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Publication numberUS20080115048 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/599,598
Publication dateMay 15, 2008
Filing dateNov 13, 2006
Priority dateNov 13, 2006
Also published asUS7761785
Publication number11599598, 599598, US 2008/0115048 A1, US 2008/115048 A1, US 20080115048 A1, US 20080115048A1, US 2008115048 A1, US 2008115048A1, US-A1-20080115048, US-A1-2008115048, US2008/0115048A1, US2008/115048A1, US20080115048 A1, US20080115048A1, US2008115048 A1, US2008115048A1
InventorsOlga Veselova, Myungsub Kim
Original AssigneeMicrosoft Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Providing resilient links
US 20080115048 A1
Abstract
Embodiments are provided to create and maintain one or more links or associations to different types of data and other information. In an embodiment, one or more links be created and maintained, wherein the one or more links provide one or more pathways between structured information. A user can use a link to locate desired information, such as a notebook, section group, section, page, and/or page object for example for example. The various embodiments provide links that remain resilient should the information be reorganized or otherwise changed.
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Claims(20)
1. A computer readable medium including executable instructions which, when executed, locate information by:
examining a number of parameters associated with a link, wherein the parameters include one or more parameters associated with a link target;
using the number of parameters associated with the link to determine a path to the link target, wherein the path includes at least one of an absolute path and a relative path;
using the at least one of the absolute path and the relative path to locate the link target;
using a target identifier to locate the link target if the link target is not located using the at least one of the absolute path and the relative path; and,
using a base path to locate the link target if the link target is not located using the target identifier and the at least one of the absolute path and the relative path.
2. The computer-readable medium of claim 1, wherein the instructions, when executed, locate information by using a page title and the at least one of the absolute path and the relative path to locate the path to the link target.
3. The computer-readable medium of claim 1, wherein the instructions, when executed, locate information by navigating to the link target upon locating the link target.
4. The computer-readable medium of claim 1, wherein the instructions, when executed, locate information by examining the number of parameters associated with the link, wherein the number of parameters comprise parameters associated with a note-taking application.
5. The computer-readable medium of claim 1, wherein the instructions, when executed, locate information by examining the number of parameters associated with the link, wherein the link is between items of a hierarchal information structure.
6. The computer-readable medium of claim 5, wherein the instructions, when executed, locate information by organizing information associated with the link, wherein the elements of the hierarchal information structure include at least one of a notebook, section, page, and page object.
7. The computer-readable medium of claim 1, wherein the instructions, when executed, locate information by using at least one of a page and a section identifier to locate the link target if the link target is not located using the at least one of the absolute path and the relative path.
8. The computer-readable medium of claim 1, wherein the instructions, when executed, locate information by using the base path to locate the link target, wherein the base path is associated with a location of the link.
9. The computer-readable medium of claim 8, wherein the instructions, when executed, locate information by using the base path to locate the link target, wherein the base path points to the relative path.
10. The computer-readable medium of claim 1, wherein the instructions, when executed, locate information by using a page object identifier associated with a page object to locate the link target.
11. The computer-readable medium of claim 10, wherein the instructions, when executed, locate information by navigating to the page object if the page object is located using the page object identifier.
12. The computer-readable medium of claim 1, wherein the instructions, when executed, locate information by locating at least one of a notebook, section, page, and page object after making changes to the number of parameters associated with the link.
13. A system to maintain information comprising:
an organizer component to organize the information according to a hierarchal information structure;
a link component to create one or more links to a target associated with the hierarchal information structure, wherein the one or more links include a number of parameters associated with a path selected from at least one of an absolute path and a relative path; and,
a locator component to locate the target associated with the link, wherein the locator component is to use the number of parameters associated with the at least one of the absolute path and relative path to locate the target.
14. The system of claim 13, wherein the link component is further configured to create one or more links to the hierarchal information structure that includes at least one of a notebook, section group, section, page, and page object.
15. The system of claim 13, wherein the locator component is further configured to locate the target associated with the link by examining at least one of the relative path, a target identifier, and a base path.
16. A method of associating information comprising:
determining a target of a link, wherein the target is associated with a hierarchal information structure;
defining a path to the target, wherein the path includes one or more parameters associated with the target including at least one of a base path and a relative path; and
creating the link to the target, wherein the link includes at least one of the base path, the relative path, and a target identifier, wherein the link can be interacted with to locate the target.
17. The method of claim 16, further comprising determining an origin of the link.
18. The method of claim 16, further comprising relativizing the path to the target if the link is located in a note-taking application.
19. The method of claim 18, further comprising defining a base path to the location of the link.
20. The method of claim 16, further comprising including a Global Unique Identifier (GUID) as the target identifier.
Description
BACKGROUND

Note-taking and tablet applications are becoming more popular for users who prefer to use a straightforward interface and tools when interacting and communicating with others. Currently, users can use note taking applications to create and organize ideas, correspondence, and other information. For example, users can use a note taking application to create notebooks, folders, sections, pages, etc. However, it is difficult to link and relate information using current note taking applications and users are unable to link and relate information in a meaningful and resilient manner. Unfortunately, a user may have to perform lengthy and inefficient searches to find relevant notebooks, sections, pages, notes, and other information.

