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Publication numberUS20080187888 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/024,693
Publication dateAug 7, 2008
Filing dateFeb 1, 2008
Priority dateFeb 1, 2007
Also published asCA2676254A1, EP2115379A2, WO2008115624A2, WO2008115624A3
Publication number024693, 12024693, US 2008/0187888 A1, US 2008/187888 A1, US 20080187888 A1, US 20080187888A1, US 2008187888 A1, US 2008187888A1, US-A1-20080187888, US-A1-2008187888, US2008/0187888A1, US2008/187888A1, US20080187888 A1, US20080187888A1, US2008187888 A1, US2008187888A1
InventorsGiles D. Jones, Bradley C. Huang, Qingce Bian, Christopher A. Tomlinson, Peter M. Wallrich, William W. Price, Jeffrey E. Decker, Eric R. Davis
Original AssigneeJones Giles D, Huang Bradley C, Qingce Bian, Tomlinson Christopher A, Wallrich Peter M, Price William W, Decker Jeffrey E, Davis Eric R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Simulated Firearm Having A Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System
US 20080187888 A1
Abstract
According to one embodiment of the disclosure, an apparatus that simulates a firearm includes a simulated firearm housing and a multiple integrated laser engagement system (MILES) device. The simulated firearm housing simulates the appearance of an actual firearm. The MILES device is housed in and integrated within the simulated firearm housing. A MILES circuit portion detects a triggering event. A transmitter transmits a MILES signal in response to the triggering event, the MILES signal representing a bullet fired from the actual firearm.
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Claims(20)
1. An apparatus that simulates a firearm, the apparatus comprising:
a simulated firearm housing configured to simulate the appearance of an actual firearm; and
a multiple integrated laser engagement system (MILES) device housed in the simulated firearm housing, the MILES device integrated within the simulated firearm housing and comprising:
a MILES circuit portion configured to detect a triggering event; and
a transmitter configured to transmit a MILES signal in response to the triggering event, the MILES signal representing a bullet fired from the actual firearm.
2. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising:
a pneumatic device coupled to the MILES device and configured to release compressed air in response to a trigger signal.
3. The apparatus of claim 1, the MILES device further configured to detect the triggering event by:
detecting that a pneumatic device has released compressed air.
4. The apparatus of claim 1, the MILES device further configured to detect the triggering event by:
detecting a trigger signal.
5. The apparatus of claim 1, the MILES device configured within a firearm attachment.
6. The apparatus of claim 1, the MILES device configured within a sonic suppressor.
7. The apparatus of claim 1, the MILES device configured within a flash suppressor.
8. The apparatus of claim 1, the MILES device further comprising:
a programmable interface configured to receive an instruction to program software executed by the MILES circuit portion to simulate the actual firearm.
9. The apparatus of claim 1, the MILES circuit portion configured within a handgun lower receiver, the transmitter configured within a handgun upper receiver.
10. The apparatus of claim 1, the actual firearm selected from the group consisting of a Maschinenpistole 5 (MP5), an 1947 (AK-47), a Heckler & Koch GmbH G3, a Messier 92 (M92), and a handgun.
11. An apparatus that simulates a firearm, the apparatus comprising:
a simulated firearm housing configured to simulate the appearance of an actual sub-machine gun, the simulated firearm housing comprising a detachable firearm attachment; and
a multiple integrated laser engagement system (MILES) device housed in the simulated firearm housing, the MILES device integrated within the simulated firearm housing and comprising:
a MILES circuit portion configured to detect a triggering event; and
a transmitter configured to transmit a MILES signal in response to the triggering event, the MILES signal representing a bullet fired from the actual sub-machine gun.
12. The apparatus of claim 11, further comprising:
a pneumatic device coupled to the MILES device and configured to release compressed air in response to a trigger signal.
13. The apparatus of claim 11, the MILES device further configured to detect the triggering event by:
detecting that a pneumatic device has released compressed air.
14. The apparatus of claim 11, the MILES device further configured to detect the triggering event by:
detecting a trigger signal.
15. The apparatus of claim 11, the firearm attachment comprising a sonic suppressor.
16. The apparatus of claim 11, the firearm attachment comprising a flash suppressor.
17. The apparatus of claim 11, the MILES device further comprising:
a programmable interface configured to receive an instruction to program software executed by the MILES circuit portion to simulate the actual firearm.
18. An apparatus that simulates a firearm, the apparatus comprising:
a simulated firearm housing configured to simulate the appearance of an actual handgun, the simulated firearm housing comprising a handgun lower receiver and a handgun upper receiver; and
a multiple integrated laser engagement system (MILES) device housed in the simulated firearm housing, the MILES device integrated within the simulated firearm housing and comprising:
a MILES circuit portion configured to detect a triggering event, the MILES circuit portion configured within the handgun lower receiver; and
a transmitter configured to transmit a MILES signal in response to the triggering event, the transmitter configured within the handgun upper receiver, the MILES signal representing a bullet fired from the actual firearm.
19. The apparatus of claim 18, the MILES device further configured to detect the triggering event by:
detecting a trigger signal.
20. The apparatus of claim 18, the MILES device further comprising:
a programmable interface configured to receive an instruction to program software executed by the MILES circuit portion to simulate the actual firearm.
Description
RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims benefit under 35 U.S.C. 119(e) of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/898,886, entitled “Simulated Firearm for a Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System,” Attorney's Docket 077443.0116, filed Feb. 1, 2007, by Giles D. Jones et al.

