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Publication numberUS20080186702 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/099,021
Publication dateAug 7, 2008
Filing dateApr 7, 2008
Priority dateNov 12, 2004
Also published asEP1657757A2, EP1657757A3, US7419839, US8067254, US20060105478, US20060105482, US20100109568, US20120043564, US20130293145
Publication number099021, 12099021, US 2008/0186702 A1, US 2008/186702 A1, US 20080186702 A1, US 20080186702A1, US 2008186702 A1, US 2008186702A1, US-A1-20080186702, US-A1-2008186702, US2008/0186702A1, US2008/186702A1, US20080186702 A1, US20080186702A1, US2008186702 A1, US2008186702A1
InventorsMichael D. Camras, William R. Imler, Franklin J. Wall, Frank M. Steranka, Michael R. Krames, Helena Ticha, Ladislav Tichy, Robertus G. Alferink
Original AssigneeLumileds Lighting U.S., Llc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Array of Light Emitting Devices to Produce a White Light Source
US 20080186702 A1
Abstract
A device is provided with an array of a plurality of phosphor converted light emitting devices (LEDs) that produce broad spectrum light. The phosphor converted LEDs may produce light with different correlated color temperature (CCT) and are covered with an optical element that assists in mixing the light from the LEDs to produce a desired correlated color temperature. The phosphor converted LEDs may also be combined in an array with color LEDs. The color LEDs may be controlled to vary their brightness such that light with an approximately continuous broad spectrum is produced. By controlling the brightness of the color LEDs, light can be produced with a fixed brightness over a large range of white points with a high color rendering quality.
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Claims(25)
1. An apparatus comprising:
at least one phosphor converted light emitting device that produces light with a broad spectrum;
a plurality of color light emitting devices that produce light with a narrow spectrum; and
a controller for controlling the brightness of the light produced by the color light emitting devices, wherein the combination of the broad spectrum light produced by the at least one phosphor converted light emitting device and the narrow spectra light from the brightness controlled plurality of color light emitting devices produces a resulting spectrum that is more continuous than the broad spectrum produced by the at least one phosphor converted light emitting devices.
2. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a board, the at least one phosphor converted light emitting device and the plurality of color light emitting devices are mounted on the board.
3. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein there is a greater number of phosphor converted light emitting devices than color light emitting devices.
4. The apparatus of claim 3, wherein there is over twice as many phosphor converted light emitting devices as color light emitting devices.
5. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the color light emitting devices produce blue, cyan, amber and red light.
6. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the controller individually controls the brightness of the color light emitting devices to vary the correlated color temperature of the resulting spectrum.
7. A method comprising:
providing at least one phosphor converted light emitting device that produces light with a broad spectrum;
providing a plurality of color light emitting devices, each of which produces light with a narrow spectrum;
mixing the light produced by the at least one phosphor converted light emitting device and the plurality of color light emitting devices to produce light with a resulting spectrum that is more continuous than the broad spectrum produced by the at least one phosphor converted light emitting devices;
controlling the brightness of the light produced by the plurality of color light emitting devices to vary the correlated color temperature of the resulting spectrum.
8. The method of claim 7, further providing a board and mounting the at least one phosphor converted light emitting device and the plurality of color light emitting devices on the board.
9. The method of claim 7, wherein a greater number of phosphor converted light emitting devices are provided than color light emitting devices.
10. The method of claim 9, wherein over twice as many phosphor converted light emitting devices as color light emitting devices are provided.
11. The method of claim 7, wherein the color light emitting devices produce blue, cyan, amber and red light.
12. The method of claim 7, wherein the brightness of the light produced by each color light emitting device is controlled separately to vary the correlated color temperature.
13. The method of claim 7, wherein the brightness of each different colored light produced by the color light emitting devices is controlled separately to vary the correlated color temperature.
14. A method comprising:
providing a plurality of phosphor converted light emitting devices that produce light with a broad spectrum, the phosphor converted light emitting devices producing light with different correlated color temperature;
arranging the plurality of phosphor converted light emitting devices in an array; and
covering the array of phosphor converted light emitting devices with an optical element that assists mixing of the light with different correlated color temperatures to produce light with a desired correlated color temperature.
15. The method of claim 14, wherein the optical element is bonded to the phosphor converted light emitting devices.
16. The method of claim 14, wherein the optical element is a dome mounted over the phosphor converted light emitting devices and filled with an encapsulant.
17. The method of claim 14, wherein arranging the plurality of phosphor converted light emitting devices comprises mounting the plurality of phosphor converted light emitting devices to a board.
18. The method of claim 14, the method further comprising:
providing a plurality of color light emitting devices, each of which produces light with a narrow spectrum;
arranging the plurality of color light emitting devices in the array with the plurality of phosphor converted light emitting devices.
19. The method of claim 18, further comprising controlling the brightness of the light produced by the plurality of color light emitting devices to vary the correlated color temperature of the resulting spectrum.
20. An apparatus that produces broadband light with a desired correlated color temperature, the apparatus comprising:
an array of a plurality of phosphor converted light emitting devices that produce light with a broad spectrum with different correlated color temperatures; and
an optical element disposed over the array of the plurality of phosphor converted light emitting devices, the optical element mixing the light with different correlated color temperatures to produce light with the desired correlated color temperature.
21. The apparatus of claim 20, wherein the optical element is bonded to the phosphor converted light emitting devices.
22. The apparatus of claim 20, wherein the optical element is a dome mounted over the phosphor converted light emitting devices and filled with an encapsulant.
23. The apparatus of claim 20, further comprising a board to which the array of the plurality of phosphor converted light emitting devices is mounted.
24. The apparatus of claim 20, wherein the array further comprises a plurality of color light emitting devices.
25. The apparatus of claim 24, the apparatus further comprising a controller for controlling the brightness of the light produced by the plurality of color light emitting devices to vary the correlated color temperature to the desired correlated color temperature.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

