but opposite) fashion as the PASS LINE wager, once the POINT is established, the player having wagered on the DON'T PASS LINE will win if the shooter rolls a 7 on a subsequent throw before making the established POINT, that is, a roll of the same value as the established point. The player will usually win a payout of 1 to 1 on the initial DON'T PASS LINE wager.

Just as with the PASS LINE, a player having placed the DON'T PASS LINE wager has the opportunity to place an additional wager down once the POINT is established. The DON'T PASS LINE wagering player can LAY the odds, and the odds and payouts for this additional wager are as follows:

POINT PAYOUT
6 or 8 5 to 6
5 or 9 2 to 3
 4 or 10 1 to 2

Again, the player who wagered on the DON'T PASS LINE, and made this additional wager, will win if the shooter rolls a 7 on any subsequent throw. If this occurs, the player will normally receive a payout of 1 to 1 on the original DON'T PASS LINE wager, and receive the odds as stated above for the additional laying of the odds wager on the DON'T PASS LINE.

However, after establishing the POINT, if on any subsequent throw the shooter makes the established POINT by rolling that number again prior to the shooter obtaining a 7, the player would lose all money wagered on the DON'T PASS LINE, as well as any and all additional money wagered on this particular established POINT (i.e., the LAYING of the odds wager).

Once either the POINT is made, or the shooter rolls a 7 after the POINT is established, all bets would be settled, and this would signify the end of that portion or play for that particular established POINT. The shooter on the house's next throw would be looking to establish a “new” POINT for the players. Basically a “new” round of craps begins. If the shooter throws a seven and “sevens-out,” all bets are settled and the dice are passed to a next shooter.

Players wagering on the DON'T PASS LINE can take their entire wager (including any LAY wager placed) down (i.e., remove their wager) at any time during the course of play, as long as there have been no dice thrown. COME and DON'T COME wagers:

The COME and DON'T COME wagers can only be made after the POINT has been established. The COME wager is similar to the PASS LINE wager. Players making a COME wager win if the shooter rolls a 7 or establishes another POINT. All of the same rules as in the PASS LINE wager apply to the COME wager as far as throws of other numbers are concerned. Furthermore, all of the same rules apply as far as making this additional POINT is concerned.

The DON'T COME area is similar to the DON'T PASS LINE wager. Players making a DON'T COME wager win if the shooter fails to roll a 7 or establish another point for them. All of the same rules in the DON'T PASS LINE apply to the DON'T COME wager as far as throws of other numbers are concerned. Furthermore, all of the same rules apply as far as making this additional POINT is concerned.

FIELD Bet:

Players may also play the FIELD. This is a one throw wager where the player receives a 1 to 1 payout if the shooter's roll on the very next throw totals any one of 3, 4, 9, 10, or 11. Some casinos will replace the 9 with the 5 and vice versa. This is a choice reserved by the house, and does not impact the integrity of the game of the invention. Whether the number 5 or 9 is included in the field, would be pre-established, and noted on each and every table so that all players would be fully aware of the numbers making up the FIELD wager. Also included in the FIELD wager and payout would be a shooter total of 2 or 12 on the shooter's first two cards of the very next throw. Under these scenarios, the payout would be as follows:

NUMBER PAYOUT
2 2 to 1
12 3 to 1

The FIELD wager is also a one throw wager, and the player will win as described above. However, any other first roll total obtained by the shooter (other than that identified by the FIELD and displayed on the table layout) will result in a player loss of the entire wager placed. All of the field wagers are settled on each and every throw. Hence, this is a one throw wager, with the player either winning or losing on each throw.

PLACE (or BUY) and LAY wagering:

A player wishing to PLACE a wager on any of the following numbers: 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10, may do so after the point is established. Players placing (or buying) a wager on a particular number are looking for the shooter's subsequent throw after the come out throw to total the number the wager was placed on. This wager will remain active until such time that the shooter's next throw totals the number the wager was placed on, or a 7 is rolled. Any other total obtained by the shooter would be irrelevant to the player making this wager, and the wager would remain on the table, unless the player indicates to take the wager down (or turn the wager off or remove the wager). The player can take their wager down (or turn off their wager) at any time during the course of play, as long as no dice have been thrown to begin a new round of throwing.

