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Publication numberUS20080113769 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/609,315
Publication dateMay 15, 2008
Filing dateDec 11, 2006
Priority dateNov 9, 2006
Also published asWO2008060473A2, WO2008060473A3
Publication number11609315, 609315, US 2008/0113769 A1, US 2008/113769 A1, US 20080113769 A1, US 20080113769A1, US 2008113769 A1, US 2008113769A1, US-A1-20080113769, US-A1-2008113769, US2008/0113769A1, US2008/113769A1, US20080113769 A1, US20080113769A1, US2008113769 A1, US2008113769A1
InventorsMatias Montero, Michael Park, Jon Muskin
Original AssigneeMatias Montero, Michael Park, Jon Muskin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
System and Method for Allowing Piggyback Wagering
US 20080113769 A1
Abstract
A method and apparatus that can be used by a casino to allow a first player of a first gaming machine to piggyback his or her bets on a second gaming machine played by a second player. The first gaming machine can copy a bonus round triggered by the second gaming machine exactly as displayed by the second gaming machine or the first gaming machine can display independent results from the second gaming machine.
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Claims(14)
1. A method for implementing a wagering game, the method comprising:
allowing a piggybacking player to select piggybacking betting options on a piggybacking machine;
receiving, by a piggybacking machine, a source game results generated by a source machine;
displaying the source game results on the piggybacking machine; and
generating an award amount on the piggybacking machine by applying the piggybacking betting options to the source game results.
2. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the piggybacking betting options comprise a bet amount.
3. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the piggybacking betting options comprise a selection of active paylines.
4. The method as recited in claim 1, further comprising:
allowing a source player to select source betting options on the source machine;
receiving, by the source machine, a piggybacking game results generating by the piggybacking machine;
displaying the piggybacking game results on the source machine; and
generating an award amount on the source machine by applying the source betting options to the piggybacking game results.
5. The method as recited in claim 1, further comprising:
identifying, by the piggybacking player on the piggybacking machine, a source player; and
locating, by a server, the source machine that is being played by the source player.
6. The method as recited in claim 5, wherein the identifying is performed by the piggybacking player typing in a player's number associated with the source player.
7. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein a paytable used to generate the award amount on the piggybacking machine is different from a source paytable used to generate an award on the source machine.
8. A method for implementing a wagering game, the method comprising:
generating a first random outcome by a first machine and awarding a first award on the first machine based on the first random outcome;
generating a second random outcome by a second machine and awarding a second award on the second machine based on the second random outcome;
displaying the first random outcome on the second machine and awarding a third award on the second machine based on the first random outcome; and
displaying the second random outcome on the first machine and awarding a fourth award on the first machine based on the second random outcome.
9. The method as recited in claim 8, further comprising:
allowing a player of the first machine to set a wager amount applied to the second random outcome which affects the fourth award.
10. The method as recited in claim 98, further comprising:
allowing a player of the second machine to set a wager amount applied to the first random outcome which affects the third award.
11. A method for implementing a wagering game, the method comprising:
receiving, by a piggybacking machine, a source game results generating by a source machine;
displaying the source game results on the piggybacking machine;
triggering a source bonus round on a source machine; and
triggering a piggybacking bonus round on a destination machine,
wherein the piggybacking bonus round is not identical to the source bonus round.
12. The method as recited in claim 11, wherein the piggybacking bonus round is independent of the source bonus round.
13. The method as recited in claim 11, wherein selections in the bonus round are made and displayed on the piggybacking machine and awards are copied from the piggybacking bonus round.
14. The method as recited in claim 13, wherein the awards are copied in the piggybacking bonus round in a same sequence that the awards were generated in the source bonus round.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation in part of commonly owned application Ser. No. 11/558,405, entitled, “System and Method for Allowing Piggyback Wagering,” filed on Nov. 9, 2006, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety for all purposes.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present inventive concept relates to a system, method, and computer readable storage, for allowing one player to base his or her bets on outcomes generated by another player.