The present application is a divisional application of and claims priority to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/987,241, filed Nov. 12, 2004, entitled “Bonding an Optical Element to a Light Emitting Device”, by Michael D. Camras et al, which is incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to light emitting devices and, more particularly, to an array of light emitting devices to produce a white light source.

BACKGROUND

Adding or mixing a number of different color light emitting devices (LEDs) can be used to produce light with a broad spectrum. The spectrum produced, however, consists of the peaks of the narrow band spectra produced by the individual LEDs. Consequently, the color rendering of such a light source is poor. White light sources with high color rendering, such as that produced by a halogen lamp, have a continuous or near continuous spectrum over the full visible light spectrum (400-700 nm).

Thus, a white light source with high color rendering that is produced using an array of LEDs is desired

SUMMARY

In accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, a plurality of phosphor converted light emitting devices may be combined in an array to obtain light with a desired correlated color temperature (CCT). In one embodiment, the phosphor converted light emitting devices produce light with different CCTs. An array of the plurality of phosphor converted light emitting devices may be covered with an optical element that optionally can be filled with a material that assists in light extraction and mixing the light to produce light with the desired CCT. In another embodiment, a plurality of color light emitting devices are combined with the plurality of phosphor converted light emitting devices and the brightness of the color light emitting devices are controlled to produce light with the desired characteristics.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1A illustrates a side view of an LED die mounted on a submount and an optical element that is to be bonded to the LED die.

FIG. 1B illustrates the optical element bonded to the LED die.

FIG. 2 illustrates an embodiment in which multiple LED dice are mounted to a submount and a separate optical element is bonded to each LED die.

FIG. 3 illustrates an embodiment in which multiple LED dice are mounted to a submount and a single optical element is bonded to the LED dice.

FIG. 4 is a flow chart of one implementation of producing such an LED device with wavelength converting material covering the optical element.

FIG. 5 illustrates an embodiment in which a layer of wavelength converting material is disposed between the bonding layer and the optical element.

FIG. 6 illustrates an embodiment in which a layer of wavelength converting material is deposited on the LED die.

FIG. 7 illustrates an array of LEDs, which are mounted on a board.

FIG. 8 is a graph of the broad spectrum produced by a phosphor converted blue LED.

FIG. 9 is a CIE chromaticity diagram for the spectrum shown in FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a graph of the spectra produced by phosphor converted LEDs and colored LEDs, which are combined to produce an approximately continuous spectrum.

FIG. 11 is a portion of a CIE chromaticity diagram that shows the variation in the CCT that may be produced by varying the brightness of the colored LEDs.

FIG. 12 is a portion of another CIE chromaticity diagram that illustrates variable CCT values for an array of 29 phosphor converted LEDs and 12 color LEDs.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1A illustrates a side view of a transparent optical element 102 and a light emitting diode (LED) die 104 that is mounted on a submount 106. The optical element 102 is to be bonded to the LED die 104 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 1B illustrates the optical element 102 bonded to the LED die 104.