If the shooter's roll totals the number the player placed the wager on, then the player would win and be paid according to the below payout table:

PLACE BUY (plus 5%)
NUMBER PAYOUT PAYOUT
 4 or 10 9 to 5 2 to 1
5 or 9 7 to 5 3 to 2
6 or 8 7 to 6 6 to 5

However, if any of the shooter's subsequent throws total a seven, any and all players who have made a PLACE (or BUY) wager would lose the entire amount wagered. It should be noted again that all other numbers aside from a 7 or the number the PLACE (or BUY) wager was made are inconsequential to this wager, and the wager will remain active for the next round of throwing, unless the player decides to take the wager down by removing the wager (or turn the wager off, where a special “OFF” button may be placed on the wager).

A player BUYING a number would have to place a desired wager plus 5% to obtain the odds in the far right column as stated directly above. The additional 5% would go directly to the house. Therefore, if the player desired to BUY the 5 for $10.00, they would have to give $10.50. The $10.00 would be placed on the 5, and the player would receive a payout of 3 to 2 on this $10.00, should the player win. The $0.50 would be retained by the house, and will not be included in any payout calculation.

LAY wagering:

A player wishing to LAY a wager on any of the following numbers: 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10, may do so after a point has been established. The LAY bet is essentially the opposite of a BUY wager. Players laying a wager on a particular number will win if a 7 is rolled before the number wagered on. This wager will remain active until such time that the shooter's first and next throw totals the number the wager was placed on, or a 7 is rolled. Any other total obtained by the shooter would be irrelevant to the player making this wager, and the wager would remain on the table, unless the player indicates to take the wager down. The player can take their wager down at any time during the course of play, as long as no dice have been thrown to begin a new round of throwing.

If the shooter's first and next throw totals a 7, then the player would win, and be paid according to the below payout table:

NUMBER LAY (plus 5%) PAYOUT
 4 or 10 1 to 2
5 or 9 2 to 3
6 or 8 5 to 6

However, if the shooter's next throw totals the number the LAY wager was placed on, the player loses the entire amount wagered. It should be noted that all other numbers aside from a 7 or the number the LAY wager was made are inconsequential to this wager, and the wager will remain active for the next round of throwing, unless the player decides to take the wager down (or turn the wager off).

A player LAYING a number, would have to place down a desired wager plus 5%. The additional 5% would go directly to the house. Therefore, if the player desired to LAY the 5 for $10.00, they would have to give the shooter $10.50. The $10.00 would be placed behind the 5, and the player would receive a payout of 2 to 3 on this $10.00, should the player win. The $0.50 would be retained by the house, and will not be included in any payout calculation.

Standard Proposition Wagers

In wagering on the standard proposition bets at the craps table, a player makes a wager as to the occurrence of a specific event on the next single roll of the dice. The player can only win if the sum of the shooter's first (next) throw of the dice is the exact number his or her wager was placed on, for example, with odds typically as follows:

WAGER PLACED PAYOUT
 2 30 to 1
12 30 to 1
 3 15 to 1
11 15 to 1
 2 & 12 15 to 1
2 & 3  9 to 1
11 & 12  9 to 1
 3 & 11  7 to 1
(Horn)  4 to 1
2, 3, 11 & 12

According to the present teachings, individual boxes may be provided for wagers that are ordinarily split into separate wagers or placed across lines separating the wagers, such as 2 & 12 (high/low) is a bet (with ½ the total wager on 2, and ½ the total wager on 12), similarly wagers are placed (and have to be split) on a prop bet on a 2 and a 3 on the next roll or on an 11 or 12 (Referred to as E.T., eleven-twelve) which is split or placed on the line separating the 11 and 12 in the prop bet area. “Any Craps” (a roll of 2, 3 or 12) and Three-Way craps (with specific wager amounts on each of the craps events of 2, 3 and 12) bets can be placed. These odds and payouts must be clearly marked on the table so that all players are aware of the exact odds, as the odds may vary slightly at different casinos or even at different table.

In addition to these standard wagers (and others, such as BIG 6 or BIG 8, hopping wagers, “Big Red” (any seven), Three-Way Seven, and the like, that may be present on a casino craps table or electronic version thereof.