2. Description of the Related Art

Casinos offer slot machine games to be played locally. If two players wish to play together, then they would need to be physically present at the same machine to deposit and view slot machine results.

What is needed is a way for one player to “piggyback” on another player's machine in order to share in that player's good or bad fortune, in a more entertaining and flexible manner than previously known in the art.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is an aspect of the present general inventive concept to provide configurations to facilitate cooperation of slot machine play.

The above aspect(s) can be obtained by a method that includes (a) allowing a piggybacking player to select piggybacking betting options on a piggybacking machine; (b) receiving, by a piggybacking machine, a source game results generated by a source machine; (c) displaying the source game results on the piggybacking machine; and (d) generating an award amount on the piggybacking machine by applying the piggybacking betting options to the source game results.

The above aspect(s) can also be obtained by a method that includes (a) generating a first random outcome by a first machine and awarding a first award on the first machine based on the first random outcome; (b) generating a second random outcome by a second machine and awarding a second award on the second machine based on the second random outcome; (c) displaying the first random outcome on the second machine and awarding a third award on the second machine based on the first random outcome; and (d) displaying the second random outcome on the first machine and awarding a fourth award on the first machine based on the second random outcome.

The above aspects(s) can also be obtained by a method that includes (a) receiving, by a piggybacking machine, a source game results generating by a source machine; (b) displaying the source game results on the piggybacking machine; (c) triggering a source bonus round on a source machine; and (d) triggering a piggybacking bonus round on a destination machine, wherein the piggybacking bonus round is not identical to the source bonus round.

These together with other aspects and advantages which will be subsequently apparent, reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Further features and advantages of the present invention, as well as the structure and operation of various embodiments of the present invention, will become apparent and more readily appreciated from the following description of the preferred embodiments, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings of which:

FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating exemplary configurations of a source player and a piggybacking player; according to an embodiment;

FIG. 2A is a diagram illustrating a source output and a piggybacker output, according to an embodiment;

FIG. 3 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of allowing a piggybacking player to piggyback his or her wager on a source player, according to an embodiment;

FIG. 4A is an illustration of a source output and an associated piggybacker identical output, according to an embodiment;

FIG. 4B is an illustration of a source output and an associated piggybacker independent output, according to an embodiment;

FIG. 4C is an illustration of a source output and a piggybacking output of an associated piggybacker with simulated identical results, according to an embodiment;

FIG. 5A is a flowchart illustrating a source machine side of implementing simulated identical results, according to an embodiment;

FIG. 5B is a flowchart illustrating a piggybacking machine side of implementing simulated identical results, according to an embodiment;

FIG. 6 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of generating an independent bonus round for a piggybacker, according to an embodiment;

FIG. 7 illustrates exemplary outputs of two output displays implementing two way piggybacking, according to an embodiment;

FIG. 8 is an exemplary flowchart illustrating a method to implement a two way piggyback, according to an embodiment;

FIG. 9 is an exemplary output of a source machine and a piggybacking machine with a modified paytable, according to an embodiment; and

FIG. 10 is an exemplary flowchart illustrating a method of piggybacking on a specific person, according to an embodiment.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Reference will now be made in detail to the presently preferred embodiments of the invention, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference numerals refer to like elements throughout.

The present general inventive concept relates to a method, system, and computer readable storage which allows a player (or players) to make wagers based on results of another player. For example, a source player (player A) is playing a slot machine. A piggybacking player (player B) can make wagers on results that appear on the machine of player A. There are many other variations of this theme that will be discussed herein. How this can be implemented is described in US patent publication 2006/0046853, US patent publication 2006/0121972, and U.S. Pat. No. 6,001,016, all three of which are incorporated by reference herein in their entireties.

There are numerous reasons why player(s) would want to do this. A player may be at home and may enjoy the excitement of piggybacking on a player in a physical casino (e.g. the player's wife, husband, friend, or stranger). The player will also trust that if he or she piggybacks upon real results in a casino from home, that the results will be fair. A husband and his wife (or two friends) may be in the same casino (or different casinos) and may wish the excitement of sharing in each others' good or bad fortune.

FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating exemplary configurations of a source player and a piggybacking player; according to an embodiment.

Slot machines A 100, B 102, C 104 physically exist in a casino. Slot machines 100, 102 and 104 are all connected to server 106, which is configured to communicate with slot machines 100, 102, and 104 and other components. Server 106 can be connected to a computer communications network such as the Internet 108, which in turn links a remote client 110 using a home computer with the server 106.

Any of the slot machines 100, 102, 104, for example machine A 100, can be linked with the remote client 110. When the player at machine A spins the reels and the reels stop at a result, the same results will show up on an output device of client 110.

FIG. 2A is a diagram illustrating a source output and a piggybacker output, according to an embodiment.

A source output 200 is an output display of a source player. The source player can be playing a machine at a physical casino, or alternatively at home using the Internet. The source output shows a final reel position (or any other random determination occurring at the source) and other information relating to the source player (e.g. his bet, win, and credits). The game as three possible lines, a top horizontal line (7 7 7), a middle horizontal line (BAR * BAR) and a lower horizontal line (* BAR BAR). In this example, the player has only bet a single line (line 2), since only the ‘2’ is highlighted. In this example the player has lost, since (BAR * BAR) is not a winning combination. The winning combinations on this exemplary machine are (7 7 7) and (BAR BAR BAR).

A piggybacker output 202 is displayed which mimics the source output 200 either exactly or in part (as shown). In this example, a final reel position is duplicated in the piggybacker output 202 as displayed in the source output, however some additional information is not copied but instead displayed as it relates to the piggerbacker. For example, the amount bet, the win, and the credits of the piggybacker may not be identical to the source player. The bet and win may be different on the piggybacker output than the source output because the piggybacker is free to choose his or her own game parameters affecting the wager, even though the underlying random output of the source is nevertheless duplicated in the piggybacker's output. Note that the piggybacker has decided to bet lines 1, 2 and 3 (note these numbers are highlighted in the piggybacker output 202). Thus, the piggybacker has bet $1 per line or $3. Since line 1 has 7 7 7, the player has won this combination's payout ($100). Thus, it is possible for the piggybacker to have a winning session while the source player has a losing session and vice/versa, since the piggybacker is permitted to make his or her own betting options using the source player's random results. The piggybacker also may not be required to play every spin that the source player spins, at the piggybacker's option.

FIG. 3 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of allowing a piggybacking player to piggyback his or her wager on a source player, according to an embodiment. Player A can be considered the source player using machine A, and player B can be considered the piggybacking player using machine B.

The method can start with operation 300, which sets a link between machine B and machine A. This can be done by player B indicating his intention to piggyback on player B (either by specifying the player with particularity or the system can assign a random player to be player B). A server (such as server 106) can store the association between machine A and machine B.

From operation 300, the method can proceed to operation 302, wherein player B sets his or her wagering preferences on his or her machine (or computer). This can be done as known in the art for directly playing a machine, by touching a screen, pressing button(s), using a mouse, etc.

From operation 302, the method can proceed to operation 304, which generates results on machine A and transmits the results to a server (for example server 106 or other server). This can be done as known in the art.

From operation 304, the method can proceed to operation 306, which transmits the results from the server in operation 302 to machine B. This can be done using a computer communications network.

From operation 306, the method can proceed to operation 308, which displays the result (generated in operation 304) at machine B. Thus, the piggybacker (player B using machine B) can view a result that was generated by player/machine A.

Since the piggybacker has set his own wagering preferences in operation 302, for example, bet amount(s), lines to bet on, and/or any other possible choices in the game, player B can win different amounts than player A, even though the generated random outcomes in operation 304 is shared with player B.

A piggybacker can also piggyback upon a source machine when the source machine triggers and enters a bonus round. A bonus round is a special game different from the main slot game (where reels are spun), where the player can typically make choices in order to win additional prizes. When a source player triggers a bonus round, the associated piggybacking bonus round can be addressed in numerous ways.

