Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20080130637 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/570,323
PCT numberPCT/US2005/042239
Publication dateJun 5, 2008
Filing dateNov 18, 2005
Priority dateNov 18, 2004
Also published asCA2588974A1, EP1834446A2, EP1834446A4, US8238326, US20060104262, US20060153124, WO2006055933A2, WO2006055933A3, WO2006055939A2, WO2006055939A3
Publication number11570323, 570323, PCT/2005/42239, PCT/US/2005/042239, PCT/US/2005/42239, PCT/US/5/042239, PCT/US/5/42239, PCT/US2005/042239, PCT/US2005/42239, PCT/US2005042239, PCT/US200542239, PCT/US5/042239, PCT/US5/42239, PCT/US5042239, PCT/US542239, US 2008/0130637 A1, US 2008/130637 A1, US 20080130637 A1, US 20080130637A1, US 2008130637 A1, US 2008130637A1, US-A1-20080130637, US-A1-2008130637, US2008/0130637A1, US2008/130637A1, US20080130637 A1, US20080130637A1, US2008130637 A1, US2008130637A1
InventorsNishi Kant, Atchuta Rallapalli
Original AssigneeNishi Kant, Atchuta Rallapalli
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Maintaining Consistent Network Connections While Moving Through Wireless Networks
US 20080130637 A1
Abstract
A proxy server (208) provides an anchor point for access network changes in a wireless environment. One example embodiment uses the concept of proxy server in order to preserve a uniform connectivity to a gateway service node while roaming across different networks through a handover mechanism. In one embodiment, the client connects to a proxy server through one access network (204), and the proxy server manages and keeps track of the user session toward the gateway service node. The client then connects to any packet service network, including Internet, through the proxy. When the client moves from one network to another, it indicates the change to the proxy and proxy, using a handover mechanism, switches the access network while maintaining the user session toward the gateway service node. The handover mechanism involved is efficient, with minimal messaging overhead, and preserves the application layer IP address of the client. Therefore, the data connections do not suffer from interruptions due to roaming through different networks and the service is seamlessly continued.
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(28)
1. A method of wireless communication, comprising the steps of:
when a multifunction mobile client is in a GPRS session, routing GPRS control and user traffic to an SGSN;
routing at least the GRPS control traffic to a GGSN through a proxy server transparently to the client; and
routing the GPRS user traffic to a GGSN, either directly from the SGSN or through the proxy server.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the route of the user traffic is determined at the proxy server and this information becomes available to the SGSN and the GGSN by the proxy server.
3. The method of claim 2, wherein the route of the user traffic is specified by the tunnel end point provided by the proxy server, where if the SGSN is specified as the tunnel end point for user traffic, then the user traffic is routed from the SGSN directly to GGSN bypassing the proxy server, and where if the proxy server is specified as the tunnel end point for user traffic, then the user traffic is routed from the SGSN to the GGSN through the proxy server.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein the routing of either GPRS control traffic or GPRS control and user traffic from the SGSN to the proxy server happens through an address resolution mechanism internal to an address resolution node, accessed by SGSN.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein the routing of either GPRS control traffic or GPRS control and user traffic from the proxy to the GGSN happens through an address mapping mechanism and an address resolution mechanism internal to the proxy and an address resolution node, accessible by a proxy.
6. The method of claim 1, wherein the GPRS user traffic route can be changed any time by updating the user traffic tunnel end point to be either the proxy server or the SGSN.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein when the mobile client switches to a non-GPRS, IP-based access technology during a GPRS session, using the proxy server as a wireless gateway for the client while continuing to communicate at least some GPRS control and user traffic through the proxy server.
8. The method of claim 7, wherein the IP-based access technology is a wireless local area network.
9. The method of claim 7, wherein the client's application layer IP address does not change when access networks are changed, wherein the proxy server maintains the control of the user session and keeps the IP address the same.
10. The method of claim 7, wherein access networks can be changed while maintaining service continuity, by the proxy server maintaining the control of the user session toward the GGSN while switching the access networks.
11. A method of wireless communication, comprising the steps of:
when a multifunction mobile client accesses a GPRS network using an IP-based access technology:
routing control traffic and user traffic to a proxy server; and
transparently to the mobile client, routing the control traffic and user traffic from the proxy server to a GGSN.
12. The method of claim 11, further comprising the steps of, when the mobile client switches to a GPRS access technology, routing control and user traffic from the mobile client to an SGSN; and
transparently to the mobile client, routing at least GPRS control traffic from the SGSN to the proxy server; and routing the GPRS user traffic to the GGSN, either directly from the SGSN or through the proxy server
13. The method of claim 12, wherein the route of the user traffic is determined at the proxy server and this information becomes available to the SGSN and the GGSN by the proxy server.
14. The method of claim 12, wherein the GPRS user traffic route can be changed any time by updating the user traffic tunnel end point to be either the proxy server or the SGSN.
15. The method of claim 12, wherein the route of the user traffic is specified by the tunnel end point provided by the proxy server, where if the SGSN is specified as the tunnel end point for user traffic, then the user traffic is routed from the SGSN directly to the GGSN bypassing the proxy server, and where if the proxy server is specified as the tunnel end point for user traffic, then the user traffic is routed from the SGSN to the GGSN through the proxy server, thereby separating the control and user traffic.
16. The method of claim 2, wherein the routing of traffic from the proxy to the GGSN happens using an address mapping mechanism and an address resolution mechanism internal to the proxy server and an address resolution node, transparently to the mobile client.
17. The method of claim 12, wherein the client's application layer IP address does not change when access networks are changed by the proxy server maintaining the control of a user session upon handover and keeping the IP address the same.
18. The method of claim 12, wherein access networks can be changed while maintaining service continuity by the proxy server maintaining control of a user session toward the GGSN and switching access networks upon handover.
19. A wireless network system, comprising:
a proxy server adapted to support both GPRS traffic and a non-GPRS and IP-based traffic from a mobile client and to communicate with a GGSN through GPRS protocol;
wherein when the mobile client uses a GPRS access network:
GPRS control traffic is sent to the GGSN through a proxy server, transparently to the mobile client; and
GPRS user traffic is sent to the GGSN either through the proxy server or directly from an SGSN; and
wherein when the mobile client uses a non-GPRS, IP-based access network:
both control traffic and user traffic are sent to the proxy server; and
transparently to the mobile client, both control traffic and user traffic are routed to the GGSN.
20. The system of claim 19, wherein the routing to the proxy server is by use of an address resolution mechanism internal to an address resolution node and the routing from the proxy server to the GGSN is by use of an address mapping mechanism and an address resolution mechanism internal to the proxy and the address resolution node.
21 The system of claim 19, wherein when the mobile client uses a GPRS access network, the routing of the user traffic is decided by proxy by use of specifying the tunnel end point of the user traffic.
22. The system of claim 19, wherein when the mobile client uses a GPRS access network, the user traffic is routed to the GGSN through the proxy server if the proxy server is specified as a tunnel end point of the user traffic; and the user traffic is routed directly to the GGSN if the SGSN is specified as the tunnel end point of the user traffic.
23. The system of claim 19, wherein when the mobile client uses a GPRS access network, the user traffic route can be changed any time by updating the tunnel end point of the user traffic; where the tunnel end point of the user traffic can be either proxy or SGSN.