Few games offered by casinos offer ranges of player control over wagering options displayed. Among those are U.S. Pat. No. 6,811,484 (Katz) which describes apparatus and methods for their play. In one embodiment, a multi-level game of chance is played by presenting the player with multiple options, where there is at least one positive option and at least one negative option. By way of example, at each level the player selects one of four boxes, where two have a monetary amount, and one has a strike. Optionally, the fourth box may comprise a ‘mystery box’, which requires a decision within a decision. When presented with the mystery box, the player may elect to open it or not. If they do not open it, game play resumes at the existing game level. If they open it, one of multiple options is presented, including a positive option and a negative option. In the preferred embodiment, the positive option could include: a multiplier of the winnings of the player, e.g., a double of the money in the player's account, or the updating of the safe level for the player. A negative result could be an additional strike. Preferably, the probability of a negative outcome from the opening of the mystery box should be the same as the probability of a negative event the general playing of the game. In studio participation, casino based play, or play over an electronic network, such as the Internet, is contemplated. In another embodiment, a series of numbers are randomly drawn for the player and the system, and a win determined based upon predefined rules, e.g., four of a kind beats three of a kind.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,652,378 (Cannon et al.) describes a gaming apparatus and methods of conducting a wagering game of chance. A gaming machine is disclosed which is configured for mutually concurrent play of a plurality of games of chance on a single display screen. A method of conducting a wagering activity includes providing a player with a plurality of differing games of chance, at least some of which are mutually concurrently playable on a single screen display of a gaming device and enabling mutually concurrent play of the plurality of differing games of chance on the single screen display. Various other gaming machine configurations and methods of play related to multiple differing games of chance on a single display screen are also disclosed herein. Networked gaming machines are also disclosed.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,604,740 (Singer et al.) describes a slot machine that enables a player to select one or more symbols as wild symbols (“Select-A-Wild”). In one embodiment, the game displays three spin buttons. Each spin button is permanently associated with a symbol. All of the associated symbols have matching symbols on the reel strips. Each of the associated symbols have the same probability of appearing on the reel strips. The player selects a wild symbol by pressing a spin button. The symbol associated with the pressed spin button acts as a wild symbol for that spin. After each spin, the player receives awards for all winning combinations.

U.S. Pat. No. 6443,837 (Jaffe) describes a gaming machine bonus feature involving the selection of strategy options. The player selects strategy options, one at a time, in successive game stages. Each of the strategy options is associated with a game activity having a number of possible outcomes. After selection of the strategy options, a gaming machine processor determines the outcomes associated with the designated game activity. In one embodiment, the game program defines a selection probability for the possible outcomes which may vary in the successive game stages. In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, there is provided a gaming machine and method of operating of the gaming machine to execute a game program defining a first and second strategy option. Each of the first and second strategy options are associated with a designated game activity. The method comprises a first step of selecting, under player control, one of the first and second strategy options. The processor identifies the designated game activity associated with the selected strategy option and a number of possible outcomes of the designated game activity. Then, the processor selects one of the possible outcomes and the gaming machine displays indicia of the selected outcome.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

An electronic wagering system is disclosed in which at least seven distinct types of wagers can be placed. Players may select levels of wagering panels compatible with their perceived level of competency or comfort in the game. Players advance their progression through different levels of complexity in panels as their comfort increases or as they feel that strategy indicates that an alteration in betting form may be desirable. Panels may show limited wagering selections and progress in difficulty up to the highest level of complexity, which would be a display of or availability of all wagers. Players may even design panel displays of only those wagers that they wish to engage in, excluding wagers that they know they will never place.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 shows a craps table with multiple wagering monitors distributed at player positions about the craps table.

FIG. 2 shows a monitor screen shot of a low level of complexity wagering screen for roulette.

FIG. 3 shows a monitor screen shot of a higher level of complexity wagering screen for roulette.

FIG. 4 shows a monitor screen shot of a low level of complexity wagering screen for craps.

FIG. 5 shows a monitor screen shot of a more complex wagering capability than the low level of complexity wagering screen of FIG. 4 for craps.

FIG. 6 shows a monitor screen shot of a more complex wagering capability than the moderate level of complexity wagering screen of FIG. 5 for craps.

FIG. 7 shows a monitor screen shot of a more complex wagering capability than the moderately high level of complexity wagering screen of FIG. 6 for craps.

