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Publication numberUS20080173325 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/962,353
Publication dateJul 24, 2008
Filing dateDec 21, 2007
Priority dateJan 19, 2007
Publication number11962353, 962353, US 2008/0173325 A1, US 2008/173325 A1, US 20080173325 A1, US 20080173325A1, US 2008173325 A1, US 2008173325A1, US-A1-20080173325, US-A1-2008173325, US2008/0173325A1, US2008/173325A1, US20080173325 A1, US20080173325A1, US2008173325 A1, US2008173325A1
InventorsHeather McGarry
Original AssigneeMcgarry Heather
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Modular Makeup Storage
US 20080173325 A1
Abstract
A modular makeup storage system is provided which comprises a support assembly and a template attached to the support assembly, said template having a predetermined arrangement of holes for permanent or removable attachment of fixtures. The storage system is of any desired size and shape, and may fit on a table top or may be portable. The user may design the desired configuration of the storage system to allow flexibility for various makeup and other products.
Images(16)
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Claims(21)
1. A modular makeup storage system comprising:
a template having a predetermined arrangement of holes for permanent or removable attachment of fixtures.
2. The system of claim 1, further comprising:
a support assembly, onto which the template is attached.
3. The system of claim 1, wherein the fixtures are one or more selected from the group consisting of: shelves, bins, and clips.
4. The system of claim 1, wherein each fixture is attached to the template using one or more holes.
5. The system of claim 4, wherein a fixture is attached to the template using one hole.
6. The system of claim 4, wherein a fixture is attached to the template using more than one hole.
7. The system of claim 4, wherein a fixture is a bin, and the bin is attached to the template using four holes.
8. The system of claim 4, wherein a fixture is a clip, and the clip is attached to the template using three holes.
9. The system of claim 2, wherein the template is permanently or releasably attached to the support assembly.
10. The system of claim 9, wherein the template is attached to the support assembly using one or more members of the group consisting of: glue, rivets, tape, hook and loop fabrics, snaps, nails, screws, melted plastic, and other attachment means.
11. The system of claim 2, wherein the support assembly comprises the components: two doors which close vertically upon a main compartment, said main compartment having a top, a back, two sides and a bottom; and wherein the template is attached to at least one component.
12. The system of claim 11, wherein a template is attached to at least one door or the back.
13. The system of claim 11, wherein a template is attached to a door and the back.
14. The system of claim 2, wherein the support assembly comprises: a back and an optional attached or removable front.
15. The system of claim 14, wherein the support assembly further comprises: two sides, a top and a bottom.
16. A modular makeup storage system comprising:
a support assembly comprising a back, a front, two sides, and a bottom;
a template attached to the back of the support assembly; said template having a predetermined arrangement of holes for permanent or removable attachment of fixtures;
an optional handle, and an optional carrying strap.
17. The storage system of claim 16, wherein the front is removably or permanently attached to the back.
18. The storage system of claim 17, wherein the front has one or more pockets.
19. The storage system of claim 16, wherein the front is zipped onto the back.
20. A one-piece clip for releasably holding a jar-type vessel, comprising:
a bottom shelf;
a back attached to the bottom shelf;
an arm member attached to the back;
a front-facing top bar attached to the arm member;
an upward-extending hook attached to the arm member;
two rear-facing attachment members attached to the back.
21. The clip of claim 20, wherein the arm member comprises two separate arm portions.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority from U.S. provisional application Ser. No. 60/885,824, filed Jan. 19, 2007, which is hereby incorporated by reference to the extent not inconsistent with the disclosure herewith.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The storage and organization of various makeup products presents a problem for many people. Individuals typically have different types of makeup products, such as lipstick, face powder, nail polish, mascara, and the like. In addition, typically an individual has multiple different shades or colors of products. The makeup user also requires different applicators, such as brushes for different products. The organization of the products to allow access as well as storage when the products are not in use is a continual concern for many users.

