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Publication numberUS20080163915 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/830,933
Publication dateJul 10, 2008
Filing dateJul 31, 2007
Priority dateJan 8, 2007
Publication number11830933, 830933, US 2008/0163915 A1, US 2008/163915 A1, US 20080163915 A1, US 20080163915A1, US 2008163915 A1, US 2008163915A1, US-A1-20080163915, US-A1-2008163915, US2008/0163915A1, US2008/163915A1, US20080163915 A1, US20080163915A1, US2008163915 A1, US2008163915A1
InventorsPhilip Nathaniel Wobrock
Original AssigneePhilip Nathaniel Wobrock
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stake and integrated driving tool
US 20080163915 A1
Abstract
The present invention is an integrated tool that comprises a stake and post assembly and a hollow sleeve in the form of a pounding member which, when slid in a reciprocating motion over the post and brought downwards with a velocity to strike a collar, imparts sufficient force to the stake for driving the stake into the ground or any other hard surface.
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Claims(15)
1. An integrated stake and driving-in tool comprising:
a first member having an upper end and a lower end;
a collar fixedly attached to said upper end;
a working end adapter physically integrated with said lower end;
a post member fixedly attached to said collar; and
a hollow sleeve positioned over said post member wherein said hollow sleeve is configured to be capable of moving in a reciprocating motion over said post member and striking said collar.
2. The integrated stake and driving-in tool of claim 1 wherein the reciprocating motion over said post member to strike the collar imparts sufficient force to the stake for driving the stake into the ground or any hard surface.
3. The integrated stake and driving-in tool of claim 1 wherein the hollow sleeve is employed to loosen the stake in the ground for ease of removal.
4. The integrated stake and driving-in tool of claim 1 wherein the lower end comprises screw holes so that a plurality of different working end adapters can be attached to the lower end.
5. The integrated stake and driving-in tool of claim 1 wherein the working end adapter is a chisel.
6. The integrated stake and driving-in tool of claim 1 wherein the working end adapter is a hammer head.
7. The integrated stake and driving-in tool of claim 1 wherein the working end adapter is a fork.
8. The integrated stake and driving-in tool of claim 1 wherein the working end adapter is a V-shaped member.
9. The integrated stake and driving-in tool of claim 1 wherein the working end adapter is a foot member.
10. The integrated stake and driving-in tool of claim 1 wherein the working end adapter is a pencil point.
11. The integrated stake and driving-in tool of claim 1 wherein the working end adapter is a single angle point.
12. The integrated stake and driving-in tool of claim 1 wherein the working end adapter is an arrow head.
13. A tent comprising:
at least one layer of fabric forming at least a roof and walls;
at least one pole for providing structural support; and
at least one integrated stake and driving-in tool for securing the tent to the ground, wherein the integrated stake and driving-in tool further comprises:
a first member having an upper end and a lower end;
a collar fixedly attached to said upper end;
a working end adapter physically integrated with said lower end;
a post member fixedly attached to said collar; and
a hollow sleeve positioned over said post member wherein said hollow sleeve is configured to be capable of moving in a reciprocating motion over said post member and striking said collar,
wherein the integrated stake and driving-in tool may be physically integrated with the at least one pole.
14. An umbrella comprising:
a wire frame, comprising a pole having and upper end and a lower end;
a fabric cover attached to the upper end of the wire frame; and
at least one integrated stake and driving-in tool physically integrated with the lower end of the pole for securing the umbrella to the ground, wherein the integrated stake and driving-in tool further comprises:
a first member having an upper end and a lower end;
a collar fixedly attached to said upper end;
a working end adapter physically integrated with said lower end;
a post member fixedly attached to said collar; and
a hollow sleeve positioned over said post member wherein said hollow sleeve is configured to be capable of moving in a reciprocating motion over said post member and striking said collar.
15. A net for a sporting activity comprising:
a fabric net;
at least one pole for securing the net, wherein the at least one pole has an upper end and a lower end; and
at least one integrated stake and driving-in tool physically integrated with the lower end of the at least one pole for securing the net to the ground, wherein the integrated stake and driving-in tool further comprises:
a first member having an upper end and a lower end;
a collar fixedly attached to said upper end;
a working end adapter physically integrated with said lower end;
a post member fixedly attached to said collar; and
a hollow sleeve positioned over said post member
wherein said hollow sleeve is configured to be capable of moving in a reciprocating motion over said post member and striking said collar.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE

