Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20080149351 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/769,230
Publication dateJun 26, 2008
Filing dateJun 27, 2007
Priority dateDec 20, 2006
Also published asUS8485265, US20080149345, WO2008079485A2, WO2008079485A3, WO2008079486A1, WO2008079486B1
Publication number11769230, 769230, US 2008/0149351 A1, US 2008/149351 A1, US 20080149351 A1, US 20080149351A1, US 2008149351 A1, US 2008149351A1, US-A1-20080149351, US-A1-2008149351, US2008/0149351A1, US2008/149351A1, US20080149351 A1, US20080149351A1, US2008149351 A1, US2008149351A1
InventorsManuel Marya, Nitin Y. Vaidya, Rashmi Bhavsar
Original AssigneeSchlumberger Technology Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Temporary containments for swellable and inflatable packer elements
US 20080149351 A1
Abstract
A packer system ready for downhole use includes an elastomer member, wherein the elastomer member is swellable or inflatable; and a temporary containment enclosing the elastomer member, wherein the temporary containment comprises a degradable material A method for deploying a swellable packer includes running a packer system into a well to a predetermined location, wherein the packer system comprises a swellable packer or an inflatable packer that is enclosed by a temporary containment, wherein the temporary containment comprises a degradable material; and degrading the degradable material of the temporary containment to set the swellable packer.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(14)
1. A packer system for downhole use, comprising:
an elastomer member, wherein the elastomer member is swellable or inflatable; and
a temporary containment enclosing the elastomer member, wherein the temporary containment comprises a degradable material.
2. The packer system of claim 1, wherein the degradable material comprises a metal or an alloy.
3. The packer system of claim 2, wherein the metal or alloy is one selected from the group consisting of calcium, aluminum, magnesium, and an alloy thereof.
4. The packer system of claim 1, wherein the degradable material comprises a polymer.
5. The packer system of claim 4, wherein the polymer comprises a functional group that is hydrolysable by a base or a nucleophile.
6. The packer system of claim 1, wherein the degradable material comprises an inorganic material.
7. A method for deploying a packer, comprising:
running a packer system into a well to a predetermined location, wherein the packer system comprises a swellable packer or an inflatable packer that is enclosed by a temporary containment, wherein the temporary containment comprises a degradable material; and
degrading the degradable material of the temporary containment to set the swellable packer or the inflatable packer.
8. The method of claim 7, wherein the degrading of the temporary containment is by contacting with a fluid.
9. The method of claim 8, wherein the fluid is one selected from the group consisting of water, hydrocarbon, an acid solution, and brine.
10. The method of claim 7, wherein the degrading of the temporary containment is initiated by changing temperature, by changing pressure, or by changing temperature and pressure.
11. The method of claim 7, wherein temporary containment comprises a coating on the degradable material such that degradation is retarded.
12. The method of claim 7, wherein the degradable material is one selected from the following; a metal, and an alloy.
13. The method of claim 7, wherein the degradable material is a polymer.
14. The method of claim 7, wherein the degradable material is an inorganic material.
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application claims, under 35 U.S.C. §119(e), the benefits of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/870,859 filed on Dec. 20, 2006. This Provisional Application is incorporated by reference in its entirety. This application is related to a co-pending application (Schlumberger Attorney Docket No. 68.0691), entitled “Smart Actuation Materials Triggered by Degradation in Oilfield Environments and Method of Use,” by Marya et al., filed herewith.
  • FIELD OF INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates generally to oilfield exploration, production, and testing, and more specifically to swellable and inflatable packer elements.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0003]
    In a variety of wellbore environments, completion tools such as packers need to be safely and controllably deployed to precise locations to provide basic functions, such as zonal isolation, tubing anchoring, casing protection, and flow control. Packers typically include production packers, zonal isolation packers and gravel pack packers. Most packers are surface controlled and set by mechanical and/or hydraulic mechanisms.
  • [0004]
    A type of packers known as inflatable packers uses an inflatable bladder to expand the packer element against the casing or wellbore to provide zone isolation. In preparation for setting the packer, a drop ball or series of tubing movements are generally required, with the hydraulic pressure required to inflate the packer provided by carefully applying surface pump pressure. Inflatable packers are capable of relatively large expansion ratios, an important factor in through-tubing work where the tubing size or completion components can impose a significant size restriction on devices designed to set in the casing or liner below the tubing.
  • [0005]
    Another type of packers, known as swellable packers, does not require any mechanical or hydraulic setting mechanisms. These packers include a swellable material, which volume expand upon contacting a selected fluid. The selected fluids may be water-based (including diluted acids and brines) or hydrocarbons. Depending upon the types of fluids and elastomers used, the chemical swelling process may increase the volume of a packer by as much as several hundred percents. In such a swelling process, the swellable packer element typically expands quickly during the initial phase. Then, the swelling continues at a slower rate.
  • [0006]
    Due to their simplicity of actuation, swell packers are attractive for zonal isolation applications. Such packers may be used for cased hole and open hole applications. In open hole applications, the use of swellable packers is more challenging and the packer elements are more likely to be damaged.
  • [0007]
    If the packer swells too quickly, the packer may not reach its intended downhole destination. Swelling that starts prematurely would make impossible the safe delivery of the packer to the desired location and could result in permanent damages to the sleeve, and evidently improper sealing.