The makeup storage and organization solutions currently in use have drawbacks. Most makeup storage products do not allow access to or visualization of many different products at once. Some disclosed products include: a cabinet having drawers and open compartments, two mirrored doors, and a light in US 2006/0006772; a portable vanity case having multiple drawers in a center section of the cabinet, with an upper section having a mirror which closes over the drawers, and two side doors which close over the side walls of the case in U.S. Pat. No. D261,825; and a cosmetics travel case which has a bottom portion containing two trays that can be extended horizontally when the case is open in U.S. Pat. No. 5,941,255.

The cosmetic cases currently available do not allow for storing and organizing multiple different types and sizes of products securely and allowing for changing the products which can be stored.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Provided is a modular makeup storage system. More specifically, in one embodiment, provided is a modular makeup storage system comprising: a template having a predetermined arrangement of holes for permanent or removable attachment of fixtures. The template may be attached to a support assembly, which can have various forms. In one embodiment, provided is a modular makeup storage system comprising: a support assembly; and a template attached to the support assembly, said template having a predetermined arrangement of holes for permanent or removable attachment of fixtures. In one embodiment, a template is permanently or releasably attached to the support assembly. Some methods of attaching a template to the support assembly are one or more members of the group consisting of: glue, tape, rivets, hook and loop fabrics (such as Velcro®), sewing, snaps, nails, screws, melted plastic, and other attachment means. One or more methods of attaching a template may be used in the same storage system. In one embodiment, a template is used to attach fixtures, which are used for storage or attachment of various items, as described further herein.

The storage system may have any suitable configuration and size. In one embodiment, the storage system is designed to be relatively portable in size. In one embodiment, the storage system is designed to be relatively larger for placement on a table-top, or for use in storing a large number of products, for example. Different configurations of the storage system and support assembly are further described herein.

Other optional features may be present in any embodiment, such as a handle, a strap, a lock, a mirror, pads under the bottom (for protection of a surface, for example), reinforcement of various portions (such as the corners), pockets, a drawer, and other features as known in the art. Any embodiment may include a stand, as further described herein.

There may be more than one template attached to the support assembly. In one embodiment, there is one template attached to the back of the support assembly. In one embodiment, there are two templates attached to the back of the support assembly. In one embodiment, there is one template attached to a side of the support assembly. In one embodiment, there is one template attached to each side of the support assembly.

Each embodiment of the system may include optional removable or permanent “fixtures” for sorting or storing items, which fixtures are not required to be attached to the template. As used herein, “fixture” is used to refer to a variety of items which can be used for sorting or storing items such as bins, clips, containers, organizers, trays, closures, straps, and other items as known in the art. These optional removable or permanent fixtures may include open or multi-component bins or containers for storing items such as brushes, swabs, cotton balls, lipsticks, pencils or nail polish; removable or permanent fixtures which may be rolled or otherwise closed; and other fixtures known to a person of ordinary skill in the art without undue experimentation. In one embodiment, fixtures include one or more members of the group consisting of: shelves, bins, and clips. Fixtures may be attached to the template using one or more holes, depending, in part, on the size and weight of the fixture, as well as the amount of holding strength required for the fixture, among other factors. Fixtures may also be attached to other portions of the support assembly or other portions of the storage system. In one embodiment, a fixture is attached to the template using one hole. In one embodiment, a fixture is attached to the template using more than one hole. In one embodiment, a fixture is a bin, and the bin is attached to the template using four holes. In one embodiment, the fixture is a clip, and the clip is attached to the template using three holes. In one embodiment, the fixture is a clip, and the clip is attached to the template using two holes. Clips include clamps and other devices which are intended to hold an item, such as a brush or container. Shelves include any embodiment which is designed to be used in a relatively horizontal manner, including a solid surface, or a surface having holes or perforations, or other embodiment. In one embodiment, items are placed on a shelf. Items may also be placed in depressions or openings in or on a shelf. Bins include any embodiment which is intended to at least partially form an enclosure. Bins may be round, square, rectangular, triangular, or any other desired shape. Bins do not need to be a fixed or permanent shape, such as if fabric is used to form one or more “walls” of the bin. In one embodiment, items are placed in a bin.

