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Publication numberUS20080255026 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/915,239
PCT numberPCT/US2006/020230
Publication dateOct 16, 2008
Filing dateMay 25, 2006
Priority dateMay 25, 2005
Also published asEP1891231A2, EP1891231A4, US8404809, US20100081791, US20140154230, WO2006127896A2, WO2006127896A3
Publication number11915239, 915239, PCT/2006/20230, PCT/US/2006/020230, PCT/US/2006/20230, PCT/US/6/020230, PCT/US/6/20230, PCT/US2006/020230, PCT/US2006/20230, PCT/US2006020230, PCT/US200620230, PCT/US6/020230, PCT/US6/20230, PCT/US6020230, PCT/US620230, US 2008/0255026 A1, US 2008/255026 A1, US 20080255026 A1, US 20080255026A1, US 2008255026 A1, US 2008255026A1, US-A1-20080255026, US-A1-2008255026, US2008/0255026A1, US2008/255026A1, US20080255026 A1, US20080255026A1, US2008255026 A1, US2008255026A1
InventorsShawn DeFrees, Robert J. Bayer, Caryn Bowe, Panneerselvam Krishnasamy
Original AssigneeGlycopegylated Factor 1X
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Glycopegylated Factor Ix
US 20080255026 A1
Abstract
The present invention provides conjugates between Factor Ix and PEG moieties. The conjugates are linked via a glycosyl linking group interposed between and covalently attached to the peptide and the modifying group. Conjugates are formed from glycosylated peptides by the action of a glycosyltransferase. The glycosyltransferase ligates a modified sugar moiety onto a glycosyl residue on the peptide. Also provided are methods for preparing the conjugates, methods for treating various disease conditions with the conjugates, and pharmaceutical formulations including the conjugates.
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Claims(36)
1. A Factor IX peptide conjugate comprising a Factor IX peptide sequence and at least one conjugated moiety having the formula:
wherein
D is a member selected from —OH and R1-L-HN—;
G is a member selected from R1-L- and —C(O)(C1-C6)alkyl;
R1 is a moiety comprising a member selected a straight-chain or branched poly(ethylene glycol) residue; and
L is a linker which is a member selected from a bond, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl and substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl,
such that when D is OH, G is R1-L-, and when G is —C(O)(C1-C6)alkyl, D is R1-L-NH—,
said peptide having a recovery value that is at least 15% greater 24 hours after in vivo administration than said peptide sequence without said conjugated moiety.
2. The Factor IX peptide according to claim 1, wherein L-R1 has the formula:
wherein
a is an integer from 0 to 20.
3. The Factor IX peptide according to claim 1, wherein R1 has a structure that is a member selected from:
wherein
e and f are integers independently selected from 1 to 2500; and
q is an integer from 0 to 20.
4. The Factor IX peptide according to claim 1, wherein R1 has a structure that is a member selected from:
wherein
e, f and f′ are integers independently selected from 1 to 2500; and
q and q′ are integers independently selected from 1 to 20.
5. The Factor IX peptide according to claim 1, wherein R1 has a structure that is a member selected from:
wherein
e, f and f′ are integers independently selected from 1 to 2500; and
q, q′ and q″ are integers independently selected from 1 to 20.
6. The Factor IX peptide according to claim 1 wherein R1 has a structure that is a member selected from:
wherein
e and f are integers independently selected from 1 to 2500.
7. The Factor IX peptide according to claim 1, wherein said moiety has the formula:
8. The Factor IX peptide according to claim 1, wherein said moiety has the formula:
9. The Factor IX peptide according to claim 1, wherein said moiety has the formula:
wherein
AA is an amino acid residue of said peptide.
10. The Factor IX peptide according to claim 9, wherein said amino acid residue is a member selected from serine or threonine.
11. The Factor IX peptide according to claim 1, wherein said peptide has the amino acid sequence of SEQ. ID. NO:1.
12. The Factor IX peptide according to claim 11, wherein said amino acid residue is serine at position 61 of SEQ. ID. NO:1.
13. The Factor IX peptide according to claim 1, wherein said moiety has the formula:
wherein
a, b, c, d, i, r, s, t, and u are integers independently selected from 0 and 1;
q is 1;
e, f, g, and h are members independently selected from the integers from 0 to 6;
j, k, l, and m are members independently selected from the integers from 0 and 100;
v, w, x, and y are independently selected from 0 and 1, and least one of v, w, x and y is 1;
AA is an amino acid residue of said Factor IX peptide;
Sia-(R) has the formula:
wherein
D is a member selected from —OH and R1-L-HN—;
G is a member selected from R1-L- and —C(O)(C1-C6)alkyl;
R1 is a moiety comprising a member selected a straight-chain or branched poly(ethylene glycol) residue; and
L is a linker which is a member selected from a bond, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl and substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl,
such that when D is OH, G is R1-L-, and when G is —C(O)(C1-C6)alkyl, D is R1-L-NH—.
14. The Factor IX peptide according to claim 7, wherein said glycosyl residue is attached to a member selected from Asn 157, Asn 167 and combinations thereof.
15. A pharmaceutical formulation comprising the Factor IX according to claim 1 and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier.
16. A method of stimulating blood coagulation in a mammal, said method comprising administering to said mammal said Factor IX peptide according to claim 1.
17. A method of treating hemophilia in a subject, said method comprising administering to said subject said Factor IX peptide according to claim 1.
18. A method of making a Factor IX peptide conjugate comprising the moiety:
wherein
D is a member selected from —OH and R1-L-HN—;
G is a member selected from R1-L- and —C(O)(C1-C6)alkyl;
R1 is a moiety comprising a member selected a straight-chain or branched poly(ethylene glycol) residue; and
L is a linker which is a member selected from a bond, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl and substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl,
such that when D is OH, G is R1-L-, and when G is —C(O)(C1-C6)alkyl, D is R1-L-NH—,
said method comprising:
(a) contacting a substrate Factor IX peptide with a PEG-sialic acid donor moiety having the formula:
and an enzyme that transfers said PEG-sialic acid onto an amino acid or glycosyl residue of said Factor IX peptide, under conditions appropriate for the transfer.
19. The method according to claim 18, wherein L-R1 has the formula:
wherein
a is an integer from 0 to 20.
20. The method according to claim 18, wherein R1 has a structure that is a member selected from:
wherein
e and f are integers independently selected from 1 to 2500; and
q is an integer from 0 to 20.
21. The method according to claim 18, wherein R1 has a structure that is a member selected from:
wherein
e, f and f′ are integers independently selected from 1 to 2500; and
q and q′ are integers independently selected from 1 to 20.
22. The method according to claim 18, wherein R1 has a structure that is a member selected from:
wherein
e, f and f′ are integers independently selected from 1 to 2500; and
q, q′ and q″ are integers independently selected from 1 to 20.
23. The method according to claim 18 wherein R1 has a structure that is a member selected from:
wherein
e and f are integers independently selected from 1 to 2500.
24. The method according to claim 18, wherein said Factor IX peptide conjugate comprises a moiety having the formula:
25. The method according to claim 18, wherein said Factor IX peptide conjugate comprises a moiety having the formula:
26. The method according to claim 18, wherein said factor IX peptide conjugate comprises a moiety having the formula:
wherein
AA is an amino acid residue of said Factor IX peptide.
27. The method according to claim 26, wherein said amino acid residue is a member selected from serine or threonine.
28. The method according to claim 18, wherein said factor IX substrate peptide has the amino acid sequence of SEQ. ID. NO:1.
29. The Factor IX peptide according to claim 28, wherein said amino acid residue is serine at position 61 of SEQ. ID. NO:1.
30. The method according to claim 18, wherein said Factor IX conjugate comprises a glycosyl residue having the formula:
wherein
a, b, c, d, i, r, s, t, and u are integers independently selected from 0 and 1;
q is 1;
e, f, g, and h are members independently selected from the integers from 0 to 6;
j, k, l, and m are members independently selected from the integers from 0 and 100;
v, w, x, and y are independently selected from 0 and 1, and at least one of v, w, x, and y is 1;
AA is an amino acid residue of said Factor IX peptide;
Sia-(R) has the formula:
wherein
D is a member selected from —OH and R1-L-HN—;
G is a member selected from R1-L- and —C(O)(C1-C6)alkyl,
R1 is a moiety comprising a member selected a straight-chain or branched poly(ethylene glycol) residue; and
L is a linker which is a member selected from a bond, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl and substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl,
such that when D is OH, G is R1-L-, and when G is —C(O)(C1-C6)alkyl, D is R1-L-NH—.
31. The method according to claim 30, wherein said glycosyl residue is attached to a member selected from Asn 157, Asn 167 and combinations thereof.
32. The method of claim 18, further comprising, prior to step (a):
(b) expressing said substrate Factor IX peptide in a suitable host cell.
33. The method of claim 32, wherein said host is selected from an insect cell and a mammalian cell.
34. A Factor IX peptide conjugate comprising a water-soluble polymer conjugated to a Factor IX peptide sequence, said peptide having a recovery at least about 15% greater 24 hours after in vivo administration than said peptide conjugate without said water-soluble polymer conjugated thereto.
35. A Factor IX peptide conjugate comprising a Factor IX peptide sequence and a conjugated glycosyl linking group attached to an amino acid residue of said peptide, said glycosyl linking group comprising a modified sialyl residue having the formula:
wherein
R2 is H, CH2OR7, COOR7 or OR7
wherein
R7 represents H, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl or substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl;
R3 and R4 are members independently selected from H, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, OR8, NHC(O)R9
wherein
R8 and R9 are independently selected from H, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl or sialic acid;
La is a linker selected from a bond, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl and substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl′
R16 and R17 are independently selected polymeric arms;
X2 and X4 are independently selected linkage fragments joining polymeric moieties R16 and R17 to C; and
X5 is a non-reactive group.
36. The Factor IX peptide conjugate according to claim 35 wherein said peptide conjugate has a recovery at least about 15% greater 24 hours after in vivo administration than said peptide conjugate without said conjugated glycosyl linking group conjugated thereto.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/684,729 filed May 25, 2005, U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/707,994, filed Aug. 12, 2005, and U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/710,535 filed Aug. 23, 2005, each of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety for all purposes.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Vitamin K-dependent proteins (e.g., Factor IX) contain 9 to 13 gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues (Gla) in their amino terminal 45 residues. The Gla residues are produced by enzymes in the liver that utilize vitamin K to carboxylate the side chains of glutamic acid residues in protein precursors. Vitamin K-dependent proteins are involved in a number of biological processes, of which the most well described is blood coagulation (reviewed in Nelsestuen, Vitam. Horm. 58: 355-389 (2000)). Vitamin K-dependent proteins include protein Z, protein S, prothrombin (Factor II), Factor X, Factor IX, protein C, Factor VII, Gas6, and matrix GLA protein. Factors VII, IX, X and II function in procoagulation processes while protein C, protein S and protein Z serve in anticoagulation roles. Gas6 is a growth arrest hormone encoded by growth arrest-specific gene 6 (gas6) and is related to protein S. See, Manfioletti et al. Mol. Cell. Biol. 13: 4976-4985 (1993). Matrix GLA protein normally is found in bone and is critical to prevention of calcification of soft tissues in the circulation. Luo et al. Nature 386: 78-81 (1997).

The regulation of blood coagulation is a process that presents a number of leading health problems, including both the failure to form blood clots as well as thrombosis, the formation of unwanted blood clots. Agents that prevent unwanted clots are used in many situations and a variety of agents are available. Unfortunately, most current therapies have undesirable side effects. Orally administered anticoagulants such as Warfarin act by inhibiting the action of vitamin K in the liver, thereby preventing complete carboxylation of glutamic acid residues in the vitamin K-dependent proteins, resulting in a lowered concentration of active proteins in the circulatory system and reduced ability to form clots. Warfarin therapy is complicated by the competitive nature of the drug with its target. Fluctuations of dietary vitamin K can result in an over-dose or under-dose of Warfarin. Fluctuations in coagulation activity are an undesirable outcome of this therapy.

Injected substances such as heparin, including low molecular weight heparin, also are commonly used anticoagulants. Again, these compounds are subject to overdose and must be carefully monitored.

A newer category of anticoagulants includes active-site modified vitamin K-dependent clotting factors such as factor VIIa and IXa. The active sites are blocked by serine protease inhibitors such as chloromethylketone derivatives of amino acids or short peptides. The active site-modified proteins retain the ability to form complexes with their respective cofactors, but are inactive, thereby producing no enzyme activity and preventing complexing of the cofactor with the respective active enzymes. In short, these proteins appear to offer the benefits of anticoagulation therapy without the adverse side effects of other anticoagulants. Active site modified factor Xa is another possible anticoagulant in this group. Its cofactor protein is factor Va. Active site modified activated protein C (APC) may also form an effective inhibitor of coagulation. See, Sorensen et al. J. Biol. Chem. 272: 11863-11868 (1997). Active site modified APC binds to factor Va and prevents factor Xa from binding.

A major inhibition to the use of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors is cost. Biosynthesis of vitamin K-dependent proteins is dependent on an intact glutamic acid carboxylation system, which is present in a small number of animal cell types. Overproduction of these proteins is limited by this enzyme system. Furthermore, the effective dose of these proteins is high. A common dosage is 1000 μg of peptide/kg body weight. See, Harker et al. 1997, supra.

Another phenomena that hampers the use of therapeutic peptides is the well known aspect of protein glycosylation is the relatively short in vivo half life exhibited by these peptides. Overall, the problem of shot in vivo half life means that therapeutic glycopeptides must be administered frequently in high dosages, which ultimately translate to higher health care costs than might be necessary if a more efficient method for making longer lasting, more effective glycoprotein therapeutics was available.

Factor VIIa, for example, illustrates this problem. Factor VII and VIIa have circulation half-times of about 2-4 hours in the human. That is, within 2-4 hours, the concentration of the peptide in the serum is reduced by half. When Factor VIIa is used as a procoagulant to treat certain forms of hemophilia, the standard protocol is to inject VIIa every two hours and at high dosages (45 to 90 .mu.g/kg body weight). See, Hedner et al., Transfus. Med. Rev. 7: 78-83 (1993)). Thus, use of these proteins as procoagulants or anticoagulants (in the case of factor VIIa) requires that the proteins be administered at frequent intervals and at high dosages.

One solution to the problem of providing cost effective glycopeptide therapeutics has been to provide peptides with longer in vivo half lives. For example, glycopeptide therapeutics with improved pharmacokinetic properties have been produced by attaching synthetic polymers to the peptide backbone. An exemplary polymer that has been conjugated to peptides is poly(ethylene glycol) (“PEG”). The use of PEG to derivatize peptide therapeutics has been demonstrated to reduce the immunogenicity of the peptides. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 4,179,337 (Davis et al.) discloses non-immunogenic polypeptides such as enzymes and peptide hormones coupled to polyethylene glycol (PEG) or polypropylene glycol. In addition to reduced immunogenicity, the clearance time in circulation is prolonged due to the increased size of the PEG-conjugate of the polypeptides in question.

The principal mode of attachment of PEG, and its derivatives, to peptides is a non-specific bonding through a peptide amino acid residue (see e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 4,088,538 U.S. Pat. No. 4,496,689, U.S. Pat. No. 4,414,147, U.S. Pat. No. 4,055,635, and PCT WO 87/00056). Another mode of attaching PEG to peptides is through the non-specific oxidation of glycosyl residues on a glycopeptide (see e.g., WO 94/05332).

In these non-specific methods, poly(ethyleneglycol) is added in a random, non-specific manner to reactive residues on a peptide backbone. Of course, random addition of PEG molecules has its drawbacks, including a lack of homogeneity of the final product, and the possibility for reduction in the biological or enzymatic activity of the peptide. Therefore, for the production of therapeutic peptides, a derivitization strategy that results in the formation of a specifically labeled, readily characterizable, essentially homogeneous product is superior. Such methods have been developed.

Specifically labeled, homogeneous peptide therapeutics can be produced in vitro through the action of enzymes. Unlike the typical non-specific methods for attaching a synthetic polymer or other label to a peptide, enzyme-based syntheses have the advantages of regioselectivity and stereoselectivity. Two principal classes of enzymes for use in the synthesis of labeled peptides are glycosyltransferases (e.g., sialyltransferases, oligosaccharyltransferases, N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases), and glycosidases. These enzymes can be used for the specific attachment of sugars which can be subsequently modified to comprise a therapeutic moiety. Alternatively, glycosyltransferases and modified glycosidases can be used to directly transfer modified sugars to a peptide backbone (see e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 6,399,336, and U.S. Patent Application Publications 20030040037, 20040132640, 20040137557, 20040126838, and 20040142856, each of which are incorporated by reference herein). Methods combining both chemical and enzymatic synthetic elements are also known (see e.g., Yamamoto et al. Carbohydr. Res. 305: 415-422 (1998) and U.S. Patent Application Publication 20040137557 which is incorporated herein by reference).

Factor IX is an extremely valuable therapeutic peptide. Although commercially available forms of Factor IX are in use today, these peptides can be improved by modifications that enhance the pharmacokinetics of the resulting isolated glycoprotein product. Thus, there remains a need in the art for longer lasting Factor IX peptides with improved effectiveness and better pharmacokinetics. Furthermore, to be effective for the largest number of individuals, it must be possible to produce, on an industrial scale, a Factor IX peptide with improved therapeutic pharmacokinetics that has a predictable, essentially homogeneous, structure which can be readily reproduced over, and over again.

Fortunately, Factor IX peptides with improved pharmacokinetics and methods for making them have now been discovered. In addition to Factor IX peptides with improved pharmacokinetics, the invention also provides industrially practical and cost effective methods for the production of these Factor IX peptides. The Factor IX peptides of the invention comprise modifying groups such as PEG moieties, therapeutic moieties, biomolecules and the like. The present invention therefore fulfills the need for Factor IX peptides with improved the therapeutic effectiveness and improved pharmacokinetics for the treatment of conditions and diseases wherein Factor IX provides effective therapy.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It has now been discovered that the controlled modification of Factor IX with one or more modifying group, e.g., water-soluble polymer, water-insoluble polymer, targeting moiety, etc., provides FIX polymers having heretofore unavailable properties.

In an illustrative aspect, the Factor IX peptide is modified with a water-soluble polymer moiety, e.g., a poly(ethylene glycol) moiety affording a novel Factor IX derivative with pharmacokinetic properties that are surprisingly improved relative to the corresponding native (unconjugated) Factor IX. Moreover, the conjugated Factor IX retains at least the pharmacological activity of the unconjugated peptide.

In a first aspect, the invention provides conjugates between Factor IX and a water-soluble polymer having a T1/2 enhanced relative to an identical unconjugated FIX peptide. In a preferred embodiment, these peptides show an enhanced recovery relative to the unconjugated peptide as well.

In an exemplary embodiment, the Factor IX conjugates of the invention are prepared by “glycoconjugation” of the water-soluble polymer to the Factor IX peptide using a sugar donor conjugated to the water-soluble polymer, and an enzyme that is capable of transferring a modified sugar moiety from the donor to a glycosyl or amino acid residue of the peptide. An exemplary strategy for preparation of the Factor IX conjugates of the invention relies on “glycoPEGylation.”

“GlycoPEGylated” Factor IX molecules of the invention are produced by the enzyme mediated formation of a conjugate between a glycosylated or non-glycosylated Factor IX peptide and an enzymatically transferable saccharyl moiety that includes a poly(ethylene glycol) moiety within its structure. The PEG moiety is attached to the saccharyl moiety directly (i.e., through a single group formed by the reaction of two reactive groups) or through a linker moiety, e.g., substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl, etc.

The polymeric modifying moiety can be attached at any position of a glycosyl moiety of Factor IX. Moreover, the polymeric modifying moiety can be bound to a glycosyl residue at any position in the amino acid sequence of a wild type or mutant Factor IX peptide.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides an Factor IX peptide that is conjugated through a glycosyl linking group to a polymeric modifying moiety. Exemplary Factor IX peptide conjugates include a glycosyl linking group having a formula selected from:

In Formulae I and II, R2 is H, CH2OR7, COOR7 or OR7, in which R7 represents H, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl or substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl. The symbols R3, R4, R5, R6 and R6′ independently represent H, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, OR8, NHC(O)R9. The index d is 0 or 1. R8 and R9 are independently selected from H, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl or sialic acid. At least one of R3, R4, R5, R6 or R6′ includes the polymeric modifying moiety e.g., PEG. In an exemplary embodiment, R6 and R6′, together with the carbon to which they are attached are components of the side chain of sialic acid. In a further exemplary embodiment, this side chain is functionalized with the polymeric modifying moiety.

In another aspect, the invention provides a method of treating a condition in a subject in need thereof. Exemplary conditions include those characterized by compromised blood clotting in the subject. The method includes the step of administering to the subject an amount of the polymer-modified Factor IX peptide of the invention effective to ameliorate the condition in the subject.

In a further aspect, the invention provides a method of enhancing blood clotting in a mammal. The method includes administering to the mammal an amount of the polymer-modified Factor IX peptide of the invention effective to enhance clotting in the mammal.

The invention also provides a method of treating a condition in a mammalian subject in need of treatment with Factor IX. The method includes the step of administering to the subject an amount of a polymer-modified Factor IX peptide of the invention effective to ameliorate the condition of the subject.

Also provided is a pharmaceutical formulation comprising a polymer-modified Factor IX peptide of the invention and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent to those of skill in the art from the detailed description that follows.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is the structure of Factor IX, showing the presence and location of potential glycosylation sites at Asn 157, Asn 167; Ser 53, Ser 61, Thr 159, Thr 169, and Thr 172.

FIG. 2 is a scheme showing an exemplary embodiment of the invention in which a carbohydrate residue on a Factor IX peptide is remodeled and glycopegylated: (A) sialic acid moieties are removed by sialidase and the resulting galactose residues are glycopegylated with the sialic acid derivative of FIG. 5; (B) a mannose residue is glycopegylated with the sialic acid PEG; (C) a sialic acid moiety of an N-glycan is glycopegylated with the sialic acid PEG; (D) a sialic acid moiety is of an O-glycan is glycopegylated with the sialic acid PEG; (E) SDS PAGE gel of Factor IX from 2(A); (F) SDS PAGE gel of Factor IX from the reaction producing 2(C) and 2(D).

FIG. 3 is a plot comparing the in vivo residence lifetimes of unglycosylated Factor IX and enzymatically glycopegylated Factor IX.