  • [0008]
    If, on the contrary, the packer expands too slowly, the swell packer is likely to loose its advantages. A packer that is slow to set would inevitably create rig time waste. Rig times are extremely costly, and deployment and setting of the packers should be conducted within a limited time. The ability to control the settings of such packers is therefore very important for their use.
  • [0009]
    Some swellable packer designs simply use an exposed element that begins to swell upon insertion into a wellbore, with the idea that the swelling will progress slowly enough to allow enough time for the delivery of the packer to a desired location downhole. Some examples of such packers are disclosed in: U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,848,505; 4,137,970; 4,919,989 4,936,386; and 6,854,522.
  • [0010]
    In another design of swellable packers, the swellable material is covered by a protective envelope, which is made of high-tear resistant elastomers. Examples of such a design are disclosed in: U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,073,692; 6,834,725; 5,048,605; and 5,195,583.
  • [0011]
    In yet another design, a swellable packer may be covered with a protective cover that may be removed downhole to allow a predetermined time to deliver the packer to the desired location before the onset of swelling. Examples of swelling packers with a delay feature to facilitate delivery are disclosed: U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,862,967; 6,854,522; 3,918,523; and 4,612,985.
  • [0012]
    Another design makes use of a swaging (a retaining device), wherein a swelling member is held by a mechanical retainer during the delivery of the packer to the desired location in the well. Upon reaching the desired location, the expansion of the swellable materials breaks the retainer or otherwise defeats it so that swelling can take place. A packer involving a swaging device is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 6,854,522.
  • [0013]
    Another design uses multilayer packer elements to insure a proper deployment. A typical multilayered packer element includes an elastomeric element covered with another elastomeric material that provides a slow rate of reaction in the packer setting fluid.
  • [0014]
    While these prior art packer elements are useful in many downhole operations, there remains a need for improved swellable packer elements.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0015]
    One aspect of the invention relates to swellable packers. A swellable packer in accordance with one embodiment of the invention includes a packer having a swellable material; and a temporary containment enclosing the packer, wherein the temporary containment comprises a degradable material that protects the swellable elastomer of the packer, and prevent premature and undesirable swelling.
  • [0016]
    Another aspect of the invention relates to inflatable packers. An inflatable packer in accordance with one embodiment of the invention includes a packer having a inflatable elastomer part; and a temporary containment enclosing the packer, wherein the temporary containment comprises a degradable material that prevents the inflatable packers to accidentally inflate.
  • [0017]
    Another aspect of the invention relates to methods for deploying a swellable packer or an inflatable packer in a wellbore. A method in accordance with one embodiment of the invention includes running a packer system into a well to a predetermined location, wherein the packer system comprises a swellable packer or an inflatable packer that is enclosed by a temporary containment, wherein the temporary containment comprises a degradable material; and degrading the degradable material of the temporary containment to set the packer.
  • [0018]
    Other aspects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description and the appended claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
  • [0019]
    FIG. 1 shows a schematic illustrating a swellable packer having a temporary containment that is made of a degradable material in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • [0020]
    FIGS. 2A and 2B illustrate a swellable packer element before and after deployment in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • [0021]
    FIGS. 3A and 3B show a schematic illustrating inflatable packer elements having temporary containments used in zonal isolation with sand screen in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • [0022]
    FIGS. 4A and 4B show two charts each illustrating the effect of increases in temperature and pH, respectively on the rate of degradation of a degradable material in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0023]
    In the following description, numerous details are set forth to provide an understanding of the present invention. However, it would be understood by those skilled in the art that the present invention may be practiced without these details and that numerous variations or modifications from the described embodiments may be possible without departing from the scope of the invention.
  • [0024]
    Embodiments of the invention relate to temporary containments for swellable and inflatable packers that may be fully degraded downhole once the packers are delivered to its intended location. The materials used to provide a temporary containment for the swellable packers may be metals, alloys, polymers, plastics, ceramics, and composites or combinations of these different materials provided that they may be induced to degrade by a selected reagent or condition. The degradable materials in accordance with embodiments of the invention are selected, and/or specifically designed for their ability to degrade under predetermined conditions; e.g., the existing wellbore environment, or by injection/pumping of an active fluid (i.e. a fluid that would degrade the materials of the temporary containment).
  • [0025]
    The “degradation” as used herein refers to any process that converts a degradable material from a first state (or phase) to a second state (or phase). The “degradation” may be in the form of dissolution, disintegration (defragmentation), swelling, or shrinkage. The degradation of the degradable materials may be by contacting selected fluids, or by changing temperatures and/or pressures. In addition, the pH of the fluids may also be changed to influence degradation of the degradable materials, in particular rate of degradation. With changing temperature and/or pressure as the degradation mechanism, the materials may be so selected that the changes in temperatures and/or pressure (i.e., in typical downhole applications) either reduce or increase degradation rates. FIGS. 4A and 4B show two charts illustrating how degradation rates (i.e., the degradation of the degradable materials) may be controlled by temperature (FIG. 4A) and pH (FIG. 4B).
  • [0026]
    In accordance with some embodiments of the invention, the degradation may be activated by contacts with selected fluids. The so-called fluids that can be used to degrade the degradable materials of the temporary containment may be solvent to the particular materials such that these materials will dissolve in the fluids. For oil and gas applications, the active fluid may be aqueous or non-aqueous. Examples of degradable materials may include hydrophobic materials that can be dissolved by hydrophobic solvents, or hydrophilic materials that can be dissolved by water.