The term “transparent” is used herein to indicate that the element so described, such as a “transparent optical element,” transmits light at the emission wavelengths of the LED with less than about 50%, preferably less than about 10%, single pass loss due to absorption or scattering. The emission wavelengths of the LED may lie in the infrared, visible, or ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. One of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that the conditions “less than 50% single pass loss” and “less than 10% single pass loss” may be met by various combinations of transmission path length and absorption constant.

LED die 104 illustrated in FIGS. 1A and 1B includes a first semiconductor layer 108 of n-type conductivity (n-layer) and a second semiconductor layer 110 of p-type conductivity (p-layer). Semiconductor layers 108 and 110 are electrically coupled to an active region 112. Active region 112 is, for example, a p-n diode junction associated with the interface of layers 108 and 110. Alternatively, active region 112 includes one or more semiconductor layers that are doped n-type or p-type or are undoped. LED die 104 includes an n-contact 114 and a p-contact 116 that are electrically coupled to semiconductor layers 108 and 110, respectively. Contact 114 and contact 116 are disposed on the same side of LED die 104 in a “flip chip” arrangement. A transparent superstrate 118 coupled to the n layer 108 is formed from a material such as, for example, sapphire, SiC, GaN, GaP, diamond, cubic zirconia (ZrO2), aluminum oxynitride (AlON), AlN, spinel, ZnS, oxide of tellurium, oxide of lead, oxide of tungsten, polycrystalline alumina oxide (transparent alumina), and ZnO.

Active region 112 emits light upon application of a suitable voltage across contacts 114 and 116. In alternative implementations, the conductivity types of layers 108 and 110, together with respective contacts 114 and 116, are reversed. That is, layer 108 is a p-type layer, contact 114 is a p-contact, layer 110 is an n-type layer, and contact 116 is an n-contact.

Semiconductor layers 108 and 110 and active region 112 may be formed from III-V semiconductors including but not limited to AlN, AlP, AlAs, AlSb, GaN, GaP, GaAs, GaSb, InN, InP, InAs, InSb, II-VI semiconductors including but not limited to ZnS, ZnSe, CdSe, ZnO, CdTe, group IV semiconductors including but not limited to Ge, Si, SiC, and mixtures or alloys thereof.

Contacts 114 and 116 are, in one implementation, metal contacts formed from metals including but not limited to gold, silver, nickel, aluminum, titanium, chromium, platinum, palladium, rhodium, rhenium, ruthenium, tungsten, and mixtures or alloys thereof.

Although FIGS. 1A and 1B illustrate a particular structure of LED die 104, the present invention is independent of the structure of the LED die. Accordingly, other types of LED configurations may be used instead of the specific configuration shown. Further, the number of semiconductor layers in LED die 104 and the detailed structure of active region 112 may differ. It should be noted that dimensions of the various elements of LED die 104 illustrated in the various figures are not to scale.

The LED die 104 is mounted to submount 106 via contacts elements 120, such as solder bumps, pads, or other appropriate elements, such as a layer of solder. Contact elements 120 will be sometimes referred to herein as bumps 120 for the sake of simplicity. Bumps 120 are manufactured from Au, Sn, Ag, Sb, Cu, Pb, Bi, Cd, In, Zn or alloys thereof including AuSn, SnSb, SnCu, SnAg, SnAgBi, InSn, BiPbSn, BiPbCd, BiPbIn, InCd, BiPb, BiSn, InAg, BiCd, InBi, InGa, or other appropriate material with a melting temperature that is greater than the temperature that will be used to bond the optical element 102 to the LED die 104, but is preferably Au or AuSn. In one implementation, the melting temperature of bumps 120 is greater than 250° C. and preferably greater than 300° C. The submount 106 may be, e.g., silicon, alumina or AlN and may include vias for backside connections.

The LED die 104 is mounted to the submount 106, e.g., using thermosonic bonding. For example, during the thermosonic bonding process, the LED die 104 with bumps 120 are aligned with the submount 106 in the desired position while the submount 106 is heated to approximately 150-160° C. A bond force of, e.g., approximately 50-100 gm/bump, is applied to the LED die 104 by a bonding tool, while ultrasonic vibration is applied. If desired other processes may be used, such as thermo-compression, to bond the LED die 104 to the submount 106. As is well known in the art, with thermo-compression higher temperatures and greater bonding forces are typically required.