FIG. 4 is a table comparing the activities of the species shown in FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is the amino acid sequence of Factor IX.

FIG. 6 is a graphic presentation of the pharmacokinetic properties of various glycopegylated Factor IX molecules compared to a non-pegylated Factor IX.

FIG. 7 is a table of representative modified sugar species of use in the present invention.

FIG. 8 is a table of representative modified sugar species of use in the present invention.

FIG. 9 is a table of sialyltransferases of use to transfer onto an acceptor a modified and/or modified sialic acid moiety, such as those set forth herein.

FIG. 10 is a time-course plot comparing the in vivo activity of a Factor IX glycoconjugate with 30 kD PEG (Neose A), a Factor IX glycoconjugate with 2 kD PEG (Neose B) and unconjugated Factor IX.

FIG. 11 is a plot of in vivo concentration of rhFIX, glycoPEGylated FIX (30 kD sialic acid; Compound A), glycoPEGylated FIX (2 kD sialic acid; Compound B) measured by an ELISA assay.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION AND THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Abbreviations

PEG, poly(ethylene glycol); PPG, poly(propylene glycol); Ara, arabinosyl; Fru, fructosyl; Fuc, fucosyl; Gal, galactosyl; GalNAc, N-acetylgalactosaminyl; Glc, glucosyl; GlcNAc, N-acetylglucosaminyl; Man, mannosyl; ManAc, mannosaminyl acetate; Xyl, xylosyl; NeuAc (N-acetylneuraminyl), Sia (sialyl); M6P, mannose-6-phosphate.

DEFINITIONS

Unless defined otherwise, all technical and scientific terms used herein generally have the same meaning as commonly understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to which this invention belongs. Generally, the nomenclature used herein and the laboratory procedures in cell culture, molecular genetics, organic chemistry and nucleic acid chemistry and hybridization are those well known and commonly employed in the art. Standard techniques are used for nucleic acid and peptide synthesis. The techniques and procedures are generally performed according to conventional methods in the art and various general references (see generally, Sambrook et al. MOLECULAR CLONING: A LABORATORY MANUAL, 2d ed. (1989) Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y., which is incorporated herein by reference), which are provided throughout this document. The nomenclature used herein and the laboratory procedures in analytical chemistry, and organic synthetic described below are those well known and commonly employed in the art. Standard techniques, or modifications thereof, are used for chemical syntheses and chemical analyses.

All oligosaccharides described herein are described with the name or abbreviation for the non-reducing saccharide (i.e., Gal), followed by the configuration of the glycosidic bond (□ or □), the ring bond (1 or 2), the ring position of the reducing saccharide involved in the bond (2, 3, 4, 6 or 8), and then the name or abbreviation of the reducing saccharide (i.e., GlcNAc). Each saccharide is preferably a pyranose. For a review of standard glycobiology nomenclature, see, Essentials of Glycobiology Varki et al. eds. CSHL Press (1999).

Oligosaccharides are considered to have a reducing end and a non-reducing end, whether or not the saccharide at the reducing end is in fact a reducing sugar. In accordance with accepted nomenclature, oligosaccharides are depicted herein with the non-reducing end on the left and the reducing end on the right.

The term “sialic acid” refers to any member of a family of nine-carbon carboxylated sugars. The most common member of the sialic acid family is N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (2-keto-5-acetamido-3,5-dideoxy-D-glycero-D-galactononulopyranos-1-onic acid (often abbreviated as Neu5Ac, NeuAc, or NANA). A second member of the family is N-glycolyl-neuraminic acid (Neu5Gc or NeuGc), in which the N-acetyl group of NeuAc is hydroxylated. A third sialic acid family member is 2-keto-3-deoxy-nonulosonic acid (KDN) (Nadano et al. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261: 11550-11557; Kanamori et al., J. Biol. Chem. 265: 21811-21819 (1990)). Also included are 9-substituted sialic acids such as a 9-O—C1-C6 acyl-Neu5Ac like 9-O-lactyl-Neu5Ac or 9-O-acetyl-Neu5Ac, 9-deoxy-9-fluoro-Neu5Ac and 9-azido-9-deoxy-Neu5Ac. For review of the sialic acid family, see, e.g., Varki, Glycobiology 2: 25-40 (1992); Sialic Acids Chemistry, Metabolism and Function, R. Schauer, Ed. (Springer-Verlag, New York (1992)). The synthesis and use of sialic acid compounds in a sialylation procedure is disclosed in international application WO 92/16640, published Oct. 1, 1992.

“Peptide” refers to a polymer in which the monomers are amino acids and are joined together through amide bonds, alternatively referred to as a polypeptide. Additionally, unnatural amino acids, for example, □-alanine, phenylglycine and homoarginine are also included. Amino acids that are not gene-encoded may also be used in the present invention. Furthermore, amino acids that have been modified to include reactive groups, glycosylation sites, polymers, therapeutic moieties, biomolecules and the like may also be used in the invention. All of the amino acids used in the present invention may be either the D- or L-isomer. The L-isomer is generally preferred. In addition, other peptidomimetics are also useful in the present invention. As used herein, “peptide” refers to both glycosylated and unglycosylated peptides. Also included are peptides that are incompletely glycosylated by a system that expresses the peptide. For a general review, see, Spatola, A. F., in CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY OF AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS, B. Weinstein, eds., Marcel Dekker, New York, p. 267 (1983).

The term “peptide conjugate,” refers to species of the invention in which a peptide is conjugated with a modified sugar as set forth herein.

The term “amino acid” refers to naturally occurring and synthetic amino acids, as well as amino acid analogs and amino acid mimetics that function in a manner similar to the naturally occurring amino acids. Naturally occurring amino acids are those encoded by the genetic code, as well as those amino acids that are later modified, e.g., hydroxyproline, γ-carboxyglutamate, and O-phosphoserine. Amino acid analogs refers to compounds that have the same basic chemical structure as a naturally occurring amino acid, i.e., an a carbon that is bound to a hydrogen, a carboxyl group, an amino group, and an R group, e.g., homoserine, norleucine, methionine sulfoxide, methionine methyl sulfonium. Such analogs have modified R groups (e.g., norleucine) or modified peptide backbones, but retain the same basic chemical structure as a naturally occurring amino acid. Amino acid mimetics refers to chemical compounds that have a structure that is different from the general chemical structure of an amino acid, but that function in a manner similar to a naturally occurring amino acid.

As used herein, the term “modified sugar,” refers to a naturally- or non-naturally-occurring carbohydrate that is enzymatically added onto an amino acid or a glycosyl residue of a peptide in a process of the invention. The modified sugar is selected from enzyme substrates including, but not limited to sugar nucleotides (mono-, di-, and tri-phosphates), activated sugars (e.g., glycosyl halides, glycosyl mesylates) and sugars that are neither activated nor nucleotides. The “modified sugar” is covalently functionalized with a “modifying group.” Useful modifying groups include, but are not limited to, PEG moieties, therapeutic moieties, diagnostic moieties, biomolecules and the like. The modifying group is preferably not a naturally occurring, or an unmodified carbohydrate. The locus of functionalization with the modifying group is selected such that it does not prevent the “modified sugar” from being added enzymatically to a peptide.

The term “water-soluble” refers to moieties that have some detectable degree of solubility in water. Methods to detect and/or quantify water solubility are well known in the art. Exemplary water-soluble polymers include peptides, saccharides, poly(ethers), poly(amines), poly(carboxylic acids) and the like. Peptides can have mixed sequences of be composed of a single amino acid, e.g., poly(lysine). An exemplary polysaccharide is poly(sialic acid). An exemplary poly(ether) is poly(ethylene glycol). Poly(ethylene imine) is an exemplary polyamine, and poly(acrylic) acid is a representative poly(carboxylic acid).

The polymer backbone of the water-soluble polymer can be poly(ethylene glycol) (i.e. PEG). However, it should be understood that other related polymers are also suitable for use in the practice of this invention and that the use of the term PEG or poly(ethylene glycol) is intended to be inclusive and not exclusive in this respect. The term PEG includes poly(ethylene glycol) in any of its forms, including alkoxy PEG, difunctional PEG, multiarmed PEG, forked PEG, branched PEG, pendent PEG (i.e. PEG or related polymers having one or more functional groups pendent to the polymer backbone), or PEG with degradable linkages therein.

The polymer backbone can be linear or branched. Branched polymer backbones are generally known in the art. Typically, a branched polymer has a central branch core moiety and a plurality of linear polymer chains linked to the central branch core. PEG is commonly used in branched forms that can be prepared by addition of ethylene oxide to various polyols, such as glycerol, pentaerythritol and sorbitol. The central branch moiety can also be derived from several amino acids, such as lysine. The branched poly(ethylene glycol) can be represented in general form as R(-PEG-OH)m in which R represents the core moiety, such as glycerol or pentaerythritol, and m represents the number of arms. Multi-armed PEG molecules, such as those described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,932,462, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety, can also be used as the polymer backbone.

Many other polymers are also suitable for the invention. Polymer backbones that are non-peptidic and water-soluble, with from 2 to about 300 termini, are particularly useful in the invention. Examples of suitable polymers include, but are not limited to, other poly(alkylene glycols), such as poly(propylene glycol) (“PPG”), copolymers of ethylene glycol and propylene glycol and the like, poly(oxyethylated polyol), poly(olefinic alcohol), poly(vinylpyrrolidone), poly(hydroxypropylmethacrylamide), poly(□-hydroxy acid), poly(vinyl alcohol), polyphosphazene, polyoxazoline, poly(N-acryloylmorpholine), such as described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,629,384, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety, and copolymers, terpolymers, and mixtures thereof. Although the molecular weight of each chain of the polymer backbone can vary, it is typically in the range of from about 100 Da to about 100,000 Da, often from about 6,000 Da to about 80,000 Da.

The “area under the curve” or “AUC”, as used herein in the context of administering a peptide drug to a patient, is defined as total area under the curve that describes the concentration of drug in systemic circulation in the patient as a function of time from zero to infinity.

The term “half-life” or “t½”, as used herein in the context of administering a peptide drug to a patient, is defined as the time required for plasma concentration of a drug in a patient to be reduced by one half. There may be more than one half-life associated with the peptide drug depending on multiple clearance mechanisms, redistribution, and other mechanisms well known in the art. Usually, alpha and beta half-lives are defined such that the alpha phase is associated with redistribution, and the beta phase is associated with clearance. However, with protein drugs that are, for the most part, confined to the bloodstream, there can be at least two clearance half-lives. For some glycosylated peptides, rapid beta phase clearance may be mediated via receptors on macrophages, or endothelial cells that recognize terminal galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine, N-acetylglucosamine, mannose, or fucose. Slower beta phase clearance may occur via renal glomerular filtration for molecules with an effective radius <2 nm (approximately 68 kD) and/or specific or non-specific uptake and metabolism in tissues. GlycoPEGylation may cap terminal sugars (e.g., galactose or N-acetylgalactosamine) and thereby block rapid alpha phase clearance via receptors that recognize these sugars. It may also confer a larger effective radius and thereby decrease the volume of distribution and tissue uptake, thereby prolonging the late beta phase. Thus, the precise impact of glycoPEGylation on alpha phase and beta phase half-lives will vary depending upon the size, state of glycosylation, and other parameters, as is well known in the art. Further explanation of “half-life” is found in Pharmaceutical Biotechnology (1997, D F A Crommelin and R D Sindelar, eds., Harwood Publishers, Amsterdam, pp 101-120).

The term “terminal half life” or “terminal T1/2,” refers to the effective half-life of the elimination phase. For example, for the two compartment model, the beta phase constant (beta=elimination constant) can be used to calculate the half-life of the elimination phase, e.g., T1/2=0.693/beta.

The term “recovery” refers to a quantity determined from the peak factor level that occurs in the first hour post-administration. This figure should be reported as an incremental value, i.e., after subtracting the baseline (pre-administration) level and then reported on a per dosage basis as (U/mL)/(U/kg). See, Lee et al., Hemophilia (2006), 12, (Suppl. 3), 1-7.

The term “glycoconjugation,” as used herein, refers to the enzymatically mediated conjugation of a modified sugar species to an amino acid or glycosyl residue of a polypeptide, e.g., a Factor IX peptide of the present invention. A subgenus of “glycoconjugation” is “glycol-PEGylation,” in which the modifying group of the modified sugar is poly(ethylene glycol), and alkyl derivative (e.g., m-PEG) or reactive derivative (e.g., H2N-PEG, HOOC-PEG) thereof.

The terms “large-scale” and “industrial-scale” are used interchangeably and refer to a reaction cycle that produces at least about 250 mg, preferably at least about 500 mg, and more preferably at least about 1 gram of glycoconjugate at the completion of a single reaction cycle.

The term, “glycosyl linking group,” as used herein refers to a glycosyl residue to which a modifying group (e.g., PEG moiety, therapeutic moiety, biomolecule) is covalently attached; the glycosyl linking group joins the modifying group to the remainder of the conjugate. In the methods of the invention, the “glycosyl linking group” becomes covalently attached to a glycosylated or unglycosylated peptide, thereby linking the agent to an amino acid and/or glycosyl residue on the peptide. A “glycosyl linking group” is generally derived from a “modified sugar” by the enzymatic attachment of the “modified sugar” to an amino acid and/or glycosyl residue of the peptide. The glycosyl linking group can be a saccharide-derived structure that is degraded during formation of modifying group-modified sugar cassette (e.g., oxidation□ Schiff base formation□ reduction), or the glycosyl linking group may be intact. An “intact glycosyl linking group” refers to a linking group that is derived from a glycosyl moiety in which the saccharide monomer that links the modifying group and to the remainder of the conjugate is not degraded, e.g., oxidized, e.g., by sodium metaperiodate. “Intact glycosyl linking groups” of the invention may be derived from a naturally occurring oligosaccharide by addition of glycosyl unit(s) or removal of one or more glycosyl unit from a parent saccharide structure.

The term “targeting moiety,” as used herein, refers to species that will selectively localize in a particular tissue or region of the body. The localization is mediated by specific recognition of molecular determinants, molecular size of the targeting agent or conjugate, ionic interactions, hydrophobic interactions and the like. Other mechanisms of targeting an agent to a particular tissue or region are known to those of skill in the art. Exemplary targeting moieties include antibodies, antibody fragments, transferrin, HS-glycoprotein, coagulation factors, serum proteins, β-glycoprotein, G-CSF, GM-CSF, M-CSF, EPO and the like.

As used herein, “therapeutic moiety” means any agent useful for therapy including, but not limited to, antibiotics, anti-inflammatory agents, anti-tumor drugs, cytotoxins, and radioactive agents. “Therapeutic moiety” includes prodrugs of bioactive agents, constructs in which more than one therapeutic moiety is bound to a carrier, e.g., multivalent agents. Therapeutic moiety also includes proteins and constructs that include proteins. Exemplary proteins include, but are not limited to, Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (GCSF), Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GMCSF), Interferon (e.g., Interferon-□, -□, -□), Interleukin (e.g., Interleukin II), serum proteins (e.g., Factors VII, VIIa, VIII, IX, and X), Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (HCG), Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) and Lutenizing Hormone (LH) and antibody fusion proteins (e.g. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor ((TNFR)/Fc domain fusion protein)).

As used herein, “pharmaceutically acceptable carrier” includes any material, which when combined with the conjugate retains the conjugates' activity and is non-reactive with the subject's immune systems. Examples include, but are not limited to, any of the standard pharmaceutical carriers such as a phosphate buffered saline solution, water, emulsions such as oil/water emulsion, and various types of wetting agents. Other carriers may also include sterile solutions, tablets including coated tablets and capsules. Typically such carriers contain excipients such as starch, milk, sugar, certain types of clay, gelatin, stearic acid or salts thereof, magnesium or calcium stearate, talc, vegetable fats or oils, gums, glycols, or other known excipients. Such carriers may also include flavor and color additives or other ingredients. Compositions comprising such carriers are formulated by well known conventional methods.

As used herein, “administering,” means oral administration, administration as a suppository, topical contact, intravenous, intraperitoneal, intramuscular, intralesional, intranasal or subcutaneous administration, or the implantation of a slow-release device e.g., a mini-osmotic pump, to the subject. Administration is by any route including parenteral, and transmucosal (e.g., oral, nasal, vaginal, rectal, or transdermal). Parenteral administration includes, e.g., intravenous, intramuscular, intra-arteriole, intradermal, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal, intraventricular, and intracranial. Moreover, where injection is to treat a tumor, e.g., induce apoptosis, administration may be directly to the tumor and/or into tissues surrounding the tumor. Other modes of delivery include, but are not limited to, the use of liposomal formulations, intravenous infusion, transdermal patches, etc.

The term “ameliorating” or “ameliorate” refers to any indicia of success in the treatment of a pathology or condition, including any objective or subjective parameter such as abatement, remission or diminishing of symptoms or an improvement in a patient's physical or mental well-being. Amelioration of symptoms can be based on objective or subjective parameters; including the results of a physical examination and/or a psychiatric evaluation.

The term “therapy” refers to “treating” or “treatment” of a disease or condition including preventing the disease or condition from occurring in an animal that may be predisposed to the disease but does not yet experience or exhibit symptoms of the disease (prophylactic treatment), inhibiting the disease (slowing or arresting its development), providing relief from the symptoms or side-effects of the disease (including palliative treatment), and relieving the disease (causing regression of the disease).

The term “effective amount” or “an amount effective to” or a “therapeutically effective amount” or any grammatically equivalent term means the amount that, when administered to an animal for treating a disease, is sufficient to effect treatment for that disease.

The term “isolated” refers to a material that is substantially or essentially free from components, which are used to produce the material. For peptide conjugates of the invention, the term “isolated” refers to material that is substantially or essentially free from components which normally accompany the material in the mixture used to prepare the peptide conjugate. “Isolated” and “pure” are used interchangeably. Typically, isolated peptide conjugates of the invention have a level of purity preferably expressed as a range. The lower end of the range of purity for the peptide conjugates is about 60%, about 70% or about 80% and the upper end of the range of purity is about 70%, about 80%, about 90% or more than about 90%.

When the peptide conjugates are more than about 90% pure, their purities are also preferably expressed as a range. The lower end of the range of purity is about 90%, about 92%, about 94%, about 96% or about 98%. The upper end of the range of purity is about 92%, about 94%, about 96%, about 98% or about 100% purity.

Purity is determined by any art-recognized method of analysis (e.g., band intensity on a silver stained gel, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, HPLC, or a similar means).

“Essentially each member of the population,” as used herein, describes a characteristic of a population of peptide conjugates of the invention in which a selected percentage of the modified sugars added to a peptide are added to multiple, identical acceptor sites on the peptide. “Essentially each member of the population” speaks to the “homogeneity” of the sites on the peptide conjugated to a modified sugar and refers to conjugates of the invention, which are at least about 80%, preferably at least about 90% and more preferably at least about 95% homogenous.

“Homogeneity,” refers to the structural consistency across a population of acceptor moieties to which the modified sugars are conjugated. Thus, in a peptide conjugate of the invention in which each modified sugar moiety is conjugated to an acceptor site having the same structure as the acceptor site to which every other modified sugar is conjugated, the peptide conjugate is said to be about 100% homogeneous. Homogeneity is typically expressed as a range. The lower end of the range of homogeneity for the peptide conjugates is about 60%, about 70% or about 80% and the upper end of the range of purity is about 70%, about 80%, about 90% or more than about 90%.

When the peptide conjugates are more than or equal to about 90% homogeneous, their homogeneity is also preferably expressed as a range. The lower end of the range of homogeneity is about 90%, about 92%, about 94%, about 96% or about 98%. The upper end of the range of purity is about 92%, about 94%, about 96%, about 98% or about 100% homogeneity. The purity of the peptide conjugates is typically determined by one or more methods known to those of skill in the art, e.g., liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), matrix assisted laser desorption mass time of flight spectrometry (MALDITOF), capillary electrophoresis, and the like.

“Substantially uniform glycoform” or a “substantially uniform glycosylation pattern,” when referring to a glycopeptide species, refers to the percentage of acceptor moieties that are glycosylated by the glycosyltransferase of interest (e.g., fucosyltransferase). For example, in the case of a □1,2 fucosyltransferase, a substantially uniform fucosylation pattern exists if substantially all (as defined below) of the Gal□1,4-GlcNAc-R and sialylated analogues thereof are fucosylated in a peptide conjugate of the invention. It will be understood by one of skill in the art, that the starting material may contain glycosylated acceptor moieties (e.g., fucosylated Gal□1,4-GlcNAc-R moieties). Thus, the calculated percent glycosylation will include acceptor moieties that are glycosylated by the methods of the invention, as well as those acceptor moieties already glycosylated in the starting material.

The term “substantially” in the above definitions of “substantially uniform” generally means at least about 40%, at least about 70%, at least about 80%, or more preferably at least about 90%, and still more preferably at least about 95% of the acceptor moieties for a particular glycosyltransferase are glycosylated.

Where substituent groups are specified by their conventional chemical formulae, written from left to right, they equally encompass the chemically identical substituents, which would result from writing the structure from right to left, e.g., —CH2O— is intended to also recite —OCH2—.

The term “alkyl,” by itself or as part of another substituent means, unless otherwise stated, a straight or branched chain, or cyclic hydrocarbon radical, or combination thereof, which may be fully saturated, mono- or polyunsaturated and can include di- and multivalent radicals, having the number of carbon atoms designated (i.e. C1-C10 means one to ten carbons). Examples of saturated hydrocarbon radicals include, but are not limited to, groups such as methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, isopropyl, n-butyl, t-butyl, isobutyl, sec-butyl, cyclohexyl, (cyclohexyl)methyl, cyclopropylmethyl, homologs and isomers of, for example, n-pentyl, n-hexyl, n-heptyl, n-octyl, and the like. An unsaturated alkyl group is one having one or more double bonds or triple bonds. Examples of unsaturated alkyl groups include, but are not limited to, vinyl, 2-propenyl, crotyl, 2-isopentenyl, 2-(butadienyl), 2,4-pentadienyl, 3-(1,4-pentadienyl), ethynyl, 1- and 3-propynyl, 3-butynyl, and the higher homologs and isomers. The term “alkyl,” unless otherwise noted, is also meant to include those derivatives of alkyl defined in more detail below, such as “heteroalkyl.” Alkyl groups that are limited to hydrocarbon groups are termed “homoalkyl”.