SUMMARY

This summary is provided to introduce a selection of concepts in a simplified form that are further described below in the Detailed Description. This summary is not intended to identify key features or essential features of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended as an aid in determining the scope of the claimed subject matter.

Embodiments are provided to create and maintain one or more links or associations to different types of data and other information. In an embodiment, one or more links can be created and maintained, wherein the one or more links provide one or more pathways between structured information. In one embodiment, a user can create and use a link to locate desired information, such as a notebook, section group, section, page, and/or page object. The various embodiments provide links that remain resilient should the associated information be reorganized or otherwise changed. Correspondingly, embodiments described herein can be used to create and maintain resilient links or associations between structured data and other information, but are not so limited.

These and other features and advantages will be apparent from a reading of the following detailed description and a review of the associated drawings. It is to be understood that both the foregoing general description and the following detailed description are explanatory only and are not restrictive of the invention as claimed.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a computing device that includes a note-taking application.

FIG. 2 depicts a user interface of a note taking application.

FIGS. 3A-3E depict a number of user interface menus of a note-taking application.

FIG. 4 is a flow diagram illustrating the creation of a link.

FIG. 5 is a flow diagram illustrating the locating of a link target.

FIG. 6 is a block diagram illustrating a computing environment for implementation of various embodiments described herein.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Embodiments are provided to create and maintain one or more links or associations to different types of data and other information. In an embodiment, one or more links can be created and maintained, wherein the one or more links are configured to be resilient to change. Accordingly, the various embodiments provide links that are resilient and continue to point to an intended target should the linked information be reorganized or otherwise changed. For example, a link, such as hyperlink, continues to point and/or navigate to a desired target even if a location of a target changes or the target is renamed. Correspondingly, embodiments described herein can be used to create and maintain resilient links or associations between structured data and other information, but are not so limited.

In an embodiment, a note-taking application is configured to provide resilient links that account for the unique nature of notes and associated information. For example, a user can create and use a link to locate desired information, such as locating a notebook, section group, section, page, and/or page object. The note-taking application is configured to create and maintain each link to be resilient to parameter and other changes, since notes can be more fluid than static documents, web pages, etc. Accordingly, the content, organization, and naming of parameters associated with notes, including any links, can change regularly due to a user's interaction with the notes.

For example, a user may organize and reorganize notebooks, sections, pages, page objects, etc., depending on a current focus. The note-taking application is configured to enable easy reorganization of the note hierarchy. That is, pages, sections, and section groups can be easily renamed or moved by drag and drop. The links can move with the surrounding structure. Correspondingly, link paths to notes by path and name can be fragile. Accordingly, the note-taking application is configured to provide links that are resilient to changing parameters, such as name changes, reorganization, and other modifications, as described below.

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a computing device 100 that includes a note-taking application 102. The computing device 100 includes networking, security, and other communication components configured to provide communication functionality with other computing and/or communication devices. The computing device 100 can include a desktop computer, laptop computer, tablet computer, handheld device, and other communication device. The note-taking application 102 can be installed on the computing device 100 or packaged and/or sold separately for installation at some desired time.

The note-taking application 102 is configured to capture and organize notes, which may include text, handwriting, pictures, drawings, audio, video, and/or other information. The note-taking application 102 can be used to record, organize, edit, and/or transmit information, including audio, textual, graphical, and other visual information. For example, the note-taking application 102 can be used to view and edit meeting agendas, to-do lists, date/event reminders, etc. As further example, the note-taking application 102 can also be used to share information, such as one or more notes, between one or more computing devices, such as one or more computers of a distributed computer network.

The note-taking application 102 includes an organizer component 104 to organize information associated with the note-taking application 102. For example, the organizer component 104 can be used to organize notebooks, section groups, sections, pages, page objects, and/or other information. The note-taking application 102 also includes a link component 106, described in detail below. The link component 106 is configured to create and maintain one or more links to different types of data and other information. For example, the link component 106 can be used to create hyperlinks that point to web content, such as to web objects and/or web locations of the World Wide Web (WWW). The note-taking application 102 also includes a locator component 108 for locating a link target. In an embodiment, the locator component 108 is configured to use a path associated with a link to locate the link target.

The link component 106 is also configured to create links to a notebook, section, page, page object (e.g. image, paragraph, sentence, etc.), and other notes-relating information. For example, the link component 106 can be used to create various associations, including, but not limited to: a table of contents on a page with links to the other pages in the section or with links to other parts of the same page; a favorites list that comprises a list of links to pages and sections are visited or used frequently; a definition or reference link from a term, a name, or a topic on one page to more detailed information in another place in the notes. The note-taking application 102 and associated link component 106 can be used to create links to other notes on a page, in an e-mail, and/or in other documents. For example, a user can send a link to others in an e-mail. Thereafter, a recipient can click the link to jump to the target notes if the notes are associated with a shared notebook. Links created with the note-taking application 102 and associated link component 106 can be used inside and outside of a note-taking application (e.g. e-mail, meeting items, documents, web pages, etc.).