The present invention relies on, for priority, U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/879,065 filed on Jan. 6, 2007.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention generally relates to the field of stakes, and more specifically, relates to a stake that has an integrated pounding or driving member for providing driving-in force to the stake, enabling the stake to be pushed farther into the ground without additional tooling.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Stakes are used as members to secure tents, umbrellas, and other shade coverings to the ground, tether pets, and anchor boats to the shore, among many other uses. Such stakes typically have a pointed end to be driven into ground and a flat head at the other end.

Conventional stakes are manually pushed into the ground using a pounding implement, such as a hammer or mallet, which is used to hit the head of the stake and drive the stake into the ground. However, carrying a separate pounding member is often inconvenient and, frequently, individuals forget to carry such an implement with them. Unfortunately, without this separate pounding member, a user would either not able to secure the stake at all or will have to use alternatives such as a stone or any other heavy device which can be cumbersome and perhaps difficult to locate in certain areas.

In addition, such makeshift pounding devices often fail to effectively and safely secure the stake to the ground or other area. For example, in securing an umbrella to the sand at the beach, one often has to ensure that the umbrella is far into the ground to avoid the umbrella being lost to the wind and other environmental factors. Additionally, one often has to use stakes to secure a tent to the ground. It is often difficult to judge the type of land into which one is tethering the stake. As such, one may not be as well-equipped to ensure proper tethering.

The prior art fails to provide for a compact, easy-to-use, integrated stake and pounding member. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 6,634,047, assigned to Rowland, discloses “[a] camping tool comprising: A) an upper portion with a hammer on one side and a ground penetrating-dibble on the other side, and b) a lower portion with an o-ring attached to it by a metal chain to remove a tent-stake”. The camping tool disclosed herein is still a separate member from the tent stake and may be cumbersome.

In addition, U.S. Pat. No. 5,085,281, assigned to Selly, describes “[a] slide hammer for driving a stake member into the ground, the stake member having a top edge, two legs having leg portions transversely extending at an angle relative to one another, and a side surface, the slide hammer comprising an axially elongated mounting member having a lower end portion that has a lower terminal transverse edge and a top end portion, an anvil mounted to the top end portion and having a top surface, a longitudinally elongated slide member longitudinally reciprocally mounted on the mounting member for upward and downward movement relative to the mounting member and having upper and lower end portions, a cap mounted by the slide member upper end portion for delivering a hammering blow to the anvil top surface when the slide member is moved downwardly relative to the mounting member, and a hammer member fixedly attached to the mounting member lower end portion and having a terminal transverse lower edge extending transversely away from the mounting member for abutting against the stake top edge to transmit a hammering force to the stake, the hammer member transverse lower edge being substantially more closely adjacent to the mounting member top end portion than the mounting member lower transverse edge while the mounting member lower end portion extends downwardly along the side surface of the stake, the hammer member having plate portions transversely extending at substantially the same angle relative to one another that the stake leg portions extend relative to one another.” The slide hammer described by Selly is cumbersome, however, and requires many functional parts, lending to breakage and difficulty of use.

What is needed therefore is a stake that obviates the need for a separate pounding member.

What is also needed is a stake that can be used to secure a tent to a ground surface, such as on sand or a field.

What is also needed is a stake that can be used to secure an umbrella, such as a shade umbrella on the ground, such as on the beach sand or a field.

What is also needed is a stake that can be used to secure a sports net to a ground surface, such as on sand or a field.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention to provide an integrated stake and driving-in tool.

It is an object of the present invention to use the integrated driving-in tool as a pounding member to drive the stake into the ground or any other surface without the need of a separate pounding member, such as a hammer, mallet, and the like.

It is another object of the present invention to enable a plurality of working end adaptors to be affixed to the integrated tool enabling the integrated tool to be used across a plurality of work applications.