The term “alkylene” by itself or as part of another substituent means a divalent radical derived from an alkane, as exemplified, but not limited, by —CH2CH2CH2CH2—, and further includes those groups described below as “heteroalkylene.” Typically, an alkyl (or alkylene) group will have from 1 to 24 carbon atoms, with those groups having 10 or fewer carbon atoms being preferred in the present invention. A “lower alkyl” or “lower alkylene” is a shorter chain alkyl or alkylene group, generally having eight or fewer carbon atoms.

The terms “alkoxy,” “alkylamino” and “alkylthio” (or thioalkoxy) are used in their conventional sense, and refer to those alkyl groups attached to the remainder of the molecule via an oxygen atom, an amino group, or a sulfur atom, respectively.

The term “heteroalkyl,” by itself or in combination with another term, means, unless otherwise stated, a stable straight or branched chain, or cyclic hydrocarbon radical, or combinations thereof, consisting of the stated number of carbon atoms and at least one heteroatom selected from the group consisting of O, N, Si and S, and wherein the nitrogen and sulfur atoms may optionally be oxidized and the nitrogen heteroatom may optionally be quaternized. The heteroatom(s) O, N and S and Si may be placed at any interior position of the heteroalkyl group or at the position at which the alkyl group is attached to the remainder of the molecule. Examples include, but are not limited to, —CH2—CH2—O—CH3, —CH2—CH2—NH—CH3, —CH2—CH2—N(CH3)—CH3, —CH2—S—CH2—CH3, —CH2—CH2, —S(O)—CH3, —CH2—CH2—S(O)2—CH3, —CH═CH—O—CH3, —Si(CH3)3, —CH2—CH═N—OCH3, and —CH═CH—N(CH3)—CH3. Up to two heteroatoms may be consecutive, such as, for example, —CH2—NH—OCH3 and —CH2—O—Si(CH3)3. Similarly, the term “heteroalkylene” by itself or as part of another substituent means a divalent radical derived from heteroalkyl, as exemplified, but not limited by, —CH2—CH2—S—CH2—CH2— and —CH2—S—CH2—CH2—NH—CH2—. For heteroalkylene groups, heteroatoms can also occupy either or both of the chain termini (e.g., alkyleneoxy, alkylenedioxy, alkyleneamino, alkylenediamino, and the like). Still further, for alkylene and heteroalkylene linking groups, no orientation of the linking group is implied by the direction in which the formula of the linking group is written. For example, the formula —C(O)2R′— represents both —C(O)2R′— and —R′C(O)2—.

The terms “cycloalkyl” and “heterocycloalkyl”, by themselves or in combination with other terms, represent, unless otherwise stated, cyclic versions of “alkyl” and “heteroalkyl”, respectively. Additionally, for heterocycloalkyl, a heteroatom can occupy the position at which the heterocycle is attached to the remainder of the molecule. Examples of cycloalkyl include, but are not limited to, cyclopentyl, cyclohexyl, 1-cyclohexenyl, 3-cyclohexenyl, cycloheptyl, and the like. Examples of heterocycloalkyl include, but are not limited to, 1-(1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridyl), 1-piperidinyl, 2-piperidinyl, 3-piperidinyl, 4-morpholinyl, 3-morpholinyl, tetrahydrofuran-2-yl, tetrahydrofuran-3-yl, tetrahydrothien-2-yl, tetrahydrothien-3-yl, 1-piperazinyl, 2-piperazinyl, and the like.

The terms “halo” or “halogen,” by themselves or as part of another substituent, mean, unless otherwise stated, a fluorine, chlorine, bromine, or iodine atom. Additionally, terms such as “haloalkyl,” are meant to include monohaloalkyl and polyhaloalkyl. For example, the term “halo(C1-C4)alkyl” is mean to include, but not be limited to, trifluoromethyl, 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl, 4-chlorobutyl, 3-bromopropyl, and the like.

The term “aryl” means, unless otherwise stated, a polyunsaturated, aromatic, substituent that can be a single ring or multiple rings (preferably from 1 to 3 rings), which are fused together or linked covalently. The term “heteroaryl” refers to aryl groups (or rings) that contain from one to four heteroatoms selected from N, O, and S, wherein the nitrogen and sulfur atoms are optionally oxidized, and the nitrogen atom(s) are optionally quaternized. A heteroaryl group can be attached to the remainder of the molecule through a heteroatom. Non-limiting examples of aryl and heteroaryl groups include phenyl, 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, 4-biphenyl, 1-pyrrolyl, 2-pyrrolyl, 3-pyrrolyl, 3-pyrazolyl, 2-imidazolyl, 4-imidazolyl, pyrazinyl, 2-oxazolyl, 4-oxazolyl, 2-phenyl-4-oxazolyl, 5-oxazolyl, 3-isoxazolyl, 4-isoxazolyl, 5-isoxazolyl, 2-thiazolyl, 4-thiazolyl, 5-thiazolyl, 2-furyl, 3-furyl, 2-thienyl, 3-thienyl, 2-pyridyl, 3-pyridyl, 4-pyridyl, 2-pyrimidyl, 4-pyrimidyl, 5-benzothiazolyl, purinyl, 2-benzimidazolyl, 5-indolyl, 1-isoquinolyl, 5-isoquinolyl, 2-quinoxalinyl, 5-quinoxalinyl, 3-quinolyl, tetrazolyl, benzo[b]furanyl, benzo[b]thienyl, 2,3-dihydrobenzo[1,4]dioxin-6-yl, benzo[1,3]dioxol-5-yl and 6-quinolyl. Substituents for each of the above noted aryl and heteroaryl ring systems are selected from the group of acceptable substituents described below.

For brevity, the term “aryl” when used in combination with other terms (e.g., aryloxy, arylthioxy, arylalkyl) includes both aryl and heteroaryl rings as defined above. Thus, the term “arylalkyl” is meant to include those radicals in which an aryl group is attached to an alkyl group (e.g., benzyl, phenethyl, pyridylmethyl and the like) including those alkyl groups in which a carbon atom (e.g., a methylene group) has been replaced by, for example, an oxygen atom (e.g., phenoxymethyl, 2-pyridyloxymethyl, 3-(1-naphthyloxy)propyl, and the like).

Each of the above terms (e.g., “alkyl,” “heteroalkyl,” “aryl” and “heteroaryl”) is meant to include both substituted and unsubstituted forms of the indicated radical. Preferred substituents for each type of radical are provided below.

Substituents for the alkyl and heteroalkyl radicals (including those groups often referred to as alkylene, alkenyl, heteroalkylene, heteroalkenyl, alkynyl, cycloalkyl, heterocycloalkyl, cycloalkenyl, and heterocycloalkenyl) are generically referred to as “alkyl group substituents,” and they can be one or more of a variety of groups selected from, but not limited to: —OR′, ═O, ═NR′, ═N—OR′, —NR′R″, —SR′, -halogen, —SiR′R″R′″, —OC(O)R′, —C(O)R′, —CO2R′, —CONR′R″, —OC(O)NR′R″, —NR″C(O)R′, —NR′—C(O)NR″R′″, —NR″C(O)2R′, —NR—C(NR′R″R′″)═NR″″, —NR—C(NR′R″)═NR′″, —S(O)R′, —S(O)2R′, —S(O)2NR′R″, —NRSO2R′, —CN and —NO2 in a number ranging from zero to (2m′+1), where m′ is the total number of carbon atoms in such radical. R′, R″, R′″ and R″″ each preferably independently refer to hydrogen, substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted aryl, e.g., aryl substituted with 1-3 halogens, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, alkoxy or thioalkoxy groups, or arylalkyl groups. When a compound of the invention includes more than one R group, for example, each of the R groups is independently selected as are each R′, R″, R′″ and R″″ groups when more than one of these groups is present. When R′ and R″ are attached to the same nitrogen atom, they can be combined with the nitrogen atom to form a 5-, 6-, or 7-membered ring. For example, —NR′R″ is meant to include, but not be limited to, 1-pyrrolidinyl and 4-morpholinyl. From the above discussion of substituents, one of skill in the art will understand that the term “alkyl” is meant to include groups including carbon atoms bound to groups other than hydrogen groups, such as haloalkyl (e.g., —CF3 and —CH2CF3) and acyl (e.g., —C(O)CH3, —C(O)CF3, —C(O)CH2OCH3, and the like).

Similar to the substituents described for the alkyl radical, substituents for the aryl and heteroaryl groups are generically referred to as “aryl group substituents.” The substituents are selected from, for example: halogen, —OR′, ═O, ═NR′, —N—OR′, —NR′R″, —SR′, -halogen, —SiR′R″R′″, —OC(O)R′, —C(O)R′, —CO2R′, —CONR′R″, —OC(O)NR′R″, —NR″C(O)R′, —NR′—C(O)NR″R′″, —NR″C(O)2R′, —NR—C(NR′R″R′″)═NR″″, —NR—C(NR′R″)═NR′″, —S(O)R′, —S(O)2R′, —S(O)2NR′R″, —NRSO2R′, —CN and —NO2, —R′, —N3, —CH(Ph)2, fluoro(C1-C4)alkoxy, and fluoro(C1-C4)alkyl, in a number ranging from zero to the total number of open valences on the aromatic ring system; and where R′, R″, R′″ and R″″ are preferably independently selected from hydrogen, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted aryl and substituted or unsubstituted heteroaryl. When a compound of the invention includes more than one R group, for example, each of the R groups is independently selected as are each R′, R″, R′″ and R″″ groups when more than one of these groups is present. In the schemes that follow, the symbol X represents “R” as described above.

Two of the substituents on adjacent atoms of the aryl or heteroaryl ring may optionally be replaced with a substituent of the formula -T-C(O)—(CRR′)q-U-, wherein T and U are independently —NR—, —O—, —CRR′— or a single bond, and q is an integer of from 0 to 3. Alternatively, two of the substituents on adjacent atoms of the aryl or heteroaryl ring may optionally be replaced with a substituent of the formula -A-(CH2)r-B-, wherein A and B are independently —CRR′—, —O—, —NR—, —S—, —S(O)—, —S(O)2—, —S(O)2NR′— or a single bond, and r is an integer of from 1 to 4. One of the single bonds of the new ring so formed may optionally be replaced with a double bond. Alternatively, two of the substituents on adjacent atoms of the aryl or heteroaryl ring may optionally be replaced with a substituent of the formula —(CRR′)S—X—(CR″R′″)d—, where s and d are independently integers of from 0 to 3, and X is —O—, —NR′—, —S—, —S(O)—, —S(O)2—, or —S(O)2NR′—. The substituents R, R′, R″ and R′″ are preferably independently selected from hydrogen or substituted or unsubstituted (C1-C6)alkyl.

As used herein, the term “heteroatom” is meant to include oxygen (O), nitrogen (N), sulfur (S) and silicon (Si).

Introduction

As described above, Factor IX is vital in the blood coagulation cascade. A deficiency of Factor IX in the body characterizes a type of hemophilia (type B). Treatment of this disease is usually limited to intravenous transfusion of human plasma protein concentrates of Factor IX. However, in addition to the practical disadvantages of time and expense, transfusion of blood concentrates involves the risk of transmission of viral hepatitis, acquired immune deficiency syndrome or thromboembolic diseases to the recipient.

While Factor IX is an important and useful compound for therapeutic applications, present methods for the production of Factor IX from recombinant cells (U.S. Pat. No. 4,770,999) result in a product with a rather short biological half-life and an inaccurate glycosylation pattern that could potentially lead to immunogenicity, loss of function, an increased need for both larger and more frequent doses in order to achieve the same effect, and the like.

To improve the effectiveness of recombinant Factor IX used for therapeutic purposes, the present invention provides conjugates of glycosylated and unglycosylated Factor IX peptides with polymers, e.g., PEG (m-PEG), PPG (m-PPG), etc. The conjugates may be additionally or alternatively modified by further conjugation with diverse species such as therapeutic moieties, diagnostic moieties, targeting moieties and the like.

The conjugates of the invention are formed by the enzymatic reaction of a modified sugar with the glycosylated or unglycosylated peptide. A glycosylation site and/or a glycosyl residue provides a locus for conjugating a sugar bearing a modifying group to the peptide, e.g., by glycoconjugation. An exemplary modifying group is a water-soluble polymer, such as poly(ethylene glycol), e.g., methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol). Modification of the Factor IX peptides, e.g., with a water-soluble peptide can improve the stability and retention time of the recombinant Factor IX in a patient's circulation, and/or reduce the antigenicity of recombinant Factor IX.

The methods of the invention make it possible to assemble peptide conjugates that have a substantially homogeneous derivatization pattern. The enzymes used in the invention are generally selective for a particular amino acid residue, combination of amino acid residues, or particular glycosyl residues of the peptide. The methods are also practical for large-scale production of modified peptide conjugates. Thus, the methods of the invention provide a practical means for large-scale preparation of glycopeptides having preselected uniform derivatization patterns.

The present invention also provides conjugates of glycosylated and unglycosylated peptides with increased therapeutic half-life due to, for example, reduced clearance rate, or reduced rate of uptake by the immune or reticuloendothelial system (RES). Moreover, the methods of the invention provide a means for masking antigenic determinants on peptides, thus reducing or eliminating a host immune response against the peptide. Selective attachment of targeting agents can also be used to target a peptide to a particular tissue or cell surface receptor that is specific for the particular targeting agent.

Peptide Conjugates

Conjugates between FIX peptides and water-soluble polymers, e.g., PEG, are known to be significantly less effective in standard coagulation assays than the corresponding unconjugated FIX peptide. Thus, the discovery that FIX peptides conjugated with a water-soluble polymer have an activity in a coagulation assay that is significantly enhanced relative to the corresponding unconjugated FIX is an important and surprising result. The present invention provides FIX conjugates with water-soluble polymers that exhibit enhanced activity relative to the corresponding unconjugated FIX peptide in standard coagulation assays.

Thus, in a first aspect, the instant invention provides a conjugate between a FIX peptide and a water-soluble polymer that has coagulation activity that is enhanced relative to that of a FIX peptide that is not conjugated with a water-soluble polymer. In a preferred embodiment, the unconjugated peptide and the peptide of the conjugate have identical amino acid sequences. In another preferred embodiment, the conjugated and unconjugated peptide are more than about 90% homologous, preferably, more than about 95% homologous, more preferably, more than about 97% homologous and even more preferably, more than about 99% homologous.

In a preferred embodiment, the water-soluble polymer is a linear or branched PEG. It is generally preferred that the conjugates include from 1 to about 9 PEG moieties per peptide. In a preferred embodiment, the water-soluble polymer is a linear PEG and the conjugate includes approximately 6 to 8 PEG moieties per peptide molecule. In another preferred embodiment, the water-soluble polymer is a branched PEG and the conjugate includes approximately 1 to 5 PEG moieties per peptide molecule.

In exemplary embodiments, in which the PEG is a linear species, the PEG moiety has a molecular weight which is from about 200 D to about 20 kD. In preferred embodiments, in which the PEG moiety is a linear PEG moiety, the molecular weight of the linear PEG is at least about 200 D, more preferably, at least about 500 D, even more preferably, at least about 1 kD, more preferably, at least about 2 kD.

In other exemplary embodiments in which the PEG species is branched, the branched PEG includes from 2 to 6 linear PEG arms. Exemplary PEG arms have a molecular weight from about 200 D to about 30 kD. It is generally preferred that each arm has an individually selected molecular weight that is at least about 2 kD, preferably, at least about 5 kD, more preferably, at least about 10 kD, still more preferably, at least about 15 kD.

A preferred PEG species has two PEG arms. A presently preferred embodiment of the two-arm branched structure is based on an amino acid. Preferred amino acids include serine, cysteine and lysine.

In a preferred embodiment, the FIX conjugate of the invention has an in vivo coagulation activity that is at least about 15% greater than the activity of an identical non-conjugated peptide at a 24 hour time point in an in vivo coagulation assay. Preferred Factor IX conjugates of the invention exhibit a coagulation activity at a 24 hour time point that is enhanced over the identical nonconjugated peptide by at least about 40%, preferably, at least about 60%, more preferably, at least about 80%, even more preferably, at least about 100%, still more preferably, at least about 150%, and even more preferably, at least about 200%.

A presently preferred conjugate includes from 1-4 branched PEG moieties, in which the branched PEG is based upon an amino acid (i.e., the PEG arms are covalently linked to an amino acid core). This conjugate preferably has an activity that is enhanced at a 24 hour time point by at least about 100%, preferably, at least about 120%, more preferably, at least about 140%, still more preferably, at least about 160%, even more preferably, at least about 180% and more preferably, at least about 200% over the activity of the identical unconjugated FIX peptide in the same assay. In this embodiment, the branched PEG species have a molecular weight of at least about 15 kD, preferably, at least about 20, kD, and more preferably, at least about 30 kD. A preferred branched PEG species has a molecular weight of about 30 kD: even more preferred, the branched PEG species includes two linear PEG moieties covalently attached to an amino acid which is a member selected from lysine, serine and cysteine. Each branched PEG moiety is covalently attached to an amino acid or a glycosyl residue of the Factor IX peptide.

Another preferred conjugate of the invention includes from 5 to 9, more preferably, from 6 to 8 linear PEG moieties. In this embodiment, the PEG moieties have a molecular weight that is at least about 500 D, preferably, at least about 1 kD, more preferably, at least about 1.5 kD and, still more preferably, at least about 2 kD. The linear PEG moieties are covalently conjugated to an amino acid or glycosyl residue of the peptide: The conjugates according to this embodiment preferably have an activity enhanced by at least about 15%, preferably, at least about 25%, more preferably, at least about 35%, even more preferably, at least about 45%, and still more preferably, at least about 60% relative to an identical unconjugated FIX peptide in the same assay.

In another preferred embodiment, the branched or linear PEG species is covalently attached to an amino acid or glycosyl residue of the peptide. The PEG species are preferably attached to a sialic acid moiety of a glycosyl residue. When the PEG species are attached to an amino acid, they are preferably attached through a linker moiety to an amino acid which is a member selected from lysine, asparagine, serine and threonine. A generally preferred linker structure includes at least one glycosyl moiety. Additional embodiments in which the linking group is a glycosyl residue or includes at least one glycosyl moiety are discussed in detail in the sections that follow.

In a preferred embodiment, the water-soluble polymer is attached to a member selected from Asn 157, Asn 167; Ser 53, Ser 61, Thr 159, Thr 169, and Thr 172 of rhFIX.

The coagulation activities of the conjugated and unconjugated peptides are readily and routinely measured using art-standard coagulation assay methods, e.g., a standard mouse tail cut assay, aPTT assay, etc.

In another preferred embodiment, the conjugated FIX peptide has a terminal half life that is at least about 10% greater, preferably, at least about 30% greater, more preferably, at least about 50% greater, still more preferably, at least about 70% greater, and even more preferably at least about 100% greater than the terminal half-life of the identical unconjugated FIX peptide.

In each of the aspects and embodiments of the invention discussed herein, the Factor IX peptide may have the same sequence as a wild-type FIX peptide, or it may be a mutant peptide. A peptide conjugate can have one of several forms. In an exemplary embodiment, a peptide conjugate can comprise a Factor IX peptide and a modifying group linked to an amino acid of the peptide. In an exemplary embodiment, this modifying group is attached to the Factor IX peptide through a glycosyl linking group.

Thus, in a second aspect, the present invention provides a conjugate between a modified sugar and a Factor IX peptide.

In an exemplary embodiment, the glycosyl group is an intact glycosyl linking group. In another exemplary embodiment, the glycosyl group further comprises a modifying group. In another exemplary embodiment, the modifying group is a non-glycosidic modifying group. In another exemplary embodiment, the modifying group does not include a naturally occurring saccharide moiety.

In another exemplary embodiment, the peptide conjugate can comprise a Factor IX peptide and a glycosyl linking group which is bound to both a glycopeptide carbohydrate and directly to an amino acid residue of the peptide backbone. In yet another exemplary embodiment, a peptide conjugate can comprise a Factor IX peptide and a modifying group linked directly to an amino acid residue of the peptide. In this embodiment, the peptide conjugate may not comprise a glycosyl group. In any of these embodiments, the Factor IX peptide may or not be glycosylated. The present invention also encompasses a method for the modification of the glycan structure on Factor IX, providing a conjugate between Factor IX and a modifying group.

The conjugates of the invention will typically correspond to the general structure:

in which the symbols a, b, c, d and s represent a positive, non-zero integer; and t is either 0 or a positive integer. The “agent” is a therapeutic agent, a bioactive agent, a detectable label, water-soluble moiety (e.g., PEG, m-PEG, PPG, and m-PPG) or the like. The “agent” can be a peptide, e.g., enzyme, antibody, antigen, etc. The linker can be any of a wide array of linking groups, infra. Alternatively, the linker may be a single bond or a “zero order linker.”

Factor IX Peptide

Factor IX has been cloned and sequenced. Essentially any Factor IX peptide having any sequence is of use as the Factor IX peptide component of the conjugates of the present invention. In an exemplary embodiment, the peptide has the sequence presented herein as SEQ ID NO:1:

YNSGKLEEFVQGNLERECMEEKCSFEEAREVFENTERTTEFWKQYVDGDQ
CESNPCLNGGSCKDDINSYECWCPFGFEGKNCELDVTCNIKNGRCEQFCK
NSADNKVVCSCTEGYRLAENQKSCEPAVPFPCGRVSVSQTSKLTRAEAVF
PDVDYVNSTEAETILDNITQSTQSFNDFTRVVGGEDAKPGQFPWQVVLNG
KVDAFCGGSIVNEKWIVTAAHCVETGVKITVVAGEHNIEETEHTEQKRNV
IRIIPHHNYNAAINKYNHDIALLELDEPLVLNSYVTPICIADKEYTNIFL
KFGSGYVSGWGRVFHKGRSALVLQYLRVPLVDRATCLRSTKFTIYNNMFC
AGFHEGGRDSCQGDSGGPHVTEVEGTSFLTGIISWGEECAMKGKYGIYTK
VSRYVNWIKEKTKLT.

The present invention is in no way limited to the sequence set forth herein. Factor IX variants are well known in the art, as described in, for example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,770,999, 5,521,070 in which a tyrosine is replaced by an alanine in the first position, U.S. Pat. No. 6,037,452, in which Factor IX is linked to an alkylene oxide group, and U.S. Pat. No. 6,046,380, in which the DNA encoding Factor IX is modified in at least one splice site. As demonstrated herein, variants of Factor IX are well known in the art, and the present disclosure encompasses those variants known or to be developed or discovered in the future.