  • [0027]
    Thus, in accordance with embodiments of the invention, a simple example of degradable materials for temporary containment for swellable and inflatable packers may be a hydrophobic material that is not soluble in an aqueous solvent, but is readily soluble in a hydrophobic solvent. Such a hydrophobic material may be used to construct a portion (or all) of a packer element. The presence of the hydrophobic material (temporary containment) keeps the device in an initial state. When actuation of the device is desired, a solvent may be brought into contact with the device. The hydrophobic solvent dissolves the hydrophobic material and removes the temporary containment. As a result, the device adopts a second state. Similarly, a hydrophilic material may be used in a device to be deployed in a non-aqueous environment. When actuation is needed, water or an aqueous solution may be used to dissolve the degradable material.
  • [0028]
    In accordance with embodiments of the invention, the degradable materials may be metallic (or alloy), organic (e.g., polymers or composite), inorganic (e.g., water glass), or ceramic. Examples of polymer degradable materials may include any polymer having a functional group that can be converted into a different type of functional group. After conversion, the physical and/or chemical properties of such polymers are changed. The functional groups that are useful in this regard, for example, may include hydrolyzable functional groups such as anhydrides, lactones, esters, imides, lactams, and the like. Note that the anhydrides, lactones and esters include thioanhydrides, thiolactones and thioesters. A common property of these functional groups is that they can be readily hydrolyzed by a base (e.g., OH) or a nucleophile (e.g., ammonia, a hydroxylamine, or an amine R—NH2). A base may be any base commonly known in the art, such as sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, lithium hydroxide, or the like. When a base is added to or generated in a solution, the pH of the solution is raised. Thus, adding or generating a base may be referred to as raising the pH of a solution.
  • [0029]
    Examples of such polymers may include ISOBAM 600® manufactured by Kuraray Co., Ltd. (Tokyo, Japan). ISOBAM 600® is a co-polymer of isobutylene with maleic anhydride. This polymer is insoluble in water under acidic or neutral conditions. However, the polymer becomes water soluble in the presence of a base or a nucleophile because the anhydride groups can be readily opened up by the base or the nucleophile. Upon hydrolysis this polymer becomes water soluble.
  • [0030]
    Other examples may include modified polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH). PVOH is typically prepared by polymerizing vinyl acetate, followed by hydrolysis of the acetate groups. The hydrolysis step can be controlled to occur to a desired extent such that the PVOH has a desired property—not soluble in water. Examples of such modified PVOH polymers are described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,137,969, issued to Marten et a. (Col. 5, lines 1-11). Some of these modified PVOH are sold by Celanese Chemicals (Dallas, Tex., U.S.A.) under the trade name of Vytek™. Such PVOH can be hydrolyzed by based to become water soluble. Similarly, low-viscosity latex, such as those supplied by Hexion Specialty Chemicals (Columbus, Ohio), may also be prepared to retain some functional groups such that it is not soluble in aqueous medium until such functional groups are hydrolyzed by base. These materials are described in a co-pending application Ser. No. 11/610600, entitled “Fluid Loss Control Agent With Triggerable Removal Mechanism,” by Hoefer et al.
  • [0031]
    In addition to adding a base (increased pH) or nucleophile, these degradable polymer materials may also be degraded by increased temperatures. These materials are susceptible to slow hydrolysis in aqueous medium even without added base or nucleophile. The slow background rates may be increased by increasing temperatures. For example, the background hydrolysis rates of these polymers at room temperature may not be noticeable. However, the same reaction may become sufficiently fast to degrade these polymers in downhole conditions.
  • [0032]
    The degradable materials in accordance with embodiments of the invention are selected for their ability to degrade under predetermined conditions and may comprise, for example, calcium, magnesium, or aluminum, as one constituent of the material. In accordance with some embodiments of the invention, such degradable materials may be metals, alloys, or composites of metals and alloys that may include non-metallic materials such as polymer, plastics, other organic materials (e.g. pasty fluids), or ceramics.
  • [0033]
    Typical examples of degradable metals and alloys in accordance with embodiments of the invention may include alkaline and alkaline-earth metals such as calcium (Ca safely dissolves in water regardless of pH), magnesium (Mg dissolves at low pH), aluminum (Al dissolves at low pH), and alloys and composites of those metals that degrade in water at rates that depend upon temperature, pressure, and fluid composition. For example, acids may accelerate degradation of these metals or alloys.
  • [0034]
    The following Table lists some examples of metal and alloy degradable materials in accordance with embodiments of the invention. The Table lists metal and alloy compositions, degradation rates at normal pressure (1 atm) in water of specific pH and temperature, as well as their approximate ambient-temperature strength. As shown in this Table, an alloy of calcium containing 20 percent by weight magnesium degrades much slower than pure calcium metal (i.e., 99.99% Ca) and is also about 10 times stronger (i.e., its strength is comparable that of quenched and tempered steels). In addition, note that aluminum can be made degradable in neutral water with suitable alloying elements.