24. The system of claim 19, wherein when the mobile client changes from a first access network of a first type to a second access network of a second type, the proxy server acts as an anchor point for at least the control traffic and maintains the route toward the GGSN and switches the control path between two access networks.
25. The system of claim 19, wherein when the mobile client changes from a first access network of a first type to a second access network of a second type, the user traffic is routed according to the type of the access network.
26. The system of claim 20, wherein the first access network type is a GPRS access network, and wherein the second access network type is a WLAN access network.
27. The system of claim 19, wherein the client's IP address does not change when access networks are changed by the proxy server acting as the anchor point and maintaining control of the user session and keeping the IP address the same upon access network change.
28. The system of claim 19, wherein access networks can be changed while maintaining service continuity by the proxy server acting as the anchor point and maintaining the control of the user session toward the GGSN and switching between the access networks.
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application claims priority from provisional patent application 60/629,855 filed on Nov. 18, 2004, which is hereby incorporated by reference.
  • [0002]
    This application also claims priority from provisional patent application 60/705,224, filed on Aug. 3, 2005, which is hereby incorporated by reference.
  • BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0004]
    The present inventions relate generally to wireless data movement and, more particularly, to how wireless devices maintain consistent network connections when more than one network is present.
  • [0005]
    2. Background
  • [0006]
    Wireless networks have evolved from a simple point-to-point link to encompassing different coverage areas at varying data transfer rates. For example, a short ranged network (made up of connectivity devices such as Bluetooth capable devices) provides data rates in excess of 3 Mb/s covering a small room; a medium range network (such as Wi-Fi or 802.11) that provides data rates of 25 Mbps covering a several rooms; a large range network (such as The Global System for Mobile TeleCommunications (GSM)) with cells that provide several hundred kbits/s data rate covering a city; and the largest connectivity devices, satellite networks, provide data coverage for several countries. The multi-mode mobile terminal has capabilities to connect to different networks based on the policies of the user and the network, such as the particular sources that have been purchased or provided. Due to the overlapping of these networks a user can roam through multiple networks during a single session. In all roaming scenarios, the handover mechanism between these hybrid networks is a vital topic.
  • [0007]
    General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) is a data communication technology that is capable of transferring packet data and signaling in a cost-efficient manner over GSM radio networks while optimizing the use of radio and network resources. The voice traffic and the data packet share the same physical channel, but new logical GPRS radio channels are defined. Data transfer rates up to 171.2 Kbps are possible over GPRS thus enabling mobile data services, like Internet applications, over mobile devices. The data traffic is segregated and sent to a Serving GPRS Support Node (SGSN) node from the BSC. The SGSN node connects to a Gateway GPRS Support Node (GGSN) for communication with external packet data networks. The next generation of this technology is UMTS that provides higher data transfer rates. Typically GPRS and UMTS networks operate over licensed frequencies and are owned by mobile operators. Several entities have created a partnership project called 3GPP that is responsible for defining services, architecture and protocols. These specifications cover wireless access network, core network nodes and interconnection protocols etc.
  • [0008]
    The Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) is a wireless extension to Ethernet LAN technologies. The IEEE 802.11 committee has defined several of these standards and named them 802.11b, 802.11g and 802.11a. In WLAN, each service access point (AP) covers a cell. In IEEE 802.11, each single cell is defined as a basic service set (BSS). Several BSSs can form an extended service set (ESS). IEEE 802.11 only defines the communication between the client (referred to also as the mobile terminal (MT) or mobile node (MN)) and access point (AP) (the physicals layer and data link layer). The client connects to the AP that has higher signal quality and communicates wirelessly to the AP. The data communication is similar to the wired Ethernet communication except for the physical layer and medium access.
  • [0009]
    802.11x WLAN technologies, popularly known as the Wi-Fi, have become predominant in the limited mobility wireless data networks due to reasonably higher data transfer rates and affordability of the technology. In fact, 3GPP has come up with a specification (TS 23.234) on how to interwork WLAN with GPRS/UMTS networks. Both these wireless technologies are complimentary in several aspects. Therefore, many operators provide both services, with GPRS for global roaming and Wi-Fi for limited mobility areas popularly known as hotspots. There are several devices that support these dual technologies paving way for pervasive computing. The hotspots are WLAN islands scattered at key geographic locations. The mobile user would be roaming between GPRS coverage area and Wi-Fi coverage area very frequently thus requiring a fast and efficient handover procedure.
  • [0010]
    To achieve seamless mobility, the client should do fast handover from GPRS network to WLAN or vice versa without interruption. Several methodologies have been proposed for this roaming scenario. Two different methodologies that address this problem are described below.
  • [0011]
    Background: Mobile IP
  • [0012]
    Mobile IP (MIP) provides mobility at the network layer thus enabling roaming between different networks. The MIP is specified in Request for Comments (RFC) 3344 (for IPv4) and 3775 (for IPv6) by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) community. MIP defines two nodes, Home Agent (HA) and Foreign Agent (FA). The HA is the coordinating node on the home network of a user. The mobile node communicates to HA node directly, using normal IP routing, when connected to the home network. A Foreign Agent is a node in a MIP network that enables roamed IP users to register on the foreign network. The FA will communicate with the HA (Home Agent) to enable IP data to be transferred between the home IP network and the roamed IP user on the foreign network. Whenever the node is connected on a foreign network, it acquires a care-of-address (COA) and registers with the HA providing the COA. The data packets sent by a correspondent node (CN) destined to the mobile node are captured by HA in the home network and are tunneled to the COA. The packets are decapsulated either at FA or client. When the client roams to another network, it acquires new COA and registers with HA about its new location. Now all the data packets destined to this mobile node are tunneled to the new COA.
  • [0013]
    One common solution for GPRS and WLAN mobility using MIP is to provide home agent (HA) functionality at the Gateway GPRS Support Node (GGSN). The FA functionality can be at Serving GPRS Support Node (SGSN) for the GPRS network and at the Wireless Gateway (WG) for the Wide Area Local Network (WLAN). Otherwise a co-located Care of Address (COA) can be used if the client supports MIP.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 1 illustrates this type of communication network. A GGSN 102 is connected to both a SGSN 104 and a WLAN Gateway 106. There is generally a constant connection between the GGSN, SGSN, and WLAN Gateway. A HA 112 is located north of GGSN, which, in this embodiment, means that the HA is connected directly to the GGSN which is connected to the client networks 104 and 106. Clients 108, 110 may connect to the GGSN through either the SGSN or through the WLAN Gateway. The GGSN provides connectivity to an IP network such as the Internet. When the client is connected through GPRS network, it acquires the remote IP address from the GGSN. This GGSN-assigned IP address works as the COA and the client registers this COA to the HA. When the client moves into WLAN area and connected to the WLAN, it acquires the IP address from either NAS or WLAN gateway. This IP address is different from the GGSN-assigned IP address and it serves as a new COA. The client registers this IP address to the HA. Since the client's home address remains the same and only the COA is changed, the mobility can be supported with the service continuity.