For example, one possible bonus round (although of course the methods/apparatuses described herein are not limited to this type) is wherein a player views multiple elements and can pick any of the elements at random. Behind each element is an award. The player keeps picking random elements and earning awards until the player has picked every available element or the player picks a termination element. That is, behind an element is a termination symbol (such as skull and crossbones) which ends the bonus round and the player takes whatever prizes he or she has earned up to that point.

FIG. 4A is an illustration of a source output and an associated piggybacker identical output, according to an embodiment.

The piggybacker output 402 can have identical results as the source machine output 400, and the piggybacker is not free to make his or her own selections. Whichever selections the source player makes will be duplicated on the piggybacker's machine, and the piggybacker will watch this bonus round passively. The amount the piggybacker wins in the bonus round will be identical to the amount the source player wins in the bonus round. In a further embodiment, the piggybacker can win a percentage of what the source player wins in the bonus round (e.g., 75%). In a further embodiment, the piggybacker can also win a percentage of what the source player wins in the main game (e.g, if the source player wins $10 on a spin, the piggybacking player can win $9).

FIG. 4B is an illustration of a source output and an associated piggybacker independent output, according to an embodiment.

In this embodiment, the piggybacking player can play his or her own bonus round independently of the source machine. The piggybacking player can make his or her own selections in the bonus round and the awards presented are generated independently of the source machine. The bonus awards can be generated by the piggybacker's own machine. Alternatively, the bonus awards can be generated by a server (such as server 106) which is in communication with the piggybacking machine and the server would transmit the results (when needed) to the piggybacking machine for display. Thus, the piggybacking output 406 can have entirely different results form the source machine output 404. Note that the hidden prizes for each element in the piggybacking machine are not the same as in the source machine, although in an alternative embodiment these prizes can be the same.

FIG. 4C is an illustration of a source output and a piggybacking output of an associated piggybacker with simulated identical results, according to an embodiment.

In an alternative embodiment, a piggybacker can have the same results that the source player will have, however the piggybacking player can be presented with an illusion that the piggybacker is actually generating the results himself or herself. As each element is uncovered by the source player, these elements are transmitted to a server and/or the piggybacking machine. When the piggybacker makes each selection in the bonus round (in this case selects each element), that element will display the same prizes that were uncovered by the source player (typically in the same order, although this is not required). Thus, if the source player picks element 1 (numbered from 1-4 top row, and numbered from 5-8 bottom row), which reveals a $20 award, then the source player picks elements 3 which reveals a $5 award, then the source player picks element 6 which reveals a $100 award, then the source player picks element 8 which reveals the skull and crossbones symbol to end the bonus round. The associated piggybacker decides to first pick element 5 which reveals a $20 award, then the associated piggybacker decides to pick element 2 which reveals a $5 award, then the associated piggybacker decides to pick element 3 which reveals a $100 award, then the associated piggybacker decides to pick element 4, which reveals the skull and crossbones symbol.

Thus, the piggybacker has the illusion that he or she is actually playing the bonus round themselves, however, each successive result is just a copy of the source machine's result.

A method to implement the simulated identical results embodiment illustrated in FIG. 4C will now be described.

FIG. 5A is a flowchart illustrating a source machine side of implementing simulated identical results, according to an embodiment.

The method can start with operation 500, wherein the source machine enters a bonus round. This can be done as known in the art, for example when a player spins slot machine reels and a final combination on the reels comprises a predetermined combinations which triggers the bonus round.

Form operation 500, the method can proceed to operation 502, which receives the source player's pick (selection) in the bonus round. This can be done as known in the art, for example by using a touch screen. An award (or other outcome) can then also be generated based on the source player's pick.

From operation 502, the method can proceed to operation 504, which transmits the generated award to a server which is used to relay information between the source machine and the piggybacking machine.