FIG. 8 shows a player redesigning the most complex wagering screen shot for craps which had displayed every available wager.

FIG. 9 shows an edited screen with a skilled players' menu of preferred wagers.

FIG. 10 shows a flow chart for use of the system of the present technology using monetary inputs (currency) into the system, accepting credit, selecting a preferred wagering profile and then placing wagers.

FIG. 11 shows a flowchart for actual wager entry and game play with wager suggestions according to the technology described herein.

FIG. 12 shows a screen shot display of an alphanumeric image of one level of player strategy wagering types that give an appearance more like a craps table surface.

FIG. 13 shows a second screen shot display of an alphanumeric image of one level of player strategy wagering types that give an appearance more like a craps table surface.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

There are a number of factors that make the game of craps less desirable to a casino than other games. It is a highly labor intensive game. The skill level of the game personnel must be higher for craps versus other casino games. The payment of awards and collection of lost wagers is time consuming. The high number of different odds and their payment makes payment particularly complex. The need for individual casino personnel to handle individual wager placement while other players must wait can slow down the pace of the game, costing the casino revenues.

The personnel required to operate a single craps table usually must include a dealer at each end of the table, a croupier for separately handling the dice and a pit boss to manage personnel, resolve disputes, and supervise changing and cashing out. The present technology uses automatic wagering and live dice to offer craps in a casino environment. By automating the taking of wagers, the personnel can be reduced to the croupier whose only job could become moving the dice and entering dice rolls into a game controller through a touch pad or panel. The level of skill of this casino employee would be reduced and yet the game would retain its essential flavor with live dice. This is important as many players enjoy the use of live random number generation (e.g., a physical wheel, dice or cards) as compared to a purely electronic random number generation system. It is also contemplated as part of the present technology to include automatic reading of the dice roll results (through under the table dice reading, above the table cameras, RFID (radio frequency identification) or other automated means, without adversely impacting the live nature of the game. One example of a suitable automated dice reading system is disclosed in Published U.S. Patent Application No. US 20050215312 A1.

The complexity of the wagering and payouts is also addressed by the proposed system, as upon entering of dice roll results, the payouts can be made by a processor. The processor may initiate a display on the individual players screen 132 showing the results of individual wagers. To enhance this effect, a screen may be shown with the individual types of wagers made by each player, an adjacent numeric showing the amount of value placed on that wager, and a resulting display of the amount of the payout on that winning wager or an indication of the loss of that wager can be highlighted, displayed or announced on the screen 132. A screen 132 with these features is shown in FIG. 12. Players may be asked if they wish to replace particular wagers, especially if those wagers (now removed) have been part of the past wagering profile of particular players.

One aspect of the technology described herein may be generally referred to as a wagering system for a wagering game using at least one live random outcome game piece in the play of the wagering game. The system may at least comprise a gaming table on which the at least one physical game piece 11 is used to determine a random outcome. The system includes at least two player interface wagering systems 12, 14 with a visual display provided on each player interface wagering system. Each player interface wagering system is in communication linkage with a game server (not shown) that processes game data and determines wager outcomes. Each player interface wagering system has at least two distinct, selectable wagering input displays that may be separately selected and displayed by a player wagering at each player interface. Each of the at least two distinct, selectable wagering input displays identifies different sets of wagers that may be placed by the player on the random outcomes of the wagering game. Each of the at least two selectable wagering input displays can display at least four separate wagers that a player may enter in the random outcomes of the wagering game. An exemplary wagering system may provide each player interface wagering system with at least three selectable wagering input displays that may be separately selected and displayed by a player wagering at each player interface. The player at a player interface wagering system may tailor at least one selectable wagering input display by entering or deleting wagers that are allowed in play of the random outcome wagering game. The wagering game may provide the at least one game piece as a six-sided die; two six-sided dice; one or more die with a number of sides other than six; or a roulette ball and a roulette wheel.