Methods for determining the activity of a mutant or modified Factor IX can be carried out using the methods described in the art, such as a one stage activated partial thromboplastin time assay as described in, for example, Biggs, Human Blood Coagulation Haemostasis and Thrombosis (Ed. 1), Oxford, Blackwell, Scientific, pg. 614 (1972). Briefly, to assay the biological activity of a Factor IX molecule developed according to the methods of the present invention, the assay can be performed with equal volumes of activated partial thromboplastin reagent, Factor IX deficient plasma isolated from a patient with hemophilia B using sterile phlebotomy techniques well known in the art, and normal pooled plasma as standard, or the sample. In this assay, one unit of activity is defined as that amount present in one milliliter of normal pooled plasma. Further, an assay for biological activity based on the ability of Factor IX to reduce the clotting time of plasma from Factor IX-deficient patients to normal can be performed as described in, for example, Proctor and Rapaport (Amer. J. Clin. Path. 36: 212 (1961).

The peptides of the invention include at least one N-linked or O-linked glycosylation site, at least one of which is conjugated to a glycosyl residue that includes a polymeric modifying moiety, e.g., a PEG moiety. In an exemplary embodiment, the PEG is covalently attached to the peptide via an intact glycosyl linking group. The glycosyl linking group is covalently attached to either an amino acid residue or a glycosyl residue of the peptide. Alternatively, the glycosyl linking group is attached to one or more glycosyl units of a glycopeptide. The invention also provides conjugates in which the glycosyl linking group is attached to both an amino acid residue and a glycosyl residue.

Preferably, neither the amino nor the carboxy terminus of the Factor IX peptide is derivatized with a polymeric modifying moiety.

Modified Sugar

In an exemplary embodiment, the peptides of the invention are reacted with a modified sugar, thus forming a peptide conjugate. A modified sugar comprises a “sugar donor moiety” as well as a “sugar transfer moiety”. The sugar donor moiety is any portion of the modified sugar that will be attached to the peptide, either through a glycosyl moiety or amino acid moiety, as a conjugate of the invention. The sugar donor moiety includes those atoms that are chemically altered during their conversion from the modified sugar to the glycosyl linking group of the peptide conjugate. The sugar transfer moiety is any portion of the modified sugar that will be not be attached to the peptide as a conjugate of the invention. For example, a modified sugar of the invention is the PEGylated sugar nucleotide, CMP-SA-PEG. For CMP-SA-PEG, the sugar donor moiety, or PEG-sialyl donor moiety, comprises PEG-sialic acid while the sugar transfer moiety, or sialyl transfer moiety, comprises CMP.

In modified sugars of use in the invention, the saccharyl moiety is preferably a saccharide, a deoxy-saccharide, an amino-saccharide, or an N-acyl saccharide. The term “saccharide” and its equivalents, “saccharyl,” “sugar,” and “glycosyl” refer to monomers, dimers, oligomers and polymers. The sugar moiety is also functionalized with a modifying group. The modifying group is conjugated to the saccharyl moiety, typically, through conjugation with an amine, sulfhydryl or hydroxyl, e.g., primary hydroxyl, moiety on the sugar. In an exemplary embodiment, the modifying group is attached through an amine moiety on the sugar, e.g., through an amide, a urethane or a urea that is formed through the reaction of the amine with a reactive derivative of the modifying group.

Any saccharyl moiety can be utilized as the sugar donor moiety of the modified sugar. The saccharyl moiety can be a known sugar, such as mannose, galactose or glucose, or a species having the stereochemistry of a known sugar. The general formulae of these modified sugars are:

Other saccharyl moieties that are useful in forming the compositions of the invention include, but are not limited to fucose and sialic acid, as well as amino sugars such as glucosamine, galactosamine, mannosamine, the 5-amine analogue of sialic acid and the like. The saccharyl moiety can be a structure found in nature or it can be modified to provide a site for conjugating the modifying group. For example, in one embodiment, the modified sugar provides a sialic acid derivative in which the 9-hydroxy moiety is replaced with an amine. The amine is readily derivatized with an activated analogue of a selected modifying group.

Examples of modified sugars of use in the invention are described in PCT Patent Application No. PCT/US05/002522, which is herein incorporated by reference.

In a further exemplary embodiment, the invention utilizes modified sugars in which the 6-hydroxyl position is converted to the corresponding amine moiety, which bears a linker-modifying group cassette such as those set forth above. Exemplary glycosyl groups that can be used as the core of these modified sugars include Gal, GalNAc, Glc, GlcNAc, Fuc, Xyl, Man, and the like. A representative modified sugar according to this embodiment has the formula:

in which R11-R14 are members independently selected from H, OH, C(O)CH3, NH, and NH C(O)CH3. R10 is a link to another glycosyl residue (—O-glycosyl) or to an amino acid of the Factor IX and/or Factor IX peptide (—NH-(Factor IX and/or Factor IX)). R14 is OR1, NHR1 or NH-L-R1. R1 and NH-L-R1 are as described above.

Glycosyl Linking Groups

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a peptide conjugate formed between a modified sugar of the invention and a Factor IX peptide. In this embodiment, the sugar donor moiety (such as the saccharyl moiety and the modifying group) of the modified sugar becomes a “glycosyl linking group”. The “glycosyl linking group” can alternatively refer to the glycosyl moiety which is interposed between the peptide and the modifying group.

Due to the versatility of the methods available for adding and/or modifying glycosyl residues on a peptide, the glycosyl linking groups can have substantially any structure. In the discussion that follows, the invention is illustrated by reference to the use of selected derivatives of furanose and pyranose. Those of skill in the art will recognize that the focus of the discussion is for clarity of illustration and that the structures and compositions set forth are generally applicable across the genus of glycosyl linking groups and modified sugars. The glycosyl linking group can comprise virtually any mono- or oligo-saccharide. The glycosyl linking groups can be attached to an amino acid either through the side chain or through the peptide backbone. Alternatively the glycosyl linking groups can be attached to the peptide through a saccharyl moiety. This saccharyl moiety can be a portion of an O-linked or N-linked glycan structure on the Factor IX peptide.

In an exemplary embodiment, the invention utilizes a glycosyl linking group that has the formula:

in which J is a glycosyl moiety, L is a bond or a linker and R1 is a modifying group, e.g., a polymeric modifying group. Exemplary bonds are those that are formed between an NH2 moiety on the glycosyl moiety and a group of complementary reactivity on the modifying group. For example, when R1 includes a carboxylic acid moiety, this moiety may be activated and coupled with the NH2 moiety on the glycosyl residue affording a bond having the structure NHC(O)R1. J is preferably a glycosyl moiety that is “intact”, not having been degraded by exposure to conditions that cleave the pyranose or furanose structure, e.g. oxidative conditions, e.g., sodium periodate.

Exemplary linkers include alkyl and heteroalkyl moieties. The linkers include linking groups, for example acyl-based linking groups, e.g., —C(O)NH—, —OC(O)NH—, and the like. The linking groups are bonds formed between components of the species of the invention, e.g., between the glycosyl moiety and the linker (L), or between the linker and the modifying group (R1). Other exemplary linking groups are ethers, thioethers and amines. For example, in one embodiment, the linker is an amino acid residue, such as a glycine residue. The carboxylic acid moiety of the glycine is converted to the corresponding amide by reaction with an amine on the glycosyl residue, and the amine of the glycine is converted to the corresponding amide or urethane by reaction with an activated carboxylic acid or carbonate of the modifying group.

An exemplary species of NH-L-R1 has the formula: —NH{C(O)(CH2)aNH}s{C(O)(CH2)b(OCH2CH2)cO(CH2)dNH}tR1, in which the indices s and t are independently 0 or 1. The indices a, b and d are independently integers from 0 to 20, and c is an integer from 1 to 2500. Other similar linkers are based on species in which an —NH moiety is replaced by another group, for example, —S, —O or —CH2. As those of skill will appreciate one or more of the bracketed moieties corresponding to indices s and t can be replaced with a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl or heteroalkyl moiety.

More particularly, the invention utilizes compounds in which NH-L-R1 is: NHC(O)(CH2)aNHC(O)(CH2)b(OCH2CH2)cO(CH2)dNHR1, NHC(O)(CH2)b(OCH2CH2)cO(CH2)dNHR1, NHC(O)O(CH2)b(OCH2CH2)cO(CH2)dNHR1, NH(CH2)aNHC(O)(CH2)b(OCH2CH2)cO(CH2)dNHR1, NHC(O)(CH2)aNHR1, NH(CH2)aNHR1, and NHR1. In these formulae, the indices a, b and d are independently selected from the integers from 0 to 20, preferably from 1 to 5. The index c is an integer from 1 to about 2500.

In an exemplary embodiment, c is selected such that the PEG moiety is approximately 1 kD, 5 kD, 10, kD, 15 kD, 20 kD, 25 kD, 30 kD, 35 kD, 40 kD, 45 kD, 50 kD, 55 kD, 60 kD or 65 kD.

For the purposes of convenience, the glycosyl linking groups in the remainder of this section will be based on a sialyl moiety. However, one of skill in the art will recognize that another glycosyl moiety, such as mannosyl, galactosyl, glucosyl, or fucosyl, could be used in place of the sialyl moiety.

In an exemplary embodiment, the glycosyl linking group is an intact glycosyl linking group, in which the glycosyl moiety or moieties forming the linking group are not degraded by chemical (e.g., sodium metaperiodate) or enzymatic (e.g., oxidase) processes. Selected conjugates of the invention include a modifying group that is attached to the amine moiety of an amino-saccharide, e.g., mannosamine, glucosamine, galactosamine, sialic acid etc. In an exemplary embodiment, the invention provides a peptide conjugate comprising an intact glycosyl linking group having a formula that is selected from:

In Formulae I R2 is H, CH2OR7, COOR7 or OR7, in which R7 represents H, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl or substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl. When COOR7 is a carboxylic acid or carboxylate, both forms are represented by the designation of the single structure COO or COOH. In Formulae I and II, the symbols R3, R4, R5, R6 and R6′ independently represent H, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, OR8, NHC(O)R9. The index d is 0 or 1. R8 and R9 are independently selected from H, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl, sialic acid or polysialic acid. At least one of R3, R4, R5, R6 or R6′ includes a modifying group. This modifying group can be a polymeric modifying moiety e.g., PEG, linked through a bond or a linking group. In an exemplary embodiment, R6 and R6′, together with the carbon to which they are attached are components of the pyruvyl side chain of sialic acid. In a further exemplary embodiment, the pyruvyl side chain is functionalized with the polymeric modifying group. In another exemplary embodiment, R6 and R6′, together with the carbon to which they are attached are components of the side chain of sialic acid and the polymeric modifying group is a component of R5.

Exemplary modifying group-intact glycosyl linking group cassettes according to this motif are based on a sialic acid structure, such as those having the formulae:

In the formulae above, R1 and L are as described above. Further detail about the structure of exemplary R1 groups is provided below.

In still a further exemplary embodiment, the conjugate is formed between a peptide and a modified sugar in which the modifying group is attached through a linker at the 6-carbon position of the modified sugar. Thus, illustrative glycosyl linking groups according to this embodiment have the formula:

in which the radicals are as discussed above. Glycosyl linking groups include, without limitation, glucose, glucosamine, N-acetyl-glucosamine, galactose, galactosamine, N-acetyl-galactosamine, mannose, mannosamine, N-acetyl-mannosamine, and the like.

In one embodiment, the present invention provides a peptide conjugate comprising the following glycosyl linking group:

wherein D is a member selected from —OH and R1-L-HN—; G is a member selected from H and R1-L- and —C(O)(C1-C6)alkyl; R1 is a moiety comprising a straight-chain or branched poly(ethylene glycol) residue; and L is a linker, e.g., a bond (“zero order”), substituted or unsubstituted alkyl and substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl. In exemplary embodiments, when D is OH, G is R1-L-, and when G is —C(O)(C1-C6)alkyl, D is R1-L-NH—.

The invention provides a peptide conjugate that includes a glycosyl linking group having the formula:

In other embodiments, the glycosyl linking group has the formula:

in which the index t is 0 or 1.

In a still further exemplary embodiment, the glycosyl linking group has the formula:

in which the index t is 0 or 1.

In yet another embodiment, the glycosyl linking group has the formula:

in which the index p represents and integer from 1 to 10; and a is either 0 or 1.

In an exemplary embodiment, a glycoPEGylated peptide conjugate of the invention selected from the formulae set forth below:

In the formulae above, the index t is an integer from 0 to 1 and the index p is an integer from 1 to 10. The symbol R15′ represents H, OH (e.g., Gal-OH), a sialyl moiety, a sialyl linking group (i.e., sialyl linking group-polymeric modifying group (Sia-L-R1), or a sialyl moiety to which is bound a polymer modified sialyl moiety (e.g., Sia-Sia-L-R1) (“Sia-Siap”)). Exemplary polymer modified saccharyl moieties have a structure according to Formulae I and II. An exemplary peptide conjugate of the invention will include at least one glycan having a R15′ that includes a structure according to Formulae I or II. The oxygen, with the open valence, of Formulae I and II is preferably attached through a glycosidic linkage to a carbon of a Gal or GalNAc moiety. In a further exemplary embodiment, the oxygen is attached to the carbon at position 3 of a galactose residue. In an exemplary embodiment, the modified sialic acid is linked α2,3-to the galactose residue. In another exemplary embodiment, the sialic acid is linked α2,6-to the galactose residue.

In an exemplary embodiment, the sialyl linking group is a sialyl moiety to which is bound a polymer modified sialyl moiety (e.g., Sia-Sia-L-R1) (“Sia-Siap”). Here, the glycosyl linking group is linked to a galactosyl moiety through a sialyl moiety:

An exemplary species according to this motif is prepared by conjugating Sia-L-R1 to a terminal sialic acid of a glycan using an enzyme that forms Sia-Sia bonds, e.g., CST-11, ST8Sia-11, ST8Sia-III and ST8Sia-IV.

In another exemplary embodiment, the glycans on the peptide conjugates have a formula that is selected from the group:

and combinations thereof.

In each of the formulae above, R15′ is as discussed above. Moreover, an exemplary peptide conjugate of the invention will include at least one glycan with an R15 moiety having a structure according to Formulae I or II.

nent, the glycosyl linking group comprises at least one glycosyl linking group having the formula:

wherein R15 is said sialyl linking group; and the index p is an integer selected from 1 to 10.

In an exemplary embodiment, the glycosyl linking moiety has the formula:

in which b is an integer from 0 to 1. The index s represents an integer from 1 to 10; and the index f represents an integer from 1 to 2500.

In an exemplary embodiment, the polymeric modifying group is PEG. In another exemplary embodiment, the PEG moiety has a molecular weight of about 20 kDa. In another exemplary embodiment, the PEG moiety has a molecular weight of about 5 kDa. In another exemplary embodiment, the PEG moiety has a molecular weight of about 10 kDa. In another exemplary embodiment, the PEG moiety has a molecular weight of about 40 kDa.

In an exemplary embodiment, the glycosyl linking group is a linear 10 kDa-PEG-sialyl, and one or two of these glycosyl linking groups are covalently attached to the peptide. In an exemplary embodiment, the glycosyl linking group is a linear 20 kDa-PEG-sialyl, and one or two of these glycosyl linking groups are covalently attached to the peptide. In an exemplary embodiment, the glycosyl linking group is a linear 5 kDa-PEG-sialyl, and one, two or three of these glycosyl linking groups are covalently attached to the peptide. In an exemplary embodiment, the glycosyl linking group is a linear 40 kDa-PEG-sialyl, and one or two of these glycosyl linking groups are covalently attached to the peptide.

Modifying Groups

The peptide conjugates of the invention comprise a modifying group. This group can be covalently attached to a FGF peptide through an amino acid or a glycosyl linking group. “Modifying groups” can encompass a variety of structures including targeting moieties, therapeutic moieties, biomolecules. Additionally, “modifying groups” include polymeric modifying groups, which are polymers which can alter a property of the peptide such as its bioavailability or its half-life in the body.

In an exemplary embodiment, the modifying group is a targeting agent that localizes selectively in a particular tissue due to the presence of a targeting agent as a component of the conjugate. In an exemplary embodiment, the targeting agent is a protein. Exemplary proteins include transferrin (brain, blood pool), HS-glycoprotein (bone, brain, blood pool), antibodies (brain, tissue with antibody-specific antigen, blood pool), coagulation factors V-XII (damaged tissue, clots, cancer, blood pool), serum proteins, e.g., α-acid glycoprotein, fetuin, α-fetal protein (brain, blood pool), β2-glycoprotein (liver, atherosclerosis plaques, brain, blood pool), G-CSF, GM-CSF, M-CSF, and EPO (immune stimulation, cancers, blood pool, red blood cell overproduction, neuroprotection), albumin (increase in half-life), and lipoprotein E.

For the purposes of convenience, the modifying groups in the remainder of this section will be largely based on polymeric modifying groups such as water soluble and water insoluble polymers. However, one of skill in the art will recognize that other modifying groups, such as targeting moieties, therapeutic moieties and biomolecules, could be used in place of the polymeric modifying groups.

Linkers of the Modifying Groups

The linkers of the modifying group serve to attach the modifying group (i.e. polymeric modifying groups, targeting moieties, therapeutic moieties and biomolecules) to the peptide. In an exemplary embodiment, the polymeric modifying group is bound to a glycosyl linking group, generally through a heteroatom, e.g., nitrogen, on the core through a linker, L, as shown below:

R1 is the polymeric moiety and L is selected from a bond and a linking group. The index w represents an integer selected from 1-6, preferably 1-3 and more preferably 1-2. Exemplary linking groups include substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl moieties and sialic acid. An exemplary component of the linker is an acyl moiety.

An exemplary compound according to the invention has a structure according to Formulae I or II above, in which at least one of R2, R3, R4, R5, R6 or R6′ has the formula:

In another example according to this embodiment at least one of R2, R3, R4, R5, R6 or R6′ has the formula:

in which s is an integer from 0 to 20 and R1 is a linear polymeric modifying moiety.

In an exemplary embodiment, the polymeric modifying group-linker construct is a branched structure that includes two or more polymeric chains attached to central moiety. In this embodiment, the construct has the formula:

in which R1 and L are as discussed above and w′ is an integer from 2 to 6, preferably from 2 to 4 and more preferably from 2 to 3.

When L is a bond it is formed between a reactive functional group on a precursor of R1 and a reactive functional group of complementary reactivity on the saccharyl core. When L is a non-zero order linker, a precursor of L can be in place on the glycosyl moiety prior to reaction with the R1 precursor. Alternatively, the precursors of R1 and L can be incorporated into a preformed cassette that is subsequently attached to the glycosyl moiety. As set forth herein, the selection and preparation of precursors with appropriate reactive functional groups is within the ability of those skilled in the art. Moreover, coupling the precursors proceeds by chemistry that is well understood in the art.

In an exemplary embodiment, L is a linking group that is formed from an amino acid, or small peptide (e.g., 1-4 amino acid residues) providing a modified sugar in which the polymeric modifying group is attached through a substituted alkyl linker. Exemplary linkers include glycine, lysine, serine and cysteine. The PEG moiety can be attached to the amine moiety of the linker through an amide or urethane bond. The PEG is linked to the sulfur or oxygen atoms of cysteine and serine through thioether or ether bonds, respectively.

In an exemplary embodiment, R5 includes the polymeric modifying group. In another exemplary embodiment, R5 includes both the polymeric modifying group and a linker, L, joining the modifying group to the remainder of the molecule. As discussed above, L can be a linear or branched structure. Similarly, the polymeric modifying group can be branched or linear.

Water-Soluble Polymers

Many water-soluble polymers are known to those of skill in the art and are useful in practicing the present invention. The term water-soluble polymer encompasses species such as saccharides (e.g., dextran, amylose, hyaluronic acid, poly(sialic acid), heparans, heparins, etc.); poly (amino acids), e.g., poly(aspartic acid) and poly(glutamic acid); nucleic acids; synthetic polymers (e.g., poly(acrylic acid), poly(ethers), e.g., poly(ethylene glycol)); peptides, proteins, and the like. The present invention may be practiced with any water-soluble polymer with the sole limitation that the polymer must include a point at which the remainder of the conjugate can be attached.

Methods for activation of polymers can also be found in WO 94/17039, U.S. Pat. No. 5,324,844, WO 94/18247, WO 94/04193, U.S. Pat. No. 5,219,564, U.S. Pat. No. 5,122,614, WO 90/13540, U.S. Pat. No. 5,281,698, and more WO 93/15189, and for conjugation between activated polymers and peptides, e.g. Coagulation Factor VIII (WO 94/15625), hemoglobin (WO 94/09027), oxygen carrying molecule (U.S. Pat. No. 4,412,989), ribonuclease and superoxide dismutase (Veronese at al., App. Biochem. Biotech. 11: 141-45 (1985)).

Exemplary water-soluble polymers are those in which a substantial proportion of the polymer molecules in a sample of the polymer are of approximately the same molecular weight; such polymers are “homodisperse.”

The present invention is further illustrated by reference to a poly(ethylene glycol) conjugate. Several reviews and monographs on the functionalization and conjugation of PEG are available. See, for example, Harris, Macronol. Chem. Phys. C25: 325-373 (1985); Scouten, Methods in Enzymology 135: 30-65 (1987); Wong et al., Enzyme Microb. Technol. 14: 866-874 (1992); Delgado et al., Critical Reviews in Therapeutic Drug Carrier Systems 9: 249-304 (1992); Zalipsky, Bioconjugate Chem. 6: 150-165 (1995); and Bhadra, et al., Pharmazie, 57:5-29 (2002). Routes for preparing reactive PEG molecules and forming conjugates using the reactive molecules are known in the art. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,672,662 discloses a water soluble and isolatable conjugate of an active ester of a polymer acid selected from linear or branched poly(alkylene oxides), poly(oxyethylated polyols), poly(olefinic alcohols), and poly(acrylomorpholine).

U.S. Pat. No. 6,376,604 sets forth a method for preparing a water-soluble 1-benzotriazolylcarbonate ester of a water-soluble and non-peptidic polymer by reacting a terminal hydroxyl of the polymer with di(1-benzotriazoyl)carbonate in an organic solvent. The active ester is used to form conjugates with a biologically active agent such as a protein or peptide.