  • [0000]
    Strength Temperature pH Degradation
    Material (MPa) (° C.) range rate (mm/h)
    Calcium metal ~70 25 3-11 ~5
    (99.99% Ca) 65 3-11 10-11
    90 3-11 17-20
    Calcium alloy ~700 25 3-11 ~0.05
    (Ca—20 wt. % Mg) 65 3-11 0.2-0.3
    90 3-11 1.2-1.7
    Aluminum metal ~100 90 7 <0.0001
    (99.99Ca)
    Aluminum alloy ~ 90 7 ~0.17
    (Al—21Ga)
    Aluminum alloy ~ 90 7 ~0.03
    (Al—10Ga—10Mg)
    Aluminum alloy ~ 25 7 0.5-0.6
    (Al—5Ga—5Mg—5In) 90 7 0.8-0.9
  • [0035]
    Typical examples of degradable ceramics are those made of alkaline and alkaline-earth metals, such as calcium carbonates, calcium phosphate, and calcium sulfate, to name a few. The dissolution behavior of such ceramics will depend on their composition, processing, final form, as well as local pH and pO2.
  • [0036]
    Embodiments of the invention may be used with any swellable packers known in the art. FIG. 1 shows a swell packer 11, which includes a swellable elastomer 12 on a basepipe or mandrel 13. The swellable elastomer 12 has anti-extrusion rings 14 made of metal on both sides. The swellable elastomer 12 may be bonded to the base pipe 13 on its inner side. The outer surface of the swellable elastomer 12 is protected by a temporary sleeve or temporary containment 15. The temporary containment 15 can be made of a degradable material in accordance with embodiments of the invention, such as degradable polymers and degradable metals/alloys. In accordance with some embodiments of the invention, the temporary containment 15 may be made of inorganic materials, such as water glass (or soluble glass). Water glass is a colorless, transparent, grasslike substance available commercially as a powder or as a transparent, viscous solution in water. Chemically it is sodium silicate, potassium silicate, or a mixture of these. It is prepared by fusing sodium or potassium carbonate with sand or by heating sodium or potassium hydroxide with sand under pressure. Water glass is very soluble in water, but the glassy solid dissolves slowly, even in boiling water.
  • [0037]
    In accordance with some embodiments of the invention, the temporary containment 15 may be made of polymers or composites that include particles of soluble polymer or metals. That is, the temporary containment 15 need not be entirely made of a degradable material. For instance, it may be a layer that contains both degradable and non-degradable materials. When such temporary containments come in contact with appropriate fluids, the degradable materials will dissolve to leave behind a layer (non-degradable part) with very high porosity and permeability.
  • [0038]
    In accordance with embodiments of the invention, an inflatable packer is first delivered to the desired location (as shown in FIG. 2A) and then the temporary containment is degraded to allow the packer to inflate and seal the wellbore (as shown in FIG. 2B). FIG. 2A shows an inflatable packer 21 on a basepipe 23 has been delivered to the desired location in a wellbore. In order to prevent damage to the outer elastomer layer of the packer, a temporary containment 25 is provided on the outside of the inflatable packer 21. When the temporary containment 25 comes in contact with an appropriate fluid, it disintegrates and/or dissolves. As a result, the temporary containment 25 loses its mechanical integrity, which in turn allows the inflatable packer 21 to be deployed in an unhindered manner, as shown in FIG. 2B. The advantage of the temporary containment 25 is to protect the delicate elastomer layer from damages (such as abrasion, wear and gauging), while the inflatable packer 21 is being run in hole. The temporary containment 25 also prevents the elastomer layers from swabbing off. Therefore, the operators can run the packer to the setting depth at a faster rate.
  • [0039]
    A swellable packer in accordance with embodiments of the invention may be used in any downhole operations that require a packer. FIGS. 3A and 3B show an example of packers used in sand screening. FIG. 3A shows swell packers 31 with temporary containments 35 to control the swelling of the packers 31 that can be used as annular constrictors for use with sand screens 36. The temporary containment 35 can be made of any degradable material in accordance with embodiments of the invention, such as metals, alloys, or polymer that readily reacts with appropriate fluids (e.g., a fluid with high or low pH). In accordance with some embodiments of the invention, the containment 35 can also be made of water soluble materials (for use in a hydrocarbon environment) or hydrocarbon soluble materials (for use in an aqueous environment). In accordance with some embodiments of the invention, the temporary containment 35 may be made to dissolve or disintegrate by spotting acids. Once the temporary containment 35 is degraded, the swellable packers 31 can be inflated by contacting a fluid to seal the wellbore into different zones, as shown in FIG. 3B.