In some embodiments, an underfill may be used with the LED die 104 and submount 106. The underfill material may have good thermal conductivity and have a coefficient of thermal expansion that approximately matches the LED die 104 and the submount 106. In another embodiment, a protective side coat, e.g., of silicone or other appropriate material, may be applied to the sides of the LED die 104 and the submount 106. The protective side coating acts as a sealant and limits exposure of the LED 104 and the bumps 120 to contamination and the environment.

For more information regarding producing bumps 120 from Au or Au/Sn and for submounts with backside vias and bonding LED dice with Au or Au/Sn bumps to a submount, see U.S. Ser. No. 10/840,459, by Ashim S. Haque, filed May 5, 2004, which has the same assignee as the present disclosure and is incorporated herein by reference. It should be understood, however, that the present invention is not limited to any specific type of submount and that any desired submount configuration may be used if desired.

After the LED die 104 is mounted to the submount 106, the optical element 102 is thermally bonded to the LED die 104. In one embodiment, a layer of bonding material is applied to the bottom surface of the optical element 102 to form transparent bonding layer 122 that is used to bond optical element 102 to LED die 104. In some embodiments, the transparent bonding layer 122 may be applied to the top surface of the LED die 104, e.g., to superstrate 118, (as indicated by the dotted lines 122 in FIG. 1A). The bonding layer 122 can be applied to the LED die 104 prior to or after mounting the LED die 104 to the submount 106. Alternatively, no bonding layer may be used and the optical element 102 may be bonded directly to the LED die 104, e.g., the superstrate 118. The transparent bonding layer 122 is, for example, about 10 Angstroms (Å) to about 100 microns (μm) thick, and is preferably about 1000 Å to about 10 μm thick, and more specifically, about 0.5 μm to about 5 μm thick. The bonding material is applied, for example, by conventional deposition techniques including but not limited to spinning, spraying, sputtering, evaporation, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), or material growth by, for example, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), vapor phase epitaxy (VPE), liquid phase epitaxy (LPE), or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). In one embodiment, the optical element 102 may be covered with a wavelength converting material 124, which will be discussed in more detail below.

In one implementation, the bonding material from which transparent bonding layer 122 is formed from glass such as SF59, LaSF 3, LaSF N18, SLAH51, LAF10, NZK7, NLAF21, LASFN35, SLAM60, or mixtures thereof, which are available from manufactures such as Schott Glass Technologies Incorporated, of Duryea, Pa. and Ohara Corporation in Somerville, N.J. Bonding layer 122 may also be formed from a high index glass, such as (Ge, As, Sb, Ga)(S, Se, Te, Cl, Br) chalcogenide or chalcogen-halogenide glasses, for example.

In other implementations, bonding layer 122 may be formed from III-V semiconductors including but not limited to GaP, InGaP, GaAs, and GaN; II-VI semiconductors including but not limited to ZnS, ZnSe, ZnTe, CdS, CdSe, and CdTe; group IV semiconductors and compounds including but not limited to Si, and Ge; organic semiconductors, metal oxides including but not limited to oxides of antimony, bismuth, boron, copper, niobium, tungsten, titanium, nickel, lead, tellurium, phosphor, potassium, sodium, lithium, zinc, zirconium, indium tin, or chromium; metal fluorides including but not limited to magnesium fluoride, calcium fluoride, potassium fluoride, sodium fluoride, and zinc fluoride; metals including but not limited to Zn, In, Mg, and Sn; yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG), phosphide compounds, arsenide compounds, antimonide compounds, nitride compounds, high index organic compounds; and mixtures or alloys thereof.

In implementations where the LED die 104 is configured with the n-contact and p-contact on opposite sides of the die 104, the transparent bonding layer 122 or 122′ may be patterned with, for example, conventional photolithographic and etching techniques to leave the top contact uncovered by bonding material and thus to permit contact to make electrical contact with a metallization layer on the optical element 102, which may serve as a lead, as is described in U.S. Ser. No. 09/880,204, filed Jun. 12, 2001, by Michael D. Camras et al., entitled “Light Emitting Diodes with Improved Light Extraction Efficiency” having Pub. No. 2002/0030194, which is incorporated herein by reference.

