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Publication numberUS20080248899 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/080,547
Publication dateOct 9, 2008
Filing dateApr 3, 2008
Priority dateApr 3, 2007
Publication number080547, 12080547, US 2008/0248899 A1, US 2008/248899 A1, US 20080248899 A1, US 20080248899A1, US 2008248899 A1, US 2008248899A1, US-A1-20080248899, US-A1-2008248899, US2008/0248899A1, US2008/248899A1, US20080248899 A1, US20080248899A1, US2008248899 A1, US2008248899A1
InventorsAlex Whitten, Graeme Waitzkin
Original AssigneeAlex Whitten, Graeme Waitzkin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lacrosse training tool
US 20080248899 A1
Abstract
A training tool for use by lacrosse players attaches a player's hand or glove to the lacrosse stick. Lacrosse players typically have a dominant hand orientation which they play with, and the development skills in the non-dominant hand orientation is of particular interest. This tool will attach the player's glove to the player's stick in their non-dominant hand orientation, allowing their gloves to slide up and down on the stick, but preventing the player from switching the player's hand orientation, in order to force the use of a non-preferred stick orientation which will strengthen the overall level of a player's skill set.
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Claims(20)
1. A athletic training tool for use by a player with a lacrosse stick having
a handle and a head comprising:
two interconnected rings;
a first ring configured to attach to the player; and
a second ring attached to the first ring,
the second ring is configured to attach to the handle of the stick.
2. A tool of claim 1 wherein the second ring is fixed at a location on the handle.
3. A tool of claim 1 wherein the first and second ring are 1 continuous construction.
4. A tool of claim 1 wherein the first ring is configured to removably connect to a glove portion of the player.
5. A tool of claim 1 wherein the first ring is configured to removably connect to an ungloved digit of the player.
6. A tool of claim 1 wherein the first ring is configured to removably connect to an arm of the player.
7. A tool of claim 1 wherein the first ring is a discontinuous loop such that the ring may be attached to the player by passing a body part of the player through a gap in the loop.
8. A tool of claim 1 wherein the second ring is a discontinuous loop such that the ring may be attached to the handle by passing the handle through a gap in the loop.
9. A tool of claim 1 wherein the second ring is deformable to accommodate quick release of handle.
10. An athletic training tool for use by a player with a lacrosse stick having a handle and a head comprising:
a glove having a mechanical attachment configured to attach the glove to the handle of the stick.
11. A tool of claim 10 where by the glove is free to move along the length of the handle.
12. A tool of claim 10 wherein the mechanical attachment is detachable from the glove.
13. A tool of claim 10 wherein the mechanical attachment comprises a ring.
14. A tool of claim 10 wherein the ring is a discontinuous loop.
15. A tool of claim 10 wherein discontinuous loop may be attached to the handle by passing the handle through a gap in the loop.
16. A tool of claim 10 wherein the mechanical attachment is configured between a digit of the glove and the handle.
17. A tool of claim 10 wherein the mechanical attachment if configured to attach two digits of the glove.
18. A tool of claim 10 wherein the mechanical attachment is configured to attach the wrist of the glove to the handle.
19. A tool of claim 10 wherein the mechanical attachment is configured to attach the palm of the glove to the handle.
20. A lacrosse tool for fixing the dominant or non-dominant grip orientation of a player's hands to a lacrosse stick comprising:
a first tool having a first body loop for encircling any portion of a player's first arm including a first forearm, first wrist, first hand or first individual digits of said first hand;
said first tool also having a first handle loop for encircling any portion of a shaft of a player's lacrosse stick;
a second tool having a second body loop for encircling any portion of a player's second arm including a second forearm, second wrist, second hand or second individual digits of said second hand;
said second tool also having a second handle loop for encircling any portion of a shaft of a player's lacrosse stick; and
said first and second body loops mechanically attached to their respective first and second handle loops;
wherein said player affixes said tools to each of said arms and stick to configure his hands in a preferred orientation of either dominant or non-dominant grip.
Description
CROSS REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority benefit of a U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/921,457 filed in the United States Patent and Trademark Office on Apr. 3, 2007 and entitled “LAX LOX”.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH

Not Applicable

REFERENCE TO APPENDIX

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to a device that attaches a players hand or glove to a sports stick, racquet, or other implement of play. More particularly the invention relates to devices that fix a lacrosse players hand orientation to a lacrosse stick. The present invention uses rings of variable flexibility and friction to provide flexibility in the attachment. The rings are connected with one ring attaching to the glove or hand and the other to the lacrosse stick.