From operation 504, the method can proceed to operation 506, which determines if the bonus round is over. This can be determined by checking if a predetermined condition has happened, for example if the player has selected a termination symbol (or symbols). If the bonus round is not over, then the method can return to operation 502, which continues to receive the source player's pick

If the determination in operation 506 determines that the bonus round is over, then the bonus round ends and the source player is award a bonus award which comprises what was earned during play of the bonus game.

While the source player is playing the bonus round, the piggybacking player is playing the simulated version of the bonus round.

FIG. 5B is a flowchart illustrating a piggybacking machine side of implementing simulated identical results, according to an embodiment;

In operation 510, the piggybacking machine enters the bonus round.

From operation 510, the method proceeds to operation 512, which receives the source player's awards generated in operation 502. Note that operation 512 can continue to be operating continuously, that is while the source player is picking and causing awards to be generating, these awards are being continuously received by the piggybacking machine (and/or the server). These awards can be stored in a queue (or other data structure) on the piggybacking machine or the server.

From operation 512, the method can proceed to operation 514, which receives the piggybacker's pick in the bonus round. This can be done as known in the art, such as using a touch screen.

From operation 514, the method can proceed to operation 516, which displays the source player's generated award (typically in order that they were generated by the source player, although they can alternatively be displayed in a different (e.g. reverse, or random) order.

From operation 516, the method can proceed to operation 518, which determines if the bonus round is over. This can be done either by a signal from the source machine or by checking to see if the termination condition(s) have been met. If the bonus round is not over, then the method returns to operation 512, which continues to receive the source player's awards.

If the determination in operation 518 determines that the bonus round is over, then the method can proceed to operation 520, which awards the piggybacking player the bonus award. Typically, in this embodiment, the piggybacker's bonus award would be the same as the source player's bonus award.

As illustrated in FIG. 4B, when a source machine triggers a bonus round, the piggybacking machine can implement a bonus round independent of the source machine. That is, the piggybacking machine implements its own bonus round independent of the source machine. For example, the picks by the source player and awards displayed by the source machine do not affect the piggybacker's bonus round. The piggybacking player makes his or her own picks, and awards generated by the piggybacker are generated according to the game software without correlation to awards generated on the source machine.

FIG. 6 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of generating an independent bonus round for a piggybacker, according to an embodiment.

The method can begin with operation 600, which receives a spin from a source machine and makes any respective awards. The piggybacking machine can receive a result from the source machine and display that result, and award the piggybacking player and respective awards.

The method can proceed to operation 602, which determines if a bonus round is triggered. If not, then the method can return to operation 600, wherein the piggyback machine displaying another result taken from the source machine and continues.

If the determination in operation 602 determines that a bonus round has been triggered, then the method can proceed to operation 604, which enters the bonus round at the piggybacker machine. This can be done as known in the art.

From operation 604, the method can proceed to operation 606, which implements the bonus round independent from the source machine. Thus, the actions taking in the bonus round are chosen by the piggybacking player and awards generated are generated independently from any awards generated by the source player. Thus, the awards awarded to the piggybacker need not be identical to the source player (although since the awards can be based on random outcomes, they still can be identical).

From operation 606, the method can proceed to operation 608, which awards the player the bonus award earned in the bonus round implemented in operation 606.

In a further embodiment, the piggybacking player can assist the source player in the bonus round. For example, the piggybacking player can make picks which can appear on the source player's screen. The piggybacking player may also provide information to the source player which may help the source player play the bonus round (e.g., which decision to make). In a further embodiment, the piggybacking player can compete against the source player in the bonus round. For example, each player can share a bonus screen and both make picks on the bonus screen to earn awards. If one player picks a top award, this top award is removed so that the other player cannot pick it.

Described above is how one player (a piggybacker) can use his or her machine (a piggybacking machine) in order to duplicate results generated by a source player using a source machine. In a further embodiment, two players can piggyback on each other (two way piggyback). For example, machine A generates results which are used by machine B, and machine B generates results which are used by machine A.