In one implementation, the optical element 102 is formed from optical glass, high index glass, GaP, CZ, ZnS, SiC, sapphire, diamond, cubic zirconia (ZrO2), AlON, by Sienna Technologies, Inc., polycrystalline aluminum oxide (transparent alumina), spinel, Schott glass LaFN21, Schott glass LaSFN35, LaF2, LaF3, and LaF10 available from Optimax Systems Inc. of Ontario, N.Y., an oxide of Pb, Te, Zn, Ga, Sb, Cu, Ca, P, La, Nb, or W, or any of the materials listed above for use as bonding materials in transparent bonding layer 122, excluding thick layers of the metals.

The transparent optical element 102 may have a shape and a size such that light entering optical element 102 from LED die 104 will intersect surface 102 a of optical element 102 at angles of incidence near normal incidence. Total internal reflection at the interface of surface 102 a and the ambient medium, typically air, is thereby reduced. In addition, since the range of angles of incidence is narrow, Fresnel reflection losses at surface 102 a can be reduced by applying a conventional antireflection coating to the surface 102 a. The shape of optical element 102 is, for example, a portion of a sphere such as a hemisphere, a Weierstrass sphere (truncated sphere), or a portion of a sphere less than a hemisphere. Alternatively, the shape of optical element 102 is a portion of an ellipsoid such as a truncated ellipsoid. The angles of incidence at surface 102 a for light entering optical element 102 from LED die 4 more closely approach normal incidence as the size of optical element 102 is increased. Accordingly, the smallest ratio of a length of the base of transparent optical element 102 to a length of the surface of LED die 104 is preferably greater than about 1, more preferably greater than about 2.

After the LED die 104 is mounted on the submount 106, the optical element 102 is thermally bonded to the LED die 104. For example, to bond the optical element 102 to the LED die 104, the temperature of bonding layer 122 is raised to a temperature between about room temperature and the melting temperature of the contact bumps 120, e.g., between approximately 150° C. to 450° C., and more particularly between about 200° C. and 400° C., and optical element 102 and LED die 104 are pressed together at the bonding temperature for a period of time of about one second to about 6 hours, preferably for about 30 seconds to about 30 minutes, at a pressure of about 1 pound per square inch (psi) to about 6000 psi. By way of example, a pressure of about 700 psi to about 3000 psi may be applied for between about 3 to 15 minutes.

The thermal bonding of the optical element 102 to the LED die 104 requires the application of elevated temperatures. With the use of bumps 120 that have a high melting point, i.e., higher than the elevated temperature used in the thermal bonding process, the LED die 104 may be mounted to the submount 106 before the optical element 102 is bonded to the LED die 104 without damaging the LED die/submount connection. Mounting the LED die 104 to the submount 106 prior to bonding the optical element 102 simplifies the pick and place process.

Bonding an optical element 102 to an LED die 104 is described in US Pub. No. 2002/0030194; Ser. No. 10/633,054, filed Jul. 31, 2003, by Michael D. Camras et al., entitled “Light Emitting Devices with Improved Light Extraction Efficiency”; Ser. No. 09/660,317, filed Sep. 12, 2000, by Michael D. Camras et al., entitled “Light Emitting Diodes with Improved Light Extraction Efficiency; Ser. No. 09/823,841, filed Mar. 30, 2001, by Douglas Pocius, entitled “Forming an Optical Element on the Surface of a Light Emitting Device for Improved Light Extraction” having Pub. No. 2002/0141006, which have the same assignee as the present application and which are incorporated herein by reference. Further, the process of bonding optical element 102 to LED die 104 described above may be performed with devices disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,502,316 and 5,376,580, incorporated herein by reference, previously used to bond semiconductor wafers to each other at elevated temperatures and pressures. The disclosed devices may be modified to accommodate LED dice and optical elements, as necessary. Alternatively, the bonding process described above may be performed with a conventional vertical press.

It should be noted that due to the thermal bonding process, a mismatch between the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of optical element 102 and LED die 104 can cause optical element 102 to detach from LED die 104 upon heating or cooling. Accordingly, optical element 102 should be formed from a material having a CTE that approximately matches the CTE of LED die 104. Approximately matching the CTEs additionally reduces the stress induced in the LED die 104 by bonding layer 122 and optical element 102. With suitable CTE matching, thermal expansion does not limit the size of the LED die that may be bonded to the optical element and, thus, the optical element 102 may be bonded to a large LED die 104, e.g., up to 16 mm2 or larger.

