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Publication numberUS20080197042 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/916,458
PCT numberPCT/AT2006/000515
Publication dateAug 21, 2008
Filing dateDec 14, 2006
Priority dateDec 21, 2005
Also published asDE502006003572D1, EP1964030A1, EP1964030B1, WO2007070902A1
Publication number11916458, 916458, PCT/2006/515, PCT/AT/2006/000515, PCT/AT/2006/00515, PCT/AT/6/000515, PCT/AT/6/00515, PCT/AT2006/000515, PCT/AT2006/00515, PCT/AT2006000515, PCT/AT200600515, PCT/AT6/000515, PCT/AT6/00515, PCT/AT6000515, PCT/AT600515, US 2008/0197042 A1, US 2008/197042 A1, US 20080197042 A1, US 20080197042A1, US 2008197042 A1, US 2008197042A1, US-A1-20080197042, US-A1-2008197042, US2008/0197042A1, US2008/197042A1, US20080197042 A1, US20080197042A1, US2008197042 A1, US2008197042A1
InventorsThomas Ullrich
Original AssigneeTeich Aktiengesellschaft
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Blister Pack With Radio-Frequency Identification Device, and Method For Manufacturing Same
US 20080197042 A1
Abstract
The invention specifies a blister pack (1) with a radio-frequency identification device (2, 2′) which comprises—a support body (3) which is made of flat plastic material and which has a plurality of depressions (5), produced from deforming this material, within a planar region (4) for the purpose of holding the packed goods,—an aluminium sealing foil (7) which is connected flat to the planar region (4) of the support body (3), and—a radio-frequency identification device (2, 2′) which is fitted in the region (8) of the support body (3) which projects over the aluminium sealing foil (7).
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Claims(20)
1. Blister pack (1) with radio frequency identification means (2, 2′) comprising the following:
a carrier body (3) of flat plastic material which has several depressions (5) produced by deformation of this material within a plane region (4) for holding the packaged article,
an aluminum sealing foil (7) which is connected flat to the plane region (4) of the carrier body, (3) and
a radio frequency identification means (2, 2′) which is attached in the region (8) of the carrier body (3) projecting over the aluminum sealing foil (7).
2. Blister pack as claimed in claim 1, wherein the radio frequency identification means (2, 2′) is a radio frequency identification transponder.
3. Blister pack as claimed in claim 1, wherein the radio frequency identification means (2, 2′) is attached to the same side as the depressions (5).
4. Blister pack as claimed in claim 1, wherein the radio frequency identification means (2, 2′) is attached to side opposite the depressions (5).
5. Blister pack as claimed in claim 1, wherein the radio frequency identification means (2, 2′) is spaced apart from the aluminum sealing foil (7).
6. Blister pack as claimed in claim 1, wherein the carrier body (3) is a plastic film or plastic film composite.
7. Blister pack as claimed in claim 6, wherein the plastic film(s) consist of polyvinylchloride (PVC) and/or polypropylene (PP).
8. Blister pack as claimed in claim 6, wherein the plastic film(s) has (have) a thickness from 0.1 to 0.5 mm.
9. Blister pack as claimed in claim 1, wherein the aluminum sealing foil (7) has a. thickness from 0.01 to 0.05 mm.
10. Blister pack as claimed in claim 1, wherein the aluminum sealing foil (7) is connected to the plane region (4) of the carrier body (3) via a hot adhesive varnish layer (6).
11. Process for producing a blister pack (1) with radio frequency identification (2, 2′) as claimed in claim 1, comprising the following process steps:
producing a carrier body (3) from flat plastic material, depressions (5) being formed within the plane region (4) by deep drawing,
filling of the carrier body (3) with the packaged article which is placed within the depressions (5),
producing the aluminum sealing foil (7) and subsequently sealing it in the plane region (4) of the carrier body (3) and
attachment of a radio frequency identification means (2, 2′) to the region (8) of the carrier body (3) projecting over the aluminum sealing foil (7).
12. Process as claimed in claim 11, wherein the radio frequency identification means (2, 2′) is a radio frequency identification transponder.
13. Process as claimed in claim 11, wherein the radio frequency identification means (2) is attached to the same side as the depressions (5) of the carrier body (3).
14. Process as claimed in claim 11, wherein the radio frequency identification means (2′) is attached to the side opposite the depressions (5) of the carrier material (3).
15. Process as claimed in claim 11, wherein the radio frequency identification means (2, 2′) is applied spaced apart from the aluminum sealing foil (7).
16. Process as claimed in claim 11, wherein a plastic film or plastic film composite is used to produce the carrier body (3).
17. Process as claimed in claim 16, wherein polyvinylchloride (PVC) and/or polypropylene (PP) film is used as the plastic film(s).
18. Process as claimed in claim 16 or 17 claim 16, wherein the plastic film(s) has (have) a thickness from 0.1 to 0.5 mm.
19. Process as claimed in claim 11, wherein an aluminum foil with a thickness from 0.01 to 0.05 mm is used to produce the aluminum sealing foil (7).
20. Process as claimed in claim 11, wherein the aluminum sealing foil (7) is connected to the plane region (4) of the carrier body (3) via a hot adhesive varnish layer (6).
Description