The template may be any suitable size and shape to be used in attaching the desired number and type of fixtures. As will be appreciated, there may be more than one type or size of fixture attached to the template. In one embodiment, the user may select the types and numbers of fixtures desired, as well as the placement of those fixtures. In addition to fixtures, other items may be attached to the template or other portions of the storage system, such as bags, pockets, and other items.

As used herein, “attachment” indicates components are permanently, semi-permanently or removably joined. “Attachment” can be used for various items, such as a template which is “attached” to a case component such as a door or back; two case components “attached” together; or fixtures which are “attached” to a template. Alternatively, when the template is “attached to” a component, the component and template may be fabricated together so that the component and template are not designed to be easily separable. As used herein, “case” is intended to mean at least a template and a support assembly. There may be other components included in the use of the term “case” which can be appreciated by the description provided.

The template can have many different ways to perform the same functions. All embodiments of the examples of the operation and fabrication of the template are intended to be used with all embodiments of the system disclosed herein.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 shows one example of a closed case.

FIG. 2 shows one embodiment of an open case.

FIG. 3 shows the embodiment in FIG. 2, including representative products.

FIG. 4 shows another embodiment of the case.

FIG. 5 shows one embodiment of a template.

FIG. 6 shows a bracket for insertion in the template.

FIG. 7 shows a clip for attachment to the template.

FIG. 8 shows a partially filled template having prearranged holes and having different sized products attached by clips.

FIG. 9 shows an embodiment of the travel case, open view.

FIG. 10 shows an embodiment of the travel case, closed view, with stand.

FIG. 11 shows one embodiment of the operation of the stand.

FIG. 12 shows one method of attaching a template.

FIG. 13 shows an embodiment of the case with four templates.

FIG. 14 shows a small version of the case with one template and four fixtures.

FIG. 15 shows an embodiment of the travel case.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The following nonlimiting description is provided to illustrate specific embodiments of the invention.

Provided is a modular makeup storage system. The modular makeup storage system can have different embodiments and arrangements, such as a system having different sizes designed for placement on a vanity top, a travel-size system, and other embodiments and arrangements which are evident from the description provided herein, and well understood by one having ordinary skill in the art.

In one embodiment, the support assembly comprises a back and an optional attached or removable front. In one embodiment, the support assembly comprises the components: two doors which close vertically upon a main compartment, said main compartment having a top, a back, two sides and a bottom; and wherein a template is attached to at least one component. As known in the art, other components may be present.

FIG. 1 shows one embodiment of the system, where reference number 100 indicates a door, 110 indicates the top, 105 indicates a side, 115 indicates the bottom, and 120 indicates a drawer. The embodiment shown in FIG. 1 shows a stylized design with curved walls and other ornamental features. It is understood that the design of the system is not necessarily a limiting feature of the embodiment. For example, straight walls may be used; and the “feet” shown may be absent, or may be simply foam or other suitable material.

FIG. 2 shows one embodiment of the system with the doors open. FIG. 2 also shows various fixtures 125 in main compartment 50. FIG. 2 shows templates 195 attached to sides of the main compartment. FIG. 2 shows an optional mirror 250 in top 110.

FIG. 3 shows one embodiment of the system shown in FIG. 2 with various makeup items added. FIG. 4 shows one embodiment of the system disclosed herein, showing handles 130, hinges 135, and latch 140. As known in the art, these components may be interchanged with other components having the same function. For example, latch 140 can be a lock, magnetic closure, or other mechanism which prevents the doors from being open at all times. Handle 130 can be positioned on the top. Other modifications can be made, as known in the art and described herein.

