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Publication numberUS20080274687 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/799,865
Publication dateNov 6, 2008
Filing dateMay 2, 2007
Priority dateMay 2, 2007
Also published asEP2145411A2, US20100185502, WO2008137756A2, WO2008137756A3
Publication number11799865, 799865, US 2008/0274687 A1, US 2008/274687 A1, US 20080274687 A1, US 20080274687A1, US 2008274687 A1, US 2008274687A1, US-A1-20080274687, US-A1-2008274687, US2008/0274687A1, US2008/274687A1, US20080274687 A1, US20080274687A1, US2008274687 A1, US2008274687A1
InventorsDale T. Roberts, Markus K. Cremer, Michael W. Mantle, Stephen Helling White, Marc Theeuwes
Original AssigneeRoberts Dale T, Cremer Markus K, Mantle Michael W, Stephen Helling White, Marc Theeuwes
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dynamic mixed media package
US 20080274687 A1
Abstract
It has been discovered that a dynamic mixed media package with a mechanism for dynamic modification/update provides a media experience to users that exceeds the experience offered by individual media files. A dynamic mixed media package accommodates various types of media and allows for additional media and modifications of existing media. Additional media includes media generated by consumers, such as media derived from a seed media. A seed media is marked and assembled with supplemental media into a package. The seed media is marked to allow performance of various operations, such as identification of the seed media during the lifetime of the package and attribution when the seed media is incorporated into consumer generated derivative media.
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Claims(27)
1. A method comprising:
examining a media package for a reference to a media package query checkpoint, wherein the media package contains seed media, supplemental media, and information that identifies the seed media;
querying the package query checkpoint for approved media package modifications for the media package with the information that identifies the seed media; and
modifying the media package with a media package modification indicated in response to the act of querying.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the seed media is a video file, an audio file, or an image file.
3. The method of claim 1, wherein the media package modification is supplemental media, references to media that corresponds to the seed media, data to enhance the seed media, replacement media, or advertisements.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein the modifying comprises adding content to the media package, removing content from the media package, modifying administrative information for the media package, modifying structural information of the media package, modifying meta-data in the media package, editing content of the media package, augmenting the package, or reducing the package.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein the querying comprises transmitting a request to the media packager that identifies the seed media.
6. A method comprising:
associating identifying information with a seed media;
incorporating the seed media into a dynamic mixed media package;
embedding a reference to a package query checkpoint into the dynamic mixed media package, wherein the package query checkpoint indicates one or more modifications available for the package;
supplying one or more instances of the dynamic mixed media package;
discovering one or more modifications available for the dynamic mixed media package;
approving those of the one or more modifications that satisfy a set of one or more rules associated with the seed media that govern modification of an instance of the dynamic mixed media package; and
indicating the approved modifications.
7. The method of claim 6, wherein the associating identifying information comprises:
watermarking the seed media;
generating a fingerprint for the seed media; and
indicating the fingerprint in the dynamic mixed media package.
8. The method of claim 7 further comprising:
generating a hash value for the seed media; and
indicating the hash value in the dynamic mixed media package;
9. The method of claim 7 further comprising:
computing attribution of a media derived from multiple individual media, one of which is the seed media.
10. The method of claim 9 further comprising computing royalties based on the computed attribution.
11. A method comprising:
examining user generated content of a dynamic mixed media package to determine attribution of the content, wherein the user generated content at least includes media from different authors; and
apportioning revenues generated from the user generated content based, at least in part, on the attribution.
12. The method of claim 11, wherein the user generated content also includes media originally created by one or more consumers.
13. The method of claim 11, wherein the examining comprises identifying the different authors utilizing watermarking, fingerprinting, and hashing.
14. The method of claim 11, wherein the revenues are generated by generating revenue from one or more advertisements associated with the user generated content, or generating revenue from fees associated with the user generated content.
15. A machine-readable media having encoded therein instructions, which when executed by a processing system, causes the processing system to perform operations comprising:
examining user generated content of a dynamic mixed media package to determine attribution of the content, wherein the user generated content at least includes media from different authors; and
apportioning revenues generated from the user generated content based, at least in part, on the attribution.
16. The machine-readable media of claim 15, wherein the user generated content also includes media originally created by one or more consumers.
17. The machine-readable media of claim 15, wherein the operation of examining comprises identifying the different authors by watermarking, fingerprinting, or hashing.
18. A machine-readable media having encoded therein instructions for execution by a processing system, the instructions comprising:
a first set of instructions executable to,
ascertain a reference in a dynamic mixed media package, wherein the reference indicates a package query checkpoint and the dynamic mixed media package contains a seed media;
ascertain data that identifies the seed media,
use the reference to query the package query checkpoint with the ascertained data that identifies the seed media for an approved modification; and
a second set of instructions executable to modify the dynamic mixed media package in accordance with an approved modification indicated by the package query checkpoint.
19. The machine-readable media of claim 18, wherein the first set of instructions are further executable to ascertain a timestamp of a previous query for the dynamic mixed media package, and to indicate the ascertained timestamp in the query.
20. A machine-readable medium having encoded therein instructions for execution by a processing system, the instructions comprising:
a first set of instructions executable to perform an evaluation of media against a set of rules associated with a seed media that govern modification of an instance of a dynamic mixed media package that contains the seed media and executable to approve or reject modification of the dynamic mixed media package with the media based on the evaluation; and
a second set of instructions executable to track media approved by the first set of instructions; and
a third set of instructions executable to publish an indication of media tracked by the second set of instructions.
21. The machine-readable media of claim 20 further comprising a fourth set of instructions executable to search for media derived from seed media and to submit discovered media for evaluation by the first set of instructions.
22. The machine-readable media of claim 21, wherein the fourth set of instructions are further executable to maintain a structure that indicates results of the evaluation by the first set of instructions of media discovered by the fourth set of instructions.
23. An apparatus comprising:
a set of one or more processors;
a media player operable to present a first type of media and a second type of media in a dynamic mixed media package in accordance with a presentation directive indicated in the dynamic mixed media package; and
a package query component operable to,
detect a query event for the dynamic mixed media package,
determine a reference to a package query checkpoint, data that identifies a seed media, and a previous query time in the dynamic mixed media package, and
query a package checkpoint for a modification to the dynamic mixed package using the determined reference, identifying data, and time.
24. The apparatus of claim 23, wherein the media player is further operable to present a consumer generated media with the seed media as directed by a presentation directive for the consumer generated media.
25. A network comprising:
a first system that generates a seed media; and
a second system operable to receive the seed media from the first system, mark the seed media with data for management and identification of the seed media, bundle the seed media and supplemental media into a dynamic mixed media package, supply instances of the dynamic mixed media package, and approve or rejects candidate modifications to the dynamic mixed media package in accordance with a set of rules associated with the seed media that govern modification of the dynamic mixed media package that contains the seed media.
26. The network of claim 25, wherein the second system also maintains modifications approved for the dynamic mixed media package for distribution to media consumer systems with instances of the dynamic mixed media package.
27. The network of claim 25 further comprising a third system operable to generate a candidate modification for the dynamic mixed media package and submit an indication of the candidate modification to the second system for evaluation.
Description
TECHNICAL FIELD