In the use of the system with a craps game or craps game variant, a first selectable wagering input display may comprise at least a pass line wager and a pass line odds wager, and at least two more wagers. A second selectable wagering input display may comprise at least pass line wager and a pass line odds wager, field bet, come bet, and numbers on a line wager, and at least two more wagers. In selecting a combination of wagering screens in the play of craps and craps variations, it would be desirable to have at least some of the following combinations; a) at least one of the first selectable wagering input display and the second selectable wagering input display do not display horn high wagers and a third selectable wagering input display does display horn high wagers; b) at least one of the first selectable wagering input display and the second selectable wagering input display do not display hardways wagers and a third selectable wagering input display does display hardways wagers; and c) player input can be made by a combination of touchscreen input and button/keyboard input.

In what is referred to herein as a live or partially live game, a dealer input panel may be used by a dealer to manually input random outcomes to the game server or game controller to indicate outcomes for the game processor to use in determining wager outcomes, as opposed to automated reading of the random events, which is another option in the design of the systems. In craps, a dealer input panel may be used by a dealer to manually input random outcomes to the game server to indicate outcomes for the game processor to use in determining wager outcomes and a stick is provided to the dealer to move dice. A method of playing may require that after players have placed their wagers, the dealer manually locks out further wagers before the random outcome game piece completes determination of a random event. The method may also have a player modify at least one second selectable wagering input display to form a personalized player wagering screen and that player places a wager on the wagering game using the personalized wagering screen.

Wagering may be done on these systems by cash input to the system to establish an account, establishing an individual player account with the wagering facility and accessing the account through the game processor or other processor at the table, using a credit card, inserting a ticket representing monetary value (ticket-in, ticket-out type technology); inserting casino gaming chips into a counter or register, paying cash to the dealer and establishing a credit at each player interface, and the like.

FIG. 1 shows an electronic craps table 10, equipped with a series of blank monitors 2 with player interface control panels 16, 18 associated with each monitor, and a ‘pit’ into which dice 11, 12 are manually thrown during a game.

FIG. 2 shows a monitor screen shot 12 of a low level of complexity wagering screen for roulette. The screen shot 12 is shown as a touchscreen, where individual pressure points on the alphanumerics are used to enter wager. The simplest wagers are entered by, for example, by pressing the number wager pressure point □ NUMBER and then pressing one number at a time selected from 0 00 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36. After selecting a single number, the amount of the wager is entered by pressing pressure points on the available wager amounts, □$0.25 □$1.00 □$5.00 □$25.00 with intermediate wager amounts (such as $12.75) being made by pushing $5.00 twice, $1.00 twice and $0.25 three times. The total wagered bet on a single gaming event can be displayed in a display area such as TOTAL WAGERED BET□. Other simple wagers can be entered in similar manners by individually pressing the other wager types shown □ RED □ BLACK □ ODD □ EVEN □ 1-12 □ 13-24 ═ 25-36 and individually entering the amount of the wager desired. This individual wager total will gain be shown in the Total Wagered Bet area, while a separate display area may show the cumulative total wagers on the individual bets as TOTAL WAGERED □

FIG. 3 shows a monitor screen shot 22 of a higher level of complexity wagering screen for roulette, with all of the wagers shown in FIG. 2, plus additional wagers.

FIG. 4 shows a monitor screen shot 32 of a low level of complexity wagering screen for craps. On the screen display are pressure points (a button panel may also be used, with directional controls on the buttons to direct a virtual arrow to specific wagers and amounts and an enter button to enter the type of wager and the amount of wager s required) for entering the wagers and amounts of wagers. The wagers and displays shown in screen shot 32 include the most common and simplest craps wagers such as □ PASS LINE (P.L.), □ P.L. ODDS, □ NUMBER ON LINE (O.L.), □ NUMBER O.L. ODDS, □ FIELD, □ COME and □ ANY SEVEN wagers. The bet amounts individually enterable are shown as □$0.25 □$1.00 □$5.00 and □$25.00. Again, there may be display fields for TOTAL WAGERED BET □ and TOTAL WAGERED ROLL □. An initial screen may be simpler or more complex according to the design parameters of the manufacturer. As later shown, an individual player may redesign an individual screen to match that player's wagering tendencies. When individual player identities and player account numbers are entered, the system may reinstate the last screen designed or selected by that individual player from a memory bank of player information.

FIG. 5 shows a monitor screen shot 42 of a more complex wagering capability than the low level of complexity wagering screen of FIG. 4 for craps, including all of the wagering capabilities of FIG. 4, plus some additional wagering options that tend to be more complex and used by the more advanced player.