  • [0015]
    Though MIP provides mobility between these two networks the handover is not seamless because of the time delay from the point the client moves to a different network and the registration with the HA is completed. During this phase, HA sends all packets for client towards the old COA and these packets could be lost. This is a problem when roaming from WLAN to GPRS network since the WLAN connection is gone and any packets sent over this network will not reach the client. The other drawback of this solution is the triangle routing of the data packets (the packets from client to the correspondent node (CN) are directly routed while the packets from CN are sent to HA first and then tunneled to client) that is inherent in the MIP. Route optimization methods have been proposed to overcome this issue. Finally, there are 3GPP services that are valuable to operators and useful to end-users. Such services are accessible at the GGSN and Mobile IP layer makes this work complicated. In other words, since the anchor point is HA and all the packets should be decapsulated at HA, the service differentiation using APN (Access point name) at GGSN is not simple. GGSN also can perform some services, e.g. content-based billing, and this gets more complicated because of MIP tunneling. The MIP packet overhead in all the packets (both GPRS and WLAN) and message overhead for registration is one drawback, too.
  • [0016]
    Background: Inter-SGSN Like Handover Approach
  • [0017]
    The WLAN coverage cell is small compared to the cell of the GSM area. One method of integrating these two networks is by treating the WLAN as a smaller network within the GSM network. Several Access Points (AP) connecting to a WG represent a small coverage area. In “Method and System for Transparently and Securely Interconnecting a WLAN Radio Access Network into a GPRS/GSM Core Network.” it has been demonstrated how the WG could function in a manner similar to the SGSN and thereby providing an interconnection into GPRS core network. The roaming scenario is just like an Inter-SGSN Routing Update process described in the GPRS specification. When the client roams in to WLAN area, the client sends the Routing Area Update request to the WG. To retrieve all the MM and PDP contexts for the client, WG requests these contexts from previous serving SGSN. After the contexts are transferred to WG, SGSN starts forwarding all the packets to WG, if it receives any packets from GGSN. The WG now, based on the information of the existing GPRS PDP context, sends an Update PDP Context to the GGSN that will transfer the existing GPRS session to this network.
  • [0018]
    The GGSN sends a packet data protocol/mobility management context standby command to the old SGSN. The message is to ask the SGSN to hold the PDP/MM context till the client comes back to the UMTS or detaches. The packets are sent over the WLAN through WG to the GGSN and the IP address of the session still remains the same. When the client roams back to the GPRS network, a Routing Area (RA) update procedure is triggered that activates the old GPRS session. The handover delay in this process is lower than that of the Mobile IP method described earlier. Due to the tight integrated nature of this solution, the LAN based architecture on the WLAN needs several changes to accommodate this solution. Especially WG should support most of standard GPRS SGSN functionalities. Also, the client should be intelligent enough to obtain the GPRS session parameters and sends it to the WG. Since it is not an open architecture solution, this method is not preferred.
  • [0019]
    Maintaining Consistent Network Connections While Moving Through Wireless Networks
  • [0020]
    Handover between different wireless access networks (e.g., a GPRS access network and a WLAN access network) is facilitated by a proxy server (also referred to herein as a proxy server or proxy, which can optionally be combined with a global wireless gateway node) preferably adapted to communicate with other nodes of a network, such as nodes of a GPRS network and/or a WLAN. (Note that hereinafter, the term SGSN may be referred to a server GSN, and a GGSN can be referred to as a gateway GSN.)
  • [0021]
    In one example class of embodiments, when a multifunction (e.g., dual mode) client is operating as a GPRS client (i.e., it is using a GPRS access network), the DNS server is configured to resolve the selected APN to the proxy server's high-level address, so that all control traffic is sent to the proxy server, preferably prior to being sent to another node, such as a GGSN.
  • [0022]
    In embodiments wherein the user equipment or mobile node accesses the network via a GPRS access network, the user traffic may flow from an SGSN through the proxy server to a GGSN, or the user traffic can flow directly to the GGSN, without first passing through the proxy server, therefore reducing the number of hops for user data. When a handover to another type of access network occurs (e.g., to a WLAN access network) preferred embodiments implement one of at least two options: if only control traffic was anchored at the proxy server, then the proxy server can update the GGSN to switch the user traffic from SGSN to the proxy server. GGSN would typically reflect this in its accounting. Alternatively, if both control and user traffic were anchored at the proxy server, the proxy server can do a simple update to the GGSN for accounting purposes, since data and control flow are already established with the GGSN through proxy server.
  • [0023]
    In either case, on handover (e.g., from a GPRS to a WLAN access network) the client preferably establishes a tunnel to the proxy server as its wireless gateway. When the handover happens, the proxy server already has all the control information of the GPRS session, because the control traffic passes through the proxy server, preferably no matter what access network is used.
  • [0024]
    In embodiments wherein the user equipment uses a WLAN access network, it is preferred that both control and user traffic are routed through the proxy server, and the proxy server acts as a wireless gateway server.
  • [0025]
    Traffic on the “access side” of the proxy server can thus take different paths, depending on the access network used by the user equipment. Traffic on the other side of the proxy server (e.g., toward a GGSN or other node) is preferably unchanged when the user equipment changes access networks. This efficient means of handover between access networks is facilitated by preferred embodiments' use of the proxy server to receive control traffic for the session.
  • [0026]
    In preferred embodiments, the present innovations are implemented using an address mapping mechanism that is internal to the proxy server and another node, such as a DNS server (as part of a GPRS network). The DNS server, which normally points traffic to a GGSN, instead points to the proxy server. The proxy server includes an address mapping mechanism that points in turn to the GGSN. As stated above, either control traffic or both control and user traffic are proxied in this way, depending on the specific implementation.
  • [0027]
    Thus the present innovations provide, in preferred embodiments, efficient handover between two types of access networks, retaining at least part of the connection to a target or destination network.
  • [0028]
    The proxy server thus allows the change in route to be invisible to the GGSN. Consistent connections may therefore be maintained with the same application-layer address and optimized even when data is routed through varying networks.
  • [0029]
    The disclosed inventions, in various embodiments, provide at least the following advantages:
      • Each application's data connections are not perturbed by movement, since changes in the client's local IP address can be concealed from at least some processes and the same application layer IP address can be used across different access networks.
      • Complexities due to access changes are HIDDEN from applications.
      • The GGSN can still operate normally, and does not have to know what the proxy server is doing, therefore supporting the handover with no or minimum changes to the existing GGSN node itself
      • The client can still operate normally, and does not have to know about the proxy server, therefore supporting the handover with no or minimum changes to the existing client itself.
      • If the DNS server for a selected APN does not point to the proxy server, then conventional operation will occur, and the rest of the network is not impacted.
      • The handover mechanisms enabled by the proxy server and found in some embodiments of the inventions preserve the address of the client with minimal messaging overhead.
      • Consistent connections may therefore be maintained and optimized even when data is routed through varying networks.
      • A centralized proxy server can optionally maintain records for billing and usage purposes for all varying services (especially in the case where the proxy server is handling both data and control).
      • A centralized proxy server can optimize traffic flow over a wide range of networks.
      • A centralized proxy server can maintain a unique identifier while a client travels through different ISP's
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0040]
    The disclosed inventions will be described with reference to the accompanying drawings, which show important sample embodiments of the invention and which are incorporated in the specification hereof by reference, wherein:
  • [0041]
    FIG. 1 shows an example overview of mobile networks with two possible access networks.
  • [0042]
    FIG. 2 shows an example implementation consistent with a preferred embodiment.
  • [0043]
    FIG. 3 shows a call flow consistent with implementing a preferred embodiment of the present innovations.