The note-taking application 102 can use the organizer component 104 to organize notes and the link component 106 to create links according to a hierarchal structure. In an embodiment, the note-taking application 102 is configured to organize notes according to a hierarchal structure, such that pages are contained within sections, sections are contained within section groups, and section groups are contained within notebooks (e.g. notebook>section group>section>page>page object). A user can use the note-taking application 102 to create a link to refer to notes at any level. For example, a user can use the note-taking application 102 to create links that point to a notebook, section, page, and/or paragraph of notes. As described herein, a link created with the note-taking application 102 is configured to be resilient to the renaming of a target, relocating of a target, and/or other changes.

FIG. 2 depicts a user interface 200 of a note taking application 202, under an embodiment. The user interface 200 includes a number of interactive tools that enable a user to create, gather, organize, search, and share notes, clippings, thoughts, reference materials, and other information, but is not so limited. The user interface 200 can display notes and other information, and is organized by notebooks 204, sections 206, and pages 208. As shown, the user has a Work notebook 204 open. The Work notebook 204 includes a number of sections 206, the sections include: Meeting Notes, Business Trips, Project Ideas, Brainstorming, and Work log. The sections 206 can be analogized to dividers inside of a notebook and each section tab is associated with a particular file in the file system.

As shown in FIG. 2, the user is currently viewing a Conference trip page 208 in the Business Trip section. The Business Trip section also includes a “Contoso Visit” page. The “Conference trip” page 208 is populated with text 210, a map image 212, and a user-created link 214. If the user clicks on the link 214, the note-taking application 102 and locator component 106 are configured to locate the target of the link 214 and provide the associated target (e.g. a template page) to the user. The creation of a link of an embodiment is described below in conjunction with FIGS. 3A-3E.

FIGS. 3A-3E depict a number of user interface menus 300 a-300 e of a note-taking application after a user has right-clicked on a notebook, section group, section, page, and page object respectively. The note-taking application 102 and link component 106 operate to create one or more links based in part on a user's input. FIG. 3A depicts a user interface menu 300 a after a user has right-clicked on a notebook. The user can use the user interface menu 300 a to create a link which points to the respective notebook. FIG. 3B depicts a user interface menu 300 b after a user has right-clicked on a section group. The user can use the user interface menu 300 b to create a link which points to the respective section group. FIG. 3C depicts a user interface menu 300 c after a user has right-clicked on a section. The user can use the user interface menu 300 c to create a link which points to the respective section.

FIG. 3D depicts a user interface menu 300 d after a user has right-clicked on a page. The user can use the user interface menu 300 d to create a link which points to the respective page. FIG. 3E depicts a user interface menu 300 e after a user has right-clicked on a page object (image, ink, drawing, embedded file, etc.) or a paragraph. The user can use the user interface menu 300 e to create a link which points to the respective page object. Once the user has clicked on the pertinent “copy link to” menu item, the user can paste the link at a desired location (see FIG. 2 “Template” link).

For example, the user can paste the created link in a shared notebook, word processing document, e-mail, or other location. If a link is pasted into another application or location outside of the note-taking application 102, the link will be configured as an absolute link (an absolute path to the link target, as described below). A user can also use the note-taking application 102 to right-click on a word or phrase on a page, and then click “Create Linked Page.” Thereafter, the note-taking application 102 and link component 106 operate to create a link to the page with the associated title at the end of the current section and the selected word or phrase will be linked thereto.

As described briefly above, the note-taking application 102 and link component 106 are configured to provide links that are resilient to change. That is, once created, the link can endure changes to linked information associated with the link. In an embodiment, a link created with the note-taking application 102 and link component 106 remains valid should parameters associated with the link target change. For example, a link created with the note-taking application 102 and link component 106 is configured to remain valid if the link target is renamed. The link is also configured to remain valid if the link target or path targets are relocated.

FIG. 4 is a flow diagram illustrating the creation of a link, under an embodiment. As described above, once created, the link is configured to be resilient to change. That is, the link is configured to remain valid should parameters associated with the link change. In one embodiment, a note-taking application is used to create a link that provides a link to target information. The link is configured to remain valid if parameters associated with the link change. For example, a link created with the note-taking application is configured to navigate to a target when parameters associated with the link's target are modified or otherwise changed.

A link is configured to remain valid if the link or link target is relocated. For example, a user may move a notebook, section, page, page object, etc. and an associated link will continue to point and navigate to the relocated information. A user can thereafter use the link (e.g. clicking the link) to access the target information, such as a notebook, section group, section, page, page object, etc. As further example, a link also remains valid if a user changes the name or appearance of the link (e.g. friendly names). In an embodiment, the friendly name is the name of the link target (e.g. notebook name, folder name, section name, page name, etc.). As described below, a link will continue to navigate to an intended target even if the link or link target is renamed.