2. Background

Sports training devices to help improve a player's performance through practice are generally known. The sport of lacrosse, is played with a “stick” made up of a long thin handle and a head that contains a netted web that receives, holds, and ejects the lacrosse ball. A player typically throws, catches, and “cradles” the ball with his stick. Cradling is a well known rotational stick motion performed by a player who has possession of the ball in the webbing of his stick to keep the lacrosse ball securely within the netted head, using his two hands on the handle of the lacrosse stick. A player typically plays with two hands on the handle of the stick, but sometimes with only one hand on the stick if the player is attempting to evade a defender or protect the stick, sometimes referred to as “dodging”. Because of the presence of defenders who are permitted to “check”, i.e., hit the offensive player with their sticks, padded gloves are often worn by lacrosse players.

The stick is typically made up of a handle with a head mounted on one end. The end of the stick where the head is attached is referred to as the top, and the free end of the stick is known as the bottom or “butt”, and typically is protected by an end cap. Most players when gripping the stick with both hands are generally more skilled with their dominant hand positioned higher on the handle, i.e. closer to the head, than their non-dominant hand. In the case of ‘righties’, right handed people, the dominant position would be with the right hand closer to the top of the stick and the left hand closer to the bottom. In the case of ‘lefties’, left-handed people, the dominant position would be with the left hand closer to the top of the stick and the right hand closer to the bottom. It has been demonstrated that to play lacrosse at an advanced level, players be proficient at throwing, catching, and cradling with either hand positioned higher on the handle, whether it be their dominant or ‘off’ (non-dominant) hand.

Lacrosse coaches, particularly those coaching players under the age of 14 have found difficulty teaching their players to throw, catch and cradle with their non dominant hand on closer to the top of the stick than their dominant hand, known as the “off-hand” position. Players, particularly younger players have the tendency to avoid using the “off-hand” position because they are more comfortable with their dominant hand on top and thus it is easier. However, teaching these players to develop their “off-hand” skills is critical for success in lacrosse at both the high school and certainly the collegiate levels.

Accordingly, it would be desirable to provide a lacrosse training tool or the like of a type described in this Application that includes any one of more of these or other advantageous features:

    • 1. A device that physically attaches a player's gloves to the handle of a lacrosse, hockey or field hockey stick.
    • 2. A device that allows for a players hands to move along the handle of a lacrosse stick.
    • 3. A device that can attach to a variety of glove types and sizes.
    • 4. A device that restricts stick transfer from one hand to the other.
    • 5. A device that requires a player keep both hands connected to the handle of the stick.
    • 6. A device that can physically attach the digits of any player's hand to his stick without the use of a glove.
    • 7. A device that can be incorporated into an existing glove system.
SUMMARY

The present invention relates to a lacrosse training tool for use with a lacrosse stick having a handle and a head. The tool is made up of two interconnected rings that attach a player's hand or glove to the handle of the lacrosse stick. The tool allows the player's hand or glove to slide along the length of the stick or may be fixed in a consistent position.

The present invention also relates to a lacrosse training tool that is built-in to a lacrosse glove. The tool is made up of a ring or clip that attaches the glove to the handle of the stick. The tool allows the glove to slide along the length of the stick or may be fixed in a consistent position. The tool can be detachable from the glove.

The present invention also relates to a lacrosse training tool intended to be used on both the right and left hands or gloves. The tool allows the gloves to move along the length of a handle of a lacrosse stick. When the tool attaches the player to the handle a top and bottom hand are established, the top hand being closer to the head of the stick, the bottom hand being closer to the butt of the stick. The tool prevents the player from switching top and bottom hands without disconnecting the tool.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a schematic representation of two gloves and a lacrosse stick in use with the lacrosse training tool according to one embodiment.

FIG. 2 is a schematic representation of a glove in use with the lacrosse training tool according to the embodiment of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a schematic representation of a glove with a built-in lacrosse training tool according to another embodiment.

FIG. 4 is a schematic representation of a glove with a built-in removable lacrosse training tool according to another embodiment.

FIG. 5 is a schematic representation of a perspective view of a lacrosse training tool according to another embodiment.

FIG. 6 is a schematic representation of a perspective view of a lacrosse training tool according to another embodiment.

FIG. 7 is a schematic representation of a perspective view of a lacrosse training tool according to another embodiment.

FIG. 8 is a schematic representation of a perspective view of a lacrosse training tool according to another embodiment.

FIG. 9 is a schematic representation of a perspective view of a lacrosse training tool according to another embodiment.

FIG. 10 is a schematic representation of a perspective view of a lacrosse training tool according to another embodiment.