FIG. 2 illustrates an embodiment in which multiple LED dice 204 a, 204 b, and 204 c (sometimes collectively referred to as LED dice 204) are mounted on a submount 206. The LED dice 204 are schematically illustrated in FIG. 2 without showing the specific semiconductor layers. Nevertheless, it should be understood that the LED dice 204 may be similar to LED die 104 discussed above.

The LED dice 204 are each mounted to submount 206 as described above. Once the LED dice 204 are mounted on submount 206, individual optical elements 202 a, 202 b, and 202 c are bonded to LED dice 204 a, 204 b, and 204 c, respectively, in a manner such as that described above.

If desired, the LED dice 204 may be the same type of LED and may produce the same wavelengths of light. In another implementation, one or more of the LED dice 204 may produce different wavelengths of light, which when combined may be used to produce light with a desired correlated color temperature (CCT), e.g., white light. Another optical element (not shown in FIG. 2) may be used to cover optical elements 202 a, 202 b, and 202 c and aid in mixing the light.

FIG. 3 illustrates an embodiment of an LED device 300 that includes multiple LED dice 304 a, 304 b, and 304 c (sometimes collectively referred to as LED dice 304) mounted on a submount 306 and a single optical element 302 bonded to the LED dice 304. The LED dice 304 may be similar to LED die 104 discussed above.

The use of a single optical element 302 with multiple LED dice 304, as shown in FIG. 3, is advantageous as the LED dice 304 can be mounted close together on submount 306. Optical components typically have a larger footprint than an LED die to which it is bonded, and thus, the placement of LED dice with separate optical elements is constrained by the size of the optical elements.

After the LED dice 304 are mounted to the submount, there may be slight height variations in the top surfaces of the LED dice 304, e.g., due to the differences in the height of the bumps 320 and thickness of the dice. When the single optical element 302 is thermally bonded to the LED dice 304, any differences in the height of the LED dice 304 may be accommodated by the compliance of the bumps 320.

During the thermal bonding process of the optical element 302 to the LED dice 304, the LED dice 304 may shift laterally due to the heating and cooling of the submount 306. With the use of some bumps 320, such as Au, the compliance of the bumps 320 can be inadequate to accommodate lateral shift of the LED dice 304. Accordingly, the coefficient of thermal expansion of the optical element 302 (CTE302) should approximately match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the submount 306 (CTE306). With an approximate match between CTE302 and CTE306 any movement of the LED dice 304 caused by the expansion and contraction of the submount 306 will be approximately matched by the expansion and contraction of the optical element 302. A mismatch between CTE302 and CTE306, on the other hand, can result in the detachment of the LED dice 304 from the optical element 302 or other damage to the LED device 300, during the heating and cooling of the thermal bonding process.

With the use of sufficiently small LED dice 304, the thermal expansion of the LED dice 304 themselves during the thermal bonding process may be minimized. With the use of large LED dice 304, however, the amount of thermal expansion of the LED dice 304 during the thermal bonding process may be large and thus, the CTE for the LED dice 304 also should be appropriately matched to the CTE of the submount 306.

The LED dice 304 may be, e.g., InGaN, AlInGaP, or a combination of InGaN and AlInGaP devices. In one implementation, the submount 302 may be manufactured from AlN, while the optical element 302 may be manufactured from, e.g., SLAM60 by Ohara Corporation, or NZK7 available from Schott Glass Technologies Incorporated. In another implementation, an Alumina submount 306 may be used along with an optical element 302 manufactured from sapphire, Ohara Glass SLAH51 or Schott glass NLAF21. In some implementations, a bulk filler 305 between the LED dice 304 and the submount 306 may be used. The bulk filler 305 may be, e.g., silicone or glass. The bulk filler 305 may have good thermal conductivity and may approximately match the CTE of the submount 306 and the dice 304. If desired, a protective side coating may be applied alternatively or in addition to the bulk filler 305.

In one implementation, all of the LED dice 304 may be the same type and produce different or approximately the same wavelengths of light. Alternatively, with an appropriate choice of LED dice 304 and/or wavelength conversion materials, different wavelengths of light may be produced, e.g., blue, green and red. When LED dice 304 are the same type, the CTE for the LED dice 304 will be approximately the same. It may be desirable for the CTE of the LED dice 304 to closely match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the optical element 302 and the submount 306 to minimize the risk of detachment or damage to the LED dice 304 during the thermal bonding process.