  • [0040]
    While the invention has been described with respect to a limited number of embodiments, those skilled in the art, having benefit of this disclosure, will appreciate that other embodiments can be devised which do not depart from the scope of the invention as disclosed herein. Accordingly, the scope of the invention should be limited only by the attached claims.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3489216 *Aug 25, 1967Jan 13, 1970Halliburton CoBridge plug with valved hollow mandrel bypass
US3918523 *Jul 11, 1974Nov 11, 1975Stuber Ivan LMethod and means for implanting casing
US4137970 *Apr 20, 1977Feb 6, 1979The Dow Chemical CompanyPacker with chemically activated sealing member and method of use thereof
US4612985 *Jul 24, 1985Sep 23, 1986Baker Oil Tools, Inc.Seal assembly for well tools
US4862967 *Jul 18, 1988Sep 5, 1989Baker Oil Tools, Inc.Method of employing a coated elastomeric packing element
US4919989 *Apr 10, 1989Apr 24, 1990American Colloid CompanyArticle for sealing well castings in the earth
US4936386 *Nov 9, 1989Jun 26, 1990American Colloid CompanyMethod for sealing well casings in the earth
US5048605 *Nov 9, 1987Sep 17, 1991University Of WaterlooPacking-seal for boreholes
US5195583 *Sep 25, 1991Mar 23, 1993Solinst Canada LtdBorehole packer
US6073692 *Mar 27, 1998Jun 13, 2000Baker Hughes IncorporatedExpanding mandrel inflatable packer
US6349766 *May 5, 1999Feb 26, 2002Baker Hughes IncorporatedChemical actuation of downhole tools
US6834725 *Dec 12, 2002Dec 28, 2004Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Reinforced swelling elastomer seal element on expandable tubular
US6848505 *Jan 29, 2003Feb 1, 2005Baker Hughes IncorporatedAlternative method to cementing casing and liners
US6854522 *Sep 23, 2002Feb 15, 2005Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Annular isolators for expandable tubulars in wellbores
US7322412 *Aug 30, 2004Jan 29, 2008Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Casing shoes and methods of reverse-circulation cementing of casing
US7363986 *Jan 19, 2007Apr 29, 2008Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Annular isolators for expandable tubulars in wellbores
US7387158 *Jan 18, 2006Jun 17, 2008Baker Hughes IncorporatedSelf energized packer
US20050092382 *Sep 22, 2004May 5, 2005Epros GmbhDevice and method for pipeline rehabilitation
US20050199401 *Mar 10, 2005Sep 15, 2005Schlumberger Technology CorporationSystem and Method to Seal Using a Swellable Material
US20050274522 *Jun 11, 2004Dec 15, 2005Surjaatmadja Jim BLimited entry multiple fracture and frac-pack placement in liner completions using liner fracturing tool
US20060042798 *Aug 30, 2004Mar 2, 2006Badalamenti Anthony MCasing shoes and methods of reverse-circulation cementing of casing
US20060124310 *Dec 14, 2004Jun 15, 2006Schlumberger Technology CorporationSystem for Completing Multiple Well Intervals
US20060175065 *Dec 21, 2005Aug 10, 2006Schlumberger Technology CorporationWater shut off method and apparatus
US20070125532 *Dec 1, 2005Jun 7, 2007Murray Douglas JSelf energized backup system for packer sealing elements
US20070151724 *Jan 5, 2006Jul 5, 2007Schlumberger Technology CorporationSystem and Method for Isolating a Wellbore Region
WO2004074621A2 *Feb 20, 2004Sep 2, 2004Schlumberger Holdings LimitedSystem and method for maintaining zonal isolation in a wellbore
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7703520Apr 11, 2008Apr 27, 2010Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Sand control screen assembly and associated methods
US7712529Jan 8, 2008May 11, 2010Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Sand control screen assembly and method for use of same
US7762341May 13, 2008Jul 27, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedFlow control device utilizing a reactive media
US7775271Jul 11, 2008Aug 17, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedDevice and system for well completion and control and method for completing and controlling a well
US7775277Aug 17, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedDevice and system for well completion and control and method for completing and controlling a well
US7784543Aug 31, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedDevice and system for well completion and control and method for completing and controlling a well
US7789139Jun 23, 2008Sep 7, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedDevice and system for well completion and control and method for completing and controlling a well
US7789151Jun 18, 2008Sep 7, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedPlug protection system and method
US7789152Aug 15, 2008Sep 7, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedPlug protection system and method
US7793714Sep 14, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedDevice and system for well completion and control and method for completing and controlling a well
US7814973Oct 19, 2010Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Sand control screen assembly and method for use of same
US7814974Oct 19, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedSystems, methods and apparatuses for monitoring and recovery of petroleum from earth formations
US7819190Jun 17, 2008Oct 26, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedSystems, methods and apparatuses for monitoring and recovery of petroleum from earth formations
US7823645Nov 2, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedDownhole inflow control device with shut-off feature
US7841409Aug 29, 2008Nov 30, 2010Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Sand control screen assembly and method for use of same
US7866383Aug 29, 2008Jan 11, 2011Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Sand control screen assembly and method for use of same
US7866406Jan 11, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedSystem and method for plugging a downhole wellbore
US7886818Feb 15, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedExpandable packer system
US7891430Feb 22, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedWater control device using electromagnetics
US7913755Jul 11, 2008Mar 29, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedDevice and system for well completion and control and method for completing and controlling a well
US7913765Oct 19, 2007Mar 29, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedWater absorbing or dissolving materials used as an in-flow control device and method of use