FIG. 11 is a schematic representation of a perspective view of a lacrosse training tool according to another embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Referring now to FIG. 1, a lacrosse training tool 6 provides a mechanism to attach a player's hand or glove 5 to a lacrosse stick so that the player can not switch the vertical orientation of their hands along the handle 1 of the stick. This condition is intended to be used in the players “off-hand” or weak-hand orientation with the player's non-dominant hand closer to the head 2 or top of the stick and the players dominant hand closer to the “butt” 4 or bottom of the stick. The invention may also be used in dominant-hand orientation, where the player's dominant hand is closer to the head 2 along the handle 1, but is intended to be primarily used to in the weak-hand orientation to improve this aspect of the player's performance.

The lacrosse stick is shown with a handle 1, head 2 containing a net or “pocket” 3 to catch, throw and “cradle” a lacrosse ball, and a butt 4 similar to the invention disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,037,841 by Lewis, Jr. According to a preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 2 the lacrosse training tool 6B has a handle loop, clip or ring 8 that attaches the player's hand or glove 5 around the handle 1 of the stick. Lacrosse gloves such as those disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,237,703 Brine, et al. and U.S. Pat. No. 4,497,073 Deutsch are particularly useful since the gloves typically include a number of pads, creases, strings, and eyelets that may be attached to by the present invention.

According to a preferred embodiment, a connection is provided between the lacrosse training tool and the glove or hand of the player. This connection uses either a player ring 7 to wrap around a digit, body or glove part of the player, or a mechanical connection 17 (FIGS. 3 & 4) built in to the glove itself. The connection is linked to the handle ring 6D. According to a preferred embodiment the handle ring 8 is provided with a gap 23 so that the lacrosse training tool will easily detach to avoid injury if the player falls to the ground or is checked awkwardly.

According to a preferred embodiment, the handle ring 8 is configured so that the player can still move their hands along the length of the stick. In the embodiment the handle ring 8 is intended to be of at least approximately one inch in diameter, wide enough so that it may move vertically along the handle, but smaller than the width of the head 2.

According to another embodiment, the handle ring 8 is configured so that the player can not move or slide their hands along the length of the stick. In the embodiment the handle ring 8 may be configured with a diameter equivalent to that of the handle 1 so as to frictionally engaged the handle or the handle ring 8 may be configured to engage a fixed connection attached to the handle 1 to create a condition where the player's hands are slidably fixed in a prescribed configuration or location.

According to a preferred embodiment the player ring 7 is a continuous ring that wraps around a bare digit of the player such as his thumb or a digit of the glove 5 worn by the player. According to an illustrated embodiment, the player ring 7 wraps around the thumb 10 of the player, and is configured to also wrap around any fingers 11, 12, 13, and 14. According to another embodiment the player ring 7 attaches to the wrist padding 15 of the glove 5, or essentially bare arm or wrist of the player.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 3 the handle ring 6D is connected directly to the glove 5, with a mechanical connection 17 without the use of a player ring 7. The mechanical connection 17 may be constructed of plastic, fabric, or metal that is sewn or formed with the glove 5. This embodiment would be particularly desirable for players under the age of twelve who may be prone to lose the lacrosse training tool were it not mechanically attached to the glove. According to the illustrated embodiment the connection 17 may occur in the palm of the glove or in the webbing 16 between the thumb and index finger or along a digit 10, 11, 12, 13, or 14 of the glove or on the wrist 15 of the glove. The mechanical connection can be placed on any surface of the glove 5, even on the wrist guard portion. The attachment may also have a short tether between the glove and the handle ring 6D. The tether may be of fixed length or of a retractable design so that the distance between the glove 5 and stick handle may vary to accommodate playing motions and minor grip changes.

According to the embodiment shown in FIG. 4 the mechanical connection 17 formed of a handle ring side connection 18 and a glove side connection 19, so that the lacrosse training tool may be detached from the glove. Since the lacrosse training tool would most likely not be used in the course of an official game this embodiment could be used to freely connect and disconnect the lacrosse training tool for practice and game operations. The handle ring side connection 18 and the glove side connection may be formed from male and female connections so that they may be inserted into one another, the handle ring side connection 18 into the glove side connection 19 as illustrated.

According to another embodiment shown in FIGS. 5-7 the lacrosse training tool 6A is separate from the glove 5 and formed from one material. This material may be plastic, rubber, fabric, velcro, metal, twine, rope or string. In this embodiment two rings are formed from one continuous material with a joint 21 between the rings. According to this embodiment the rings may be continuous un-broken loops 20, or discontinuous loops 22 with a gap 23. The gap 23 serves to provide a quick attachment to either the handle 1 or the player as well as quick or emergency detachment to avoid player injury should the players hand or arm become caught in a dangerous position or be subject to excessive force.