In another implementation, the LED dice 304 may be different types and produce different wavelengths of light. With the use of different types of LED dice, the CTE of the dice can vary making it difficult to match the CTE for all the LED dice 304 with that of the optical element 302 and the submount 306. Nevertheless, with a judicious choice of the optical element 302 and submount 306 with CTEs that are as close as possible to that of the LED dice 304, problems associated with detachment of the LED dice 304 or other damage to the device 300 during the thermal bonding process may be minimized. Additionally, with the use of relatively small LED dice 304, e.g., the area smaller than approximately 1 mm2, problems associated with thermal bonding a single optical element 302 to multiple dice 304 may also be reduced. The use of a bulk filler 305 may also prevent damage to the device during thermal processing or operation.

As shown in FIG. 3, in one implementation, the optical element 302 may be coated with a wavelength converting material 310, such as a phosphor coating. In one embodiment, the wavelength converting material 310 is YAG. FIG. 4 is a flow chart of one implementation of producing such a device. As illustrated in FIG. 4, the LED dice 304 are mounted to the submount 306 (step 402) and the optical element 302 is bonded to the LED dice 304 (step 404). After the optical element 302 is bonded to the LED dice 304, a layer of the wavelength converting material 310 is deposited over the optical element 302 (step 406). The device can then be tested, e.g., by applying a voltage across the active regions of the LED dice 304 and detecting the wavelengths of light produced by the device (step 408). If the device does not produce the desired wavelengths (step 410), the thickness of the wavelength converting material is altered (step 411), e.g., by depositing additional wavelength converting material 310 over the optical element 302 or by removing some of the wavelength converting material by etching or dissolution and the device is again tested (step 408). The process stops once the desired wavelengths of light are produced (step 412).

Thus, the thickness of the wavelength converting material 310 coating is controlled in response to the light produced by the LED dice 304 resulting in a highly reproducible correlated color temperature. Moreover, because the deposition of the wavelength converting material 310 is in response to the specific wavelengths produced by the LED dice 304, a variation in the wavelengths of light produced by LED dice 304 can be accommodated. Accordingly, fewer LED dice 304 will be rejected for producing light with wavelengths outside a useful range of wavelengths.

It should be understood that the process of coating the optical element with a wavelength converting material may be applied to the embodiments shown in FIGS. 1B and 2 as well.

In another implementation, the coating of wavelength converting material may be placed between the LED die and the optical element, e.g., within, over, or under the bonding layer 322. FIG. 5, by way of example, illustrates an LED die 502 mounted to a submount 504 and bonded to an optical element 506 via bonding layer 508, where a layer of wavelength converting material 510 is disposed between the bonding layer 508 and the optical element 506. The wavelength converting material 510 may be bonded to the bottom surface of the optical element 506 by bonding layer 509 prior to or during the bonding the optical element 506 to the LED die 502. The wavelength converting material 510 may be, e.g., a phosphor impregnated glass or wavelength converting ceramic that is formed independently and then bonded to the LED die 502 and optical element 506. In some embodiments, the wavelength converting material 510 may be bonded directly to one or both of the LED die 502 and optical element 506. In one embodiment, the optical element 506, LED die 502 and wavelength converting material 510 may be bonded together simultaneously. In another embodiment, the wavelength converting material 510 may be bonded first to the optical element 506 and subsequently bonded to the LED die 502, e.g., where the bonding layer 509 has a higher bonding temperature than the bonding layer 508. A suitable wavelength converting material, such as a phosphor impregnated glass, is discussed in more detail in U.S. Ser. No. 10/863,980, filed on Jun. 9, 2004, by Paul S. Martin et al., entitled “Semiconductor Light Emitting Device with Pre-Fabricated Wavelength Converting Element”, which has the same assignee as the present application and is incorporated herein by reference.

FIG. 6 illustrates another embodiment, similar to the embodiment shown in FIG. 5, except a wavelength converting material 520 is bonded directly to the LED die 502 (and optionally over the edges of the LED die 502) prior to or during bonding of the optical element 506. Thus, as shown in FIG. 6, the wavelength converting material 520 is placed between the LED die 502 and the bonding layer 509. If desired, an additional layer of wavelength converting material may be deposited over the optical element 506 in FIGS. 5 and 6, as discussed above.

In another implementation, the coating of wavelength converting material may be located over the LED die or dice remotely, e.g., on an envelope of glass, plastic, epoxy, or silicone with a hollow space between the envelope and the LED die or dice. If desired, the hollow space may be filled with a material such as silicone or epoxy.