Accordingly, in one embodiment the integrated tool comprises a stake and post assembly and a hollow sleeve in the form of a pounding member which when slid in a reciprocating motion over the post and brought downwards with a velocity to strike a collar imparts sufficient force to the stake for driving the stake into the ground or any other hard surface. In one embodiment, the hollow sleeve comprises two members—a shorter, weighted member and a longer, lighter member welded together for a secure attachment.

In one embodiment the stake is a singular member, the lower end of which is formed in the form of a pointed tip or working end adapter.

In one embodiment, the integrated stake is used to secure an umbrella to the ground. In another embodiment, the integrated stake is used to secure a tent to the ground. In still another embodiment, the integrated stake is used to secure sports netting to the ground and in place. In yet another embodiment the stake is used as a tying post to tether a pet. In still another embodiment, the stake is used to secure garden covers or plant trellises. In one embodiment, the stake is fixedly attached to the trellis leg to offer support.

In an alternate embodiment the lower end of the stake has screws cut on to it such that working end adapters of varying sizes, shape and angle can be screwed to the lower end.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

These and other features and advantages of the present invention will be appreciated, as they become better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 illustrates an assembled view of the integrated stake and driving tool of the present invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates one embodiment of the stake and post assembly of the present invention;

FIG. 3 a depicts one embodiment of a hollow sleeve of the present invention;

FIG. 3 b is a cross-sectional view of the upper end of the lighter member of the sleeve, shown detached from the unit;

FIG. 3 c is a cross-sectional view of the lower end of the weighted member of the sleeve;

FIG. 4 a shows a working end adapter in the form of a chisel;

FIG. 4 b shows a working end adapter in the form of a hammer head;

FIG. 4 c shows a working end adapter in the form of a fork;

FIG. 4 d shows a working end adapter in the form of a wood chisel;

FIG. 4 e shows a working end adapter in the form of a V-shaped member;

FIG. 4 f shows a working end adapter in the form of a foot member;

FIG. 4 g shows a working end adapter in the form of a pencil point;

FIG. 4 h shows a working end adapter in the form of a single angle point;

FIG. 4 i shows a working end adapter in the form of an arrow head;

FIG. 5 depicts a tent comprising the stake and integrated driving tool of the present invention;

FIG. 6 depicts an umbrella comprising the stake and integrated driving tool of the present invention; and

FIG. 7 depicts a net structure for a sporting activity comprising the stake and integrated driving tool of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed towards an integrated stake and driving-in tool. The present invention is also directed towards an integrated stake and driving-in tool wherein the driving-in tool is used as a pounding member to drive the stake into the ground or any other surface without the need of a separate pounding member, such as a hammer, mallet, and the like.

In one embodiment, the present invention is directed towards an integrated tool that comprises a stake and post assembly and a hollow sleeve in the form of a pounding member which when slid in a reciprocating motion over the post and brought downwards with a velocity to strike a collar imparts sufficient force to the stake for driving the stake into the ground or any hard surface. In one embodiment, the hollow sleeve comprises two members—a shorter, weighted member and a longer, lighter member welded together for a secure attachment.

In one embodiment the stake is a singular member, the lower end of which is formed in the form of a pointed tip or working end adapter.

Reference will now be made to specific embodiments of the invention. It should be noted that the present invention is directed toward multiple embodiments. Language used in this specification should not be interpreted as a general disavowal of any one specific embodiment or used to limit the claims beyond the meaning of the terms used therein. Any alterations and further modifications in the described embodiments, and any further applications of the principles of the invention as described herein are contemplated as would normally occur to one skilled in the art to which the invention relates.

FIG. 1 illustrates an assembled view of the integrated stake and driving-in tool 100 (hereinafter referred to as the “integrated tool”) of the present invention. In one embodiment, integrated tool 100 comprises a stake and post assembly 105 and a hollow sleeve 110. In one embodiment, hollow sleeve 110 is a pounding member which when slid in a reciprocating motion and brought downwards with a velocity to strike collar 120 imparts sufficient force to stake 115 for driving stake 115 into the ground or any other surface.

In one embodiment, the hollow sleeve 110 is employed to loosen the stake in the ground for ease of removal.