  • [0044]
    FIG. 4 shows a call flow consistent with implementing a preferred embodiment of the present innovations.
  • [0045]
    FIG. 5 shows an overview of the process steps for implementing a system consistent with a preferred embodiment of the present innovations.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0046]
    The numerous innovations of the present application will be described with particular reference to the presently preferred embodiment (by way of example, and not of limitation).
  • [0047]
    The present innovations can be implemented in a number of different contexts. For purposes of clarity, specific examples are used to describe preferred embodiments, namely GPRS access networks and WLAN access networks are used by user equipment in the context of a wireless network, such as a cellular telephone network. These examples are not intended to limit the potential application or scope of the present innovations. The scope of these innovations is described in the claims.
  • [0048]
    FIG. 2 shows an overview of an example implementation consistent with a preferred embodiment. In this example, a GPRS access network 204 is used by a user equipment 202 such as a cellular telephone. For example, a GPRS access network signal is detected by the user equipment, but a WLAN signal is not detected. Therefore, the user connects using the GPRS access network. The GPRS access network 204 sends both control traffic 216 and user traffic 214 to the SGSN 206. The SGSN performs several functions, including GPRS authentication, APN selection, and DNS resolution of the APN (which points to the proxy server 208 rather than directly to the GGSN 210), which preferably causes the proxy server 208 to appear as the GGSN. A DNS server 218 is connected to both the SGSN and the proxy server. In this preferred embodiment, the protocol used is RADIUS, but other protocols could be used in other embodiments.
  • [0049]
    At the proxy server 208, APN translation is performed using a mapping mechanism to resolve the GGSN 210. In this example, the proxy server 208 appears to the GGSN 210 as the SGSN 206. Upon creating the connection to GGSN, proxy server can specify the route for both control and user traffic. If the proxy server anchors all the control and user traffic, all the traffic is routed from SGSN through proxy server to GGSN. If the proxy server anchors the control traffic only, proxy server specifies the SGSN as the user traffic end point to GGSN, resulting in the control traffic flowing from SGSN through proxy server to GGSN while user traffic flowing from SGSN to GGSN directly. The proxy server in this example acts as an anchor point for the control traffic 216 while the user traffic is routed directly to GGSN 214.
  • [0050]
    When a user equipment 202 roams within range of another access network, such as a WLAN access network 212, a handover process begins. The proxy server 208 checks that a session already exists for that user and updates the PDP context for the new access network. The control and user traffic are handed off to the new access network 212 and the connection to the old access network 204 is removed. In preferred embodiments, both control traffic and user traffic are sent through the proxy server 208 prior to being sent to the GGSN 210 (or other appropriate node).
  • [0051]
    Thus, in one example implementation, a preferred embodiment call flow starts at a GPRS access network. The control traffic flows from the access network to a SGSN, then to the proxy server, then to a GGSN. The user traffic can either follow this path, or it can go directly from the SGSN to the GGSN.
  • [0052]
    When a user is using a WLAN access network, the control and data are preferably both anchored at the proxy server, and from there routed to the GGSN.
  • [0053]
    In preferred embodiments, the proxy server acts as a GGSN when connecting to a SGSN. Similarly it acts as a SGSN when connecting to a GGSN. When the mobile connects over GPRS networks, SGSN connects to proxy server, acting as a GGSN. The proxy server maps the APN information to identify the actual GGSN from an APN mapping table. The proxy server proxies the connection request from SGSN to the actual GGSN. So, the PDP context is setup between the SGSN and the home GGSN via the proxy server. All the control and data flow of this PDP context flow through the proxy server. Since the GTP allows for separation of control and data traffic, one optimization is to proxy server only the control traffic and the data traffic path (or the GTP-U tunnel) is directly setup between SGSN and GGSN. For the WLAN connection, the proxy server acts as tunnel termination gateway, with an IPSec tunnel from the client to the proxy server. In this case, the proxy server acts as a SGSN and connects to the actual GGSN. The proxy server handles both control and user data in this case.
  • Handover Using Proxy Server
  • [0054]
    Following is a discussion of one example embodiment showing a handover between access networks using the innovative system including a proxy server. Since, in preferred embodiments, the sessions are setup through the proxy server to a common gateway node, GGSN, seamless handover can be achieved between different wireless access data networks. The sequence of the events when a mobile node roams, for example, between GPRS network and WLAN are:
      • 1. Client initiates the primary PDP context setup after it attaches to the GPRS network.
      • 2. SGSN performs the GTP tunnel setup by sending a create PDP context request to proxy server, since proxy server is configured as the GGSN node for the selected APN.
      • 3. Proxy server performs the APN mapping to identify the actual GGSN, which supports the requested service. The PDP context create request is proxied to this actual GGSN.
      • 4. The network, in this process, performs authorization and authentication as described in 3GPP specification TS 24.008. The PDP context is setup between SGSN and GGSN through the proxy server, acting in the control plane. An IP address is assigned to the client by the GGSN.
      • 5. The client can communicate with external network using the GGSN assigned PDP address. All the traffic flows between GGSN and client through SGSN.
      • 6. Upon entering into a WLAN coverage area a connection setup is initiated between the client and WLAN network.
      • 7. Proxy server performs authorization/authentication of the subscriber for WLAN access and initiates a PDP context switchover towards the actual GGSN.
      • 8. The existing PDP context GTP-U tunnel is switched over from SGSN to the proxy server. From that point onwards, all the traffic flows through the proxy server over the WLAN.
      • 9. When the mobile node leaves the WLAN coverage area, the GPRS session is updated on the attached SGSN. The SGSN create or updates the PDP context towards the proxy server.
      • 10. The proxy server updates the PDP context information on GGSN that transfers the GTP-U tunnel from proxy server to the SGSN. The traffic flows through SGSN from that point onwards.
  • Seamless Roaming
  • [0065]
    The call flows in this case are as shown in FIG. 3. Each of the steps indicated in the diagram are explained below:
  • GPRS Connection Setup
  • [0000]
      • 1. The mobile node attaches over the GSM air interface to initiate the GPRS session. The GPRS attach is made to the SGSN by providing the MN's Packet TMSI or IMSI, and the RAI. After having executed the GPRS attach, the MN is in READY state to activate the PDP contexts.
      • 2. The MN sends an Activate PDP context Request message to the SGSN with all required parameters viz., NSAPI, TI, PDP type, optional PDP address, optional APN, QoS requested and any PDP configuration options. SGSN performs the security functions to authorize and authenticate user by interacting with HLR, not shown in the figure. After these security functions are completed, there is a DNS resolution (shown in steps 2 a and 2 b in FIG. 3) where in the input is APN and the response from the DNS is the proxy server address.
      • 3. The SGSN performs the APN selection/GGSN resolution, and as a result, considering the proxy server as GGSN, sends a create PDP context request message to the proxy server, acting as a GGSN. The following minimum parameters are sent in the create request; PDP Type, APN, QoS Negotiated, TEID, NSAPI, MSISDN, Selection Mode, Charging Characteristics.