The flow diagram of FIG. 4 will be described in the context of a note-taking application, such as the note-taking application 102 of FIG. 1. However, the teachings can be applied in other contexts where it is desirable to link information and use a link to access the linked information. As shown in FIG. 4, at 400, a user creates a link by using the note-taking application 102 to create a link. For example, the user can insert a link using an insert command from a menu. Or, a user can create a link as described above in conjunction with FIGS. 3A-3E. The user may want to create a link to a notebook, section group, section, page, or page object for example. The link can be named so that the user instantly recognizes the link target. As described above, the link is configured to endure changes thereto, including name changes. The note-taking application 102 is configured to include various parameters with a link when creating the link. As described below, the link parameters can be used when attempting to locate a link target.

Once the user has created a link (e.g. pasted the link), at 402, the note-taking application 102 captures a number of parameters associated with the link origin. The origin of a link refers to the location (e.g. a page, section, clipboard, word processing application, e-mail, etc.) of the link or where it is clicked from. For example, the link origin can refer to a notebook page where a user has pasted a link. At 404, the note-taking application 102 captures one or more parameters associated with the link target. In one embodiment, the link target refers to a notebook, folder, section, page, page object, etc. that the link points to and/or navigates to when clicked.

At 405, the note-taking application 102 generates and stores a number of link parameters to memory. In an embodiment, the note-taking application 102 generates and stores parameters associated with an absolute link path, a relative link path, and/or a maximally relative link path to a target. In one embodiment, the note-taking application 102 generates and stores parameters associated with a relative link path based on a user's input, such as after a paste operation for example. Stated a different way, the note-taking application 102 is configured to relativize a link path if a link is pasted to some location or area in the note-taking application 102.

The link parameters can be included as part of the link address. For example, the link address can include information that is associated with the path to the target and/or location of the link. At 406, the note-taking application 102 uses the parameters to define the path to the target. For example, the note-taking application 102 can define the absolute path and/or relative path to the target when determining how to navigate to the target. As described above, the relative path can be defined in terms of where the link is pasted to or clicked from. At 408, the note-taking application 102 stores a number of parameters associated with the link as part of the link address and/or to memory, including the parameters associated with the link origin, target, absolute path, and/or relative path. As described further below, the parameters and/or other information can be used by the note-taking application 102 or some other application when locating and/or navigating to a link target.

Thereafter, when a user interacts with the link (e.g. clicks the link, presses enter, etc.), if the link target is located, the link target is provided to the user (e.g. notebook, section, page, page object, etc.). In one embodiment, the link target points to a page object, and the note-taking application 102 is configured to locate a page and then look for the page object. For example, a link may specify which object the page should be scrolled to, such as an outline object (e.g. container of data), an outline element (e.g. paragraph), ink, an image, an icon for inserted document, etc. If the object is not found, the note-taking application 102 is configured to navigate to a target page or section.

As described above, due in part to the link's resilience, the note-taking application 102 is configured to locate the link target if parameters associated with the link target change, such as if the target path changes for example. In one embodiment, if a target path changes, the link target can be located when a user clicks the associated link from a note-taking application 102, an e-mail application, a web page, a document, plain text, or some other application.

As described above, the note-taking application 102 is configured to determine and/or store an absolute path, a relative path, and/or a maximally relative path to a link target. An absolute path refers to a full link to a location associated with a note-taking application 102 (e.g. notebook, section group, section, page, page object, etc.). In one embodiment, an absolute path is included on a clipboard (e.g. global clipboard) when a link is created and the relative path is created when the link is pasted to some location in a note-taking application 102. The link and absolute path provided on the clipboard has all the information needed to get to a notebook (e.g. includes the full network address). For example, if a user pasted a link in a different application, such as in a word processing document, an e-mail, etc., the path remains absolute and will navigate to the link target if clicked from the different application under certain conditions (e.g. server available, user credentials, user authentication, etc.). As further example, if a user pasted a link from one computing device to a different computing device, the link path will remain absolute.

In one embodiment, the note-taking application 102 is configured to relativize a link and create a relative path to a target when a link is pasted to a location in the note-taking application 102. The relative path is associated with the absolute path but includes fewer parameters than the absolute path. Moreover, the relative path is configured to include as few details as necessary to locate and/or navigate to a link target. Correspondingly, the note-taking application 102 uses a minimal amount of information (and memory) to create the relative path from the absolute path. The relative path is configured to remain valid if a user moves large chunks of the hierarchal structure. That is, links contained within the relocated structure are configured to continue to point to a proper target.

As described above, in one embodiment, the relative path can be created when a link is pasted to a location in the note-taking application 102. That is, the note-taking application 102 constructs the relative path based on where the link is pasted in the note-taking application 102. For example, if a link is pasted to a page and points to a different page within the same section, the relative path need not include the full or absolute path to the respective section. Stated a different way, the relative path is a derivative of the absolute path and is based in part on where a user pastes or positions a link. Thereafter, if a user moves or copies a notebook, section, etc., the links that are contained therein are configured to continue to point to the proper link target.