US7918272Apr 5, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedPermeable medium flow control devices for use in hydrocarbon production
US7918275Nov 19, 2008Apr 5, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedWater sensitive adaptive inflow control using couette flow to actuate a valve
US7931081Apr 26, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedSystems, methods and apparatuses for monitoring and recovery of petroleum from earth formations
US7942206May 17, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedIn-flow control device utilizing a water sensitive media
US7992637Aug 9, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedReverse flow in-flow control device
US8056627Nov 15, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedPermeability flow balancing within integral screen joints and method
US8069919Nov 11, 2010Dec 6, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedSystems, methods and apparatuses for monitoring and recovery of petroleum from earth formations
US8069921Dec 6, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedAdjustable flow control devices for use in hydrocarbon production
US8087459Jan 3, 2012Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Packer providing multiple seals and having swellable element isolatable from the wellbore
US8096351Jan 17, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedWater sensing adaptable in-flow control device and method of use
US8113290Sep 9, 2009Feb 14, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationDissolvable connector guard
US8113292Dec 15, 2008Feb 14, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedStrokable liner hanger and method
US8132624Jun 2, 2009Mar 13, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedPermeability flow balancing within integral screen joints and method
US8151875Nov 15, 2010Apr 10, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedDevice and system for well completion and control and method for completing and controlling a well
US8151881Jun 2, 2009Apr 10, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedPermeability flow balancing within integral screen joints
US8159226Jun 17, 2008Apr 17, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedSystems, methods and apparatuses for monitoring and recovery of petroleum from earth formations
US8171999May 8, 2012Baker Huges IncorporatedDownhole flow control device and method
US8211247 *Jul 3, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationDegradable compositions, apparatus comprising same, and method of use
US8211248Jul 3, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationAged-hardenable aluminum alloy with environmental degradability, methods of use and making
US8220554Nov 16, 2007Jul 17, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationDegradable whipstock apparatus and method of use
US8225880 *Jul 24, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationMethod and system for zonal isolation
US8231947Jul 31, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationOilfield elements having controlled solubility and methods of use
US8286704Oct 16, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationCoiled tubing conveyed combined inflow and outflow control devices
US8291972Oct 23, 2012Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Sand control screen assembly and method for use of same
US8297364Oct 30, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedTelescopic unit with dissolvable barrier
US8312931Oct 12, 2007Nov 20, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedFlow restriction device
US8327931Dec 11, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedMulti-component disappearing tripping ball and method for making the same
US8403037Dec 8, 2009Mar 26, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedDissolvable tool and method
US8425651Apr 23, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedNanomatrix metal composite
US8430173Apr 12, 2010Apr 30, 2013Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.High strength dissolvable structures for use in a subterranean well
US8430174Sep 10, 2010Apr 30, 2013Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Anhydrous boron-based timed delay plugs
US8434559May 7, 2013Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.High strength dissolvable structures for use in a subterranean well
US8459366 *Mar 8, 2011Jun 11, 2013Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Temperature dependent swelling of a swellable material
US8499827Sep 23, 2010Aug 6, 2013Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Sand control screen assembly and method for use of same
US8528633Dec 8, 2009Sep 10, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedDissolvable tool and method
US8544548Oct 19, 2007Oct 1, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedWater dissolvable materials for activating inflow control devices that control flow of subsurface fluids
US8550166Jul 21, 2009Oct 8, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedSelf-adjusting in-flow control device
US8555958Jun 19, 2008Oct 15, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedPipeless steam assisted gravity drainage system and method
US8567494Aug 31, 2005Oct 29, 2013Schlumberger Technology CorporationWell operating elements comprising a soluble component and methods of use
US8573295Nov 16, 2010Nov 5, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedPlug and method of unplugging a seat
US8631876Apr 28, 2011Jan 21, 2014Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethod of making and using a functionally gradient composite tool
US8646535Aug 7, 2012Feb 11, 2014Baker Hughes IncorporatedFlow restriction devices
US8663401Nov 21, 2011Mar 4, 2014Schlumberger Technology CorporationDegradable compositions, apparatus comprising same, and methods of use
US8668019 *Dec 29, 2010Mar 11, 2014Baker Hughes IncorporatedDissolvable barrier for downhole use and method thereof
US8689894 *Mar 21, 2008Apr 8, 2014Schlumberger Technology CorporationMethod and composition for zonal isolation of a well
US8714268Oct 26, 2012May 6, 2014Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethod of making and using multi-component disappearing tripping ball
US8770261Feb 24, 2009Jul 8, 2014Schlumberger Technology CorporationMethods of manufacturing degradable alloys and products made from degradable alloys
US8776881Jun 17, 2008Jul 15, 2014Baker Hughes IncorporatedSystems, methods and apparatuses for monitoring and recovery of petroleum from earth formations