      • 4. Proxy server identifies the APN value in the request and maps to actual APN using an internal APN mapping table. This mapped APN is used for identifying the actual GGSN for this service. A second DNS resolution occurs (shown in steps 3 a and 3 b in FIG. 3) where the mapped APN is the input and the response from the DNS is the GGSN address. Proxy server then proxies the original PDP context create request to this GGSN. In the case of data path optimization, where the data tunnel is directly between SGSN and GGSN, proxy server explicitly specifies the value for SGSN node for data as the actual SGSN IP address. This case is explicitly shown in FIG. 4. In FIG. 4, there are two separate data tunnels shown through which user and control traffic may travel. The proxy server is able to accomplish data path optimization by separating the user and control traffic.
      • 5. GGSN validates the request and creates a new entry in its PDP context table and generates a charging Id. This allows GGSN to route PDP PDUs between the SGSN and the external packet data network. GGSN returns a create PDP context response with the approved values, including the dynamically assigned IP address.
      • 6. Proxy server verifies the response received from GGSN and proxies back to SGSN.
      • 7. The SGSN selects the Radio Priority and Packet flow Id based on the QoS negotiated. An activate PDP context accept message with the negotiated parameters (PDP Type, PDP Address, TI, QoS Negotiated, Radio Priority, Packet Flow Id and PDP configuration options) is sent to MN. The SGSN is now able to route PDP PDUs between the GGSN and MN.
  • GPRS Data Flow
  • [0000]
      • 8. The client uses the GGSN assigned PDP address as the IP address to communicate to other nodes. The traffic between the client and SGSN are transferred using standard GPRS mechanism. There are two GTP tunnels: GTP tunnel between SGSN and proxy server and GTP tunnel between proxy server and GGSN for both control and user traffic.
  • Roaming Into WLAN Hotspot
  • [0074]
    The client is triggered either automatically (by detecting a preferred WLAN) or manually (explicitly initiation) to initiate a handover to WLAN. The process of setting up WLAN connection and handover of connection are as follows:
  • WLAN Connection Setup
  • [0000]
      • 9. The client associates to a WLAN access point over the 802.11 radio. AP (or the hotspot gateway) can perform any authorization and security functions, including EAPOL, WPA, for additional security.
      • 10. Client sends a request to the proxy server to setup a secure connection by including the IMSI value and optional APN information. Proxy server performs the authentication of the client for WLAN access through standard procedures.
      • 11. Proxy server identifies that a GTP tunnel exists for this IMSI and APN, towards the GGSN. To perform the tunnel switchover, proxy server sends an update PDP context request with the context parameters, defined in 3GPP specification TS29.060.
      • 12. GGSN validates the update request and sends the update response to the proxy server. In this process any new QoS values can be negotiated due to change of access network.
      • 13. Proxy server sends a session setup response to the client, including the IP address that was assigned by the GGSN during GTP tunnel setup through GPRS. This becomes possible because the proxy server is acting as an anchor for GPRS and WLAN traffic.
      • 14. Now the client has flow paths to the same GGSN with different priority levels through different access network. There is no change in the IP address of the client since proxy server maintains the same IP address toward the client, thus no impact to the higher layer protocols. There is only one GTP tunnel between the proxy server and the GGSN and both control and user traffic are delivered in this GTP tunnel. The packets are sent over WLAN to proxy server, which tunnels them to the GGSN. GGSN de-capsulate the packets and routes to external network. Packets destined for the client arriving at the GGSN, are tunneled over the GTP tunnel to proxy server. The packet is de-capsulated at proxy server and forwarded to the client over the WLAN connection. The proxy server switches the traffic path between GPRS and WLAN. This way the entire traffic stream is handed over to the WLAN connection seamlessly.
  • Roaming Out of WLAN Hotspot—Handback to GPRS
  • [0000]
      • 15. When the MN roams out of the WLAN hotspot and the WLAN signal strength gets weaker below threshold level, client initiates the GPRS connection by doing the GPRS attach action as defined in step 1 above. Note that this step is optional if the mobile is already GPRS attached. In case mobile is GPRS attached and comes back to GPRS, then the mobile performs the routing area update procedure.
      • 16. Client sends a create GPRS session request to SGSN. This is similar to step 2above.
      • 17. The SGSN sends a create PDP context request to proxy server acting as a proxy server as in step 3 above.
      • 18. Proxy server verifies the request and checks for any existing PDP context (or GTP tunnel) for this IMSI. Since there is context associated with IMSI, proxy server sends an update PDP context request to the corresponding GGSN. The Proxy server IP address is used for both control and user plane tunnel end point.
      • 19. GGSN updates the PDP context information and sends the update PDP context response to the proxy server.
      • 20. Proxy server and sends the create PDP context response to SGSN.
      • 21. SGSN responds to the client with the message received from proxy server. This is same as step 7 above.
      • 22. The data from the client is now transferred over the GPRS connection to the same GGSN node, through the SGSN and proxy server. Since the session, as observed from any external node, didn't change, the session is seamlessly handed back to GPRS network. There are two GTP tunnels: GTP tunnel between SGSN and proxy server and GTP tunnel between proxy server and GGSN. It is again noted that user and control traffic can be separated, thereby following separate paths, or they can be transmitted along the same path.
  • [0089]
    A data flow illustration of one embodiment of this proxy server this is shown in FIG. 3. In this proxy-based handover without a separate data tunnel, the first step is to have the client connect to and create a PDP context with the proxy server for both control and user plane data. (Step 310). The next step is to have the proxy server establish the GTP tunnel to GGSN for both control and user plane data. With this procedure, all the data, both control and user traffic are transferred from SGSN to GGSN through proxy server. When the client enters to WLAN area, an undate PDP context request is made to the GGSN from proxy server where information regarding the WLAN area that the client has entered is transmitted (Step 330). Both control and user plane data path is handed over to proxy server from SGSN, and data flow is then made from the client through the proxy server to GGSN (Step 340). When the client leaves the WLAN area it attaches to the GPRS system again and updates the PDP context so that data flow will commence from the client through SGSN and proxy server to the GGSN.
  • [0090]
    Another data flow illustration of another embodiment of this proxy this is shown in FIG. 4. In this proxy-based handover with a separate data path, the first step is to have the client connect to and create a primary PDP context with the proxy server (Step 410). The next step is to have the proxy server to establish the GTP tunnel with GGSN (Step 420). The proxy server indicates to the GGSN that SGSN is the tunnel end point for user plane data and the proxy server itself is the tunnel end point for control plane data. The proxy server then indicates to the SGSN that GGSN is the tunnel end point for user plane data and the proxy server itself is the tunnel end point for control plane data (Step 430). After this procedure, there are separate routes for control and user plane data. The control traffic is routed in two GTP tunnels—GTP tunnel between SGSN and proxy server, and GTP tunnel between proxy server and GGSN. The user traffic is routed in one GTP tunnel between SGSN and GGSN. (step 430) When the client enters WLAN area, the client requests to create the WLAN session to the proxy server, where information regarding the WLAN area that the client has entered is transmitted (Step 440). Then the proxy server receives this request, it checks if there is a session for this user and this APN. If present, the proxy server sends the ‘update PDP context request’ to the GGSN. In this update PDP context request, the proxy server takes over the user plane data from SGSN, so that both control and user plane data is transferred through proxy server. An advantage of using this method is to proxy server only the control traffic through the proxy server when user is connected to GPRS. The data traffic will be directly tunneled between SGSN and GGSN, just like in a standard GPRS architecture, therefore reducing one hop for the user data. When the user is connected to WLAN, proxy server handles both control and user plane traffic. When the client leaves the WLAN area it must then attach to the GPRS system and update the PDP context so that user data flow will commence from the client through SGSN to GGSN, bypassing the proxy server. For the control traffic, the data will flow from the client through SGSN and proxy server to GGSN, making the proxy server the anchor point for control messages.