The invention relates to a blister pack with radio frequency identification means and a process for its manufacture.

Using blister packs for holding sensitive packaged articles such as tablets, capsules, and the like is known. In this connection a carrier body is produced from flat material, which within a plane region has several depressions produced by deformation of this material for holding the packaged article, and is connected two-dimensionally to an aluminum sealing foil in the plane region.

The aforementioned production process of a blister pack conventionally takes place in the course of the packing process. This means that the packaged articles, such as tablets or capsules, are placed in the depressions of the carrier material, and after placement, the sealing foil is fed onto the carrier material by application of pressure and elevated temperature, so that a connection is formed between the carrier material and the sealing foil.

After unpacking, it is therefore only possible more by destroying the package to achieve safety over genuineness or quality of the packaged article.

As claimed in WO-A1-01/63368, therefore to improve quality control there has been a transition to attaching radio frequency identification means to the blister pack. Radio frequency identification systems are recognition systems as are used for example in chip cards. In any case the technical processes for this purpose have been adopted from radio and radar so that the radio frequency identification system consists altogether of two components, specifically of a transponder which is attached to the objects to be identified, and a reader or detection device.

As claimed in WO-A1-01/63368, the transponder is attached directly to the blister pack. The aluminum foil in the blister pack attenuates the electromagnetic field of the reader to such an extent that the readability of the RFID transponder is greatly reduced.

It is here that the invention will provide a remedy.

As claimed in the invention, a blister pack with radio frequency identification means is suggested which comprises the following components:

    • a carrier body of flat plastic material which has several depressions produced by deformation of this material within a plane region for holding the packaged article,
    • an aluminum sealing foil which is connected flat to the plane region of the carrier body, and
    • the radio frequency identification means which is attached in the region of the carrier body projecting over the aluminum sealing foil.

Advantageous embodiments of the blister pack as claimed in the invention with radio frequency identification means are disclosed according to the dependent claims.

The invention furthermore relates to a process for producing the blister pack as claimed in the invention with radio frequency identification means comprising the following process steps:

    • producing a carrier body of flat plastic material, depressions being produced within the plane region of the carrier material by deep drawing,
    • filling of the carrier body, the packaged articles being placed in the depressions,
    • sealing of the filled carrier body in its plane region with an aluminum sealing foil and
    • subsequent attachment of a radio frequency identification means to the region of the carrier body projecting over the aluminum foil.

Advantageous embodiments of the process as claimed in the invention are disclosed according to the dependent claims.

The invention is detailed below using FIGS. 1 and 2 and using one advantageous embodiment of the blister pack as claimed in the invention.

FIG. 1 shows the blister pack as claimed in the invention with the radio frequency means 2 which is attached to the same side as the depressions 5, and FIG. 2 shows one version of this blister pack, the radio frequency identification means 2′ being attached to the side opposite the depressions 5. In this connection, the embodiments as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 are reproduced both in a top view—see FIG. 1 b, 2 b—and also in a cross section—see FIGS. 1 a, 2 a.

To produce the blister pack 1 as claimed in the invention, for example the carrier body 3 is produced from a for example transparent plastic film by a thermal deep drawing process. The parent products are for example PVC or PP films in a thickness of roughly 0.2-0.3 mm, and they can be present as monofilms or film composites. The thermal deep drawing process is a shaping process with which the depressions 5 are formed within the plane region 4 of the carrier body 3.

In a further process step the aluminum sealing foil 7 is produced. The parent product is an aluminum foil in a thickness of roughly 0.01-0.04 mm which is advantageously provided on the bottom with a hot adhesive varnish layer 6. The coating thickness of the hot adhesive varnish layer 6 is roughly in the range of 0.003-0.02 mm. Due to this hot adhesive varnish layer 6, in the flat region 4 of the carrier body 3 a connection is produced between it and the aluminum sealing foil 7.