An absolute path can become maximally relativized under certain conditions. In one embodiment, an absolute path gets maximally relativized whenever a link created by the note-taking application 102 is pasted onto a notebook page. The maximally relative path can also include the target page name if the link is to a page or page object (e.g. “ . . . \ . . . \Specs.one#Templates”). The “#” identifies a page.

Take for example the relative link path:

“onenote: . . . \Misc%20WorkMeetings.one#Content%20Council.”

The above path is deciphered to mean go up from the current folder (“ . . . ”), then go to folder “Misc Work”, then to section “Meetings”, then to page “Content Council”. The total path to the folder “Misc Work” is not required.

As part of the link pasting or positioning operation, in one embodiment, the note-taking application 102 is configured to include a base path as part of the link. The base path is included as part of the relative path and defines an absolute path to the location (e.g. section, page, etc.) where the link is pasted or positioned. That is, the note-taking application 102 can use the base path to determine where the link is located.

For example, the following link includes a base path:

“onenote: . . . \Misc %20Work\Meetings.one#Content %20Council&base-path=tkzaw-pro-16\Mydocs4\username\My %20Documents\OneNote %20Notebooks.”

As described above, if a target is on a different share, it may not be relativized.

For example:

“onenote:///\\server06\Shared\Shared %20Notebooks\OneNote %20Best %20Practi ces\More %20Cool%20Features.one#Tables.”

This absolute path will not be relativized since the link is associated with a shared notebook.

For example, an absolute path may include:

“onenote:///\\server06\Shared\Shared %20Notebooks\OneNote %20Best %20Practi ces\More %20Cool %20Features.one#Tables”.

“OneNote %20Best %20Practices” refers to a particular notebook. “More %20Cool %20Features.one” refers to the particular section and “Tables” is the page associated with the section. However, the user may only see a friendly name for the link, such as “Tables” for example. The path can be inspected if the user hovers over the link. The user can also right click on the link and view its properties. As described above, if the link is created by the note-taking application 102, the link is configured to include information that can be used to locate the link and/or link target if an associated parameter has changed.

A link created by the note-taking application 102 may include additional information that can be used when locating a link target. In one embodiment, a link includes one or more target identifiers, such as Globally Unique Identifiers (GUIDs) for example. The one or more GUIDs can be included as part of a link and used to locate a target. For example, a link may include:

“onenote:http://onetest/PM %20Team %20Notebook/Home.one#OneNote %20Example %20Customers&section-id={2C741A71-2F80-4A1A-85B2-5CE98A397837}&page-id={6D4390E2-8DDC-4D88-B90D-F0DADECDABCC}&end.”

The section-id and page-id refer to GUIDs that the note-taking application 102 can use to locate a particular target with additional granularity. The section-id GUID is associated with a particular section. Likewise, the page-id GUID is associated with a particular page. The section GUID is “2C741A71-2F80-4A1A-85B2-5CE98A397837” and the page GUID is “6D4390E2-8DDC-4D88-B90D-F0DADECDABCC”. The note-taking application 102 can use one or more GUIDs to locate a target when the name of a page is changed for example. In such a circumstance, the note-taking application 102 may not be able to locate the target based on the relative path and page title, so it can use the one or more GUIDs to locate the target. A link may include one or both of the GUIDs. A link may also include a page object identifier (e.g. GUID).

Before continuing with a description of following a link, a number of scenarios illustrate the resiliency of a link and the ability of the note-taking application 102 to locate a link target under different circumstances.

Scenario 1—the note-taking application 102 is configured to find a link target if a user has moved around or renamed the origin or target within a set of open notebooks. For example, the note-taking application 102 is configured to find the link target if a user has: renamed a target section and/or page; renamed a section group and/or section on a path to a particular target; moved a target section and/or page (e.g. drag and drop); moved a section group and/or section containing a link target in the subtree; and, moved an origin page or something containing the origin page.

Scenario 2—the note-taking application 102 is configured to find the link target if a user has moved, copied, and/or sent a notebook substructure that includes one or more internal links (e.g. links that are located in one part of the moved substructure and point to targets that are in other parts of the same substructure). For example, the note-taking application 102 is configured to find the link target if a user has: moved a section group, section, and/or page containing internal links; copied a section group, section, and/or page containing internal links; sent a section group, section, and/or page containing internal links to another user or users; and, published a notebook substructure as a portable document format (pdf).

Scenario 3—the note-taking application 102 is configured to find the link target if a user sent, moved, and/or copied (including to another notebook) the link origin but not the link target. The link is configured to navigate to the target even if the user of the link has not gone to the notebook containing the target beforehand. For example, the note-taking application 102 is configured to find a link target if a user has: moved and/or copied an origin page within the same notebook; moved and/or copied an origin page to another notebook; sent an origin page; moved and/or copied a section group and/or section containing an origin page within the same notebook; moved and/or copied a section group and/or section containing an origin page to another notebook; copied text containing a link and pasted it onto a page within the same notebook; and, copied text containing a link and pasted it onto a page in another notebook.