All embodiments of the system include at least one template as described further herein. In one embodiment, the template has a predetermined vertical and horizontal arrangement of holes, which holes allow attachment of fixtures, as further described herein (see FIG. 8, for example). In one alternative embodiment, the holes are “tracks” or slots into which various fixtures can be removably attached. In one embodiment, the fixtures include one or more appendages which extend from the fixture and fit into one or more holes or tracks or slots so that the fixture is held with sufficient force to allow the fixture to remain in place until the user desires repositioning of the fixture. This amount of force is known to one of ordinary skill in the art and the fixture can be fabricated by a combination of size of the hole or track or slot and the material from which the template (or hole or track or slot portion of the template) and appendages are made. In one embodiment, the hole or track or slot material of the template, holder or fixture contains enough elasticity or “give” to allow a suitably-sized appendage to be inserted and removed into the hole or track or slot, and also enough stability to permit sufficient holding strength of the holder or fixture which is attached thereto. The template can be made from any suitable material, such as injection molded plastic. In alternative embodiments, the template can be made from paperboard, metal or wood, or a combination of materials. The template may be positioned at a sufficient distance away from the support assembly to allow the fixtures to be inserted into the template. In one embodiment, the template itself is able to be placed upon a surface or otherwise positioned, such as hung from a wall without a separate support assembly.

Another embodiment, shown in FIG. 5, for example, does not contain holes or slots in the template, but rather allows the containers to rest on a shelf or other suitably shaped apparatus, such as a depression in a surface or cavity.

The template can be used to support any of several types of fixtures, including those designed specifically to hold makeup jars or containers. A template and various sized fixtures with containers are shown in FIG. 8. In one embodiment, several fixtures are prearranged together into a bracket, so that the bracket fits into the holes in the template. One embodiment of a bracket is shown in FIG. 6. The number of fixtures in a bracket can vary, as convenient for the size of the template, and other factors.

In one embodiment, the fixture is any device which resists gravity, such as a shelf. The fixture can have optional features such as a retaining device to prevent horizontal movement (such as the walls on a bin), a tension device to limit or prevent horizontal movement and to resist vertical movement, or a retainer bar to limit vertical movement. In one embodiment, the retainer bar is shaped so it can be used to brace a finger against when containers are removed.

In one embodiment, the fixture is a clip for attaching jars or other containers to the template. In one embodiment, provided is a one-piece clip for releasably holding a jar-type vessel, comprising: a bottom shelf; a back attached to the bottom shelf; one or more arm members attached to the back; a front-facing top bar attached to the arm member; an upward-extending hook attached to the arm member; and two rear-facing attachment members attached to the back. In one embodiment, the “arm member” is one arm that attaches at the back of the center of the arm. In one embodiment, there are two arm members attached to the back. As used herein “attachment members” means any portion that allows attachment to the template. In one embodiment, “attachment member” means a snap. In one embodiment, “attachment member” is a piece of material that is flexible enough to insert into a hole of the template, and rigid enough so that the clip is held in place until sufficient force is applied to remove the attachment member from the template.

One embodiment of a clip is shown in FIG. 7. In this example, the clip (or jar holder) comprises two arms 155, a supporting bottom shelf 160, a retainer bar 165, and a means to attach the fixture to a template. In FIG. 7, the attaching means are appendages 170. The jar is inserted into the fixture horizontally. Pressing the jar into the space between the arms widens arms 155 to accept the jar. As the jar is pressed into the fixture, arms 155 close around the jar, preventing horizontal movement. Shelf 160 below arms 155 supports the jar and prevents it from falling downward. Optional retainer bar 165 above the jar prevents upward movement and is especially useful in travel versions of the case. Supporting shelf 160 and retainer bar 165 are shaped with tapered, ski-tip ends to act as guides for placing the jar into the fixture in one embodiment. In one embodiment, shelf 160 is of a size and shape to minimize contact with user's fingers/thumbs and to provide maximum comfort, effective jar support, and minimal plastic volume. Other embodiments are possible, as known to one of ordinary skill in the art.

Clips described elsewhere can also be used. Alternatively, or in combination, a row, column or cluster of two or more clips that attaches to the template can be used. The individual clip or cluster can also be inserted directly into the case (i.e., without the use of a template). In one embodiment, each clip or jar cavity has a built-in mechanism that works like a ballpoint click-pen, or magnetic push-click opening stereo cabinet doors. In this embodiment, the jars are stored very close together without the requirement for room for fingers in between them. To remove a jar, the user presses the jar, activating the jar ejection system. When the user removes pressure from the jar, the ejection system propels the jar or cluster forward far enough for the user to grip it. To reinsert the jar or cluster, the jar or cluster is placed into the cavity to reactivate the ejection system.