GOVERNMENT FUNDING

The U.S. Government may have certain rights in this invention as provided for by the terms of Contract No. N61339-00-D-0001 awarded by the Naval Air Warfare Center, Training Systems Division for the Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training, and Instrumentation (PEO STRI).

TECHNICAL FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE

This disclosure generally relates to firearm training devices, and more particularly to a simulated firearm having a multiple integrated laser engagement system.

BACKGROUND OF THE DISCLOSURE

Training places individuals in simulated situations in order to develop appropriate responses in those situations. For example, soldiers may participate in training exercises in order to prepare for actual combat situations.

SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE

According to one embodiment of the disclosure, an apparatus that simulates a firearm includes a simulated firearm housing and a multiple integrated laser engagement system (MILES) device. The simulated firearm housing simulates the appearance of an actual firearm. The MILES device is housed in and integrated within the simulated firearm housing. A MILES circuit portion detects a triggering event. A transmitter transmits a MILES signal in response to the triggering event, the MILES signal representing a bullet fired from the actual firearm.

Certain embodiments of the invention may provide one or more technical advantages. A technical advantage of one embodiment may be that a simulated firearm has a multiple integrated laser engagement system (MILES) device that emits a MILES signal representing a bullet. The MILES device is integrated into the simulated firearm.

Certain embodiments of the invention may include none, some, or all of the above technical advantages. One or more other technical advantages may be readily apparent to one skilled in the art from the figures, descriptions, and claims included herein.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

A more complete understanding of embodiments of the disclosure will be apparent from the detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates one embodiment of a simulated firearm with a housing that simulates the appearance of an actual firearm;

FIG. 2 illustrates embodiments of a triggering mechanism and a multiple integrated laser engagement (MILES) device that may be used with the simulated firearm of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 illustrates a more detailed view of the triggering mechanism of FIG. 2;

FIGS. 4A and 4B illustrate one embodiment of a MILES device configured within a sonic suppressor of a simulated firearm;

FIGS. 5A, 5B, and 5C illustrate another embodiment of a MILES device configured within a flash suppressor of a simulated firearm; and

FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate another embodiment of a MILES device configured within a simulated firearm that simulates an actual handgun.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EXAMPLE EMBODIMENTS

FIG. 1 illustrates one embodiment of a simulated firearm 10 with a housing 20 that simulates the appearance of an actual firearm. As described below, simulated firearm 10 has a multiple integrated laser engagement system (MILES) device that is configured to transmit a MILES signal in response to detecting a triggering event. The MILES signal represents a bullet that may be fired from the actual firearm. The MILES device is integrated into the simulated firearm.

Simulated firearm 10 may simulate any suitable actual firearm. Examples of actual firearms include Maschinenpistole 5 (MP5),

1947 (AK-47), Heckler & Koch GmbH G3, Messier 92 (M92), and other shotgun, sub-machine gun, and handgun firearms. In this particular embodiment, simulated firearm 10 simulates a Maschinenpistole 5 (MP5) firearm. In one embodiment, simulated firearm 10 may be a commercial off the shelf (COTS) simulated firearm. Examples of such simulated firearms include toy or replica firearms or air guns. In one embodiment, simulated firearm 10 may be unable to fire ammunition that is fired by an actual firearm. Certain embodiments of simulated firearm 10 may provide an advantage in that simulated firearm 10 may be unable to cause injury or harm.