FIG. 5 is a flow diagram illustrating the locating of a link target, under an embodiment. At 500, the note-taking application 102 examines a number of parameters associated with a link. In one embodiment, the note-taking application 102 examines an absolute, a relative, and/or a maximally relative path to target. The absolute path, relative path, and/or maximally relative path can include a target page name if the link points to a page or page object (e.g. “ . . . \ . . . \Specs.one#Templates”). The note-taking application 102 also can examine the GUID of the target if the target is associated with a notebook section or page. In an alternative embodiment, the note-taking application 102 examines a base-path to the target (e.g. the absolute path to a section where the link is inserted). In another alternative embodiment, the note-taking application 102 can also examine the page object identifier if the target is a page object.

For example, a link and associated path may include parameters, such as:

“onenote:<maximally relative file path><#page title>&<Original section and page GUIDs>&base-bath=<path to original section where this link was pasted>”.

At 502, after a user clicks a link in the note-taking application 102 or from some other location, the note-taking application 102 is configured to locate and/or navigate to the target (by path and page name for example). In one embodiment, the note-taking application 102 is configured to use an absolute path, a relative path, and/or a page title to locate the target. The note-taking application 102 can also use one or more target identifiers (e.g. GUIDs) when locating a target. As described above with regards to Scenario 1, the note-taking application 102 can use the path first (before trying the GUIDs). For example, if a substructure of a notebooks is copied, internal relative links within each copy will continue to navigate to the correct targets, because the note-taking application 102 is configured to first try the relative path when locating the target. However, if the GUIDs were used first, it could be faced with two identical GUID's from each copy and may not navigate to the proper target. In one embodiment, the note-taking application 102 is configured to select the page with a matching GUID if there are several pages having matching names in a target section. If the target GUID does not match, the note-taking application 102 is configured to select the first page that is encountered.

If the target is not found at 504, the flow proceeds to 506, and the note-taking application is configured to locate the target using a target GUID. The note-taking application 102 can use one or more GUIDs to locate a target even if the path has changed due to renaming or moving the target or moving the origin (see Scenarios 2 and 3 above for example). If the target is a page, the note-taking application 102 uses the page ID to locate the target. If the target is a section, the note-taking application uses the section ID to locate the target. If several targets with the same GUID are found, in one embodiment, the note-taking application 102 is configured to go to the first located target. If the target is found at 504, the note-taking application 102 navigates to the target at 508.

If the target is not found at 510 or if GUID information is not available, the flow proceeds to 512, and the note-taking application 102 is configured to find the target by using the base path, when the base path is available (e.g. when the link is pasted in the note-taking application 102). For example, the note-taking application can navigate using the relative path from a point indicated by the base path. If the origin page has been moved, the note-taking application 102 may not be able to locate the target using the relative path. If the origin page has been moved, the note-taking application 102 is configured to use one or more GUIDs to located the target. In one embodiment, the note-taking application 102 is configured to know of and use the GUIDs in currently opened notebooks. If the target has not moved, the note-taking application 102 can use the base path to determine the original origin page, and calculate the path therefrom.

If the target is found at 510, the note-taking application 102 navigates to the target at 508. If the target is not found at 514, the flow proceeds to 516 and the note-taking application 102 informs the user that the link is broken (e.g. displays an error message).

If the target is found at 514, the note-taking application 102 navigates to the target at 508. If the target is a page object and the note-taking application 102 is able to locate the page it will attempt to locate the object ID for the page object, if available. For example, the note-taking application 102 can scroll the page to the page object after locating the page object. If the page object is not found, the note-taking application 102 can be configured to return the cursor to the top of the page. The embodiments and examples described herein are not intended to limit. For example, the note-taking application 102 can perform the above-described steps in order, with greater or fewer steps, or in some other manner.

Some other features of the note-taking application 102 follow:

If a user copies to the clipboard from menu “Copy Link to this <X>”: the note-taking application 102 will use the following:

For HTML: “<a href=”the onenote: link address>”>Friendly name of the link</a>”.

The address can include: the absolute path to the target, target GUID, and the friendly name.

For example:

“onenote://\\tkzaw-pro-16\MyDocs4\olyav\My %20Documents\OneNote %20Notebooks\Misc %20Work\Meetings.one#section-id={1021B20A-242A-46F1-A3FE-5D41DEF78070}&end”.

For plain text the link address includes the same information as above.

If a user copies a link to clipboard from a link on a page, the note-taking application 102 will use the following:

For HTML: “<a href=”onenote: link address as is”>Text of the link (friendly name)</a>”.

For plain text, the text of the link is used.

If a user right-clicks a link and selects “Copy Link”, the note-taking application 102 will use the following:

For HTML: “<a href=”onenote: link address as is”>Text of the link (friendly name)</a>”

For plain text, the address of the link is used.

If the user selects only part of any link, the full address is still placed on the clipboard, but only the copied part is used for the friendly name.