WO 99/45964 describes a conjugate comprising a biologically active agent and an activated water soluble polymer comprising a polymer backbone having at least one terminus linked to the polymer backbone through a stable linkage, wherein at least one terminus comprises a branching moiety having proximal reactive groups linked to the branching moiety, in which the biologically active agent is linked to at least one of the proximal reactive groups. Other branched poly(ethylene glycols) are described in WO 96/21469, U.S. Pat. No. 5,932,462 describes a conjugate formed with a branched PEG molecule that includes a branched terminus that includes reactive functional groups. The free reactive groups are available to react with a biologically active species, such as a protein or peptide, forming conjugates between the poly(ethylene glycol) and the biologically active species. U.S. Pat. No. 5,446,090 describes a bifunctional PEG linker and its use in forming conjugates having a peptide at each of the PEG linker termini.

Conjugates that include degradable PEG linkages are described in WO 99/34833; and WO 99/14259, as well as in U.S. Pat. No. 6,348,558. Such degradable linkages are applicable in the present invention.

The art-recognized methods of polymer activation set forth above are of use in the context of the present invention in the formation of the branched polymers set forth herein and also for the conjugation of these branched polymers to other species, e.g., sugars, sugar nucleotides and the like.

An exemplary water-soluble polymer is poly(ethylene glycol), e.g., methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol). The poly(ethylene glycol) used in the present invention is not restricted to any particular form or molecular weight range. For unbranched poly(ethylene glycol) molecules the molecular weight is preferably between 500 and 100,000. A molecular weight of 2000-60,000 is preferably used and preferably of from about 5,000 to about 40,000.

In other exemplary embodiments, the poly(ethylene glycol) molecule is selected from the following:

In another embodiment the poly(ethylene glycol) is a branched PEG having more than one PEG moiety attached. Examples of branched PEGs are described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,932,462; U.S. Pat. No. 5,342,940; U.S. Pat. No. 5,643,575; U.S. Pat. No. 5,919,455; U.S. Pat. No. 6,113,906; U.S. Pat. No. 5,183,660; WO 02/09766; Kodera Y., Bioconjugate Chemistry 5: 283-288 (1994); and Yamasaki et al., Agric. Biol. Chem., 52: 2125-2127, 1998. In a preferred embodiment the molecular weight of each poly(ethylene glycol) of the branched PEG is less than or equal to 40,000 daltons.

Representative polymeric modifying moieties include structures that are based on side chain-containing amino acids, e.g., serine, cysteine, lysine, and small peptides, e.g., lys-lys. Exemplary structures include:

Those of skill will appreciate that the free amine in the di-lysine structures can also be pegylated through an amide or urethane bond with a PEG moiety.

In yet another embodiment, the polymeric modifying moiety is a branched PEG moiety that is based upon a tri-lysine peptide. The tri-lysine can be mono-, di-, tri-, or tetra-PEG-ylated. Exemplary species according to this embodiment have the formulae:

in which the indices e, f and f′ are independently selected integers from 1 to 2500; and the indices q, q′ and q″ are independently selected integers from 1 to 20.

As will be apparent to those of skill, the branched polymers of use in the invention include variations on the themes set forth above. For example the di-lysine-PEG conjugate shown above can include three polymeric subunits, the third bonded to the □-amine shown as unmodified in the structure above. Similarly, the use of a tri-lysine functionalized with three or four polymeric subunits labeled with the polymeric modifying moiety in a desired manner is within the scope of the invention.

As discussed herein, the PEG of use in the conjugates of the invention can be linear or branched. An exemplary precursor of use to form the branched PEG containing peptide conjugates according to this embodiment of the invention has the formula:

Another exemplary precursor of use to form the branched PEG containing peptide conjugates according to this embodiment of the invention has the formula:

in which the indices m and n are integers independently selected from 0 to 5000. A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, A6, A7, A8, A9, A10 and A11 are members independently selected from H, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted cycloalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heterocycloalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted aryl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroaryl, —NA12A13, —OA12 and —SiA12A13. A12 and A13 are members independently selected from substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted cycloalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heterocycloalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted aryl, and substituted or unsubstituted heteroaryl.

The branched polymer species according to this formula are essentially pure water-soluble polymers. X3′ is a moiety that includes an ionizable (e.g., OH, COOH, H2PO4, HSO3, NH2, and salts thereof, etc.) or other reactive functional group, e.g., infra. C is carbon. X5, R16 and R17 are independently selected from non-reactive groups (e.g., H, unsubstituted alkyl, unsubstituted heteroalkyl) and polymeric arms (e.g., PEG). X2 and X4 are linkage fragments that are preferably essentially non-reactive under physiological conditions, which may be the same or different. An exemplary linker includes neither aromatic nor ester moieties. Alternatively, these linkages can include one or more moiety that is designed to degrade under physiologically relevant conditions, e.g., esters, disulfides, etc. X2 and X4 join polymeric arms R16 and R17 to C. When X3′ is reacted with a reactive functional group of complementary reactivity on a linker, sugar or linker-sugar cassette, X3′ is converted to a component of linkage fragment X3.

Exemplary linkage fragments for X2, X3 and X4 are independently selected and include S, SC(O)NH, HNC(O)S, SC(O)O, O, NH, NHC(O), (O)CNH and NHC(O)O, and OC(O)NH, CH2S, CH2O, CH2CH2O, CH2CH2S, (CH2)oO, (CH2)oS or (CH2)oY′-PEG wherein, Y′ is S, NH, NHC(O), C(O)NH, NHC(O)O, OC(O)NH, or O and o is an integer from 1 to 50. In an exemplary embodiment, the linkage fragments X2 and X4 are different linkage fragments.

In an exemplary embodiment, the precursor (Formula III), or an activated derivative thereof, is reacted with, and thereby bound to a sugar, an activated sugar or a sugar nucleotide through a reaction between X3′ and a group of complementary reactivity on the sugar moiety, e.g., an amine. Alternatively, X3′ reacts with a reactive functional group on a precursor to linker, L. One or more of R2, R3, R4, R5, R6 or R6′ of Formulae I and II can include the branched polymeric modifying moiety, or this moiety bound through L.

In an exemplary embodiment, the moiety:

is the linker arm, L. In this embodiment, an exemplary linker is derived from a natural or unnatural amino acid, amino acid analogue or amino acid mimetic, or a small peptide formed from one or more such species. For example, certain branched polymers found in the compounds of the invention have the formula:

Xa is a linkage fragment that is formed by the reaction of a reactive functional group, e.g. X3′, on a precursor of the branched polymeric modifying moiety and a reactive functional group on the sugar moiety, or a precursor to a linker. For example, when X3′ is a carboxylic acid, it can be activated and bound directly to an amine group pendent from an amino-saccharide (e.g., Sia, GaINH2, GlcNH2, ManNH2, etc.), forming a Xa that is an amide. Additional exemplary reactive functional groups and activated precursors are described hereinbelow. The index c represents an integer from 1 to 10. The other symbols have the same identity as those discussed above.

In another exemplary embodiment, Xa is a linking moiety formed with another linker:

in which Xb is a second linkage fragment and is independently selected from those groups set forth for Xa, and, similar to L, L1 is a bond, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl or substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl.

Exemplary species for Xa and Xb include S, SC(O)NH, HNC(O)S, SC(O)O, O, NH, NHC(O), C(O)NH and NHC(O)O, and OC(O)NH.

In another exemplary embodiment, X4 is a peptide bond to R17, which is an amino acid, di-peptide (e.g., Lys-Lys) or tri-peptide (e.g., Lys-Lys-Lys) in which the alpha-amine moiety(ies) and/or side chain heteroatom(s) are modified with a polymeric modifying moiety.

In a further exemplary embodiment, the peptide conjugates of the invention include a moiety, e.g., an R15 moiety that has a formula that is selected from:

in which the identity of the radicals represented by the various symbols is the same as that discussed hereinabove. La is a bond or a linker as discussed above for L and L1, e.g., substituted or unsubstituted alkyl or substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl moiety. In an exemplary embodiment, La is a moiety of the side chain of sialic acid that is functionalized with the polymeric modifying moiety as shown. Exemplary La moieties include substituted or unsubstituted alkyl chains that include one or more OH or NH2.

In yet another exemplary embodiment, the invention provides peptide conjugates having a moiety, e.g., an R15 moiety with formula:

The identity of the radicals represented by the various symbols is the same as that discussed hereinabove. As those of skill will appreciate, the linker arm in Formulae VII and VIII is equally applicable to other modified sugars set forth herein. In exemplary embodiment, the species of Formulae VII and VIII are the R15 moieties attached to the glycan structures set forth herein.

In yet another exemplary embodiment, the Factor IX peptide conjugate includes a R15 moiety with a formula which is a member selected from:

in which the identities of the radicals are as discussed above. An exemplary species for La is —(CH2)jC(O)NH(CH2)hC(O)NH—, in which the indices h and j are independently selected integers from 0 to 10. A further exemplary species is —C(O)NH—. The indices m and n are integers independently selected from 0 to 5000. A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, A6, A7, A8, A9, A10 and A11 are members independently selected from H, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted cycloalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heterocycloalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted aryl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroaryl, —NA12A13, —OA12 and —SiA12A13. A12 and A13 are members independently selected from substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted cycloalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heterocycloalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted aryl, and substituted or unsubstituted heteroaryl.

In an exemplary embodiment, the glycosyl linking group has a structure according to the following formula:

The embodiments of the invention set forth above are further exemplified by reference to species in which the polymer is a water-soluble polymer, particularly poly(ethylene glycol) (“PEG”), e.g., methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol). Those of skill will appreciate that the focus in the sections that follow is for clarity of illustration and the various motifs set forth using PEG as an exemplary polymer are equally applicable to species in which a polymer other than PEG is utilized.

PEG of any molecular weight, e.g., 1 kDa, 2 kDa, 5 kDa, 10 kDa, 15 kDa, 20 kDa, 25 kDa, 30 kDa, 35 kDa, 40 kDa and 45 kDa is of use in the present invention.

In an exemplary embodiment, the R15 moiety has a formula that is a member selected from the group:

In each of the structures above, the linker fragment —NH(CH2)a— can be present or absent.

In other exemplary embodiments, the peptide conjugate includes an R15 moiety selected from the group:

In each of the formulae above, the indices e and f are independently selected from the integers from 1 to 2500. In further exemplary embodiments, e and f are selected to provide a PEG moiety that is about 1 kDa, 2 kDa, 5 kDa, 10 kDa, 15 kDa, 20 kDa, 25 kDa, 30 kDa, 35 kDa, 40 kDa and 45 kDa. The symbol Q represents substituted or unsubstituted alkyl (e.g., C1-C6 alkyl, e.g., methyl), substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl or H.

Other branched polymers have structures based on di-lysine (Lys-Lys) peptides, e.g.:

and tri-lysine peptides (Lys-Lys-Lys), e.g.:

In each of the figures above, the indices e, f, f′, and f″ represent integers independently selected from 1 to 2500. The indices q, q′ and q″ represent integers independently selected from 1 to 20.

In another exemplary embodiment, the modifying group:

has a formula that is a member selected from:

wherein Q is a member selected from H and substituted or unsubstituted C1-C6 alkyl. The indices e and f are integers independently selected from 1 to 2500, and the index q is an integer selected from 0 to 20.

In another exemplary embodiment, the modifying group:

has a formula that is a member selected from:

wherein Q is a member selected from H and substituted or unsubstituted C1-C6 alkyl. The indices e, f and f′ are integers independently selected from 1 to 2500, and q and q′ are integers independently selected from 1 to 20.

In another exemplary embodiment, the branched polymer has a structure according to the following formula:

in which the indices m and n are integers independently selected from 0 to 5000. A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, A6, A7, A8, A9, A10 and A11 are members independently selected from H, substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted cycloalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heterocycloalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted aryl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroaryl, —NA12A13, —OA12 and —SiA12A13. A12 and A13 are members independently selected from substituted or unsubstituted alkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted cycloalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted heterocycloalkyl, substituted or unsubstituted aryl, and substituted or unsubstituted heteroaryl.

Formula IIIa is a subset of Formula III. The structures described by Formula IIIa are also encompassed by Formula III.

In another exemplary embodiment according to the formula above, the branched polymer has a structure according to the following formula:

In an exemplary embodiment, A1 and A2 are each —OCH3 or H.

In an illustrative embodiment, the modified sugar is sialic acid and selected modified sugar compounds of use in the invention have the formulae:

The indices a, b and d are integers from 0 to 20. The index c is an integer from 1 to 2500. The structures set forth above can be components of R15.

In another illustrative embodiment, a primary hydroxyl moiety of the sugar is functionalized with the modifying group. For example, the 9-hydroxyl of sialic acid can be converted to the corresponding amine and functionalized to provide a compound according to the invention. Formulae according to this embodiment include:

The structures set forth above can be components of R15.

Although the present invention is exemplified in the preceding sections by reference to PEG, as those of skill will appreciate, an array of polymeric modifying moieties is of use in the compounds and methods set forth herein.

In selected embodiments, R1 or L-R1 is a branched PEG, for example, one of the species set forth above. In an exemplary embodiment, the branched PEG structure is based on a cysteine peptide. Illustrative modified sugars according to this embodiment include:

in which X4 is a bond or O. In each of the structures above, the alkylamine linker —(CH2)aNH— can be present or absent. The structures set forth above can be components of R15/R15′.

As discussed herein, the polymer-modified sialic acids of use in the invention may also be linear structures. Thus, the invention provides for conjugates that include a sialic acid moiety derived from a structure such as:

in which the indices q and e are as discussed above.

Exemplary modified sugars are modified with water-soluble or water-insoluble polymers. Examples of useful polymer are further exemplified below.

In another exemplary embodiment, the peptide is derived from insect cells, remodeled by adding GlcNAc and Gal to the mannose core and glycopegylated using a sialic acid bearing a linear PEG moiety, affording a Factor IX peptide that comprises at least one moiety having the formula:

in which the index t is an integer from 0 to 1; the index s represents an integer from 1 to 10; and the index f represents an integer from 1 to 2500.

Water-Insoluble Polymers

In another embodiment, analogous to those discussed above, the modified sugars include a water-insoluble polymer, rather than a water-soluble polymer. The conjugates of the invention may also include one or more water-insoluble polymers. This embodiment of the invention is illustrated by the use of the conjugate as a vehicle with which to deliver a therapeutic peptide in a controlled manner. Polymeric drug delivery systems are known in the art. See, for example, Dunn et al., Eds. POLYMERIC DRUGS AND DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS, ACS Symposium Series Vol. 469, American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C. 1991. Those of skill in the art will appreciate that substantially any known drug delivery system is applicable to the conjugates of the present invention.

The motifs forth above for R1, L-R1, R15, R15′ and other radicals are equally applicable to water-insoluble polymers, which may be incorporated into the linear and branched structures without limitation utilizing chemistry readily accessible to those of skill in the art. Similarly, the incorporation of these species into any of the modified sugars discussed herein is within the scope of the present invention. Accordingly, the invention provides conjugates containing, and for the use of to prepare such conjugates, sialic acid and other sugar moieties modified with a linear or branched water-insoluble polymers, and activated analogues of the modified sialic acid species (e.g., CMP-Sia-(water insoluble polymer)).

Representative water-insoluble polymers include, but are not limited to, polyphosphazines, poly(vinyl alcohols), polyamides, polycarbonates, polyalkylenes, polyacrylamides, polyalkylene glycols, polyalkylene oxides, polyalkylene terephthalates, polyvinyl ethers, polyvinyl esters, polyvinyl halides, polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyglycolides, polysiloxanes, polyurethanes, poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(ethyl methacrylate), poly(butyl methacrylate), poly(isobutyl methacrylate), poly(hexyl methacrylate), poly(isodecyl methacrylate), poly(lauryl methacrylate), poly(phenyl methacrylate), poly(methyl acrylate), poly(isopropyl acrylate), poly(isobutyl acrylate), poly(octadecyl acrylate) polyethylene, polypropylene, poly(ethylene glycol), poly(ethylene oxide), poly (ethylene terephthalate), poly(vinyl acetate), polyvinyl chloride, polystyrene, polyvinyl pyrrolidone, pluronics and polyvinylphenol and copolymers thereof.

Synthetically modified natural polymers of use in conjugates of the invention include, but are not limited to, alkyl celluloses, hydroxyalkyl celluloses, cellulose ethers, cellulose esters, and nitrocelluloses. Particularly preferred members of the broad classes of synthetically modified natural polymers include, but are not limited to, methyl cellulose, ethyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose, hydroxybutyl methyl cellulose, cellulose acetate, cellulose propionate, cellulose acetate butyrate, cellulose acetate phthalate, carboxymethyl cellulose, cellulose triacetate, cellulose sulfate sodium salt, and polymers of acrylic and methacrylic esters and alginic acid.

These and the other polymers discussed herein can be readily obtained from commercial sources such as Sigma Chemical Co. (St. Louis, Mo.), Polysciences (Warrenton, Pa.), Aldrich (Milwaukee, Wis.), Fluka (Ronkonkoma, N.Y.), and BioRad (Richmond, Calif.), or else synthesized from monomers obtained from these suppliers using standard techniques.

Representative biodegradable polymers of use in the conjugates of the invention include, but are not limited to, polylactides, polyglycolides and copolymers thereof, poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(butyric acid), poly(valeric acid), poly(lactide-co-caprolactone), poly(lactide-co-glycolide), polyanhydrides, polyorthoesters, blends and copolymers thereof. Of particular use are compositions that form gels, such as those including collagen, pluronics and the like.

The polymers of use in the invention include “hybrid’ polymers that include water-insoluble materials having within at least a portion of their structure, a bioresorbable molecule. An example of such a polymer is one that includes a water-insoluble copolymer, which has a bioresorbable region, a hydrophilic region and a plurality of crosslinkable functional groups per polymer chain.

For purposes of the present invention, “water-insoluble materials” includes materials that are substantially insoluble in water or water-containing environments. Thus, although certain regions or segments of the copolymer may be hydrophilic or even water-soluble, the polymer molecule, as a whole, does not to any substantial measure dissolve in water.

For purposes of the present invention, the term “bioresorbable molecule” includes a region that is capable of being metabolized or broken down and resorbed and/or eliminated through normal excretory routes by the body. Such metabolites or break down products are preferably substantially non-toxic to the body.

The bioresorbable region may be either hydrophobic or hydrophilic, so long as the copolymer composition as a whole is not rendered water-soluble. Thus, the bioresorbable region is selected based on the preference that the polymer, as a whole, remains water-insoluble. Accordingly, the relative properties, i.e., the kinds of functional groups contained by, and the relative proportions of the bioresorbable region, and the hydrophilic region are selected to ensure that useful bioresorbable compositions remain water-insoluble.

Exemplary resorbable polymers include, for example, synthetically produced resorbable block copolymers of poly(□-hydroxy-carboxylic acid)/poly(oxyalkylene, (see, Cohn et al., U.S. Pat. No. 4,826,945). These copolymers are not crosslinked and are water-soluble so that the body can excrete the degraded block copolymer compositions. See, Younes et al., J Biomed. Mater. Res. 21: 1301-1316 (1987); and Cohn et al., J Biomed. Mater. Res. 22: 993-1009 (1988).

Presently preferred bioresorbable polymers include one or more components selected from poly(esters), poly(hydroxy acids), poly(lactones), poly(amides), poly(ester-amides), poly (amino acids), poly(anhydrides), poly(orthoesters), poly(carbonates), poly(phosphazines), poly(phosphoesters), poly(thioesters), polysaccharides and mixtures thereof. More preferably still, the bioresorbable polymer includes a poly(hydroxy) acid component. Of the poly(hydroxy) acids, polylactic acid, polyglycolic acid, polycaproic acid, polybutyric acid, polyvaleric acid and copolymers and mixtures thereof are preferred.

In addition to forming fragments that are absorbed in vivo (“bioresorbed”), preferred polymeric coatings for use in the methods of the invention can also form an excretable and/or metabolizable fragment.

Higher order copolymers can also be used in the present invention. For example, Casey et al., U.S. Pat. No. 4,438,253, which issued on Mar. 20, 1984, discloses tri-block copolymers produced from the transesterification of poly(glycolic acid) and an hydroxyl-ended poly(alkylene glycol). Such compositions are disclosed for use as resorbable monofilament sutures. The flexibility of such compositions is controlled by the incorporation of an aromatic orthocarbonate, such as tetra-p-tolyl orthocarbonate into the copolymer structure.

Other polymers based on lactic and/or glycolic acids can also be utilized. For example, Spinu, U.S. Pat. No. 5,202,413, which issued on Apr. 13, 1993, discloses biodegradable multi-block copolymers having sequentially ordered blocks of polylactide and/or polyglycolide produced by ring-opening polymerization of lactide and/or glycolide onto either an oligomeric diol or a diamine residue followed by chain extension with a di-functional compound, such as, a diisocyanate, diacylchloride or dichlorosilane.

Bioresorbable regions of coatings useful in the present invention can be designed to be hydrolytically and/or enzymatically cleavable. For purposes of the present invention, “hydrolytically cleavable” refers to the susceptibility of the copolymer, especially the bioresorbable region, to hydrolysis in water or a water-containing environment. Similarly, “enzymatically cleavable” as used herein refers to the susceptibility of the copolymer, especially the bioresorbable region, to cleavage by endogenous or exogenous enzymes.

When placed within the body, the hydrophilic region can be processed into excretable and/or metabolizable fragments. Thus, the hydrophilic region can include, for example, polyethers, polyalkylene oxides, polyols, poly(vinyl pyrrolidine), poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(alkyl oxazolines), polysaccharides, carbohydrates, peptides, proteins and copolymers and mixtures thereof. Furthermore, the hydrophilic region can also be, for example, a poly(alkylene) oxide. Such poly(alkylene) oxides can include, for example, poly(ethylene) oxide, poly(propylene) oxide and mixtures and copolymers thereof.

Polymers that are components of hydrogels are also useful in the present invention. Hydrogels are polymeric materials that are capable of absorbing relatively large quantities of water. Examples of hydrogel forming compounds include, but are not limited to, polyacrylic acids, sodium carboxymethylcellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl pyrrolidine, gelatin, carrageenan and other polysaccharides, hydroxyethylenemethacrylic acid (HEMA), as well as derivatives thereof, and the like. Hydrogels can be produced that are stable, biodegradable and bioresorbable. Moreover, hydrogel compositions can include subunits that exhibit one or more of these properties.