Related U.S. patent application having Serial No. application Ser. No. 10/987,241, filed Nov. 12, 2004, entitled “Bonding an Optical Element to a Light Emitting Device”, by Michael D. Camras et al, which has the same assignee as the present disclosure, and is incorporated herein by reference.

FIG. 7 illustrates an array 600 of LEDs 602, which are mounted on a board 604. The board 604 includes electrical traces 606 that are used to provide electrical contact to the LEDs 602. The LEDs 602 may be phosphor converted devices manufactured, e.g., as described above. The LEDs 602 may each produce white light with different CCTs. By mixing the white light with different CCTs in array 600, a light with a desired CCT may be produced. If desired, the LEDs 602 may be covered with a transparent element 608 of e.g., glass, plastic, epoxy, or silicone. The transparent element 608 may be filled, e.g., with epoxy or silicone, which assists the extracting and mixing of the light and to protect the LEDs 602. It should be understood that array 600 may include any number of LEDs 602 and that if desired, one or more of the LEDs may produce non-white light. Moreover, if desired, a plurality of the LEDs 602 may be bonded to a single optical element 603, or one or more of the LEDs 602 may not include optical element 603.

As illustrated in FIG. 7, individual or groups of LEDs 602 may be independently controlled, e.g., by controller 610, which is electrically connected to the traces 606 on the board 604. By independently controlling LEDs 602 or groups of LEDs 602, a high color rendering, e.g., over 85, with a constant brightness may be achieved. Further, the white points produced by the array 600 may be tuneable over a large range of CCT, e.g., between 3000 K and 6000 K. By way of example, a number of phosphor-converted (PC) blue LEDs that produce white light may be used in combination with LEDs with different colors, such as blue, cyan, amber and red to produce a light with a desired CCT. As shown in the graph of FIG. 8, the phosphor converted blue LEDs generates light with a broad spectrum 702 in the green area in combination with a peak in the blue region. The thickness of the phosphor may be tuned to produce approximately equal peak values for both the green and blue parts of the spectrum. FIG. 9 shows a CIE chromaticity diagram for the spectrum shown in FIG. 8, which illustrates the x and y color coordinates 752 above the black bodyline 754. Of course, PC LEDs that produce spectra having peaks in other area may be used if desired. Alternatively, if desired, PC LEDs that produce different spectra, i.e., white light having different CCTs may be used together.

A majority of the LEDs 602 in the array 600 of FIG. 7 may be PC LEDs that generate the spectrum shown in FIG. 8. The remaining LEDs 602 shown in FIG. 7 may be color LEDs, e.g., LEDs that produce blue, cyan, amber and red. The brightness of the color LEDs may be adjusted by controller 610. The combination of fully powered PC LEDs with colored LEDs generates an approximately continuous spectrum, as illustrated in FIG. 10. FIG. 10 shows a graph with the spectrum 702 from the PC LEDs along with spectra 704, 706, 708 and 710 from the blue, cyan, amber and red colored LEDs combined to form spectrum 720. As illustrated in the portion of the CIE chromaticity diagram shown in FIG. 11, by varying the brightness of the colored LEDs, an area that covers part of the black body line 764 can be obtained. By way of example, one embodiment that included 29 PC LEDs and 12 color LEDs, e.g., 3 blue, 3 cyan, 3 amber, and 3 red, is capable of producing a brightness of 800 lumen with a color rendering between 85 and 95 and a CCT between 3200 K and 5800 K. FIG. 12 illustrates a portion of the CIE chromaticity diagram that illustrates variable CCT values for an array of 29 PC LEDs and 12 color LEDs. Of course, any number of PC LEDs and color LEDs may be used.

Although the present invention is illustrated in connection with specific embodiments for instructional purposes, the present invention is not limited thereto. Various adaptations and modifications may be made without departing from the scope of the invention. Therefore, the spirit and scope of the appended claims should not be limited to the foregoing description.

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US20120014091 *Aug 12, 2010Jan 19, 2012Shenzhen China Star Optoelectronics Technology Co Ltd.Led package assembly and backlight module
US20120305902 *Feb 22, 2011Dec 6, 2012Franky SoMicrocavity oleds for lighting
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Classifications
U.S. Classification362/231, 257/E33.073, 362/235
International ClassificationF21V9/10, H01L33/58
Cooperative ClassificationH01L25/0753, H01L33/58, H05B33/0857
European ClassificationH01L33/58