If a user pastes a link onto a page, the note-taking application 102 is configured to perform the following:

1) If the link is relative and specifies no base path, it is pasted as is.

2) If the link is relative and a base path is given, the note-taking application 102 constructs the absolute path to the target.

3) If the link is absolute, the note-taking application 102 attempts to maximally relativize the link and store the relative path. If the note-taking application 102 was able to relativize the link, it is configured to add a base path as part of the link address (e.g. the path to the current section/page where the link is being pasted).

The table below includes a number of link examples and the associated procedures used by the note-taking application.

TABLE
onenote:///C:\My Notebook\Meetings.one#Status Go to page “Status Meeting” in
Meeting&page-id={2179C5D3-EBFF-11CF- Meetings.one, and to the page object with
B6FD-00AA00B4E220}&object-id={71902B16- the specified id. If the path is broken, find
A458-0DCF-078C-D560D9993E3A} the page with the specified page-id in all
open notes, and then go to the page object
on that page
onenote:///\\machineA\shareB\My Notebook\Work Go to folder “Work”
onenote:http://office/personal/username/Shared Go to section “Test” on the specified path.
Documents/Test.one&section-id={2179C5D3- If the path is broken, look for the section-id
EBFF-11CF-B6FD-00AA00B4E220} in all open notes.
onenote:..\Spec.one&section-id={2179C5D3- Go to the parent folder and look for section
EBFF-11CF-B6FD-00AA00B4E220}&base- “Spec”. If it is not found, look for the
path=onenote\PMNotebook\Work\Ideas.one section id in all open notes. If that is not
found, follow the base path, and from there
follow the relative path - which means go
to path: \\onenote\PMNotebook\Spec.one
onenote:object-id={71902B16-A458-0DCF-078C- Go to object on the current page
D560D9993E3A} (bug: this appears not to work in product)
onenote:#User Requests&object-id={71902B16- Go to page “User Requests” in the current
A458-0DCF-078C-D560D9993E3A} section and then to the object
onenote:#User Requests Go to page “User Requests” in the current
section
onenote:Templates.one#User Requests&object- Go to section “Templates” in the current
id={71902B16-A458-0DCF-078C- folder, then to page “User Requests”, then
D560D9993E3A} to object
onenote:Specs v2/Templates.one#User Requests Go to subfolder “Specs v2” in the current
folder, then to section “Templates”, then to
page “User Requests”
onenote:../Specs/Templates.one#User Requests Go up from the current folder, then go to
folder “Specs”, then to section
“Templates”, then to page “User Requests”
onenote:Specs Go to subfolder Specs in the current folder
onenote:../../Templates.one Go two folders up from the current folder,
then to section “Templates”

If the link is to another object on the same page, the note-taking application 102 maintains the page info if the link is maximally relativized, since the base path may not contain the page info.

For example:

“onenote:#Page&page-id={<GUID>}&object-id={<GUID>}&base-path=C:\My Documents\My Notebook\Templates.one”.

In an embodiment, when the user does a drag-and-drop or cut and initial paste of page objects, pages, sections, or folders, the note-taking application 102 is configured to preserve the GUID of the item rather than creating a new GUID for the pasted item. Correspondingly, a link to the item remains resilient or persists even if the item was moved by cutting and pasting it (rather than by drag and drop). Moving the item can affect the path, so the path information in the link may no longer be helpful. The item can be then found by GUID for example. In another embodiment, the note-taking application 102 is configured to repair any internal links inside a section or even a whole section group, if a GUID contained therein has changed. For example when a user saves a copy of a section or section group, the note-taking application 102 is configured to assign new GUIDs to all the pages and sections in the new copy. In addition, note-taking application 102 is configured to scan the copied structure for any links that point to other parts within the same structure. The note-taking application 102 can update the GUID information stored inside the links, since the GUIDs have just been changed. This ensures that the GUID information in the links remains correct and can be used in the future to locate the link targets correctly if the substructure is further reorganized. (detecting duplicate GUIDs or on Save As of a section for example).

As described herein, a user can create and use one or more links to different items associated with a note-taking application. The created links can also be used in conjunction with other applications, such as word processing, e-mail, and other applications that link to items of the note taking application. The embodiments described herein can be used with a number of applications that use links to point and navigate to structured and other information.

Exemplary Operating Environment

Referring now to FIG. 6, the following discussion is intended to provide a brief, general description of a suitable computing environment in which embodiments of the invention may be implemented. While the invention will be described in the general context of program modules that execute in conjunction with program modules that run on an operating system on a personal computer, those skilled in the art will recognize that the invention may also be implemented in combination with other types of computer systems and program modules.

Generally, program modules include routines, programs, components, data structures, and other types of structures that perform particular tasks or implement particular abstract data types. Moreover, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the invention may be practiced with other computer system configurations, including hand-held devices, multiprocessor systems, microprocessor-based or programmable consumer electronics, minicomputers, mainframe computers, and the like. The invention may also be practiced in distributed computing environments where tasks are performed by remote processing devices that are linked through a communications network. In a distributed computing environment, program modules may be located in both local and remote memory storage devices.