US8776884May 24, 2011Jul 15, 2014Baker Hughes IncorporatedFormation treatment system and method
US8794323 *Jul 17, 2008Aug 5, 2014Bp Corporation North America Inc.Completion assembly
US8800657 *Aug 30, 2011Aug 12, 2014Baker Hughes IncorporatedSealing system, method of manufacture thereof and articles comprising the same
US8833443Nov 22, 2010Sep 16, 2014Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Retrievable swellable packer
US8839849Mar 18, 2008Sep 23, 2014Baker Hughes IncorporatedWater sensitive variable counterweight device driven by osmosis
US8839874May 15, 2012Sep 23, 2014Baker Hughes IncorporatedPacking element backup system
US8881804 *Sep 26, 2013Nov 11, 2014Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Expandable screen by spring force
US8893809Jul 2, 2009Nov 25, 2014Baker Hughes IncorporatedFlow control device with one or more retrievable elements and related methods
US8905149Jun 8, 2011Dec 9, 2014Baker Hughes IncorporatedExpandable seal with conforming ribs
US8910945Mar 11, 2011Dec 16, 2014Tendeka B.V.Seal assembly and method of forming a seal assembly
US8931570May 8, 2008Jan 13, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedReactive in-flow control device for subterranean wellbores
US8936095May 28, 2010Jan 20, 2015Schlumberger Technology CorporationMethods of magnetic particle delivery for oil and gas wells
US8955606Jun 3, 2011Feb 17, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedSealing devices for sealing inner wall surfaces of a wellbore and methods of installing same in a wellbore
US8985155 *Aug 10, 2011Mar 24, 2015Deutz AktiengesellschaftPipe
US9016371Sep 4, 2009Apr 28, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedFlow rate dependent flow control device and methods for using same in a wellbore
US9022107Jun 26, 2013May 5, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedDissolvable tool
US9068428Feb 13, 2012Jun 30, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedSelectively corrodible downhole article and method of use
US9079246Dec 8, 2009Jul 14, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethod of making a nanomatrix powder metal compact
US9080098Apr 28, 2011Jul 14, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedFunctionally gradient composite article
US9085953Apr 10, 2012Jul 21, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedDownhole flow control device and method
US9090955Oct 27, 2010Jul 28, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedNanomatrix powder metal composite
US9090956Aug 30, 2011Jul 28, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedAluminum alloy powder metal compact
US9091133 *Feb 20, 2009Jul 28, 2015Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Swellable material activation and monitoring in a subterranean well
US9101978Dec 8, 2009Aug 11, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedNanomatrix powder metal compact
US9109269Aug 30, 2011Aug 18, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedMagnesium alloy powder metal compact
US9109429Dec 8, 2009Aug 18, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedEngineered powder compact composite material
US9127515Oct 27, 2010Sep 8, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedNanomatrix carbon composite
US9133695Sep 3, 2011Sep 15, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedDegradable shaped charge and perforating gun system
US9187990Sep 3, 2011Nov 17, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethod of using a degradable shaped charge and perforating gun system
US9194217 *May 26, 2010Nov 24, 2015Schlumberger Technology CorporationMethod and system of sand management
US9227243Jul 29, 2011Jan 5, 2016Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethod of making a powder metal compact
US9243472May 15, 2015Jan 26, 2016Geodynamics, Inc.Wellbore plug isolation system and method
US9243475Jul 29, 2011Jan 26, 2016Baker Hughes IncorporatedExtruded powder metal compact
US9243490Dec 19, 2012Jan 26, 2016Baker Hughes IncorporatedElectronically set and retrievable isolation devices for wellbores and methods thereof
US9284812Oct 5, 2012Mar 15, 2016Baker Hughes IncorporatedSystem for increasing swelling efficiency
US9347119Sep 3, 2011May 24, 2016Baker Hughes IncorporatedDegradable high shock impedance material
US20070107908 *Jun 30, 2006May 17, 2007Schlumberger Technology CorporationOilfield Elements Having Controlled Solubility and Methods of Use
US20070181224 *Jun 28, 2006Aug 9, 2007Schlumberger Technology CorporationDegradable Compositions, Apparatus Comprising Same, and Method of Use
US20080035350 *Aug 21, 2007Feb 14, 2008Baker Hughes IncorporatedDownhole Inflow Control Device with Shut-Off Feature
US20080105438 *Nov 16, 2007May 8, 2008Schlumberger Technology CorporationDegradable whipstock apparatus and method of use
US20090095484 *Aug 14, 2008Apr 16, 2009Baker Hughes IncorporatedIn-Flow Control Device Utilizing A Water Sensitive Media
US20090101329 *Oct 19, 2007Apr 23, 2009Baker Hughes IncorporatedWater Sensing Adaptable Inflow Control Device Using a Powered System
US20090101341 *Oct 19, 2007Apr 23, 2009Baker Hughes IncorporatedWater Control Device Using Electromagnetics
US20090101342 *Oct 19, 2007Apr 23, 2009Baker Hughes IncorporatedPermeable Medium Flow Control Devices for Use in Hydrocarbon Production
US20090101344 *Oct 22, 2007Apr 23, 2009Baker Hughes IncorporatedWater Dissolvable Released Material Used as Inflow Control Device
US20090101352 *Oct 19, 2007Apr 23, 2009Baker Hughes IncorporatedWater Dissolvable Materials for Activating Inflow Control Devices That Control Flow of Subsurface Fluids
US20090101353 *Oct 19, 2007Apr 23, 2009Baker Hughes IncorporatedWater Absorbing Materials Used as an In-flow Control Device
US20090101355 *Oct 19, 2007Apr 23, 2009Baker Hughes IncorporatedWater Sensing Adaptable In-Flow Control Device and Method of Use
US20090173490 *Jan 8, 2008Jul 9, 2009Ronald Glen DusterhoftSand Control Screen Assembly and Method for Use of Same
US20090205841 *Feb 6, 2009Aug 20, 2009Jurgen KlugeDownwell system with activatable swellable packer
US20090205842 *Feb 6, 2009Aug 20, 2009Peter WilliamsonOn-site assemblable packer element for downwell packing system
US20090226340 *Feb 24, 2009Sep 10, 2009Schlumberger Technology CorporationMethods of manufacturing degradable alloys and products made from degradable alloys
US20090250222 *Apr 2, 2008Oct 8, 2009Baker Hughes IncorporatedReverse flow in-flow control device
US20090277650 *May 8, 2008Nov 12, 2009Baker Hughes IncorporatedReactive in-flow control device for subterranean wellbores