  • [0091]
    In one example embodiment, sessions are setup through proxy server to a common gateway node, GGSN, and seamless handover can be achieved between different wireless data networks. FIG. 5 illustrates one sequence of events that can be followed to implement this embodiment. These are not the only steps that may be used to implement the invention, but are illustrative of the different types of steps that are available.
  • [0092]
    First, a client initiates the primary PDP context setup after it attaches to the GPRS network (Step 510). Then, a SGSN performs the GTP tunnel setup by sending a create PDP context request to WG, since it is configured as the GGSN node for this mobile node (Step 520). The network, in this preferred embodiment, performs authorization and authentication as described in 3GPP specification TS 24.008. Next, a WG performs the APN mapping to identify the actual GGSN, which the user is subscribed to. The Create PDP context request is proxied to this actual GGSN (Step 530). The PDP context is setup between SGSN and GGSN through WG, acting in the control plane. An IP address is assigned to the client by the GGSN (Step 540). The client can then communicate with external network using the GGSN assigned PDP address. All the traffic flows between GGSN and client through proxy server (Step 550). In this example embodiment, the proxy server becomes the anchor point for the traffic and has all the information on the user session. Alternatively, for routing optimization, the proxy server can anchor the control traffic only. In this case, the user traffic is routed from SGSN to GGSN directly. The proxy server still has all the necessary information of the user session, though, because it is anchoring the control traffic. Upon entering into a WLAN coverage area, client detects the presence of WLAN and initiates the connection setup toward the proxy server, which acts as a WG over WLAN network by providing the authentication credentials, including IMSI (Step 560). The proxy server performs authorization/authentication of the subscriber for WLAN access and initiates a PDP context switchover towards the GGSN (Step 570). The existing GTP tunnel endpoint for both user and control traffic is updated as proxy server. From that point onwards, all the user and control traffic flows through the proxy server over the WLAN (Step 580) to GGSN. When the mobile node leaves the WLAN coverage area, the GPRS session is updated on the attached SGSN (Step 590). The SGSN creates or updates the PDP context towards the proxy server. The proxy server then updates the PDP context information on GGSN (Step 595). If the proxy server is anchoring both user and control traffic, there is no additional action required from the proxy server except notifying the GGSN on the change of access network, because it is already acting as the tunnel end point for both user and control traffic toward GGSN. If the proxy server is anchoring only the control traffic, it updates the GGSN to change the user traffic tunnel end point becomes the SGSN.
  • [0093]
    According to a disclosed class of innovative embodiments, there is provided: A method of wireless communication, comprising the steps of: when a multifunction mobile client is in a GPRS session, routing GPRS control and user traffic to an SGSN; routing at least the GRPS control traffic to a GGSN through a proxy server transparently to the client; and routing the GPRS user traffic to a GGSN, either directly from the SGSN or through the proxy server.
  • [0094]
    According to a disclosed class of innovative embodiments, there is provided: A method of wireless communication, comprising the steps of: when a multifunction mobile client accesses a GPRS network using an IP-based access technology: routing control traffic and user traffic to a proxy server; and transparently to the mobile client, routing the control traffic and user traffic from the proxy server to a GGSN.
  • [0095]
    According to a disclosed class of innovative embodiments, there is provided: A wireless network system, comprising: a proxy server adapted to support both GPRS traffic and a non-GPRS and IP-based traffic from a mobile client and to communicate with a GGSN through GPRS protocol; wherein when the mobile client uses a GPRS access network: GPRS control traffic is sent to the GGSN through a proxy server, transparently to the mobile client; and GPRS user traffic is sent to the GGSN either through the proxy server or directly from an SGSN; and wherein when the mobile client uses a non-GPRS, IP-based access network: both control traffic and user traffic are sent to the proxy server; and transparently to the mobile client, both control traffic and user traffic are routed to the GGSN.
  • Modifications and Variations
  • [0096]
    As will be recognized by those skilled in the art, the innovative concepts described in the present application can be modified and varied over a tremendous range of applications, and accordingly the scope of patented subject matter is not limited by any of the specific exemplary teachings given.
  • [0097]
    For example, the present innovations can be implemented, consistent and within the scope of the concepts disclosed herein, using any number of network types to maintain consistent connectivity while moving into and out of a network coverage area.
  • [0098]
    Another example, that the present innovations can be implemented using, consistent and within the scope of the concepts disclosed herein, is the EDGE network WiFiMAX technology to enable constant connectivity.
  • [0099]
    Another example, that the present innovations can be implemented using, consistent and within the scope of the concepts disclosed herein, is use of a router or other device to act as the proxy server as a standalone unit away from the GGSN.
  • [0100]
    Another example, that the present innovations can be implemented using, consistent and within the scope of the concepts disclosed herein, is use of integrated telecommunications system to act as the proxy server away from the GGSN.
  • [0101]
    Another example, that the present innovations can be implemented using, consistent and within the scope of the concepts disclosed herein, is use of a proxy server as a data distribution point where data is separated into two separate streams and the streams are optimized by the proxy server for specific connections.
  • [0102]
    Additional general background, which helps to show variations and implementations, may be found in the following publications, all of which are hereby incorporated by reference: 3G Mobile Networks, S. Kasera, N. Narang, McGraw-Hill, 2005.
  • [0103]
    Abbreviations:
  • [0104]
    The following is a list of abbreviations and meanings determined from the application. These abbreviations are intended only as a source of clarity and not intended to limit the scope of the application, nor are they intended to contradict ordinary meaning to those of skill in the art.
  • [0000]
    Abbreviation Words Represented By Abbreviations
    3GPP 3rd Generation Partnership Project
    AP Access Point
    APN Access Point Name
    BSC The Base Station Controller
    BSS The Base Station Subsystem
    CN Correspondent Node
    COA Care of Address
    ESS Electronic Switching System
    FA Foreign Agent
    GGSN Gateway GPRS Support Node
    GPRS General Packet Radio Services
    GSM The Global System for Mobile Communications
    GSN GPRS Support Node
    GTP GPRS Tunneling Protocol
    HA Home Agent
    IMSI International Mobile Subscriber Identity
    IPv4 Version 4 of the Internet Protocol
    IPv6 Version 6 of the Internet Protocol
    LAN Local Area Network
    MIP Mobile IP
    MN Mobile Node
    MSISDN Mobile Station Integrated Services Digital Network
    MT Message Transfer
    NSAPI Network Service Access Point Identifier
    PDP Packet Data Protocol
    PDU Protocol Data Unit
    QoS Quality of Service.
    SGSN Serving GPRS Support Node
    TEID Terminal Equipment ID
    TFT The Traffic Flow Template
    TI Tunnel Identifier
    TOS Type of Service
    TS Technical Specification
    UMTS Universal Mobile Telecommunications System
    WGS Wireless Gateway Server
    Wi-Fi Wireless Fidelity
    WLAN Wireless Local Area Network
  • [0105]
    None of the description in the present application should be read as implying that any particular element, step, or function is an essential element which must be included in the claim scope: THE SCOPE OF PATENTED SUBJECT MATTER IS DEFINED ONLY BY THE ALLOWED CLAIMS. Moreover, none of these claims are intended to invoke paragraph six of 35 USC section 112 unless the exact words “means for” are followed by a participle.