Bio-compatible hydrogel compositions whose integrity can be controlled through crosslinking are known and are presently preferred for use in the methods of the invention. For example, Hubbell et al., U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,410,016, which issued on Apr. 25, 1995 and 5,529,914, which issued on Jun. 25, 1996, disclose water-soluble systems, which are crosslinked block copolymers having a water-soluble central block segment sandwiched between two hydrolytically labile extensions. Such copolymers are further end-capped with photopolymerizable acrylate functionalities. When crosslinked, these systems become hydrogels. The water soluble central block of such copolymers can include poly(ethylene glycol); whereas, the hydrolytically labile extensions can be a poly(□-hydroxy acid), such as polyglycolic acid or polylactic acid. See, Sawhney et al., Macromolecules 26: 581-587 (1993).

In another preferred embodiment, the gel is a thermoreversible gel. Thermoreversible gels including components, such as pluronics, collagen, gelatin, hyalouronic acid, polysaccharides, polyurethane hydrogel, polyurethane-urea hydrogel and combinations thereof are presently preferred.

In yet another exemplary embodiment, the conjugate of the invention includes a component of a liposome. Liposomes can be prepared according to methods known to those skilled in the art, for example, as described in Eppstein et al., U.S. Pat. No. 4,522,811. For example, liposome formulations may be prepared by dissolving appropriate lipid(s) (such as stearoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine, stearoyl phosphatidyl choline, arachadoyl phosphatidyl choline, and cholesterol) in an inorganic solvent that is then evaporated, leaving behind a thin film of dried lipid on the surface of the container. An aqueous solution of the active compound or its pharmaceutically acceptable salt is then introduced into the container. The container is then swirled by hand to free lipid material from the sides of the container and to disperse lipid aggregates, thereby forming the liposomal suspension.

The above-recited microparticles and methods of preparing the microparticles are offered by way of example and they are not intended to define the scope of microparticles of use in the present invention. It will be apparent to those of skill in the art that an array of microparticles, fabricated by different methods, is of use in the present invention.

The structural formats discussed above in the context of the water-soluble polymers, both straight-chain and branched are generally applicable with respect to the water-insoluble polymers as well. Thus, for example, the cysteine, serine, dilysine, and trilysine branching cores can be functionalized with two water-insoluble polymer moieties. The methods used to produce these species are generally closely analogous to those used to produce the water-soluble polymers.

Biomolecules

In another preferred embodiment, the modified sugar bears a biomolecule. In still further preferred embodiments, the biomolecule is a functional protein, enzyme, antigen, antibody, peptide, nucleic acid (e.g., single nucleotides or nucleosides, oligonucleotides, polynucleotides and single- and higher-stranded nucleic acids), lectin, receptor or a combination thereof.

Preferred biomolecules are essentially non-fluorescent, or emit such a minimal amount of fluorescence that they are inappropriate for use as a fluorescent marker in an assay. Moreover, it is generally preferred to use biomolecules that are not sugars. An exception to this preference is the use of an otherwise naturally occurring sugar that is modified by covalent attachment of another entity (e.g., PEG, biomolecule, therapeutic moiety, diagnostic moiety, etc.). In an exemplary embodiment, a sugar moiety, which is a biomolecule, is conjugated to a linker arm and the sugar-linker arm cassette is subsequently conjugated to a peptide via a method of the invention.

Biomolecules useful in practicing the present invention can be derived from any source. The biomolecules can be isolated from natural sources or they can be produced by synthetic methods. Peptides can be natural peptides or mutated peptides. Mutations can be effected by chemical mutagenesis, site-directed mutagenesis or other means of inducing mutations known to those of skill in the art. Peptides useful in practicing the instant invention include, for example, enzymes, antigens, antibodies and receptors. Antibodies can be either polyclonal or monoclonal; either intact or fragments. The peptides are optionally the products of a program of directed evolution.

Both naturally derived and synthetic peptides and nucleic acids are of use in conjunction with the present invention; these molecules can be attached to a sugar residue component or a crosslinking agent by any available reactive group. For example, peptides can be attached through a reactive amine, carboxyl, sulfhydryl, or hydroxyl group. The reactive group can reside at a peptide terminus or at a site internal to the peptide chain. Nucleic acids can be attached through a reactive group on a base (e.g., exocyclic amine) or an available hydroxyl group on a sugar moiety (e.g., 3′- or 5′-hydroxyl). The peptide and nucleic acid chains can be further derivatized at one or more sites to allow for the attachment of appropriate reactive groups onto the chain. See, Chrisey et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 24: 3031-3039 (1996).

In a further preferred embodiment, the biomolecule is selected to direct the peptide modified by the methods of the invention to a specific tissue, thereby enhancing the delivery of the peptide to that tissue relative to the amount of underivatized peptide that is delivered to the tissue. In a still further preferred embodiment, the amount of derivatized peptide delivered to a specific tissue within a selected time period is enhanced by derivatization by at least about 20%, more preferably, at least about 40%, and more preferably still, at least about 100%. Presently, preferred biomolecules for targeting applications include antibodies, hormones and ligands for cell-surface receptors.

In still a further exemplary embodiment, there is provided as conjugate with biotin. Thus, for example, a selectively biotinylated peptide is elaborated by the attachment of an avidin or streptavidin moiety bearing one or more modifying groups.

The Methods

In addition to the conjugates discussed above, the present invention provides methods for preparing these and other conjugates. Thus, in a further aspect, the invention provides a method of forming a covalent conjugate between a selected moiety and a peptide. Additionally, the invention provides methods for targeting conjugates of the invention to a particular tissue or region of the body. Furthermore, the present invention provides a method for preventing, curing, or ameliorating a disease state by administering a conjugate of the invention to a subject at risk of developing the disease or a subject that has the disease.

In exemplary embodiments, the conjugate is formed between a water-soluble polymer, a therapeutic moiety, targeting moiety or a biomolecule, and a glycosylated or non-glycosylated peptide. The polymer, therapeutic moiety or biomolecule is conjugated to the peptide via an intact glycosyl linking group, which is interposed between, and covalently linked to both the peptide and the modifying group (e.g., water-soluble polymer).

In an exemplary embodiment, the conjugate is formed through a chemical process sometimes referred to as chemoPEGylation. Further discussion of the synthesis chemoPEGylated peptide conjugates is provided in PCT/US02/3226, filed Oct. 9, 2002 and U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/287,994, filed Nov. 5, 2002, each of which are herein incorporated by reference in their entirety.

The method includes contacting the peptide with a mixture containing a modified sugar and a glycosyltransferase for which the modified sugar is a substrate. The reaction is conducted under conditions sufficient to form a covalent bond between the modified sugar and the peptide. The sugar moiety of the modified sugar is preferably selected from nucleotide sugars, activated sugars, and sugars that are neither nucleotides nor activated.

The acceptor peptide (glycosylated or non-glycosylated) is typically synthesized de novo, or recombinantly expressed in a prokaryotic cell (e.g., bacterial cell, such as E. coli) or in a eukaryotic cell such as a mammalian cell (e.g., CHO cells), yeast (e.g., Saccharomyces), insect, or plant cell. The peptide can be either a full-length protein or a fragment. Moreover, the peptide can be a wild type or mutated peptide. In an exemplary embodiment, the peptide includes a mutation that adds one or more consensus glycosylation sites to the peptide sequence.

The method of the invention also provides for modification of incompletely glycosylated peptides that are produced recombinantly. Many recombinantly produced glycoproteins are incompletely glycosylated, exposing carbohydrate residues that may have undesirable properties, e.g., immunogenicity, recognition by the RES. Employing a modified sugar in a method of the invention, the peptide can be simultaneously further glycosylated and derivatized with, e.g., a water-soluble polymer, therapeutic agent, or the like. The sugar moiety of the modified sugar can be the residue that would properly be conjugated to the acceptor in a fully glycosylated peptide, or another sugar moiety with desirable properties.

Peptides modified by the methods of the invention can be synthetic or wild-type peptides or they can be mutated peptides, produced by methods known in the art, such as site-directed mutagenesis. Glycosylation of peptides is typically either N-linked or O-linked. An exemplary N-linkage is the attachment of the modified sugar to the side chain of an asparagine residue. The tripeptide sequences asparagine-X-serine and asparagine-X-threonine, where X is any amino acid except proline, are the recognition sequences for enzymatic attachment of a carbohydrate moiety to the asparagine side chain. Thus, the presence of either of these tripeptide sequences in a polypeptide creates a potential glycosylation site. O-linked glycosylation refers to the attachment of one sugar (e.g., N-aceylgalactosamine, galactose, mannose, GlcNAc, glucose, fucose or xylose) to a the hydroxy side chain of a hydroxyamino acid, preferably serine or threonine, although 5-hydroxyproline or 5-hydroxylysine may also be used.

Addition of glycosylation sites to a peptide or other structure is conveniently accomplished by altering the amino acid sequence such that it contains one or more glycosylation sites. The addition may also be made by the incorporation of one or more species presenting an —OH group, preferably serine or threonine residues, within the sequence of the peptide (for O-linked glycosylation sites). The addition may be made by mutation or by full chemical synthesis of the peptide. The peptide amino acid sequence is preferably altered through changes at the DNA level, particularly by mutating the DNA encoding the peptide at preselected bases such that codons are generated that will translate into the desired amino acids. The DNA mutation(s) are preferably made using methods known in the art.

In an exemplary embodiment, the glycosylation site is added by shuffling polynucleotides. Polynucleotides encoding a candidate peptide can be modulated with DNA shuffling protocols. DNA shuffling is a process of recursive recombination and mutation, performed by random fragmentation of a pool of related genes, followed by reassembly of the fragments by a polymerase chain reaction-like process. See, e.g., Stemmer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91:10747-10751 (1994); Stemmer, Nature 370:389-391 (1994); and U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,605,793, 5,837,458, 5,830,721 and 5,811,238.

The present invention also provides means of adding (or removing) one or more selected glycosyl residues to a peptide, after which a modified sugar is conjugated to at least one of the selected glycosyl residues of the peptide. The present embodiment is useful, for example, when it is desired to conjugate the modified sugar to a selected glycosyl residue that is either not present on a peptide or is not present in a desired amount. Thus, prior to coupling a modified sugar to a peptide, the selected glycosyl residue is conjugated to the peptide by enzymatic or chemical coupling. In another embodiment, the glycosylation pattern of a glycopeptide is altered prior to the conjugation of the modified sugar by the removal of a carbohydrate residue from the glycopeptide. See, for example WO 98/31826.

Addition or removal of any carbohydrate moieties present on the glycopeptide is accomplished either chemically or enzymatically. Chemical deglycosylation is preferably brought about by exposure of the polypeptide variant to the compound trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, or an equivalent compound. This treatment results in the cleavage of most or all sugars except the linking sugar (N-acetylglucosamine or N-acetylgalactosamine), while leaving the peptide intact. Chemical deglycosylation is described by Hakimuddin et al., Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 259: 52 (1987) and by Edge et al., Anal. Biochem. 118: 131 (1981). Enzymatic cleavage of carbohydrate moieties on polypeptide variants can be achieved by the use of a variety of endo- and exo-glycosidases as described by Thotakura et al., Meth. Enzymol. 138: 350 (1987).

Chemical addition of glycosyl moieties is carried out by any art-recognized method. Enzymatic addition of sugar moieties is preferably achieved using a modification of the methods set forth herein, substituting native glycosyl units for the modified sugars used in the invention. Other methods of adding sugar moieties are disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,876,980, 6,030,815, 5,728,554, and 5,922,577.

Exemplary attachment points for selected glycosyl residue include, but are not limited to: (a) consensus sites for N-linked glycosylation and O-linked glycosylation; (b) terminal glycosyl moieties that are acceptors for a glycosyltransferase; (c) arginine, asparagine and histidine; (d) free carboxyl groups; (e) free sulfhydryl groups such as those of cysteine; (f) free hydroxyl groups such as those of serine, threonine, or hydroxyproline; (g) aromatic residues such as those of phenylalanine, tyrosine, or tryptophan; or (h) the amide group of glutamine. Exemplary methods of use in the present invention are described in WO 87/05330 published Sep. 11, 1987, and in Aplin and Wriston, CRC CRIT. REV. BIOCHEM., pp. 259-306 (1981).

In one embodiment, the invention provides a method for linking Factor IX and one or more peptide through a linking group. The linking group is of any useful structure and may be selected from straight-chain and branched chain structures. Preferably, each terminus of the linker, which is attached to a peptide, includes a modified sugar (i.e., a nascent intact glycosyl linking group).

In an exemplary method of the invention, two peptides are linked together via a linker moiety that includes a PEG linker. The construct conforms to the general structure set forth in the cartoon above. As described herein, the construct of the invention includes two intact glycosyl linking groups (i.e., s+t=1). The focus on a PEG linker that includes two glycosyl groups is for purposes of clarity and should not be interpreted as limiting the identity of linker arms of use in this embodiment of the invention.

Thus, a PEG moiety is functionalized at a first terminus with a first glycosyl unit and at a second terminus with a second glycosyl unit. The first and second glycosyl units are preferably substrates for different transferases, allowing orthogonal attachment of the first and second peptides to the first and second glycosyl units, respectively. In practice, the (glycosyl)1-PEG-(glycosyl)2 linker is contacted with the first peptide and a first transferase for which the first glycosyl unit is a substrate, thereby forming (peptide)1-(glycosyl)1-PEG-(glycosyl)2. Glycosyltransferase and/or unreacted peptide is then optionally removed from the reaction mixture. The second peptide and a second transferase for which the second glycosyl unit is a substrate are added to the (peptide)1-(glycosyl)1-PEG-(glycosyl)2 conjugate, forming (peptide)1-(glycosyl)1-PEG-(glycosyl)2-(peptide)2. Those of skill in the art will appreciate that the method outlined above is also applicable to forming conjugates between more than two peptides by, for example, the use of a branched PEG, dendrimer, poly(amino acid), polysaccharide or the like.

Another exemplary embodiment is set forth in Scheme 1. Scheme 1 shows a method of preparing a conjugate comprising a polymer. The polymer increases the circulatory half-life of the Factor IX protein.

in which SA is sialic acid, and polymer is PEG, mPEG, poly sialic acid, a water soluble or water insoluble polymer. Though the method is exemplified by reference to a Factor IX mutant, those of skill will appreciate it is equally applicable to wild-type Factor IX peptides.

The use of reactive derivatives of PEG (or other linkers) to attach one or more peptide moieties to the linker is within the scope of the present invention. The invention is not limited by the identity of the reactive PEG analogue. Many activated derivatives of poly(ethyleneglycol) are available commercially and in the literature. It is well within the abilities of one of skill to choose, and synthesize if necessary, an appropriate activated PEG derivative with which to prepare a substrate useful in the present invention. See, Abuchowski et al. Cancer Biochem. Biophys., 7: 175-186 (1984); Abuchowski et al., J. Biol. Chem., 252: 3582-3586 (1977); Jackson et al., Anal. Biochem., 165: 114-127 (1987); Koide et al., Biochem Biophys. Res. Commun., 111: 659-667 (1983)), tresylate (Nilsson et al., Methods Enzymol., 104: 56-69 (1984); Delgado et al., Biotechnol. Appl. Biochem., 12: 119-128 (1990)); N-hydroxysuccinimide derived active esters (Buckmann et al., Makromol. Chem., 182: 1379-1384 (1981); Joppich et al., Makromol. Chem., 180: 1381-1384 (1979); Abuchowski et al., Cancer Biochem. Biophys., 7: 175-186 (1984); Katre et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 84: 1487-1491 (1987); Kitamura et al., Cancer Res., 51: 4310-4315 (1991); Boccu et al., Z. Naturforsch., 38C: 94-99 (1983), carbonates (Zalipsky et al., POLY(ETHYLENE GLYCOL) CHEMISTRY: BIOTECHNICAL AND BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS, Harris, Ed., Plenum Press, New York, 1992, pp. 347-370; Zalipsky et al., Biotechnol. Appl. Biochem., 15: 100-114 (1992); Veronese et al., Appl. Biochem. Biotech., 11: 141-152 (1985)), imidazolyl formates (Beauchamp et al., Anal. Biochem., 131: 25-33 (1983); Berger et al., Blood, 71: 1641-1647 (1988)), 4-dithiopyridines (Woghiren et al., Bioconjugate Chem., 4: 314-318 (1993)), isocyanates (Byun et al., ASAIO Journal, M649-M-653 (1992)) and epoxides (U.S. Pat. No. 4,806,595, issued to Noishiki et al., (1989). Other linking groups include the urethane linkage between amino groups and activated PEG. See, Veronese, et al., Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol., 11: 141-152 (1985).

Preparation of Modified Sugars

In general, the sugar moiety and the modifying group are linked together through the use of reactive groups, which are typically transformed by the linking process into a new organic functional group or species that is unreactive under physiologically relevant conditions. The sugar reactive functional group(s), is located at any position on the sugar moiety. Reactive groups and classes of reactions useful in practicing the present invention are generally those that are well known in the art of bioconjugate chemistry. Currently favored classes of reactions available with reactive sugar moieties are those, which proceed under relatively mild conditions. These include, but are not limited to nucleophilic substitutions (e.g., reactions of amines and alcohols with acyl halides, active esters), electrophilic substitutions (e.g., enamine reactions) and additions to carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom multiple bonds (e.g., Michael reaction, Diels-Alder addition). These and other useful reactions are discussed in, for example, March, ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY, 3rd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1985; Hermanson, BIOCONJUGATE TECHNIQUES, Academic Press, San Diego, 1996; and Feeney et al., MODIFICATION OF PROTEINS; Advances in Chemistry Series, Vol. 198, American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C., 1982.

Useful reactive functional groups pendent from a sugar nucleus or modifying group include, but are not limited to:

    • (a) carboxyl groups and various derivatives thereof including, but not limited to, N-hydroxysuccinimide esters, N-hydroxybenzotriazole esters, acid halides, acyl imidazoles, thioesters, p-nitrophenyl esters, alkyl, alkenyl, alkynyl and aromatic esters;
    • (b) hydroxyl groups, which can be converted to, e.g., esters, ethers, aldehydes, etc.
    • (c) haloalkyl groups, wherein the halide can be later displaced with a nucleophilic group such as, for example, an amine, a carboxylate anion, thiol anion, carbanion, or an alkoxide ion, thereby resulting in the covalent attachment of a new group at the functional group of the halogen atom;
    • (d) dienophile groups, which are capable of participating in Diels-Alder reactions such as, for example, maleimido groups;
    • (e) aldehyde or ketone groups, such that subsequent derivatization is possible via formation of carbonyl derivatives such as, for example, imines, hydrazones, semicarbazones or oximes, or via such mechanisms as Grignard addition or alkyllithium addition;
    • (f) sulfonyl halide groups for subsequent reaction with amines, for example, to form sulfonamides;
    • (g) thiol groups, which can be, for example, converted to disulfides or reacted with acyl halides;
    • (h) amine or sulfhydryl groups, which can be, for example, acylated, alkylated or oxidized;
    • (i) alkenes, which can undergo, for example, cycloadditions, acylation, Michael addition, etc; and
    • (j) epoxides, which can react with, for example, amines and hydroxyl compounds.

The reactive functional groups can be chosen such that they do not participate in, or interfere with, the reactions necessary to assemble the reactive sugar nucleus or modifying group. Alternatively, a reactive functional group can be protected from participating in the reaction by the presence of a protecting group. Those of skill in the art understand how to protect a particular functional group such that it does not interfere with a chosen set of reaction conditions. For examples of useful protecting groups, see, for example, Greene et al., PROTECTIVE GROUPS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1991.

In the discussion that follows, a number of specific examples of modified sugars that are useful in practicing the present invention are set forth. In the exemplary embodiments, a sialic acid derivative is utilized as the sugar nucleus to which the modifying group is attached. The focus of the discussion on sialic acid derivatives is for clarity of illustration only and should not be construed to limit the scope of the invention. Those of skill in the art will appreciate that a variety of other sugar moieties can be activated and derivatized in a manner analogous to that set forth using sialic acid as an example. For example, numerous methods are available for modifying galactose, glucose, N-acetylgalactosamine and fucose to name a few sugar substrates, which are readily modified by art recognized methods. See, for example, Elhalabi et al., Curr. Med. Chem. 6: 93 (1999); and Schafer et al., J. Org. Chem. 65: 24 (2000)).

In an exemplary embodiment, the peptide that is modified by a method of the invention is a glycopeptide that is produced in prokaryotic cells (e.g., E. coli), eukaryotic cells including yeast and mammalian cells (e.g., CHO cells), or in a transgenic animal and thus, contains N- and/or O-linked oligosaccharide chains, which are incompletely sialylated. The oligosaccharide chains of the glycopeptide lacking a sialic acid and containing a terminal galactose residue can be PEG-ylated, PPG-ylated or otherwise modified with a modified sialic acid.

Exemplary PEG-sialic acid derivatives include:

in which L is a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl or substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl linker moiety joining the sialic acid moiety and the PEG moiety, and “n” is 1 or greater; and

in which the index “s” represents an integer from 0 to 20, and “n” is 1 or greater.

In Scheme 2, the amino glycoside 1, is treated with the active ester of a protected amino acid (e.g., glycine) derivative, converting the sugar amine residue into the corresponding protected amino acid amide adduct. The adduct is treated with an aldolase to form □-hydroxy carboxylate 2. Compound 2 is converted to the corresponding CMP derivative by the action of CMP-SA synthetase, followed by catalytic hydrogenation of the CMP derivative to produce compound 3. The amine introduced via formation of the glycine adduct is utilized as a locus of PEG attachment by reacting compound 3 with an activated PEG or PPG derivative (e.g., PEG-C(O)NHS, PEG-OC(O)O-p-nitrophenyl), producing species such as 4 or 5, respectively.

Table 1 sets forth representative examples of sugar monophosphates that are derivatized with a modifying group, such as a PEG or PPG moiety. Factor IX peptides can be modified by the method of Scheme 2. Other derivatives are prepared by art-recognized methods. See, for example, Keppler et al., Glycobiology 11: 11R (2001); and Charter et al., Glycobiology 10: 1049 (2000)). Other amine reactive PEG and PPG analogues are commercially available, or they can be prepared by methods readily accessible to those of skill in the art.