Referring now to FIG. 6, an illustrative operating environment for embodiments of the invention will be described. As shown in FIG. 6, computer 2 comprises a general purpose desktop, laptop, handheld, tablet, or other type of computer capable of executing one or more application programs. The computer 2 includes at least one central processing unit 8 (“CPU”), a system memory 12, including a random access memory 18 (“RAM”) and a read-only memory (“ROM”) 20, and a system bus 10 that couples the memory to the CPU 8. A basic input/output system containing the basic routines that help to transfer information between elements within the computer, such as during startup, is stored in the ROM 20.

The computer 2 further includes a mass storage device 14 for storing an operating system 32, application programs, such as a note-taking application 24, and other program modules. In one embodiment, the note-taking application 24 comprises the OneNote® note-taking application program from MICROSOFT CORPORATION of Redmond, Wash. However, the embodiments described herein may be utilized with other system, applications, modules, etc to provide resilient links to structured and/or hierarchal information. The mass storage device 14 is connected to the CPU 8 through a mass storage controller (not shown) connected to the bus 10. The mass storage device 14 and its associated computer-readable media provide non-volatile storage for the computer 2. Although the description of computer-readable media contained herein refers to a mass storage device, such as a hard disk or CD-ROM drive, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that computer-readable media can be any available media that can be accessed or utilized by the computer 2.

By way of example, and not limitation, computer-readable media may comprise computer storage media and communication media. Computer storage media includes volatile and non-volatile, removable and non-removable media implemented in any method or technology for storage of information such as computer-readable instructions, data structures, program modules or other data. Computer storage media includes, but is not limited to, RAM, ROM, EPROM, EEPROM, flash memory or other solid state memory technology, CD-ROM, digital versatile disks (“DVD”), or other optical storage, magnetic cassettes, magnetic tape, magnetic disk storage or other magnetic storage devices, or any other medium which can be used to store the desired information and which can be accessed by the computer 2.

According to various embodiments of the invention, the computer 2 may operate in a networked environment using logical connections to remote computers through a network 4, such as a local network, the Internet, etc. for example. The computer 2 may connect to the network 4 through a network interface unit 16 connected to the bus 10. It should be appreciated that the network interface unit 16 may also be utilized to connect to other types of networks and remote computing systems. The computer 2 may also include an input/output controller 22 for receiving and processing input from a number of input types, including a keyboard, mouse, pen, stylus, finger, and/or other means. Similarly, an input/output controller 22 may provide output to a display, a printer, or other type of output device. Additionally, a touch screen can serve as an input and an output mechanism.

As mentioned briefly above, a number of program modules and data files may be stored in the mass storage device 14 and RAM 18 of the computer 2, including an operating system 32 suitable for controlling the operation of a networked personal computer, such as the WINDOWS XP operating system from MICROSOFT CORPORATION of Redmond, Wash. The mass storage device 14 and RAM 18 may also store one or more program modules. In particular, the mass storage device 14 and the RAM 18 may store application programs, such as a word processing application 28, an imaging application 30, e-mail application 34, drawing application, etc.

It should be appreciated that various embodiments of the present invention can be implemented (1) as a sequence of computer implemented acts or program modules running on a computing system and/or (2) as interconnected machine logic circuits or circuit modules within the computing system. The implementation is a matter of choice dependent on the performance requirements of the computing system implementing the invention. Accordingly, logical operations including related algorithms can be referred to variously as operations, structural devices, acts or modules. It will be recognized by one skilled in the art that these operations, structural devices, acts and modules may be implemented in software, firmware, special purpose digital logic, and any combination thereof without deviating from the spirit and scope of the present invention as recited within the claims set forth herein.

Although the invention has been described in connection with various exemplary embodiments, those of ordinary skill in the art will understand that many modifications can be made thereto within the scope of the claims that follow. Accordingly, it is not intended that the scope of the invention in any way be limited by the above description, but instead be determined entirely by reference to the claims that follow.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US20090049374 *Aug 6, 2008Feb 19, 2009Andrew EchenbergOnline magazine
US20120084644 *Sep 30, 2010Apr 5, 2012Julien RobertContent preview
US20130061120 *Sep 6, 2011Mar 7, 2013Microsoft CorporationHyperlink Destination Visibility
Classifications
U.S. Classification715/205, 715/853
International ClassificationG06F17/00, G06F3/048
Cooperative ClassificationG06F3/0483, G06Q10/10
European ClassificationG06Q10/10, G06F3/0483
Legal Events
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Year of fee payment: 4
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Owner name: MICROSOFT CORPORATION, WASHINGTON
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Owner name: MICROSOFT CORPORATION,WASHINGTON
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:VESELOVA, OLGA;KIM, MYUNGSUB;SIGNED BETWEEN 20061218 AND20070518;REEL/FRAME:19349/691
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:VESELOVA, OLGA;KIM, MYUNGSUB;SIGNING DATES FROM 20061218TO 20070518;REEL/FRAME:019349/0691