US20090283270 *Jun 18, 2008Nov 19, 2009Baker Hughes IncoporatedPlug protection system and method
US20090283275 *May 13, 2008Nov 19, 2009Baker Hughes IncorporatedFlow Control Device Utilizing a Reactive Media
US20100012318 *Jan 21, 2010Luce Thomas ACompletion assembly
US20100051262 *Aug 29, 2008Mar 4, 2010Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Sand Control Screen Assembly and Method for Use of Same
US20100051270 *Aug 29, 2008Mar 4, 2010Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Sand Control Screen Assembly and Method for Use of Same
US20100071912 *Mar 25, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedSystem and method for plugging a downhole wellbore
US20100108313 *Oct 27, 2009May 6, 2010Schlumberger Technology CorporationCoiled tubing conveyed combined inflow and outflow control devices
US20100139929 *Dec 1, 2009Jun 10, 2010Schlumberger Technology CorporationMethod and system for zonal isolation
US20100163252 *Mar 21, 2008Jul 1, 2010Loic Regnault De La MotheMethod and composition for zonal isolation of a well
US20100209288 *Aug 19, 2010Schlumberger Technology CorporationAged-hardenable aluminum alloy with environmental degradability, methods of use and making
US20100212891 *Aug 26, 2010Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Swellable Material Activation and Monitoring in a Subterranean Well
US20100243235 *Sep 30, 2010Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Packer Providing Multiple Seals and Having Swellable Element Isolatable from the Wellbore
US20100300687 *May 26, 2010Dec 2, 2010Schlumberger Technology CorporationMethod and system of sand management
US20110000684 *Jan 6, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedFlow control device with one or more retrievable elements
US20110011577 *Sep 23, 2010Jan 20, 2011Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Sand control screen assembly and method for use of same
US20110011586 *Jan 20, 2011Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Sand control screen assembly and method for use of same
US20110017470 *Jul 21, 2009Jan 27, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedSelf-adjusting in-flow control device
US20110037230 *Oct 19, 2010Feb 17, 2011O'connor KevenExpandable packer system
US20110056686 *Sep 4, 2009Mar 10, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedFlow Rate Dependent Flow Control Device
US20110056702 *Mar 10, 2011Schlumberger Technology CorporationDissolvable connector guard
US20110132621 *Jun 9, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedMulti-Component Disappearing Tripping Ball and Method for Making the Same
US20110162844 *Aug 12, 2009Jul 7, 2011Kevin MauthAssembly and method for placing a cement plug
US20120012342 *Jul 13, 2010Jan 19, 2012Wilkin James FDownhole Packer Having Tandem Packer Elements for Isolating Frac Zones
US20120168152 *Jul 5, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedDissolvable barrier for downhole use and method thereof
US20120227986 *Mar 8, 2011Sep 13, 2012Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Temperature dependent swelling of a swellable material
US20130025849 *Jan 31, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedActuated packer arrangement having a degradable layer for a seal
US20130048289 *Feb 28, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedSealing system, method of manufacture thereof and articles comprising the same
US20130180613 *Aug 10, 2011Jul 18, 2013Deutz AktiengesellschaftPipe
US20140076540 *Sep 26, 2013Mar 20, 2014Halliburton Energy Services, IncExpandable Screen by Spring Force
US20140116688 *Jan 6, 2014May 1, 2014Baker Hughes IncorporatedDownhole water detection system and method
DE102014002195A1 *Feb 12, 2014Aug 13, 2015Wintershall Holding GmbHVorrichtung zur räumlichen Begrenzung der Abgabe von Stoffen und Energie aus in Kanälen eingebrachten Quellen
EP2734599A4 *Jun 26, 2012Nov 25, 2015Baker Hughes IncIntermetallic metallic composite, method of manufacture thereof and articles comprising the same
WO2010051301A1 *Oct 28, 2009May 6, 2010Schlumberger Canada LimitedCoiled tubing conveyed combined inflow and outflow control devices
WO2011110819A2 *Mar 11, 2011Sep 15, 2011Tendeka B.V.Seal assembly and method of forming a seal assembly
WO2011110819A3 *Mar 11, 2011Jun 28, 2012Tendeka B.V.Seal assembly and method of forming a seal assembly
WO2012050687A2 *Sep 7, 2011Apr 19, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedSwellable member, swell controlling arrangement and method of controlling swelling of a swellable member background
WO2012050687A3 *Sep 7, 2011Jun 14, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedSwellable member, swell controlling arrangement and method of controlling swelling of a swellable member background
WO2012071217A3 *Nov 15, 2011Aug 16, 2012Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Retrievable swellable packer
WO2012091984A2 *Dec 19, 2011Jul 5, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedDissolvable barrier for downhole use and method thereof
WO2012091984A3 *Dec 19, 2011Nov 8, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedDissolvable barrier for downhole use and method thereof
WO2014066064A1 *Oct 11, 2013May 1, 2014Downhole Innovations, LlcErodable bridge plug in fracturing applications
WO2014093069A1 *Dec 4, 2013Jun 19, 2014Schlumberger Canada LimitedPacker material with cut fiber reinforcing agent
WO2015120837A1Feb 12, 2015Aug 20, 2015Wintershall Holding GmbHApparatus for spatially delimiting the dispensing of substances and energy from sources introduced into ducts
WO2015134074A1 *Dec 3, 2014Sep 11, 2015Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Methods of removing a wellbore isolation device using galvanic corrosion of a metal alloy in solid solution
WO2016032758A1 *Aug 13, 2015Mar 3, 2016Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Fresh water degradable downhole tools comprising magnesium and aluminum alloys
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/387, 166/195
International ClassificationE21B33/12
Cooperative ClassificationE21B41/00, E21B33/1208, E21B23/00
European ClassificationE21B33/12F, E21B41/00, E21B23/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 21, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: SCHLUMBERGER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION, TEXAS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MARYA, MANUEL;VAIDYA, NITIN Y.;BHAVSAR, RASHMI;REEL/FRAME:019720/0488;SIGNING DATES FROM 20070726 TO 20070730