TABLE 1

wherein R represents a modifying group, e.g., linear or branched PEG or -Lx-Rx in which Lx is a linker selected from a bond (zero-order), substituted or unsubstituted alkyl and substituted or unsubstituted heteroalkyl, and Rx is the modifying group.

The modified sugar phosphates of use in practicing the present invention can be substituted in other positions as well as those set forth above. Presently preferred substitutions of sialic acid are set forth in the following formula:

in which X is a linking group, which is preferably selected from —O—, —N(H)—, —S, CH2—, and —N(R)2, in which each R is a member independently selected from R1-R5. The symbols Y, Z, A and B each represent a group that is selected from the group set forth above for the identity of X. X, Y, Z, A and B are each independently selected and, therefore, they can be the same or different. The symbols R1, R2, R3, R4 and R5 represent H, a water-soluble polymer, therapeutic moiety, biomolecule or other moiety. Alternatively, these symbols represent a linker that is bound to a water-soluble polymer, therapeutic moiety, biomolecule or other moiety.

Exemplary moieties attached to the conjugates disclosed herein include, but are not limited to, PEG derivatives (e.g., alkyl-PEG, acyl-PEG, acyl-alkyl-PEG, alkyl-acyl-PEG carbamoyl-PEG, aryl-PEG), PPG derivatives (e.g., alkyl-PPG, acyl-PPG, acyl-alkyl-PPG, alkyl-acyl-PPG carbamoyl-PPG, aryl-PPG), therapeutic moieties, diagnostic moieties, mannose-6-phosphate, heparin, heparan, SLex, mannose, mannose-6-phosphate, Sialyl Lewis X, FGF, VFGF, proteins, chondroitin, keratan, dermatan, albumin, integrins, antennary oligosaccharides, peptides and the like. Methods of conjugating the various modifying groups to a saccharide moiety are readily accessible to those of skill in the art (POLY (ETHYLENE GLYCOL CHEMISTRY: BIOTECHNICAL AND BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS, J. Milton Harris, Ed., Plenum Pub. Corp., 1992; POLY(ETHYLENE GLYCOL) CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS, J. Milton Harris, Ed., ACS Symposium Series No. 680, American Chemical Society, 1997; Hermanson, BIOCONJUGATE TECHNIQUES, Academic Press, San Diego, 1996; and Dunn et al., Eds. POLYMERIC DRUGS AND DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS, ACS Symposium Series Vol. 469, American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C. 1991).

Cross-Linking Groups

Preparation of the modified sugar for use in the methods of the present invention includes attachment of a modifying group to a sugar residue and forming a stable adduct, which is a substrate for a glycosyltransferase. The sugar and modifying group can be coupled by a zero- or higher-order cross-linking agent. Exemplary bifunctional compounds which can be used for attaching modifying groups to carbohydrate moieties include, but are not limited to, bifunctional poly(ethyleneglycols), polyamides, polyethers, polyesters and the like. General approaches for linking carbohydrates to other molecules are known in the literature. See, for example, Lee et al., Biochemistry 28: 1856 (1989); Bhatia et al., Anal. Biochem. 178: 408 (1989); Janda et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 112: 8886 (1990) and Bednarski et al., WO 92/18135.

A variety of reagents are used to modify the components of the modified sugar with intramolecular chemical crosslinks (for reviews of crosslinking reagents and crosslinking procedures see: Wold, F., Meth. Enzymol. 25: 623-651, 1972; Weetall, H. H., and Cooney, D. A., In: ENZYMES AS DRUGS. (Holcenberg, and Roberts, eds.) pp. 395-442, Wiley, New York, 1981; Ji, T. H., Meth. Enzymol. 91: 580-609, 1983; Mattson et al., Mol. Biol. Rep. 17: 167-183, 1993, all of which are incorporated herein by reference). Preferred crosslinking reagents are derived from various zero-length, homo-bifunctional, and hetero-bifunctional crosslinking reagents. Zero-length crosslinking reagents include direct conjugation of two intrinsic chemical groups with no introduction of extrinsic material. Agents that catalyze formation of a disulfide bond belong to this category. Another example is reagents that induce condensation of a carboxyl and a primary amino group to form an amide bond such as carbodiimides, ethylchloroformate, Woodward's reagent K (2-ethyl-5-phenylisoxazolium-3′-sulfonate), and carbonyldiimidazole. In addition to these chemical reagents, the enzyme transglutaminase (glutamyl-peptide γ-glutamyltransferase; EC 2.3.2.13) may be used as zero-length crosslinking reagent. This enzyme catalyzes acyl transfer reactions at carboxamide groups of protein-bound glutaminyl residues, usually with a primary amino group as substrate. Preferred homo- and hetero-bifunctional reagents contain two identical or two dissimilar sites, respectively, which may be reactive for amino, sulfhydryl, guanidino, indole, or nonspecific groups.

In still another embodiment, the invention utilizes photoactivatable groups, for example, those that are selected from diazopyruvates. For example, the p-nitrophenyl ester of p-nitrophenyl diazopyruvate reacts with aliphatic amines to give diazopyruvic acid amides that undergo ultraviolet photolysis to form aldehydes. The photolyzed diazopyruvate-modified affinity component will react like formaldehyde or glutaraldehyde forming crosslinks.

Cleavable Linker Groups

In yet a further embodiment, the linker group is provided with a group that can be cleaved to release the modifying group from the sugar residue. Many cleaveable groups are known in the art. See, for example, Jung et al., Biochem. Biophys. Acta 761: 152-162 (1983); Joshi et al., J. Biol. Chem. 265: 14518-14525 (1990); Zarling et al., J. Immunol. 124: 913-920 (1980); Bouizar et al., Eur. J. Biochem. 155: 141-147 (1986); Park et al., J. Biol. Chem. 261: 205-210 (1986); Browning et al., J. Immunol. 143: 1859-1867 (1989). Moreover a broad range of cleavable, bifunctional (both homo- and hetero-bifunctional) linker groups is commercially available from suppliers such as Pierce.

Exemplary cleaveable moieties can be cleaved using light, heat or reagents such as thiols, hydroxylamine, bases, periodate and the like. Moreover, certain preferred groups are cleaved in vivo in response to being endocytized (e.g., cis-aconityl; see, Shen et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 102: 1048 (1991)). Preferred cleaveable groups comprise a cleaveable moiety which is a member selected from the group consisting of disulfide, ester, imide, carbonate, nitrobenzyl, phenacyl and benzoin groups.

Conjugation of Modified Sugars to Peptides

The modified sugars are conjugated to a glycosylated or non-glycosylated peptide using an appropriate enzyme to mediate the conjugation. Preferably, the concentrations of the modified donor sugar(s), enzyme(s) and acceptor peptide(s) are selected such that glycosylation proceeds until the acceptor is consumed. The considerations discussed below, while set forth in the context of a sialyltransferase, are generally applicable to other glycosyltransferase reactions.

A number of methods of using glycosyltransferases to synthesize desired oligosaccharide structures are known and are generally applicable to the instant invention. Exemplary methods are described, for instance, WO 96/32491, Ito et al., Pure Appl. Chem. 65: 753 (1993), and U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,352,670, 5,374,541, and 5,545,553.

The present invention is practiced using a single glycosyltransferase or a combination of glycosyltransferases. For example, one can use a combination of a sialyltransferase and a galactosyltransferase. In those embodiments using more than one enzyme, the enzymes and substrates are preferably combined in an initial reaction mixture, or the enzymes and reagents for a second enzymatic reaction are added to the reaction medium once the first enzymatic reaction is complete or nearly complete. By conducting two enzymatic reactions in sequence in a single vessel, overall yields are improved over procedures in which an intermediate species is isolated. Moreover, cleanup and disposal of extra solvents and by-products is reduced.

In a preferred embodiment, each of the first and second enzyme is a glycosyltransferase. In another preferred embodiment, one enzyme is an endoglycosidase. In an additional preferred embodiment, more than two enzymes are used to assemble the modified glycoprotein of the invention. The enzymes are used to alter a saccharide structure on the peptide at any point either before or after the addition of the modified sugar to the peptide.

In another embodiment, the method makes use of one or more exo- or endoglycosidase. The glycosidase is typically a mutant, which is engineered to form glycosyl bonds rather than cleave them. The mutant glycanase typically includes a substitution of an amino acid residue for an active site acidic amino acid residue. For example, when the endoglycanase is endo-H, the substituted active site residues will typically be Asp at position 130, Glu at position 132 or a combination thereof. The amino acids are generally replaced with serine, alanine, asparagine, or glutamine.

The mutant enzyme catalyzes the reaction, usually by a synthesis step that is analogous to the reverse reaction of the endoglycanase hydrolysis step. In these embodiments, the glycosyl donor molecule (e.g., a desired oligo- or mono-saccharide structure) contains a leaving group and the reaction proceeds with the addition of the donor molecule to a GlcNAc residue on the protein. For example, the leaving group can be a halogen, such as fluoride. In other embodiments, the leaving group is a Asn, or a Asn-peptide moiety. In yet further embodiments, the GlcNAc residue on the glycosyl donor molecule is modified. For example, the GlcNAc residue may comprise a 1,2 oxazoline moiety.

In a preferred embodiment, each of the enzymes utilized to produce a conjugate of the invention are present in a catalytic amount. The catalytic amount of a particular enzyme varies according to the concentration of that enzyme's substrate as well as to reaction conditions such as temperature, time and pH value. Means for determining the catalytic amount for a given enzyme under preselected substrate concentrations and reaction conditions are well known to those of skill in the art.

The temperature at which an above process is carried out can range from just above freezing to the temperature at which the most sensitive enzyme denatures. Preferred temperature ranges are about 0° C. to about 55° C., and more preferably about 20° C. to about 30° C. In another exemplary embodiment, one or more components of the present method are conducted at an elevated temperature using a thermophilic enzyme.

The reaction mixture is maintained for a period of time sufficient for the acceptor to be glycosylated, thereby forming the desired conjugate. Some of the conjugate can often be detected after a few hours, with recoverable amounts usually being obtained within 24 hours r less. Those of skill in the art understand that the rate of reaction is dependent on a number of variable factors (e.g., enzyme concentration, donor concentration, acceptor concentration, temperature, solvent volume), which are optimized for a selected system.

The present invention also provides for the industrial-scale production of modified peptides. As used herein, an industrial scale generally produces at least about 250 mg, preferably at least about 500 mg, and more preferably at least about 1 gram of finished, purified conjugate, preferably after a single reaction cycle, i.e., the conjugate is not a combination the reaction products from identical, consecutively iterated synthesis cycles.

In the discussion that follows, the invention is exemplified by the conjugation of modified sialic acid moieties to a glycosylated peptide. The exemplary modified sialic acid is labeled with m-PEG. The focus of the following discussion on the use of PEG-modified sialic acid and glycosylated peptides is for clarity of illustration and is not intended to imply that the invention is limited to the conjugation of these two partners. One of skill understands that the discussion is generally applicable to the additions of modified glycosyl moieties other than sialic acid. Moreover, the discussion is equally applicable to the modification of a glycosyl unit with agents other than m-PEG including other water-soluble polymers, therapeutic moieties, and biomolecules.

An enzymatic approach can be used for the selective introduction of PEGylated or PPGylated carbohydrates onto a peptide or glycopeptide. The method utilizes modified sugars containing PEG, PPG, or a masked reactive functional group, and is combined with the appropriate glycosyltransferase or glycosynthase. By selecting the glycosyltransferase that will make the desired carbohydrate linkage and utilizing the modified sugar as the donor substrate, the PEG or PPG can be introduced directly onto the peptide backbone, onto existing sugar residues of a glycopeptide or onto sugar residues that have been added to a peptide.

An acceptor for the sialyltransferase is present on the peptide to be modified by the methods of the present invention either as a naturally occurring structure or one placed there recombinantly, enzymatically or chemically. Suitable acceptors, include, for example, galactosyl acceptors such as Gal□1,4GlcNAc, Gal□1,4GalNAc, Gal□1,3GalNAc, lacto-N-tetraose, Gal□1,3GlcNAc, GalNAc, Gal□1,3GalNAc, Gal□1,6GlcNAc, Gal□1,4Glc (lactose), and other acceptors known to those of skill in the art (see, e.g., Paulson et al., J. Biol. Chem. 253: 5617-5624 (1978)).

In one embodiment, an acceptor for the sialyltransferase is present on the glycopeptide to be modified upon in vivo synthesis of the glycopeptide. Such glycopeptides can be sialylated using the claimed methods without prior modification of the glycosylation pattern of the glycopeptide. Alternatively, the methods of the invention can be used to sialylate a peptide that does not include a suitable acceptor; one first modifies the peptide to include an acceptor by methods known to those of skill in the art. In an exemplary embodiment, a GalNAc residue is added by the action of a GalNAc transferase.

In an exemplary embodiment, the galactosyl acceptor is assembled by attaching a galactose residue to an appropriate acceptor linked to the peptide, e.g., a GalNAc. The method includes incubating the peptide to be modified with a reaction mixture that contains a suitable amount of a galactosyltransferase (e.g., Galβ1,3 or Galβ1,4), and a suitable galactosyl donor (e.g., UDP-galactose). The reaction is allowed to proceed substantially to completion or, alternatively, the reaction is terminated when a preselected amount of the galactose residue is added. Other methods of assembling a selected saccharide acceptor will be apparent to those of skill in the art.

In yet another embodiment, glycopeptide-linked oligosaccharides are first “trimmed,” either in whole or in part, to expose either an acceptor for the sialyltransferase or a moiety to which one or more appropriate residues can be added to obtain a suitable acceptor. Enzymes such as glycosyltransferases and endoglycosidases (see, for example U.S. Pat. No. 5,716,812) are useful for the attaching and trimming reactions.

In the discussion that follows, the method of the invention is exemplified by the use of modified sugars having a water-soluble polymer attached thereto. The focus of the discussion is for clarity of illustration. Those of skill will appreciate that the discussion is equally relevant to those embodiments in which the modified sugar bears a therapeutic moiety, biomolecule or the like.

In an exemplary embodiment, an O-linked carbohydrate residue is “trimmed” prior to the addition of the modified sugar. For example a GalNAc-Gal residue is trimmed back to GalNAc. A modified sugar bearing a water-soluble polymer is conjugated to one or more of the sugar residues exposed by the “trimming.” In one example, a glycopeptide is “trimmed” and a water-soluble polymer is added to the resulting O-side chain amino acid or glycopeptide glycan via a saccharyl moiety, e.g., Sia, Gal, or GalNAc moiety conjugated to the water-soluble polymer. The modified saccharyl moiety is attached to an acceptor site on the “trimmed” glycopeptide. Alternatively, an unmodified saccharyl moiety, e.g., Gal can be added the terminus of the O-linked glycan.

In another exemplary embodiment, a water-soluble polymer is added to a GalNAc residue via a modified sugar having a galactose residue. Alternatively, an unmodified Gal can be added to the terminal GalNAc residue.

In yet a further example, a water-soluble polymer is added onto a Gal residue using a modified sialic acid.

In another exemplary embodiment, an O-linked glycosyl residue is “trimmed back” to the GalNAc attached to the amino acid. In one example, a water-soluble polymer is added via a Gal modified with the polymer. Alternatively, an unmodified Gal is added to the GalNAc, followed by a Gal with an attached water-soluble polymer. In yet another embodiment, one or more unmodified Gal residue is added to the GalNAc, followed by a sialic acid moiety modified with a water-soluble polymer.

Using the methods of the invention, it is possible to “trim back” and build up a carbohydrate residue of substantially any desired structure. The modified sugar can be added to the termini of the carbohydrate moiety as set forth above, or it can be intermediate between the peptide core and the terminus of the carbohydrate.

In an exemplary embodiment, the water-soluble polymer is added to a terminal Gal residue using a polymer modified sialic acid. An appropriate sialyltransferase is used to add a modified sialic acid. The approach is summarized in Scheme 3.

In yet a further approach, summarized in Scheme 4, a masked reactive functionality is present on the sialic acid. The masked reactive group is preferably unaffected by the conditions used to attach the modified sialic acid to the peptide. After the covalent attachment of the modified sialic acid to the peptide, the mask is removed and the peptide is conjugated with an agent such as PEG, PPG, a therapeutic moiety, biomolecule or other agent. The agent is conjugated to the peptide in a specific manner by its reaction with the unmasked reactive group on the modified sugar residue.

Any modified sugar can be used with its appropriate glycosyltransferase, depending on the terminal sugars of the oligosaccharide side chains of the glycopeptide (Table 2). As discussed above, the terminal sugar of the glycopeptide required for introduction of the PEG-ylated or PPG-ylated structure can be introduced naturally during expression or it can be produced post expression using the appropriate glycosidase(s), glycosyltransferase(s) or mix of glycosidase(s) and glycosyltransferase(s).

TABLE 2
X = O, NH, S, CH2, N—(R1−5)2.
Y = X; Z = X; A = X; B = X.
Q = H2, O, S, NH, N—R.
R, R1−4 = H, Linker-M, M.
M = Ligand of interest
Ligand of interest = acyl-PEG, acyl-PPG, alkyl-PEG, acyl-alkyl-PEG, acyl-alkyl-PEG, carbamoyl-PEG, carbamoyl-PPG, PEG, PPG, acyl-aryl-PEG, acyl-aryl-PPG, aryl-PEG, aryl-PPG, Mannose-6-phosphate, heparin, heparan, SLex, Mannose, FGF, VFGF, protein, chondroitin, keratan, dermatan, albumin, integrins, peptides, etc.

In a further exemplary embodiment, UDP-galactose-PEG is reacted with bovine milk □1,4-galactosyltransferase, thereby transferring the modified galactose to the appropriate terminal N-acetylglucosamine structure. The terminal GlcNAc residues on the glycopeptide may be produced during expression, as may occur in such expression systems as mammalian, insect, plant or fungus, but also can be produced by treating the glycopeptide with a sialidase and/or glycosidase and/or glycosyltransferase, as required.

In another exemplary embodiment, a GlcNAc transferase, such as GNT1-5, is utilized to transfer PEGylated-GlcN to a terminal mannose residue on a glycopeptide. In a still further exemplary embodiment, an the N- and/or O-linked glycan structures are enzymatically removed from a glycopeptide to expose an amino acid or a terminal glycosyl residue that is subsequently conjugated with the modified sugar. For example, an endoglycanase is used to remove the N-linked structures of a glycopeptide to expose a terminal GlcNAc as a GlcNAc-linked-Asn on the glycopeptide. UDP-Gal-PEG and the appropriate galactosyltransferase is used to introduce the PEG- or PPG-galactose functionality onto the exposed GlcNAc.

In an alternative embodiment, the modified sugar is added directly to the peptide backbone using a glycosyltransferase known to transfer sugar residues to the peptide backbone. This exemplary embodiment is set forth in Scheme 5. Exemplary glycosyltransferases useful in practicing the present invention include, but are not limited to, GalNAc transferases (GalNAc T1-20), GlcNAc transferases, fucosyltransferases, glucosyltransferases, xylosyltransferases, mannosyltransferases and the like. Use of this approach allows the direct addition of modified sugars onto peptides that lack any carbohydrates or, alternatively, onto existing glycopeptides. In both cases, the addition of the modified sugar occurs at specific positions on the peptide backbone as defined by the substrate specificity of the glycosyltransferase and not in a random manner as occurs during modification of a protein's peptide backbone using chemical methods. An array of agents can be introduced into proteins or glycopeptides that lack the glycosyltransferase substrate peptide sequence by engineering the appropriate amino acid sequence into the polypeptide chain.

In each of the exemplary embodiments set forth above, one or more additional chemical or enzymatic modification steps can be utilized following the conjugation of the modified sugar to the peptide. In an exemplary embodiment, an enzyme (e.g., fucosyltransferase) is used to append a glycosyl unit (e.g., fucose) onto the terminal modified sugar attached to the peptide. In another example, an enzymatic reaction is utilized to “cap” (e.g., sialylate) sites to which the modified sugar failed to conjugate. Alternatively, a chemical reaction is utilized to alter the structure of the conjugated modified sugar. For example, the conjugated modified sugar is reacted with agents that stabilize or destabilize its linkage with the peptide component to which the modified sugar is attached. In another example, a component of the modified sugar is deprotected following its conjugation to the peptide. One of skill will appreciate that there is an array of enzymatic and chemical procedures that are useful in the methods of the invention at a stage after the modified sugar is conjugated to the peptide. Further elaboration of the modified sugar-peptide conjugate is within the scope of the invention.

Purification of Factor IX Conjugates

The products produced by the above processes can be used without purification. However, it is usually preferred to recover the product and one or more of the intermediates, e.g., nucleotide sugars, branched and linear PEG species, modified sugars and modified nucleotide sugars. Standard, well-known techniques for recovery of glycosylated saccharides such as thin or thick layer chromatography, column chromatography, ion exchange chromatography, or membrane filtration can be used. It is preferred to use membrane filtration, more preferably utilizing a reverse osmotic membrane, or one or more column chromatographic techniques for the recovery as is discussed hereinafter and in the literature cited herein. For instance, membrane filtration wherein the membranes have molecular weight cutoff of about 3000 to about 10,000 can be used to remove proteins such as glycosyl transferases.

If the peptide is produced intracellularly, as a first step, the particulate debris, either host cells or lysed fragments, is removed. Following glycoPEGylation, the PEGylated peptide is purified by art-recognized methods, for example, by centrifugation or ultrafiltration; optionally, the protein may be concentrated with a commercially available protein concentration filter, followed by separating the polypeptide variant from other impurities by one or more steps selected from immunoaffinity chromatography, ion-exchange column fractionation (e.g., on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) or matrices containing carboxymethyl or sulfopropyl groups), chromatography on Blue-Sepharose, CM Blue-Sepharose, MONO-Q, MONO-S, lentil lectin-Sepharose, WGA-Sepharose, Con A-Sepharose, Ether Toyopearl, Butyl Toyopearl, Phenyl Toyopearl, or protein A Sepharose, SDS-PAGE chromatography, silica chromatography, chromatofocusing, reverse phase HPLC (e.g., silica gel with appended aliphatic groups), gel filtration using, e.g., Sephadex molecular sieve or size-exclusion chromatography, chromatography on columns that selectively bind the polypeptide, and ethanol or ammonium sulfate precipitation.

Modified glycopeptides produced in culture are usually isolated by initial extraction from cells, enzymes, etc., followed by one or more concentration, salting-out, aqueous ion-exchange, or size-exclusion chromatography steps. Additionally, the modified glycoprotein may be purified by affinity chromatography. Finally, HPLC may be employed for final purification steps.