FIG. 6 shows a monitor screen shot 62 of a more complex wagering capability than the moderate level of complexity wagering screen of FIG. 5 for craps, including all of the wagering capabilities of FIG. 5, plus some additional wagering options that tend to be more complex and used by the more advanced player.

FIG. 7 shows a monitor screen shot 92 of a more complex wagering capability than the moderately high level of complexity wagering screen of FIG. 6 for craps, including all of the wagering capabilities of FIG. 6, plus some additional wagering options that tend to be more complex and used by the more advanced player.

FIG. 8 shows a player redesigning the most complex wagering screen shot 102 for craps which had displayed essentially every available wager. In this screen shot 103, a player has used an erase or delete function (shown by double strikethroughs) to temporarily remove specific wagers (Big 6, Big 8, DON'T PASS and DON'T PASS ODDS) from a personalized wagering screen because that player indicates that he never uses those wagers and wishes to somewhat simplify his own unique wagering screen. This individual screen tailoring does not affect the ability of others to make the excluded wagers, and the player may re-edit his/her personal screen to add those wagers back into the repertoire or delete further items over the course of play. The player may even be able to enter unique wager combinations, such as the rarely and colloquially named, “Buffalo with a Hump” which is a World bet with a double value on the Any Seven component, such as 1 unit on each of 2, 3, 11 and 12 and two units on the Any Seven.

FIG. 9 shows an edited screen 132 with a skilled players' menu of preferred wagers.

FIG. 10 shows a flow chart for use of the system of the present technology using monetary inputs (currency) 20 into the system, accepting credit, selecting a preferred wagering profile and then placing wager 24. Each level has some pre-determined bet offerings that allows players shortcuts in the play. The Novice level will offer the simplest bet levels and highlight them to the player, or offer a shortcut to place a nominated bet. The next level of the invention is determining the level of the player, and then offering shortcuts that emulate what a player may do. The vagaries of the game are such that players may wish to parlay one bet into another, or take off some money once a certain event occurs. There may also be instances where more contrarian players are offered some hedging bet options to protect earlier, more successful bets. The flowchart below tracks this through each step of the game.

As shown in the flow chart, a player inserts money 20 to obtain wagering credit. A series or suite of player level types are offered 21. The player selects the player skill level 22 desired for that player. The player then selects 23 enters wagers to play the game 26.

FIG. 11 shows a flow chart for further play on the technology described herein. In this flowchart, the game is started 30, and the main available wagers are highlighted 32 or at least displayed on the player's selected wagering screen. The player places wagers 34 by touch screen entry. A processor receives the bets, evaluates the bets 36 and the play continues. After a number of rolls 38, the processor may signal the player 40 through the screen that other wagers or other levels may be available from which the player should consider wagers. This can be done on a rote manner, with certain wagers promoted based on the general level of play of the individual, or the processor may evaluate the roll or event history, display the roll or event history, and imply to the player that certain additional wagers seem to be indicated on the basis of roll history and events. For example, if the player has rolled craps more than 25% of the time, the processor may indicate to the player that craps wagers have returned over 50% in a defined history, even though players should realize that dice have no memory and that each roll is statistically neutral.

As players proceed through the game, the unit assesses their bet level 36 and may assign a level to that particular player. To promote further play of the game and a better understanding, further bets from the next level are offered after every X games. The reference of the next level may assign players a level based on bets being made. Such a table may look something like the following:

Player Level Bet types
1 Come/Don't come line, straight number or ‘Field’
2 Multiple Level 1 bets at once
3 Once point established, player plays point [may include
level 1 + 2 bets]
4 Player lays bets and plays odds in conjunction with
levels 1, 2 and 3
5 Player hedging and playing on over 5 positions

One of the desirable aspects of the present technology is that the system can promote short cut betting in line with what the player is playing, preventing excess electronic chip movement and accelerated game play. If a player plays X number of bets on a particular level, they are offered more exotic bets 40, and if this is rejected 42 twice in a row, the player may not be offered the same set of wagers again while there are credits in the machine (although the system may reset once credits reaches zero). It is also envisaged that any player system requiring a player's unique card would know the players required strategy and play offering levels.