  • [0106]
    The claims as filed are intended to be as comprehensive as possible, and NO subject matter is intentionally relinquished, dedicated, or abandoned.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6891842 *Sep 19, 2002May 10, 2005Nokia CorporationSystem and method for enabling mobile edge services
US7151931 *Feb 27, 2003Dec 19, 2006Industrial Technology Research InstituteMethod and system enabling roaming between different wireless networks
US7218618 *Jul 19, 2002May 15, 2007Nokia CorporationMethod of providing mobile IP functionality for a non mobile IP capable mobile node and switching device for acting as a mobile IP proxy
US7239632 *Jun 17, 2002Jul 3, 2007Tatara Systems, Inc.Method and apparatus for converging local area and wide area wireless data networks
US7394795 *Dec 23, 2002Jul 1, 2008Interdigital Technology CorporationRLAN wireless telecommunication system with RAN IP gateway and methods
US7483411 *Jan 30, 2002Jan 27, 2009Nec CorporationApparatus for public access mobility LAN and method of operation thereof
US7489696 *Oct 23, 2003Feb 10, 2009Nokia CorporationMethod and system for implementing a signalling connection in a distributed radio access network
US7526289 *Oct 23, 2002Apr 28, 2009Nokia CorporationRadio resource control method in mobile communication system, mobile communication system and network element
US20020150091 *Apr 17, 2001Oct 17, 2002Jussi LopponenPacket mode speech communication
US20040139201 *Jun 19, 2002Jul 15, 2004Mobility Network Systems, Inc.Method and system for transparently and securely interconnecting a WLAN radio access network into a GPRS/GSM core network
US20050007984 *Apr 30, 2004Jan 13, 2005Interdigital Technology CorporationMethod and architecture for accessing an internet protocol multimedia subsystem (IMS) over a wireless local area network (WLAN)
US20050025164 *Nov 14, 2003Feb 3, 2005Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ)Seamless hand-off of mobile node to a wireless local area network (WLAN)
US20050102410 *Jan 22, 2004May 12, 2005Nokia CorporationCommunication system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7610038 *Apr 14, 2004Oct 27, 2009Panasonic CorporationService in wlan inter-working, address management system, and method
US7733824 *Jun 23, 2005Jun 8, 2010Nokia CorporationFixed access point for a terminal device
US7817611 *Apr 4, 2007Oct 19, 2010Nec CorporationWireless local area network system
US7856226Apr 17, 2007Dec 21, 2010Aylus Networks, Inc.Systems and methods for IMS user sessions with dynamic service selection
US7864936Jun 24, 2005Jan 4, 2011Aylus Networks, Inc.Method of avoiding or minimizing cost of stateful connections between application servers and S-CSCF nodes in an IMS network with multiple domains
US8014750Dec 7, 2007Sep 6, 2011Starent Networks LlcReducing call setup delays from non-call related signaling
US8018955 *Dec 7, 2007Sep 13, 2011Starent Networks LlcProviding dynamic changes to packet flows
US8081971Sep 14, 2009Dec 20, 2011Panasonic CorporationService in WLAN inter-working, address management system, and method
US8149784 *Jul 24, 2007Apr 3, 2012Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Bridge-based radio access station backbone network system and signal processing method therefor
US8170534Dec 21, 2010May 1, 2012Aylus Networks, Inc.Systems and methods for user sessions with dynamic service selection
US8213913Dec 7, 2007Jul 3, 2012Cisco Technology, Inc.Providing location based services for mobile devices
US8250634Dec 5, 2007Aug 21, 2012Cisco Technology, Inc.Systems, methods, media, and means for user level authentication
US8300629Dec 7, 2007Oct 30, 2012Cisco Technology, Inc.Device and method for providing interaction management for communication networks
US8315227 *Sep 27, 2005Nov 20, 2012Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ)GTP for integration of multiple access
US8359644Nov 17, 2008Jan 22, 2013At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P.Seamless data networking
US8374580Nov 9, 2011Feb 12, 2013Panasonic CorporationService in WLAN inter-working, address management system, and method
US8416791 *Sep 17, 2008Apr 9, 2013Nokia Siemens Networks OyLocal break out in case of WiMAX roaming
US8432899Feb 22, 2007Apr 30, 2013Aylus Networks, Inc.Systems and methods for enabling IP signaling in wireless networks
US8433303Apr 30, 2012Apr 30, 2013Aylus Networks, Inc.Systems and methods for user sessions with dynamic service selection
US8483373Jan 4, 2011Jul 9, 2013Aylus Networks, Inc.Method of avoiding or minimizing cost of stateful connections between application servers and S-CSCF nodes in an IMS network with multiple domains
US8483685Jun 4, 2012Jul 9, 2013Cisco Technology, Inc.Providing location based services for mobile devices
US8503460 *Mar 23, 2009Aug 6, 2013Qualcomm IncorporatedDynamic home network assignment
US8553866Sep 7, 2011Oct 8, 2013Aylus Networks, Inc.System and method to provide dynamic call models for users in a network
US8611334Mar 18, 2008Dec 17, 2013Aylus Networks, Inc.Systems and methods for presenting multimedia objects in conjunction with voice calls from a circuit-switched network
US8620307 *Nov 6, 2006Dec 31, 2013Nokia CorporationSelection of access interface
US8638753 *Apr 21, 2008Jan 28, 2014Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ)QCI mapping at roaming and handover
US8645564 *Oct 10, 2011Feb 4, 2014The Boeing CompanyMethod and apparatus for client-directed inbound traffic engineering over tunnel virtual network links
US8724463Dec 7, 2007May 13, 2014Cisco Technology, Inc.Scalability of providing packet flow management
US8730906 *Jan 3, 2008May 20, 2014Core Wireless Licensing S.A.R.L.Apparatus and method for removing path management
US8730945Apr 17, 2008May 20, 2014Aylus Networks, Inc.Systems and methods for using a recipient handset as a remote screen
US8763109Nov 28, 2012Jun 24, 2014At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P.Seamless data networking
US8769111 *Aug 15, 2011Jul 1, 2014Numerex Corp.IP network service redirector device and method
US8837382 *Aug 11, 2009Sep 16, 2014Cisco Technology, Inc.Multimedia broadcast and multicast service enhancements
US8929360Nov 14, 2007Jan 6, 2015Cisco Technology, Inc.Systems, methods, media, and means for hiding network topology
US8989149Apr 18, 2014Mar 24, 2015Core Wireless Licensing S.A.R.L.Apparatus and method for removing path management
US9026117Apr 17, 2008May 5, 2015Aylus Networks, Inc.Systems and methods for real-time cellular-to-internet video transfer
US9055563Jan 9, 2013Jun 9, 2015Wi-Fi One, LlcService in WLAN inter-working, address management system, and method
US9113331 *Dec 23, 2005Aug 18, 2015Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ)Validating user identity by cooperation between core network and access controller