Another embodiment of the clip uses deflectable retainer bar instead of arms, and an indented bottom shelf to hold the jar horizontally. The jar insertion motion is the same as described elsewhere herein, but uses a single ‘arm’/retainer bar which presses down on the jar. Another embodiment of the clip uses two wide, vertically-opposed retainer bars, with jar-shaped indentations (no shelf per se, and no arms). In one embodiment, a general description of the clip described herein is an apparatus which allows removable retainment or attachment of a jar, pot or other item.

Another aspect of the storage system is the use of a mechanism to release the jar or container from the clip. This embodiment allows the storage of more jars or containers since the amount of space required to remove and re-insert the jars may be less than if each jar or container is removed and re-inserted by hand. In this embodiment, a mechanism having a click-pen or spring-loaded access method is used. The jar or container fixtures may one or more of a variety of embodiments.

The storage system is designed to be modular, so that the user can decide how many of which type of fixture to insert in the template at any time. If the user does not wish to put makeup jars in the case or template, shelves or bins can be inserted in the case to hold any other container having makeup or other items. The case or template can also be used to hold a combination of jar makeup and other types of makeup. The case or template can also be used to hold brushes, cotton balls, lotions, and other items.

Additional organizational features such as lipstick caddies and brush bins can also be added to the system for increased functionality. These features can be free-standing and placed in a suitable area of the case or template, or made as fixtures to fit into the template. Any combination of free-standing or modular features can be used.

One embodiment contains one or more drawers which are accessible from inside or outside the system. The drawer, if present, can be any suitable size. In one embodiment, the bottom of the drawer does not touch the bottom of the system. In one embodiment, the drawer forms the bottom of the system. Drawers and their fabrication and use are well known in the art.

The doors of the case can be closed in any suitable way, such as by using a lock, a latch, a tie, a magnetic closure, a zipper, or other methods known in the art.

The system can be used for many purposes, such as a table-top or portable organizer for personal and/or professional use. The modular design can be used to customize the organization to fit the user's needs. For example, some users may use the templates and fixtures to store and organize makeup jars, such as loose powder makeup, pressed powder, creams, glosses, gels, and other items. The fixtures may be used to hold a container in any desired orientation. This variable orientation feature may be designed into the template, by arranging the angle of hole or slot, or by the fixture itself. Some users may use the templates and fixtures to store and organize various makeup brushes and applicators. Some users may use the templates and fixtures to store and organize various lipstick items. Some users may use the templates and fixtures to store and organize lotions and cleansing items. Some users may use the templates and fixtures to store and organize various nail polish items. Some users may use the templates and fixtures to store and organize a combination of different items used to apply and/or remove cosmetics and other similar beauty products. As the user's needs or the manufacturer's products change, the modular makeup storage system can be adapted. For example, if a manufacturer produces items which are square in shape, the fixtures can be adapted to hold these items.

As known in the art, different materials, colors, and sizes of the modular makeup case are envisioned. The modular makeup storage systems of the invention may be made from any suitable material, including one or more of wood, composite materials, fabric, vinyl, plastic, leather or leather-like, or other pliable material. In one embodiment, materials used to make a laptop case, luggage or handbags may be used. In one embodiment, the outside is made from heavy-duty nylon denier fabric (such as 1680D); the lining is made from durable PVC and clear vinyl. Any color and pattern may be used. Different materials may be used for different portions of the case, if desired. In one embodiment, the case is made from wood or wood that is covered with another material, such as a veneer or metal or metallic or vinyl material. In one embodiment, the case is made from plastic or polymer material. In one embodiment, the case is made from metal, such as aluminum. In one embodiment, the case is made from wood, such as particle board or solid wood, such as walnut. In one embodiment, the case is made from a combination of materials. In one embodiment, the case is made from a natural or artificial fabric, such as vinyl, cloth, or leather. In this embodiment, the sides fold by virtue of the pliability of the fabric. If the case is made from fabric, stiffeners, such as cardboard, may be added, if desired, as known in the art. Alternatively, it may be desired to have no stiffeners.