FIG. 7 illustrates exemplary outputs of two output displays implementing two way piggybacking, according to an embodiment.

Machine A output 700 illustrates machine A's reels 702 and a machine A piggyback window 704 which displays machine B's reels. Machine B output 710 illustrates machine B's reels 712 and a machine B piggyback window 714 which displays machine A's reels.

Each player of each machine is free choose their bet (and any other options such as which paylines to bet on and how much to bet on those paylines) on either set of reels. For example, player A at machine A is betting $3 on his own reels and $1 on machine's B's reels, while player B at machine B is betting $9 on his own reels and $2 on machine A's reels. Thus, a husband and wife can play slots while at the same time watching and sharing in the fortune of their spouse. A player may also choose to bet $0 on the other machine and just watch how the other machine/player is doing.

Referring back to FIG. 1, the two way piggybacking can be accomplished between machine A 100 and machine B 102 by transmitting A's results to the server 106 and then to machine B 102, while transmitting machine B's 102 results to the server 106 and then to machine A 100. Machine A can receive a wager amount (and any other betting options) on how much player A (playing machine A) wishes to bet on machine B's 102 game, while machine B can receive a wager amount (and any other betting options) on how much player B (playing machine B) wishes to bet on machine A's 100 game. The bet amounts on the other machines can be transmitted to the server 106 before the results are generated on the other machine. Also, a player may typically be allowed only to change betting options (including bet amounts and paylines bet on) for spins not yet generated on the other machine. For example, once machine B has spun its reels to an outcome, player A cannot now make betting options for that outcome since player B may wish to adjust the betting options based on the outcome. Player B can of course change his or her betting options on machine A for any future spins not yet generated by machine A. A remote client 110 can also take place in two way piggybacking as well, in a similar fashion to that described herein.

FIG. 8 is an exemplary flowchart illustrating a method to implement a two way piggyback, according to an embodiment.

The method is similar to the method illustrated in FIG. 3, but operates in both directions. Thus, operations 800, 802, 804, 806, and 808 all involve machine B piggybacking on machine A, while operations 810, 812, 814, 816, 818 all involve machine A simultaneously piggybacking on machine B.

It is further noted that a source player may be playing a source machine that has a progressive jackpot, while a piggybacker is playing a piggybacking machine associated with the source machine. Progressive jackpots can add up to a lot of money, more than a casino may be able to duplicate. Thus, if a piggybacker is piggybacking on a source machine with a progressive jackpot, the casino administering the piggybacking machine may not be able to offer the piggybacker the progressive jackpot. To compensate for this, the casino can do one of the following: offer the piggybacker a fixed jackpot amount in place of the progressive jackpot that can be won by the source player. This would typically work to the piggybacker's disadvantage, since the fixed jackpot would typically be less than the progressive jackpot. Alternatively, the casino can offer the piggybacker a better paytable than is offered to the source player. In this way, the piggybacker has a better return than the source player on the payouts which do not include the progressive jackpot in order to offset the piggerbacker's inability to win the progressive jackpot (although the piggybacker can still be offered a flat jackpot amount in place of the actual progressive won by the source player).

FIG. 9 is an exemplary output of a source machine and a piggybacking machine with a modified paytable, according to an embodiment.

Output A 900 is an output on a source machine with a progressive jackpot. A progressive jackpot is a variable payout that continuously grows until it is hit, then the jackpot amount resets to a starting level and grows anew. A progressive meter 902 on machine A informs the player the current level of the progressive jackpot. A machine A paytable 904 indicates payouts for a number of combinations.

Output B 910 is an output on a piggybacking machine. The piggybacking machine may be another machine at the same casino as machine A, a different casino, or a player playing on a remote computer (e.g., a home computer connected to the Internet). The piggybacking machine does not have a progressive jackpot. To compensate, a machine B paytable 914 has a fixed amount for the progressive jackpot ($10,000) and a higher payout for at least one of the payouts (e.g., 7/7/7 pays $110 on machine B while it pays only $100 on machine A). This can serve to compensate to the player for the fact that machine B is not able to hit the progressive jackpot as a piggybacking machine.