The radio frequency identification means 2, 2′ is advantageously intended as a so-called RFID transponder which is located in a housing 9. The important transponder components are a coupling element or an antenna 10 in the form of copper wires and a microchip 11.

The RFID transponder 2 and 2′ is now attached in the region 8 of the plastic carrier material 3 which projects over the aluminum sealing foil 7. This takes place for example by the RFID transponder being purchased in label form and being cemented onto the carrier material 3 in the region 8 by means of commercial automatic labelling machines.

Furthermore it is possible to buy the RFID transponder in tape goods and to cut off according to the dimensions of the region 8 and to apply it in this region.

Furthermore it is possible to imprint parts of the RFID transponder 2, 2′ such as the antenna and the coupling element 10 as well as the contact surface for the microchip 11 in the region 8 of the carrier material 3. Then the microchip 11 is inserted mechanically into the imprinted contact surfaces. This process is also called “pending”.

In series production it is recommended that all parts of the RFID transponder 2, 2′, i.e. the antenna or the coupling element 10 and also the microchip 11, be imprinted onto the carrier material 3 using printing technology.

As is apparent from FIG. 1, the RFID transponder 2 in the region 8 of the carrier material 3 is attached to the same side on which the depressions 5 for holding the tablets are provided. In this case it is advantageous to provide a certain distance 13 which can be varied from case to case, in order to thus avoid disruptions in reading out the data stored on the microchip in any case.

Furthermore, it is possible, as shown in FIG. 2, to attach the RFID transponder 2′ in the region 8, but on the side opposite the depressions 5. Here it is advantageous to provide a gap 12 with a width which can vary from case to case, in order to thus avoid disruptions in reading out the data stored on the microchip in any case.

Both for the version as shown in FIG. 1 and also for that as shown in FIG. 2 it is possible to input data sets into the microchip 11, such as security codes relating to checking the genuineness of materials such as pharmaceuticals, their production date, expiration date, batch number and general data for checking. They can now be easily read out with a reader (not shown), and a practicable distance between the transponder and reader can be achieved in the range from 10 to 30 cm. This means that contactless detection or read-out of the stored data can take place without possible disruptive factors. Contactless read-out of the aforementioned data is especially necessary when using sensitive packaged articles such as pharmaceuticals.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7688206 *Jan 10, 2005Mar 30, 2010Alien Technology CorporationRadio frequency identification (RFID) tag for an item having a conductive layer included or attached
US8091790 *Mar 11, 2008Jan 10, 2012University Of Pittsburgh - Of The Commonwealth System Of Higher EducationSecurity for blister packs
US8418883Sep 24, 2008Apr 16, 2013Momentive Performance MaterialsPacket for viscous material and kit
US8471709 *Mar 29, 2010Jun 25, 2013Alien Technology CorporationRadio frequency identification (RFID) tag for an item having a conductive layer included or attached
US8544687Aug 28, 2008Oct 1, 2013Momentive Performance Materials, Inc.Display card with viscous material dispenser
US8640920Oct 12, 2009Feb 4, 2014Momentive Performance Materials Inc.Method of forming and filling a pouch
US8752730Dec 20, 2006Jun 17, 2014Momentive Performance Materials Inc.Viscous material selective packet method
US20110037485 *Apr 16, 2009Feb 17, 2011Amcor Flexibles Kreuzlingen Ltd.Covering and sealing film for a pack and a method for determining the opening state of a pack
EP2577573A1 *May 31, 2011Apr 10, 2013Boehringer Ingelheim International GmbHSafety system with a transponder and a reading device of an rfid system
WO2012103564A1 *Jan 31, 2012Aug 9, 2012Ait Austrian Institute Of Technology GmbhContainer and packaging unit
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/531
International ClassificationB65D83/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65B9/045, B65D2203/10, B65D75/327
European ClassificationB65B9/04C, B65D75/32D3
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 2, 2010ASAssignment
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:TEICH AKTIENGESELLSCHAFT;REEL/FRAME:025437/0451
Owner name: CONSTANTIA TEICH GMBH, AUSTRIA
Effective date: 20100910
Feb 1, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: TEICH AKTIENGESELLSCHAFT, AUSTRIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ULLRICH, THOMAS;REEL/FRAME:020453/0980
Effective date: 20071106