The various aspects of the case can be attached together using any suitable attachment method, including screws, zippers, hook and loop fabrics, locks, hinges, sewing, rivets, and other methods known to one of ordinary skill in the art without undue experimentation.

In one embodiment, the case is sized to fit on top of a counter. In one embodiment, the case is sized to fit in a carry-on luggage bag. In one embodiment, the case is sized to fit in a purse or handbag. In one embodiment, the case is sized to be easily carried. In one embodiment, the case is carry-on luggage sized. FIG. 14 shows a version of the case with one template, attached to the back of the case, and several bins or fixtures attached to other portions of the case.

The travel-size system is designed to be used while traveling, although users may find it convenient for everyday or other uses, as well. Additional nonlimiting description of the travel-size system is provided herein. One embodiment of a travel-size system is shown in FIGS. 9-11. In FIG. 9, main compartment having top 175, back 180, two sides 185 and bottom 190 includes two templates 195 as further described elsewhere herein. FIG. 9 shows a removable front 230 where the front may be zippered on and off. Front 230 contains optional bags and pockets. There may be one or more templates attached to one or more components of the case, depending on the size of the main compartment and the size of the templates. The templates may be attached to the main compartment using any suitable means, as described elsewhere herein. In one embodiment shown in FIG. 12, a strip of “hook” 245 is sewn to the back of the case and a strip of “loop” 255 is sewn to the back of the case. The strips of hook and loop are positioned so that when a template is positioned in front of the strips of hook and loop, excess hook and loop material may be engaged together in the front of the template, so as to attach the template to the main compartment. As an alternative or additional method of attaching the template to the main compartment which may be used with any suitable method of attachment described here or known in the art, the template may have “fins” 265 which sit on the bottom and/or top of the main compartment. The top and/or bottom of the main compartment (or portions thereof) may be lined with hook or loop material, and flaps lined with the corresponding hook or loop material can be folded over the fins of the template. This is also shown in FIG. 12.

The front may be fully removable from the main compartment by any suitable means, such as a zipper or snaps. The front may include optional pouches and other compartments. The inner surface of the front may be lined with material, such as vinyl to form a pocket. The pocket can be opened and closed with a zipper, snap, or hook-and-loop closure, or other methods as known in the art. There may be optional pockets which may be gusseted incorporated into the front. The front portion may include a hook for hanging the front portion of the case. There may be a separate zippered pocket on the outside of the front, for access when the case is closed. These various features are shown in FIG. 15.

To give the case enough support to be placed on a desired surface, rigid or semi-rigid inserts may be placed one or more of the back, top, and sides of the case. These inserts may be made from any desired material, such as cardboard, masonite, paperboard, wood, plastic, or other suitable materials as known in the art. The inserts can be attached to the components by any suitable method, such as sewn, glued, stapled, riveted, friction, or any other methods known in the art. Alternatively, the case may be fabricated out of material which possesses sufficient strength to provide the desired level of case support.

The interior of one or more sides of the case may include any desired feature, such as a pocket which can be attached to the side of the case with hook and loop material (shown in FIG. 12B, for example). Other features of the case may be included, such as an adjustable or fixed length carrying strap which may clip on and off; and a carrying handle on the top.