In one embodiment, simulated firearm 10 has a housing 20 that includes components similar to those of an actual firearm. In one embodiment, housing 20 may include a scope 30, a sight 34, a stock 38, a lower receiver 42, a trigger 46, a magazine 54, a barrel 50, a sonic suppressor 58, and a flash suppressor (not shown). In one embodiment, certain components may be configured as detachable firearm attachments, such as scope 30, lower receiver 42, magazine 54, sonic suppressor 58, and a flash suppressor.

FIG. 2 illustrates embodiments of a triggering mechanism 60 and a multiple integrated laser engagement (MILES) device 62 that may be used with simulated firearm 10 of FIG. 1. Triggering mechanism 60 initiates a simulated firing of simulated firearm 10. In one embodiment, trigger 46 may be activated, such as pulled, to generate a trigger signal that initiates a simulated firing of simulated firearm 10. Triggering mechanism 60 is described in more detail with reference to FIG. 3.

FIG. 3 illustrates a more detailed view of the triggering mechanism 60 of FIG. 2. In the embodiment, triggering mechanism 60 includes a transmitter switch 80, a magazine switch 84, and a pneumatic device 88 coupled as shown. In response to activation of trigger 46, transmitter switch 80 provides a trigger signal, which in turn activates magazine switch 84. Activation of magazine switch 84 activates pneumatic device 88, which releases compressed gas. In one embodiment, the release of compressed gas constitutes a triggering event that initiates MILES device 62. In another embodiment, the trigger signal itself constitutes a triggering event.

Referring back to FIG. 2, MILES device 62 emits a MILES signal that represents a bullet fired from the actual firearm, and may emit the signal in response to detecting a triggering event. A MILES signal may be a line-of-sight type signal, such as an infrared signal emitted from a light emitting diode (LED) or laser. The MILES signal may carry information about the shooter, firearm, and/or ammunition simulated by simulated firearm 10.

In the illustrated embodiment, MILES device 62 includes a triggering event detector 66, a processing circuit 70, a programmable interface 74, and a transmitter 78. Triggering event detector 66 detects a triggering event that indicates that trigger 46 has been activated and has generated a trigger signal. In one embodiment, the triggering event may be release of compressed air by a pneumatic device in response to a trigger signal. In another embodiment, the triggering event may be the trigger signal itself.

Processing circuit 70 manages the operation of MILES device 62, and may instruct transmitter 78 to emit a MILES signal in response to triggering event detector 66 detecting a triggering event. Processing circuit 70 may control features of MILES device 62 to simulate characteristics of one or more actual firearms. Features that may be controlled may include the signal strength, speed at which signals are fired, and/or the number of signals that may be fired after the trigger is activated, in a certain time period, or after reloading. Simulated characteristics may include the ammunition type and caliber, firing speed, or magazine capacity. Processing circuit 70 may track the number of simulated firings after the trigger is pulled, during a certain time period, and/or after reloading.

Programmable interface 74 may be used to program and/or upgrade software executed by processing circuit 70. For example, programmable interface 74 may receive an instruction to program software to have simulated firearm 10 simulate a particular type of actual firearm. Programmable interface 74 may also be used to load weapon and/or user identifier codes. Programmable interface 74 may be any suitable interface, such as a universal serial bus (USB) interface.

Transmitter 78 transmits the MILES signal. Transmitter 78 may be any suitable transmitter configured to transmit a MILES signal, such as a light emitting diode or a laser. Transmitter 78 may be placed anywhere on or within an suitable component of simulated firearm 10. In the illustrated embodiment, transmitter 78 is configured in sonic suppressor 58.

One or more components of MILES device 62 may be disposed within or on one or more components of simulated firearm 10 in any suitable manner. In one embodiment, triggering event detector 66, processing circuit 70, and programmable interface 74 may form a MILES circuit portion 76 configured within or on one component, and transmitter 78 may be configured within or on another component.