US9148766Mar 17, 2015Sep 29, 2015Aylus Networks, Inc.Systems and methods for real-time cellular-to-internet video transfer
US9160570Apr 30, 2013Oct 13, 2015Aylus Networks, Inc.Systems and method for enabling IP signaling in wireless networks
US9215283 *Sep 30, 2011Dec 15, 2015Alcatel LucentSystem and method for mobility and multi-homing content retrieval applications
US9219680Apr 28, 2014Dec 22, 2015Cisco Technology, Inc.Scalability of providing packet flow management
US9253815May 13, 2010Feb 2, 2016Apple Inc.Session suspend and resume using a transient binding option messaging
US9468033Oct 19, 2011Oct 11, 2016Aylus Networks, Inc.Associated device discovery in IMS networks
US9560521May 8, 2015Jan 31, 2017Wi-Fi One, LlcService in WLAN inter-working, address management system, and method
US20060187926 *Feb 22, 2006Aug 24, 2006Kddi CorporationCommunications session switching method and system
US20060209768 *Jan 14, 2004Sep 21, 2006Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.Service in wlan inter-working, address management system, and method
US20060291412 *Mar 8, 2006Dec 28, 2006Naqvi Shamim AAssociated device discovery in IMS networks
US20060291448 *Jun 23, 2005Dec 28, 2006Nokia CorporationFixed access point for a terminal device
US20060291484 *Jun 24, 2005Dec 28, 2006Naqvi Shamim AMethod of avoiding or minimizing cost of stateful connections between application servers and S-CSCF nodes in an IMS network with multiple domains
US20060291487 *Nov 18, 2005Dec 28, 2006Aylus Networks, Inc.IMS networks with AVS sessions with multiple access networks
US20070232301 *Apr 2, 2007Oct 4, 2007Fujitsu LimitedRoaming in wireless networks
US20070297378 *Nov 6, 2006Dec 27, 2007Nokia CorporationSelection Of Access Interface
US20080019387 *Jul 24, 2007Jan 24, 2008Samsung Electronics Co.; LtdBridge-based radio access station backbone network system and signal processing method therefor
US20080049695 *Apr 4, 2007Feb 28, 2008Nec CorporationWireless Local Area Network system
US20080137541 *Dec 7, 2007Jun 12, 2008Kaitki AgarwalProviding dynamic changes to packet flows
US20080137646 *Dec 7, 2007Jun 12, 2008Kaitki AgarwalProviding interaction Management for Communication networks
US20080137671 *Dec 7, 2007Jun 12, 2008Kaitki AgarwalScalability of providing packet flow management
US20080137686 *Nov 14, 2007Jun 12, 2008Starent Networks CorporationSystems, methods, media, and means for hiding network topology
US20080165725 *Jan 3, 2008Jul 10, 2008Nokia CorporationRemoving GTP-U path management in UGAN
US20080168540 *Dec 5, 2007Jul 10, 2008Kaitki AgarwalSystems, Methods, Media, and Means for User Level Authentication
US20080205379 *Feb 22, 2007Aug 28, 2008Aylus Networks, Inc.Systems and methods for enabling IP signaling in wireless networks
US20080219218 *Sep 27, 2005Sep 11, 2008Gunnar RydnellGtp for Integration of Multiple Access
US20080259887 *Mar 18, 2008Oct 23, 2008Aylus Networks, Inc.Systems and methods for presenting multimedia objects in conjunction with voice calls from a circuit-switched network
US20080261593 *Apr 17, 2007Oct 23, 2008Aylus Networks, Inc.Systems and methods for IMS user sessions with dynamic service selection
US20080274744 *Apr 17, 2008Nov 6, 2008Naqvi Shamim ASystems and Methods for Using a Recipient Handset as a Remote Screen
US20080291905 *Apr 17, 2008Nov 27, 2008Kiran ChakravadhanulaSystems and Methods for Real-Time Cellular-to-Internet Video Transfer
US20080305768 *Dec 23, 2005Dec 11, 2008Tomas NylanderValidating User Identity by Cooperation Between Core Network and Access Controller
US20080317010 *Jun 22, 2007Dec 25, 2008Aylus Networks, Inc.System and method for signaling optimization in ims services by using a service delivery platform
US20090238099 *Mar 23, 2009Sep 24, 2009Qualcomm IncorporatedDynamic home network assignment
US20100002668 *Sep 14, 2009Jan 7, 2010Panasonic CorporationService in wlan inter-working, address management system, and method
US20100039978 *Aug 11, 2009Feb 18, 2010Starent Networks, CorpMultimedia broadcast and multicast service enhancements
US20100125902 *Nov 17, 2008May 20, 2010At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P.Seamless data networking
US20100208659 *Sep 17, 2008Aug 19, 2010Nokia Siemens Networks OyLocal break out in case of wimax roaming
US20110044198 *Apr 21, 2008Feb 24, 2011Teleonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (publ)QCI Mapping at Roaming and Handover
US20110092206 *Dec 21, 2010Apr 21, 2011Aylus Networks, Inc.Systems and methods for ims user sessions with dynamic service selection
US20110151871 *Dec 27, 2010Jun 23, 2011Aylus Networks, Inc.Ims networks with avs sessions with multiple access networks
US20110164563 *Jan 4, 2011Jul 7, 2011Aylus Networks, Inc.Method of Avoiding or Minimizing Cost of Stateful Connections Between Application Servers and S-CSCF Nodes in an IMS Network with Multiple Domains
US20120203926 *Aug 15, 2011Aug 9, 2012Michael CampIP Network Service Redirector Device and Method
US20130086142 *Sep 30, 2011Apr 4, 2013K. Georg HampelSystem and Method for Mobility and Multi-Homing Content Retrieval Applications
US20130091196 *Oct 10, 2011Apr 11, 2013Fred L. TemplinMethod and apparatus for client-directed inbound traffic engineering over tunnel virtual network links
US20140126532 *Nov 5, 2012May 8, 2014Stoke, Inc.Seamless mobility from 3g network to wifi network
US20150195739 *Feb 26, 2015Jul 9, 2015Core Wireless Licensing S.A.R.L.Apparatus and method for removing path management
US20160174107 *Dec 12, 2014Jun 16, 2016Satish KanugoviWifi boost with lte ip anchor
USRE44412Sep 14, 2011Aug 6, 2013Aylus Networks, Inc.Digital home networks having a control point located on a wide area network
CN102484823A *May 13, 2010May 30, 2012北方电讯网络有限公司Session suspend and resume using a transient binding option messaging
WO2010019573A1 *Aug 11, 2009Feb 18, 2010Starent Networks, CorpMultimedia broadcast and multicast service enhancements
WO2010132700A1 *May 13, 2010Nov 18, 2010Nortel Networks LimitedSession suspend and resume using a transient binding option messaging
Classifications
U.S. Classification370/389, 370/331
International ClassificationH04W76/02, H04W84/04, H04L12/56, H04W8/08, H04W36/00
Cooperative ClassificationH04W36/12, H04W8/087, H04W8/082, H04W8/26, H04W76/022, H04W80/04, H04W36/02, H04W36/0011, H04W84/042, H04W76/041, H04W88/06, H04W76/02
European ClassificationH04W84/04C, H04W8/08M, H04W76/02, H04W36/00P2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 12, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: RUSTIC CANYON VENTURES SBIC, L.P., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:AZAIRE NETWORKS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:019541/0825
Effective date: 20070710