FIGS. 12 and 13 show alternate screen shot displays of alphanumeric images of levels of wagering types that give an appearance more like a craps table surface. FIG. 12 displays more complex betting options, while FIG. 13 displays more simple betting options. The players would place wagers and amounts of wagers in a touchscreen fashion using this system also.

Although one skilled in the art would be aware of the underlying nature of hardware and software that would be used in systems such as those described herein, a further specific description of presently preferred system requirements is provided.

Hardware Considerations

  • 1. An interface between a Dealer PC and the display controller is provided to receive bets placed by the player terminals in real time and send them to the display to be represented on display screen.
  • 2. A display controller may be used to create a 3d graphical representation of chips stacked as they would be on a live table.
  • 3. An intelligent sound system can be used to interface with the game controller and display controller to play different sounds and sound volumes depending on what stage and state of play the game is in. Includes speakers and a subwoofer in the table to vibrate the table and give it feel at certain points in the game. For example, rolls may be announced, running points may be announced before each roll, audio reminders of specific wagers may be made (e.g., Crap-Eleven? Hardways? Odds on number bets? Etc.).
  • 4. Moderate size such as 10 inch″ (25.4 cm) touch screens may be connected to the craps table with a layout of the game for the players to interact with the game.
  • 5. Serial Card reader can be provided for players to insert rating cards which are logged in the Rapid Database.
  • 6. A dealer PC may be provided that the dealer operates to start the game, enter results, buy in players, cashout players and open/close the table.
  • 7. Server PC with SQL database can be provided.
  • 8. BOH PC with Reporting and configuration utility can be provided.
  • 9.A relatively larger 26 inch (65 cm) LCD screen or other monitor can be used for Display or results, histories, and other information.
  • 10. A steel frame Crap Table designed to be enclosed to house peripheral equipment under the playing surface and have the 10 inch (25.4 cm) touch screens attached can be provided as a standard equipment piece.
Software Consideration

  • 1. SQL Database for holding game configuration and game data and player ratings can be provided into the system.
  • 2. Table Configuration software to configure odds, table layout, betting positions, commission value, table maximum and minimum, bet position maximum and minimum as well as chip values should be provided in the system.
  • 3. Reporting software, for reporting to central auditing, record keeping, player comping, central finance area can and should be provided.
  • 4. SGC software to allow the dealer to start the game, enter the result, confirm the result, open/close the table, buy in players, cash out players and disable/enable player terminals should be provided in the system.
  • 5. Terminal Software to show the table layout on the 10 inch (25.4 cm) LCD Touch screens and allow the player to interact with the game are preferred, although table menu prints of wagers are acceptable. The layout on the terminal may have various magnification points to allow the players better access to betting positions represented on the small screen, either upon demand or automatically as wagers are being placed in particular areas of the table layout image. There may also be prompting configured into the terminal software to allow new players to follow the game by graying out area's on the screen where a bet cannot be placed or prompting players to move bets to positions with better odds. There is also an in depth help function that players can follow on game rules, common Craps terminology and betting positions.
  • 6. Game Controller software to catch or read bet positions and values from player terminals as they are received by the SGC and send them to the display controller in real time.
  • 7. Display software may be provided on the display controller PC with the capability on showing the game play in real time on a 3d representation of the game table along with a number tree of previous results of individual throwers and animation of dice, table open and closed.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8157652 *Nov 10, 2006Apr 17, 2012IgtInteractive gaming table
US8647189 *Sep 24, 2010Feb 11, 2014Universal Entertainment CorporationGaming machine capable of displaying information for a description of bet types including a winning condition
US20100227673 *Feb 3, 2010Sep 9, 2010Stan DargueCraps variation with indicia matching
US20110014984 *Sep 9, 2009Jan 20, 2011Douglas PenmanSystem and Method for Personality Adoption by Online Game Peripherals
US20110092266 *Sep 24, 2010Apr 21, 2011Universal Entertainment CorporationGaming machine capable of displaying a description of bet types
Classifications
U.S. Classification463/16
International ClassificationA63F9/24
Cooperative ClassificationG07F17/32, G07F17/3288
European ClassificationG07F17/32, G07F17/32P2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 8, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: STARGAMES CORPORATION PARTY LIMITED, AUSTRALIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:O HALLORAN, TERRY;REEL/FRAME:018897/0135
Effective date: 20061219