As shown in more detail in FIGS. 10 and 11, a stand can be included as part of the case if necessary or desired, or the case can be free-standing. In FIG. 11, an exemplary stand is shown, where bottom member 200 and top member 190 are shown. Bottom member 200 is attached to the main portion of the case using any suitable method, such as sewing, gluing, riveting, or other methods known to one or ordinary skill in the art. In one embodiment, at least one of the top and bottom members include a portion having the desired rigidity to enable the case to withstand the desired amount of force without collapsing, and a portion which is less rigid to enable attachment of various members together. FIG. 11C shows the stand folded for storage. In operation, bottom member 200 is unfolded from top member 190 (shown in FIG. 11B). Next, top member 190 is unfolded from the case. Top member 190 is attached to bottom member at flexible portion 109 (shown in FIG. 11A). FIG. 11 shows a hook and loop attachment. As known in the art, other methods to attach the portions of the stand together, and to attach portions of the stand to the case may be used, such as snaps or screws. FIG. 11 shows a flexible portion of the bottom member folded over the top member. As known in the art, the top member may be folded over the bottom member, or a portion of the bottom or top member can just be placed on the other member, as shown in FIG. 11D. One embodiment of the stand may be thought of as one piece of material which attaches at two positions of the back, and has a foldable portion between the top and bottom. The rigid portions of the stand members can be fabricated from any desired material or combination of materials, such as cardboard, paperboard, masonite, wood, metal, plastic, or other suitable material known in the art to perform the desired functions. The stand may be covered in the same fabric the case is made from. The flexible portions of the stand members can be fabricated from any desired material or combination of materials, such as fabric, plastic, metal wire, or sheet metal, nonwoven material, or other suitable material known in the art to perform the desired functions. The number of flaps and the location of their attachment to the case is variable. For example, a multi-fold flap might be attached halfway up the back of the case or to the bottom of the case, and could fold out to create the slanted and bottom support elements of the stand. Or the flap could be attached via a tension hinge or other method such that only one section of flap was required for the stand. Alternatively, the stand could detach from the case and be stored inside the case when not in use.

Alternatively, FIG. 10 shows a one-piece stand 210 which is attached to the case on the back at 220, and in one embodiment, can be unfolded and stored at 230.

FIG. 13 shows an embodiment having various templates, attached to the components of the case. FIG. 13 also shows a liner tray, which is an optional feature to help minimize spills, and which may also assist in positioning the system on the desired surface. FIG. 13 shows a bottom leveler which is used to assist in keeping portions of the case level. The bottom leveler is intended to provide a flat surface in the inside, bottom surface of the main compartment such that jars, pots, and other containers may be placed in the bottom of the main compartment without tipping, sliding or spilling. Alternatively, levelers can be used on other areas of the case such as the sides, bottoms or ceilings of any part of the system for functional or cosmetic purposes. Levelers can be used in other areas such as the drawer or doors. The bottom leveler can be any thickness and can be cut to any desired shape including a shape to fit closely around the templates, or attachment fins of the templates, such that the bottom leveler and the template fin are the same height. The bottom leveler can be made of any suitable material such as paperboard, masonite, foam, plastic etc. It may be covered in any suitable material such as PVC, polyurethane, vinyl, fabric, paper, or other materials known in the art without undue experimentation. The materials are selected using various factors, such as ease of fabrication, aesthetic value, cost, weight, size, and other factors known in the art.

Also provided is an improved lid for jars. In one embodiment, the jar contents are powdered or finely divided particles, such that upon opening, some of the particles are sent out of the jar. This improved lid allows easier, faster, and cleaner access to jar contents. The lid may be a screw-cap design, which is designed to form a lid to the jar. The lid may also be a replacement for any insert present in the jar design. In this embodiment, the lid may be press-fit into the opening of the jar.

The alternate lid is a screw-cap design, and is a 2-component product in one embodiment. On top of the screw-on lid is a hinged cover. This cover is actuated by pushing up on a small feature protruding over the edge of the body of the lid. The cover is equipped with a stopper (solid or open with a solid outline), attached to the inside of the cover. This stopper fits down inside a hole in main body of the lid, preventing spillage of makeup powder. The hole is small compared to the size of the entire lid-25% or less, in one embodiment, but can be any suitable size. The lid is made of any suitable material, such as polymer, such as nylon.