In one embodiment, MILES device 62 is disposed within one or more components of simulated firearm 10 to preserve the appearance of simulated firearm 10 as an actual firearm. MILES device 62 may be disposed within a firearm attachment to allow for interchangeability with other commercial off the shelf simulated firearms.

FIGS. 4A and 4B illustrate one embodiment of MILES device 62 configured within sonic suppressor 58 of simulated firearm 10. MILES device 62 includes circuit portion 76 and transmitter 78. Circuit portion 76 is disposed within the muzzle of sonic suppressor 58, closer towards barrel 50. In the illustrated example, circuit portion 76 is temporarily removed from sonic suppressor 58 for explanatory purposes only. Transmitter 78 is disposed within sonic suppressor 58, farther away from barrel 50.

FIGS. 5A, 5B, and 5C illustrate another embodiment of a MILES device 62 configured within a flash suppressor 110 of a simulated firearm 10. Flash suppressor 110 reduces the visibility of a muzzle flash that occurs upon firing. MILES device 62 includes circuit portion 76 and transmitter 78. Circuit portion 76 is disposed within the muzzle on flash suppressor 110, closer towards barrel 50. Transmitter 78 is disposed within the muzzle of flash suppressor 110, farther away from barrel 50. Screws 114 may facilitate attachment of MILES device 62 to and removal MILES device 62 from flash suppressor 110.

Flash suppressor 110 may be mounted to simulated firearm 10 using any suitable coupling, such as screws, bolts, lugs, or threaded aperture. In this particular embodiment, flash suppressor 110 is configured with lugs 118 used to couple flash suppressor 110 to simulated firearm 10.

FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate another embodiment of MILES device 62 configured within a simulated firearm 122 that simulates an actual handgun. Simulated firearm 122 is shown in a disassembled state in order to show MILES device 62. In the illustrated embodiment, simulated firearm 122 includes a lower receiver 42 and an upper receiver 126. MILES device 62 includes circuit portion 76 and transmitter 78. A first portion of circuit portion 76 is disposed within lower receiver 42, and a second portion of circuit portion 76 and transmitter 78 are disposed within upper receiver 126. In one embodiment, the first portion comprises programmable interface 74, and the second portion comprises triggering event detector 66 and processing circuit 70.

Modifications, additions, or omissions may be made to simulated firearm 10 without departing from the scope of the invention. The components of simulated firearm 10 may be integrated or separated. Moreover, the operations of simulated firearm 10 may be performed by more, fewer, or other components. For example, the operations of circuit portion 76 and transmitter 78 may be performed by one component, or the operations of circuit portion 76 may be performed by more than one component. Additionally, operations of simulated firearm 10 may be performed using any suitable logic comprising software, hardware, and/or other logic. As used in this document, “each” refers to each member of a set or each member of a subset of a set.

Certain embodiments of the invention may provide one or more technical advantages. A technical advantage of one embodiment may be that a simulated firearm has a MILES device that emits a MILES signal representing a bullet. The MILES device is integrated into the simulated firearm.

Although several embodiments have been illustrated and described in detail, it will be recognized that substitutions and alterations are possible without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention, as defined by the following claims.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7976309Oct 27, 2006Jul 12, 2011Raytheon CompanyMethod and apparatus for simulating weapon explosions inside a chamber
US8312814Sep 8, 2008Nov 20, 2012Raytheon CompanySimulated hand grenade having a multiple integrated laser engagement system
US8602785Nov 10, 2011Dec 10, 2013Rick Allen JensenSmart magazine for simulated weapon
US8690575 *Nov 3, 2009Apr 8, 2014ACME Worldwide Enterprises, Inc.Apparatus and method for a weapon simulator
EP2455700A2Nov 16, 2011May 23, 2012Universal Electronics, Inc.Smart magazine for simulated weapon
Classifications
U.S. Classification434/21, 434/18
International ClassificationF41G3/26
Cooperative ClassificationF41G3/2655, F41A33/02, F41G3/2666
European ClassificationF41G3/26C1G, F41G3/26C1E, F41A33/02
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 16, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: RAYTHEON COMPANY, MASSACHUSETTS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:JONES, GILES D.;HUANG, BRADLEY C.;BIAN, QINGCE;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:020809/0441;SIGNING DATES FROM 20080226 TO 20080408