A protease inhibitor, e.g., methylsulfonylfluoride (PMSF) may be included in any of the foregoing steps to inhibit proteolysis and antibiotics or preservatives may be included to prevent the growth of adventitious contaminants. In an exemplary embodiment, the protease inhibitor is antipain.

Within another embodiment, supernatants from systems which produce the modified glycopeptide of the invention are first concentrated using a commercially available protein concentration filter, for example, an Amicon or Millipore Pellicon ultrafiltration unit. Following the concentration step, the concentrate may be applied to a suitable purification matrix. For example, a suitable affinity matrix may comprise a ligand for the peptide, a lectin or antibody molecule bound to a suitable support. Alternatively, an anion-exchange resin may be employed, for example, a matrix or substrate having pendant DEAE groups. Suitable matrices include acrylamide, agarose, dextran, cellulose, or other types commonly employed in protein purification. Alternatively, a cation-exchange step may be employed. Suitable cation exchangers include various insoluble matrices comprising sulfopropyl or carboxymethyl groups. Sulfopropyl groups are particularly preferred.

Other methods of use in purification include size exclusion chromatography (SEC), hydroxyapatite chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography and chromatography on Blue Sepharose.

One or more RP-HPLC steps employing hydrophobic RP-HPLC media, e.g., silica gel having pendant methyl or other aliphatic groups, may be employed to further purify a polypeptide conjugate composition. Some or all of the foregoing purification steps, in various combinations, can also be employed to provide a homogeneous or essentially homogeneous modified glycoprotein.

The modified glycopeptide of the invention resulting from a large-scale fermentation may be purified by methods analogous to those disclosed by Urdal et al., J Chromatog. 296: 171 (1984). This reference describes two sequential, RP-HPLC steps for purification of recombinant human IL-2 on a preparative HPLC column. Alternatively, techniques such as affinity chromatography may be utilized to purify the modified glycoprotein.

Pharmaceutical Compositions

Descriptions of the pharmaceutical compositions of use in the invention are further described in U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/684,729, filed May 25, 2005 (Attorney Docket No: 040853-01-5144P1) and U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/527,089, filed Sep. 13, 2004 (attorney docket no: 040853-01-5144PR), both of which are herein incorporated by reference.

The following examples are provided to illustrate the conjugates, and methods and of the present invention, but not to limit the claimed invention.

EXAMPLES Example 1 Preparation of Cysteine-PEG2 (2)

1.1 Synthesis of (1)

Potassium hydroxide (84.2 mg, 1.5 mmol, as a powder) was added to a solution of L-cysteine (93.7 mg, 0.75 mmol) in anhydrous methanol (20 mL) under argon. The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 30 min, and then mPEG-O-tosylate of molecular mass 20 kilodalton (Ts; 1.0 g, 0.05 mmol) was added in several portions over 2 hours. The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 5 days, and concentrated by rotary evaporation. The residue was diluted with water (30 mL), and stirred at room temperature for 2 hours to destroy any excess 20 kilodalton mPEG-O-tosylate. The solution was then neutralized with acetic acid, the pH adjusted to pH 5.0 and loaded onto a reverse phase chromatography (C-18 silica) column. The column was eluted with a gradient of methanol/water (the product elutes at about 70% methanol), product elution monitored by evaporative light scattering, and the appropriate fractions collected and diluted with water (500 mL). This solution was chromatographed (ion exchange, XK 50 Q, BIG Beads, 300 mL, hydroxide form; gradient of water to water/acetic acid-0.75N) and the pH of the appropriate fractions lowered to 6.0 with acetic acid. This solution was then captured on a reversed phase column (C-18 silica) and eluted with a gradient of methanol/water as described above. The product fractions were pooled, concentrated, redissolved in water and freeze-dried to afford 453 mg (44%) of a white solid (1). Structural data for the compound were as follows: 1H-NMR (500 MHz; D2O) δ 2.83 (t, 2H, O—C—CH 2—S), 3.05 (q, 1H, S—CHH—CHN), 3.18 (q, 1H, (q, 1H, S—CHH—CHN), 3.38 (s, 3H, CH 3O), 3.7 (t, OCH 2CH 2O), 3.95 (q, 1H, CHN). The purity of the product was confirmed by SDS PAGE.

1.2 Synthesis of (2)

Triethylamine (˜0.5 mL) was added dropwise to a solution of 1 (440 mg, 22 μmol) dissolved in anhydrous CH2Cl2 (30 mL) until the solution was basic. A solution of 20 kilodalton mPEG-O-p-nitrophenyl carbonate (660 mg, 33 μmol) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (3.6 mg, 30.8 μmol) in CH2Cl2 (20 mL) was added in several portions over 1 h at room temperature. The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 24 h. The solvent was then removed by rotary evaporation, the residue was dissolved in water (100 mL), and the pH adjusted to 9.5 with 1.0 N NaOH. The basic solution was stirred at room temperature for 2 h and was then neutralized with acetic acid to a pH 7.0. The solution was then loaded onto a reversed phase chromatography (C-18 silica) column. The column was eluted with a gradient of methanol/water (the product elutes at about 70% methanol), product elution monitored by evaporative light scattering, and the appropriate fractions collected and diluted with water (500 mL). This solution was chromatographed (ion exchange, XK 50 Q, BIG Beads, 300 mL, hydroxide form; gradient of water to water/acetic acid-0.75N) and the pH of the appropriate fractions lowered to 6.0 with acetic acid. This solution was then captured on a reversed phase column (C-18 silica) and eluted with a gradient of methanol/water as described above. The product fractions were pooled, concentrated, redissolved in water and freeze-dried to afford 575 mg (70%) of a white solid (2). Structural data for the compound were as follows: 1H-NMR (500 MHz; D2O) δ 2.83 (t, 2H, O—C—CH 2—S), 2.95 (t, 2H, O—C—CH 2—S), 3.12 (q, 1H, S—CHH—CHN), 3.39 (s, 3H CH 3O), 3.71 (t, OCH 2CH 2O). The purity of the product was confirmed by SDS PAGE.

Example 2 GlycoPEGylation of Factor IX Produced in CHO Cells

This example sets forth the preparation of asialoFactor IX and its sialylation with CMP-sialic acid-PEG.

2.1 Desialylation of rFactor IX

A recombinant form of Coagulation Factor IX (rFactor IX) was made in CHO cells. 6000 IU of rFactor IX were dissolved in a total of 12 mL USP H2O. This solution was transferred to a Centricon Plus 20, PL-10 centrifugal filter with another 6 mL USP H2O. The solution was concentrated to 2 mL and then diluted with 15 mL 50 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.4, 0.15 M NaCl, 5 mM CaCl2, 0.05% NaN3 and then reconcentrated. The dilution/concentration was repeated 4 times to effectively change the buffer to a final volume of 3.0 mL. Of this solution, 2.9 mL (about 29 mg of rFactor IX) was transferred to a small plastic tube and to it was added 530 mU α2-3,6,8-Neuraminidase-agarose conjugate (Vibrio cholerae, Calbiochem, 450 μL). The reaction mixture was rotated gently for 26.5 hours at 32° C. The mixture was centrifuged 2 minutes at 10,000 rpm and the supernatant was collected. The agarose beads (containing neuraminidase) were washed 6 times with 0.5-mL 50 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.12, 1 M NaCl, 0.05% NaN3. The pooled washings and supernatants were centrifuged again for 2 minutes at 10,000 rpm to remove any residual agarose resin. The pooled, desialylated protein solution was diluted to 19 mL with the same buffer and concentrated down to 2 mL in a Centricon Plus 20 PL-10 centrifugal filter. The solution was twice diluted with 15 mL of 50 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.4, 0.15 M NaCl, 0.05% NaN3 and reconcentrated to 2 mL. The final desialylated rFactor 1× solution was diluted to 3 mL final volume (˜10 mg/mL) with the Tris Buffer. Native and desialylated rFactor IX samples were analyzed by IEF-Electrophoresis. Isoelectric Focusing Gels (pH 3-7) were run using 1.5 μL (15 μg) samples first diluted with 10 μL Tris buffer and mixed with 12 μL sample loading buffer. Gels were loaded, run and fixed using standard procedures. Gels were stained with Colloidal Blue Stain (FIG. 154), showing a band for desialylated Factor IX.

Example 3 Preparation of PEG (1 kDa and 10 kDa)-SA-Factor IX

Desialylated rFactor-IX (29 mg, 3 mL) was divided into two 1.5 mL (14.5 mg) samples in two 15 mL centrifuge tubes. Each solution was diluted with 12.67 mL 50 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.4, 0.15 M NaCl, 0.05% NaN3 and either CMP-SA-PEG-1 k or 10 k (7.25 μmol) was added. The tubes were inverted gently to mix and 2.9 U ST3Gal3 (326 μL) was added (total volume 14.5 mL). The tubes were inverted again and rotated gently for 65 hours at 32° C. The reactions were stopped by freezing at −20° C. 10 μg samples of the reactions were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The PEGylated proteins were purified on a Toso Haas Biosep G3000SW (21.5×30 cm, 13 um) HPLC column with Dulbecco's Phosphate Buffered Saline, pH 7.1 (Gibco), 6 mL/min. The reaction and purification were monitored using SDS Page and IEF gels. Novex Tris-Glycine 4-20% 1 mm gels were loaded with 10 μL (10 μg) of samples after dilution with 2 μL of 50 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.4, 150 mM NaCl, 0.05% NaN3 buffer and mixing with 12 μL sample loading buffer and 1 μL 0.5 M DTT and heated for 6 minutes at 85° C. Gels were stained with Colloidal Blue Stain (FIG. 155) showing a band for PEG (1 kDa and 10 kDa)-SA-Factor IX.

Example 4 Direct Sialyl-GlycoPEGylation of Factor IX

This example sets forth the preparation of sialyl-PEGylation of Factor IX without prior sialidase treatment.

4.1 Sialyl-PEGylation of Factor-IX with CMP-SA-PEG-(10 KDa)

Factor IX (1100 IU), which was expressed in CHO cells and was fully sialylated, was dissolved in 5 mL of 20 mM histidine, 520 mM glycine, 2% sucrose, 0.05% NaN3 and 0.01% polysorbate 80, pH 5.0. The CMP-SA-PEG-(10 kDa) (27 mg, 2.5 μmol) was then dissolved in the solution and 1 U of ST3Gal3 was added. The reaction was complete after gently mixing for 28 hours at 32° C. The reaction was analyzed by SDS-PAGE as described by Invitrogen. The product protein was purified on an Amersham Superdex 200 (10×300 mm, 13 μm) HPLC column with phosphate buffered saline, pH 7.0 (PBS), 1 mL/min. Rt=9.5 min.

Example 5 Sialyl-PEGylation of Factor-IX with CMP-SA-PEG-(20 kDa)

Factor IX (1100 IU), which was expressed in CHO cells and was fully sialylated, was dissolved in 5 mL of 20 mM histidine, 520 mM glycine, 2% sucrose, 0.05% NaN3 and 0.01% polysorbate 80, pH 5.0. The CMP-SA-PEG-(20 kDa) (50 mg, 2.3 μmol) was then dissolved in the solution and CST-II was added. The reaction mixture was complete after gently mixing for 42 hours at 32° C. The reaction was analyzed by SDS-PAGE as described by Invitrogen.

The product protein was purified on an Amersham Superdex 200 (10×300 mm, 13 μm) HPLC column with phosphate buffered saline, pH 7.0 (Fisher), 1 mL/min. Rt=8.6 min.

Example 6 Sialic Acid Capping of GlycoPEGylated Factor IX

This examples sets forth the procedure for sialic acid capping of sialyl-glycoPEGylated Factor IX.

6.1 Sialic Acid Capping of N-Linked and O-Linked Glycans of Factor-IX-SA-PEG (10 kDa)

Purified r-Factor-IX-PEG (10 kDa) (2.4 mg) was concentrated in a Centricon® Plus 20 PL-10 (Millipore Corp., Bedford, Mass.) centrifugal filter and the buffer was changed to 50 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.2, 0.15 M NaCl, 0.05% NaN3 to a final volume of 1.85 mL. The protein solution was diluted with 372 μL of the same Tris buffer and 7.4 mg CMP-SA (12 μmol) was added as a solid. The solution was inverted gently to mix and 0.1 U ST3Gal1 and 0.1 U ST3Gal3 were added. The reaction mixture was rotated gently for 42 h at 32° C.

A 10 μg sample of the reaction was analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Novex Tris-Glycine 4-12% 1 mm gels were performed and stained using Colloidal Blue as described by Invitrogen. Briefly, samples, 10 μL (10 μg), were mixed with 12 μL sample loading buffer and 1 μL 0.5 M DTT and heated for 6 minutes at 85° C.

Example 7 Glycopegylated Factor IX Pharmacokinetic Study

Four glycoPEGylated FIX variants (PEG-9 variants) were tested in a PK study in normal mice. The activity of the four compounds had previously been established in vitro by clot, endogenous thrombin potential (ETP), and thromboelastograph (TEG) assays. The activity results are summarized in Table I.

TABLE I
ETP TEG
Clot activity (relative (relative
Compound (% of plasma) specific activity specific activity
rhFIX 45% 1.0 1.0
PEG-9-2K (LS) 27% 0.3 0.2
PEG-9-2K (HS) 20% 0.2 0.1
PEG-9-10K 11% 0.6 0.3
PEG-9-30K 14% 0.9 0.4

To assess the prolongation of activity of the four PEG-9 compounds in circulation, a PK study was designed and performed. Non-hemophilic mice were used, 2 animal per time point, 3 samples per animal. Sampling time points were 0, 0.08, 0.17, 0.33, 1, 3, 5, 8, 16, 24, 30, 48, 64, 72, and 96 h post compound administration. Blood samples were centrifuged and stored in two aliquots; one for clot analysis and one for ELISA. Due to material restrictions, the PEG-9 compounds were dosed in different amounts: rhFIX 250 U/kg; 2K (low substitution: “LS” (1-2 PEG substitutions per peptide molecule) 200 U/kg; 2K (high substitution: “HS” (3-4 PEG substitutions per peptide molecule) 200 U/kg; 10K 100 U/kg; 30K 100 U/kg. All doses were based on measured clotting assay units.

The results are outlined in Table II.

TABLE II
Dose Cmax AUC CL
Compound (U/kg) (U/mL) (h-U/mL (mL/h/kg)
rhFIX 250 0.745 1.34 187
PEG-9-2K (LS) 200 0.953 4.69 42.7
PEG-9-2K (HS) 200 0.960 9.05 22.1
PEG-9-10K 100 0.350 2.80 35.7
PEG-9-30K 100 1.40 8.83 11.3

The results demonstrate a trend towards prolongation for all the PEG-9 compounds. The values of AUC and Cmax were not compared directly. However, clearance (CL) was compared and CL is lower for the PEG-9 compounds compared to rhFIX, indicating a longer residence time in the mice. The time for the last detectable clot activity is increased for the PEG-9 compounds compared to rhFIX, even though rhFIX was administered at the highest dose.

Example 8 Preparation of LS and HS GlycoPEGylated Factor IX

GlycoPEGylated Factor IX with a low degree of substitution with PEG were prepared from native Factor IX by an exchange reaction catalyzed by ST3Gal-III. The reactions were performed in a buffer of 10 mM histidine, 260 mM glycine, 1% sucrose and 0.02% Tween 80, pH 7.2. For PEGylation with CMPSA-PEG (2 kD and 10 kD), Factor IX (0.5 mg/mL) was incubated with ST3GalIII (50 mU/mL) and CMP-SA-PEG (0.5 mM) for 16 h at 32° C. For PEGylation with CMP-SA-PEG 30 kD, the concentration of Factor IX was increased to 1.0 mg/mL, and the concentration of CMP-SA-PEG was decreased to 0.17 mM. Under these conditions, more than 90% of the Factor IX molecules were substituted with at least one PEG moiety.

GlycoPEGylated Factor IX with a high degree of substitution with PEG was prepared by enzymatic desialylation of native Factor IX. The Factor IX peptide was buffer exchanged into 50 mM mES, pH 6.0, using a PD10 column, adjusted to a concentration of 0.66 mg/mL and treated with AUS sialidase (5 mU/mL) for 16 h at 32° C. Desialylation was verified by SDS-PAGE, HPLC and MALDI glycan analysis. Asialo Factor IX was purified on Q Sepharose FF to remove the sialidase. The CaCl2 fraction was concentrated using an Ultra15 concentrator and buffer exchanged into MES, pH 6.0 using a PD10 column.

2 kD and 10 kD PEGylation of asialo-Factor IX (0.5 mg/mL) was carried out by incubation with ST3Gal-III (50 mU/mL) and CMP-SA-PEG (0.5 mM) at 32° C. for 16 h. For PEGylation with CMPSA-PEG-30 kD, the concentration of Factor IX was increased to 1.0 mg/mL and the concentration of CMP-SA-PEG was decreased to 0.17 mM. After 16 h of PEGylation, glycans with terminal galactose were capped with sialic acid by adding 1 mM CMP-SA and continuing the incubation for an additional 8 h at 32° C. Under these conditions, more than 90% of the Factor IX molecules were substituted with at least one PEG moiety. Factor IX produced by this method has a higher apparent molecular weight in SDS-PAGE.

Example 9 Preparation of O-GlycoPEGylated Factor IX

O-glycan chains were introduced de novo into native Factor IX (1 mg/mL) by incubation of the peptide with GalNAcT-II (25 mU/mL) and 1 mM UDP-GalNAc at 32° C. After 4 h of incubation, the PEGylation reaction was initiated by adding CMPSA-PEG (2 Kd or 10 Kd at 0.5 mM or 30 kDd at 0.17 mM) and ST6GalNAc-I (25 mU/mL) and incubating for an additional 20 h.

Example 10 aPTT Assay of Compound A (PEG 30K FIX), Compound B (PEG 2K FIX), and FIX (rhFIX) in FIX-Deficient Knockout Mice 10.1 Materials and Methods

All mice used in the experiment were FIX knockout mice (Lin et al., Blood 1997), crossed into a C57Bl/6 strain background. Mice were aged 9-19 weeks at the time of the pharmacokinetic study. Both male and female mice were studied. Mice were distributed between groups to give a mean weight for each group which was similar and to give a distribution of weights in each of the groups. Additional mice were maintained for regular phlebotomy to provide FIX deficient serum for dilution of samples and standards. Test animals were anesthetized with Avertin or Domitor. Right and left neck was shaved, and prepared in a sterile fashion. A small incision was made in the right neck to expose the external jugular vein. Factor IX was delivered (150 U/kg) in a total volume of approximately 100-120 microliters. The needle was withdrawn and gelfoam/surgifoam was applied with pressure to supplement local hemostasis. The neck incision was sutured closed. The mouse was placed under a warming lamp and whole blood was collected into 9 volumes: 1 volume sodium citrate at the following times: pre-bleed (24 h or 48 h pre-dosing or 72 h post); 15 min; 1 h; 4 h; 24 h; 48 h; 72 h (for cross-over groups or in place of pre-bleed). Plasma from each aliquot was used for aPTT analysis using a Start 4 Coagulation Analyzer and Dapttin Tc-reagent.

Compound A was a FIX glycoPEGylated with sialic acid branched PEG (30 kD) based on cysteine bearing a PEG at the S atom and a PEG at NH. Compound B was a FIX glycoPEGylated with a sialic acid linear PEG (2 kD) glycine construct with PEG at the NH moiety.

10.2 Results

Pre 24 hours (Mean; range) 48 hours (M/R) 72 hours (M/R)
Factor IX (n = 12)
<1% 7.5% (2-16%) 3.0% (1.2-4.1%) 1.6% (<1-2.5%)
Compound A (n = 9)
<1% 187% (95-200%) 140% (79-200%) 77% (36-118%)
Compound B (n = 11)
<1% 62% (39-89%) 24% (9-40%) 10.1% (6-19%)

The terminal phase half-life of conjugated and unconjugated FIX in these mice was determined by plotting the average values at each timepoint (60 minutes, 24 hour, 48 hour, 72 hour for terminal phase), generating the linear curve of the fall-off, and then using the slope of that line in the following formula:


T 1/2=loge(2)/b 2

Where b2 is the slope. (Ewenstein, et al. Transfusion 2002). The unconjugated FIX T1/2 in the mice was 12.8 hours.

The values for the unconjugated FIX samples were determined from undiluted (1:1) samples, because all values fell within the linear range for the aPTT standard. The 15 minutes sample was actually run at 1:1 and 1:2, and each gave a consistent result of 74% at 15 minutes. The dose of 150 U/kg would give an expected recovery after dosing of plasma-derived FIX to a human of 150%. Unconjugated FIX is known to have a decreased recovery (˜55-80% of expected) when compared to PD FIX in humans. This could be even lower in mice, accounting for the FIX recovery of about 50% of expected seen in these animals (74% observed/150% expected).

Determination of the values for Neose A samples had to account for the unexpectedly high initial values, which rose above the top standard (200%) even when diluted 1:2 and 1:4. The recoversie in the first hour appear to be in the 700-800% range, which is to about 500% of the expected recovery after a dose of 150 U/kg. The terminal half-life is 23 hours, calculated as above.

The values for the Neose B samples were in the range of 325-350% in the first hour after injection, indicating a recovery of >200% of expected. The terminal phase T1/2 was 14.4 hours.

It is understood that the examples and embodiments described herein are for illustrative purposes only and that various modifications or changes in light thereof will be suggested to persons skilled in the art and are to be included within the spirit and purview of this application and scope of the appended claims. All publications, patents, and patent applications cited herein are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety for all purposes.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US20110137011 *Apr 21, 2009Jun 9, 2011Novo Nordisk A/SHyperglycosylated human coagulation factor ix
WO2011009916A2Jul 22, 2010Jan 27, 2011Airbus Operations GmbhMethod and device for system installation, and freight loading system
WO2013156488A2Apr 16, 2013Oct 24, 2013Leverton Licence Holdings LimitedOptimised subcutaneous therapeutic agents
Classifications
U.S. Classification514/1.1, 530/300, 435/68.1
International ClassificationC07K2/00, C12P21/06, A61K38/02
Cooperative ClassificationC12Y304/21022, A61K47/48215, C12N9/644
European ClassificationA61K47/48K6P, C12N9/64F21G
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