According to preferred illustrated embodiments shown in FIGS. 8, 9, and 10, the lacrosse training tool 6B is shown composed of 2 distinct rings fabricated separately. According to the embodiment, the player ring 24 and the handle ring 25 may be, but are most likely not, formed of the same material. The handle ring 25 is hard and having a lower coefficient of friction, than the player ring, to slide easily along the handle 1, while the player ring 24 is designed to be elastically manipulated to wrap around a body part of the player or a part of the player's equipment. According to this embodiment the handle ring 25 and the player ring 24 are again connected with a joint 21. In the embodiment the joint 21 may consist of a hinge formed from one ring passing through a penetration in the other ring, or an overlapping of mirrored shapes to create the hinge. According to the embodiment the rings may be continuous unbroken loops, potentially circular, but according to another preferred embodiment either or both the player ring 24 and the handle ring 25 may be discontinuous, having a gap 23. According to an illustrated embodiment the handle ring 25 is shown as discontinuous having a gap 23. On either side of the gap 23, the handle ring is enlarged at the ends 9 to provide some resistance to unintentional release of the handle 1 through the gap 23, in all those other than the most forceful conditions.

According to a preferred embodiment the handle ring 8 shown in FIG. 2, 6D shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, 25 shown in FIGS. 8, 9, 10, 11 is particularly rigid and having a low coefficient of friction so that the handle ring 8, 6D, or 25, may slide freely along the length of the handle 1. According to the embodiment the handle ring 8, 6D, or 25 may have a coefficient of friction of approximately 0.3 and a compressive strength of greater than 4,000 psi. According to a preferred embodiment handle ring 8, 6D, or 25 is fabricated from hard plastic. According to an alternate embodiment handle ring 8, 6D, or 25 is fabricated from metal or a composite material. According to another embodiment handle ring 8, 6D, or 25 is fabricated from a more flexible material like fabric, such as a Velcro, string or rope. According to a further alternate embodiment, the handle ring 8, 6D, or 25 may be fabricated from a softer material, such as rubber or soft plastic.

According to a preferred embodiment player rings 7 shown in FIGS. 2 and 24 shown in FIGS. 8, 9, 10, 11 is a flexible material having the capacity to stretch around a part of the player's body, i.e. a digit or arm, or around a part of the player's equipment, i.e. glove or arm pad. According to the embodiment player ring 7 or 25 is fabricated from rubber, rubber bands, string, rope, fabric or soft plastic. According to an alternate embodiment, the player ring 7 or 24 may be fabricated from a harder material, such as metal or hard plastic, or a composite material.

According to a final illustrated embodiment in FIG. 11 the invention is shown as formed from 3 distinct pieces 24, 25, 28. In the embodiment, the handle ring 25 is connected to the player ring 24 by another piece, connector 28. According to one embodiment, connector 28, adjustable during the manufacturing process is bent around the handle ring 25 and passes through a penetration 26 in the player ring 24. According to another embodiment, player ring 24 is equipped with an insert portion 29 configured to fit into a fold in a player's glove 5 or other piece of equipment.

In summary this invention provides an apparatus comprised of two rings or loops joined together in some mechanical fashion. One loop, the handle ring is designed to grip the shaft of a lacrosse or other sports stick or handle. This loop may be designed to slide or not slide on the shaft depending upon its intended use and the skill set the instructor is trying to improve. The second loop, the thumb or glove loop is designed to attach to some part of a player's hand, wrist or forearm in a secure manner. These two loops are then mechanically joined fixedly or by a swivel, union, hinge or other movable joint, or even by a flexible tether of fixed or changeable length. An instructor may have his player use one of these tools on each hand or the instructor may only have the player use one tool to position just one hand on the shaft, thus allowing for single handed play, but still fixing the orientation of the player's grip with respect to either a dominant grip or a non-dominant grip.

As for materials used in the design of the tool, the inventors have found that a desirable thumb ring can be made of a flexible rubber compound having a through hole for receiving the handle ring. The flexible rubber compound creates a comfortable fit and provides the necessary friction to stay on the glove digit or bare digit of the player. The handle ring can be made of a polymer having a fiberglass component for strength. The handle ring is a harder material and provides less friction so that the handle ring may slide up and down the stick shaft in accordance with the playing preferences of the player and to accommodate grip changes but not allow a total grip switch away from the non-dominant orientation the coach or instructor is trying to work on.

The foregoing description of the embodiments of the invention has been presented for the purposes of illustration and description. It is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise form disclosed. Many modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teaching. It is intended that the scope of the invention be limited not by this detailed description, but rather by the claims appended hereto.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8100782 *Oct 26, 2009Jan 24, 2012Stefan CraineLacrosse practice device
US8152661Jan 29, 2010Apr 10, 2012House Richard GLacrosse training method and apparatus
WO2013026156A1 *Aug 16, 2012Feb 28, 2013Seize And Persist Inc.Stick handling training glove
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/446
International ClassificationA63B69/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/00, A63B2243/005
European ClassificationA63B69/00