One feature of this lid is useful for vacuum control. When a suction-fit lid is opened, the air rushing into the container disturbs the powder and sends it flying, making a mess. However, if the vacuum created from pushing the lid up could be controlled, the mess would be dramatically reduced or eliminated. This invention solves that problem by having a lip that sticks up around the access hole. In the front of that lip (the face farthest from the hinge) are small vent slots/holes, in any suitable shape, such as circular, square, rectangular, or oval. As the stopper lifts out of the access hole, it moves beyond the vent slots before it releases from the access hole. Air can enter the jar and relieve the vacuum caused by the moving stopper before the access hole is open. This prevents a large rush of air from disturbing the powder and making a mess.

The inside cover may also contain a liner material, ideal for mixing powder makeup on. The lid may be translucent or any desired color or pattern.

The system and all aspects of the system including the template may be fabricated and assembled using methods known in the art.

Although this description contains many specificities, this should not be construed as limiting the scope of the invention. Other dimensions, materials, configurations and the like are easily used by one of ordinary skill in the art and are included in this invention, even if not specifically listed.

All references throughout this application, for example patent documents including issued or granted patents or equivalents; patent application publications; and non-patent literature documents or other source material; are hereby incorporated by reference herein in their entireties, as though individually incorporated by reference, to the extent each reference is at least partially not inconsistent with the disclosure in this application (for example, a reference that is partially inconsistent is incorporated by reference except for the partially inconsistent portion of the reference).

All patents and publications mentioned in the specification are indicative of the levels of skill of those skilled in the art to which the invention pertains. References cited herein are incorporated by reference herein in their entirety to indicate the state of the art, in some cases as of their filing date, and it is intended that this information can be employed herein, if needed, to exclude (for example, to disclaim) specific embodiments that are in the prior art.

Every formulation or combination of components described or exemplified can be used to practice the invention, unless otherwise stated. One of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that device elements other than those specifically exemplified can be employed in the practice of the invention without resort to undue experimentation. All art-known functional equivalents, of any such device elements are intended to be included in this invention.

As used herein, “comprising” is synonymous with “including,” “containing,” or “characterized by,” and is inclusive or open-ended and does not exclude additional, unrecited elements or method steps. As used herein, “consisting of” excludes any element, step, or ingredient not specified in the claim element. As used herein, “consisting essentially of” does not exclude materials or steps that do not materially affect the basic and novel characteristics of the claim. Any recitation herein of the term “comprising”, particularly in a description of components of a composition or in a description of elements of a device, is understood to encompass those compositions and methods consisting essentially of and consisting of the recited components or elements. The invention illustratively described herein suitably may be practiced in the absence of any element or elements, limitation or limitations which is not specifically disclosed herein.

The terms and expressions which have been employed are used as terms of description and not of limitation, and there is no intention in the use of such terms and expressions of excluding any equivalents of the features shown and described or portions thereof, but it is recognized that various modifications are possible within the scope of the invention claimed. Thus, it should be understood that although the present invention has been specifically disclosed by preferred embodiments and optional features, modification and variation of the concepts herein disclosed may be resorted to by those skilled in the art, and that such modifications and variations are considered to be within the scope of this invention as defined by the appended claims.

In general the terms and phrases used herein have their art-recognized meaning, which can be found by reference to standard texts, journal references and contexts known to those skilled in the art. The following definitions are provided to clarify their specific use in the context of the invention.

One skilled in the art readily appreciates that the present invention is well adapted to carry out the objects and obtain the ends and advantages mentioned, as well as those inherent in the present invention. The methods, components, materials and dimensions described herein as currently representative of preferred embodiments are provided as examples and are not intended as limitations on the scope of the invention. Changes therein and other uses which are encompassed within the spirit of the invention will occur to those skilled in the art, are included within the scope of the claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8096428 *Mar 25, 2005Jan 17, 2012Parfums Christian DiorCounter display for articles such as perfumes and cosmetic products
Classifications
U.S. Classification132/315, 132/314, 211/13.1, 211/153
International ClassificationA47F5/08, A45D40/00, A45D40/24, A47F7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B67/02, A47F5/0807, A45D40/24, A45C5/005, A45D44/02
European ClassificationA47F5/08B, A47B67/02, A45D44/02, A45C5/00T, A45D40/24