In one embodiment, as shown in FIG. 2, the stake and post assembly 200 comprises a stake 205 which is a rod having a lower end 206 and an upper end 207. The lower end 206 preferably has the shape of a pointed tip 208 (hereinafter referred to as “working end adapters”) for easy insertion in the ground when imparted driving-in force thereto.

In an optional embodiment, lower end 206 is adapted to fit working end adapters of varying sizes, shapes, and angles. For example, in one embodiment, lower end 206 has screws cut (not shown) into it such that working end adapters of varying sizes, shapes and angles can be attached to lower end 206. FIGS. 4A through 4I illustrate various embodiments of working end adapters for use with stake 205. FIG. 4 a shows a working end adapter in the form of a chisel. FIG. 4 b shows a working end adapter in the form of a hammer head. FIG. 4 c shows a working end adapter in the form of a fork. FIG. 4 d shows a working end adapter in the form of a wood chisel. FIG. 4 e shows a working end adapter in the form of a V-shaped member. FIG. 4 f shows a working end adapter in the form of a foot member. FIG. 4 g shows a working end adapter in the form of a pencil point. FIG. 4 h shows a working end adapter in the form of a single angle point, and FIG. 4 i shows a working end adapter in the form of an arrow head. These working end adapters can be used to enhance the applicability of the integrated tool to applications including, but not limited to, staking in flag posts and any other use that would be readily evident to persons of ordinary skill in the art.

Referring back to FIG. 2, upper end 207 is attached to a post 210 and collar 215. To provide secure attachment, in one embodiment, upper end 207 of stake 205 and lower end 211 of the post 210 are welded together. Thereafter, collar 215, upper end 207 of stake 205 and lower end 211 of post 210 are all welded together. In order to provide enough surface area for a secure weld sufficient longitudinal portions of the upper end 207 of the stake 205 and the lower end 211 of the post 210 are overlapped and welded together.

In an alternate embodiment, the upper end 207 of the stake 205 and the lower end 211 of the post 210 are flattened in the overlapping portion and then welded together to provide an even larger surface area for a sturdy weld. It would be advantageous to have the stake of larger diameter than that of the post so that when the ends of the two are flattened, the flattened upper end 207 of the stake is wider than the lower end 211 of the post 210 thereby further improving the sturdiness of the attachment.

In one embodiment, stake 205 is 12 inches long and is fixedly attached to post 210, which is 15 inches long, such that about 1 inch of stake 205 and 1 inch of post 210 overlap each other to form a welded joint. In one embodiment, post 210 is a rod having a diameter of ½ inch. In one embodiment, collar 215 has a ½ inch bore to fit on post 210 for welding to stake 205 and post 210. In one embodiment, collar 215 has a thickness of 3/16 inch and an overall diameter of 1.25 inches.

FIG. 3 a depicts one embodiment of a hollow sleeve 300 of the present invention. In one embodiment, hollow sleeve 300 slides on post 315 of the stake and post assembly described in detail in FIG. 2. For ease of illustration, the stake and post assembly is not shown in this diagram. In one embodiment, sleeve 300 is fabricated from two hollow members—first hollow member 305 and second hollow member 310. In one embodiment, first hollow member 305 is a short, weighted member and second hollow member 310 is a relatively longer, lighter than first hollow member 305. First member 305 and second member 310 are securely attached to each other by welding. First member 305 forms the lower end 306 of sleeve 300 and abuts collar 120 (shown in FIG. 1). Second hollow member 310 forms the rest of the portion of sleeve 300 having its proximal end welded to first hollow member 305 and its distal end 307 free of attachment.

FIG. 3 b is a cross-sectional view of the upper end 307 of the second hollow member 310 of sleeve 300, shown in FIG. 3 a. In one embodiment, cross-section of second hollow member 310 shows a central bore, ‘bu’, having a diameter of 1 inch and a thickness of ⅛ inch so as to form a hollow circular member 310 of the sleeve 300 having an overall diameter of 1.25 inches. In one embodiment, second hollow member 310 is 12 inches long (along the longitudinal axis).