In a further embodiment, a piggybacking player may wish to piggyback on a player with whom the piggybacking player is acquainted. This player (the intended source player) may be playing in a casino and the piggybacking player may not know the machine ID that the source player is playing.

The piggybacking player may know information to identify the source player. For example, this could be the source player's comp card number, name, machine identification number, or any other identifying information that can be used to locate the source player. A casino database can keep track of each slot machine in play and associated player along with their respective identifications. For example, each player using a comp card in a slot machine is tracked by a server which knows which machine is being played by which player. Thus, a husband playing at home may wish to piggyback upon his wife playing at a casino by using her comp card number which he knows.

FIG. 10 is an exemplary flowchart illustrating a method of piggybacking on a specific person, according to an embodiment.

The method can start with operation 1000, which receives a source player identification from piggybacking player. Actually this player is not yet piggybacking but intends to do so. The identification can be the source player's name, comp card number, other identifying number, machine ID#, or any other information associated with the source player that the casino database has knowledge of. The piggybacking player can indicate the source player identification, for example, by typing it on a computer screen.

From operation 1000, the method can proceed to operation 1002, which locates the source player in the casino. This is performed by a casino server and can be accomplished by querying the casino's servers to see if the identification provided by the player matches any player currently playing a machine. If there is no such player, then the piggybacking player is informed as such and the method can end.

If the source player can be located, then the method can proceed to operation 1004, which asks the source player's permission to allow the piggybacking player. The source player can receive an output on his or her slot machine asking for permission, and the source player can indicate yes or no by pressing buttons or touching a touch screen.

If the source player does not consent to allowing the piggybacker, then the method can proceed to operation 1008, wherein the method ends.

If the source player does consent to allowing the piggybacker, then the method can proceed to operation 1010, which allows the piggybacker to piggyback on the source player. This can be done as described herein.

It is further noted that piggybacking on another player can occur automatically. That is, a piggybacking player can set a wager amount and other wagering options (such as paylines bet on), and the wager amount can be placed automatically each time the source machine generates a random outcome (e.g., spins reels). If the player no longer wishes to piggyback, then the player should indicate to the piggybacking machine (e.g., by pressing a button) to stop piggyback so no more action would be placed on the source machine.

Further, the order of any of the operations described herein can be performed in any order and wagers can be placed/resolved in any order. Any operation described herein can also be optional. Any embodiments herein can also be played in electronic form and programs and/or data for such can be stored on any type of computer readable storage medium (e.g. CD-ROM, DVD, disk, etc.)

The descriptions provided herein also include any hardware and/or software known in the art and needed to implement the operations described herein. All components illustrated herein may also optionally communicate with any other illustrated or described component.

The many features and advantages of the invention are apparent from the detailed specification and, thus, it is intended by the appended claims to cover all such features and advantages of the invention that fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation illustrated and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8096871Feb 1, 2008Jan 17, 2012Video Gaming Technologies, Inc.Gaming machine and method
US20130303249 *May 8, 2012Nov 14, 2013John F. AcresShared game play on gaming device
Classifications
U.S. Classification463/25
International ClassificationA63F9/24
Cooperative ClassificationG07F17/3286, G07F17/3244, G07F17/32
European ClassificationG07F17/32K, G07F17/32P, G07F17/32
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 2, 2009ASAssignment
Owner name: AFFORDABLE LEASING, LLC, FLORIDA
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:ID INTERACTIVE, LLC;REEL/FRAME:022354/0011
Effective date: 20090102
Owner name: AFFORDABLE LEASING, LLC,FLORIDA
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:ID INTERACTIVE, LLC;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100511;REEL/FRAME:22354/11
Apr 23, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: ID INTERACTIVE, FLORIDA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MONTERO, MATIAS;PARK, MICHAEL;MUSKIN, JON;REEL/FRAME:019196/0900;SIGNING DATES FROM 20070228 TO 20070423