FIG. 3 c is a cross-sectional view of the lower end 306 of first hollow member 305 of sleeve 300, shown in FIG. 3 a. In one embodiment, cross-section of first hollow member 305 shows a central bore ‘b1’ having a diameter of ½ inch and a thickness of ⅜ inch so as to form a hollow circular member 305 of the sleeve 300 having an overall diameter of 1.25 inches. In one embodiment, first hollow member 305 is 2 inches long (along the 1-1 longitudinal axis).

It should be noted that the thickness of first hollow member 305 is, in one embodiment, three times the thickness of the second hollow member 310, while the overall diameter of the first and second hollow members are the same. The thicker first hollow member 305 ensures that it is heavier than second hollow member 310, thus enabling first hollow member 305 to act as a head of a hammer possessing higher mass while the second hollow member 310 acts as the handle possessing relatively lighter mass. Such a combination of a heavier and a lighter member provides a user at least the following two advantages: 1) the overall weight of the sleeve 300 is kept relatively low for easy handling and portability and 2) having a higher weighted first hollow member 305 forming the lower portion of the sleeve 300 ensures that when the user reciprocates the sleeve downwards with a velocity to strike the collar 120 (shown in FIG. 1), the heavier member enables higher momentum to the sleeve 300 which upon striking the collar results in a higher rate of change of momentum thereby imparting higher downward force to drive the stake into the ground.

It should be evident to persons of ordinary skill in the art that the dimensions of the sleeve 300 and the members 305 and 310 are only exemplary and not limiting in any form. Thus, while in one embodiment the thickness of the first hollow member is three times that of the thickness of the second hollow member, in alternate embodiments these could be any other whole or fractional multiple of each other as long as this multiple allows the first hollow member 305 to be heavier than the second hollow member 310.

In one embodiment, the overall diameters of the members 305 and 310 are 1.25 inches in diameter. In alternate embodiments, the diameter of the first hollow member 305 may be different from the diameter of second hollow member 310. Similarly, the longitudinal lengths of the members 305 and 310 may vary from the ones provided in the embodiment above. The sizing of the different hollow members may vary depending upon the amount of force needed and the type of stake used.

In an alternate embodiment, the longitudinal length of the first hollow member 305 is equal to or larger than that of the second hollow member 310. In one embodiment, the bore of the first hollow member 305 is kept within of ½ inch diameter so that it enables a close fit sliding onto the post that also has an equivalent diameter of ½ inch as shown in FIG. 2. In one embodiment, the bore diameter is close to that of the diameter of the post rod for close fit yet frictionless sliding. In one embodiment, the diameter of the hole at the bottom of the hollow sleeve is 9/16 inch while the diameter of the rod is ½ inch.

However, there is no limitation on the actual diameter of the post rod and therefore the equivalent bore diameter of the first hollow member 305.

It should also be understood by those of ordinary skill in the art that the dimensions of the stake, the post, the overlap thereof, the collar and the sleeve can be designed depending upon the intended use or application of the integrated tool of the present invention. For example, but not limited to such example, if the integrated tool of present invention is used as a stake to fasten a small tent or tether a pet the overall dimensions of the integrated tool may be such that the overall weight of the integrated tool is fairly light. In addition, the lengths of the stake, post, and sleeve may similarly be designed to accommodate for varying uses.

FIG. 5 depicts a tent comprising the stake and integrated driving tool of the present invention. As shown in FIG. 5, at least one stake and integrated driving tool 505 is used to secure tent 510 to a ground surface. The ground surface can be any surface in which a stake can be driven through, including, but not limited to sand, gravel, and dirt.

Tent 510 may be any type of conventional tent. Tent fabric may be of many materials, including cotton (canvas), nylon, felt and polyester. There are typically three basic configurations of tents, including single wall, single wall with flysheet and double wall, each of which can also appear with many variations. The first is a single skin or single wall tent. In a single wall tent, only one layer of fabric is used, comprising at least a roof and walls. In a double skin or double wall tent, the outer tent is a waterproof layer which extends down to the ground. One or more inner tents provide sleeping areas. The outer tent may be just a little larger that the inner tent or it may be a lot larger and provide a separate living area.

A typical tent may optionally include a flysheet or rain fly, as described above, to protect the inside of the tent from water. It is waterproof on the outside and also provides a surface to collect condensation on the inside. Optionally, a flysheet or rain fly may be suspended over and clear of the roof of the tent; overlapping the tent slightly, but not extending down the sides of the tent. Further, the tent may include an air vent to help reduce the effects of condensation.

A typically tent may also optionally include a groundsheet to provide a waterproof barrier between the ground and a sleeping bag. The groundsheet may either be sewn in or separate.

Further, a typical tent kit optionally comprises poles to provide structural support. Still optionally, the poles may be collapsible for easier transport and storage. It should be understood to those or ordinary skill in the art that the poles may be made of a rigid material, such as metal or wood or a semi-rigid material, such as fiberglass or special metal alloys. A semi-rigid material is typically used for dome tents.

A typical tent also optionally includes stakes or pegs that are used to fasten the tent to the ground and provide extra wind stability. In some embodiments, tent stakes are used to anchor the bottom edge of the fabric to the ground to help shape the tent and/or lend additional stability. Stakes may be made of wood, plastic, or metal. Conventionally, a mallet is used to drive thicker stakes into the ground.

In one embodiment, four stakes and integrated driving tools 505 are employed to secure the tent to the ground, one at each corner of the tent. It should be noted that the invention as described herein is not limited to this embodiment and can be used in any number and configuration and with any tent size or shape to achieve the purpose of securing the tent to the ground.

FIG. 6 depicts an umbrella comprising the stake and integrated driving tool of the present invention. As shown in FIG. 6, at least one stake and integrated driving tool 605 is used to secure umbrella 610 to a ground surface. The ground surface can be any surface in which a stake can be driven through, including, but not limited to sand, gravel, and dirt.

A conventional umbrella is a collapsible canopy that can offer protection from both rain and sun. As shown in FIG. 6, an umbrella is conventionally made by stretching a fabric or other material 611 over a wire frame 612, further comprising a pole 613 for securing to a handle (not shown) or securing in a base, such as stake and integrated driving tool 605. Pole 613 may be a single pole or a telescopic, retractable pole that can also be used to adjust the height of the umbrella.

FIG. 7 depicts a net structure for a sporting activity comprising the stake and integrated driving tool of the present invention. As shown in FIG. 7, at least one stake and integrated driving tool 705 is used to secure net 710 to a ground surface.

The net can be any conventional net, including but not limited to a sports net. In one embodiment, but not limited to such embodiment, the net is a volleyball net. It should be noted herein that any sporting net can be used with the present invention and the description of a volleyball net herein is only intended to be exemplary.

The integrated stake and driving tool of the present invention can be used with any tent, umbrella, or sporting net that typically uses stakes for securing the item to the ground. In one embodiment, the integrated stake and driving tool of the present invention can be removably attached to the item and thus, is a retrofit device. In another embodiment, the integrated stake and driving tool is fixedly attached to the item. For example, but not limited to such example, in the case of the volleyball net, the integrated stake and driving tool of the present invention may be fixedly attached to the end of a volleyball net pole 711.

In another embodiment if the present invention is used as a stake to fasten larger and heavier tents the tool may be designed such that the overall weight of the integrated tool is sufficiently high to enable secure staking/anchoring of the larger and heavier tents. Thus, it is the intention of the inventors to optimize the dimensions of the integrated tool in multiple embodiments based on the application or use of the integrated tool.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7992900Apr 29, 2009Aug 9, 2011Reliable Racing Supply, Inc.Pole anchor and ski pole base with extending brush bristles and acircular, preferably hexagonal, section
US8240713Jul 11, 2011Aug 14, 2012Reliable Racing Supply, Inc.Pole anchor and ski pole base with extending brush bristles and acircular, preferably hexagonal section
US8297295 *Jan 1, 2011Oct 30, 2012Ashoke BanerjeeMulti-fold umbrella combined with writing implement or cosmetic case
US20120167932 *Jan 1, 2011Jul 5, 2012Ashoke BanerjeeMulti-fold umbrella combined with writing implement or cosmetic case
Classifications
U.S. Classification135/118, 473/490, 135/15.1
International ClassificationE04H15/62, E04H15/00, A45B25/00, A63B61/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04H15/62, E04H12/2215, A63B61/02, A63B2071/024
European ClassificationA63B61/02, E04H15/62, E04H12/22A1