The present application relates generally to the technical field of media packages; and more specifically to delivery and management of dynamic mixed media packages.

BACKGROUND

The entertainment industry does not exercise complete control over their raw assets delivered through digital distribution channels. Conventional delivery of these raw assets suffers from several limitations, which is perhaps most obvious with conventional distribution of music content. First, conventional digital music delivery over the Internet or other digital distribution channels (e.g., digital radio broadcast, Compact Disc, Audio or Video on Demand services through cable, terrestrial broadcast or via satellite, cellular phone networks, etc.) is limited to delivery of an individual or delivery of multiple individual tracks. This limitation constrains a consumer to single track playback. Second, an individual audio track is separate from other related assets. Third, the format of audio tracks is often proprietary (i.e. non-standard) and only in one format or resolution. These limitations hamper control over their raw assets and the ability of music industry members to innovate with respect to their raw assets. Although described in the context of music content, these same issues plague other digital content spaces (e.g., eBooks, videos, games, image data, etc.).

The conventional delivery model restrains the entertainment industry owners' and creators' ability to innovate. The conventional delivery model relies heavily on an intermediate entity (i.e. content aggregators and distributors, download store front and network operators, content delivery and playback software/device manufacturers etc.). The intermediate entity that delivers content separates the owners and creators of the content from their customers. This separation interferes with the owners' and creators' ability to collect helpful statistical data and interact closer with their end customers. Instead, distributors and software/hardware providers (e.g., Apple iTunes® music service, Real Network Rhapsody® music service, etc.) substantially control the consumer experience of consuming content via the Internet, digital media files, and media streams. Allowing these intermediate entities to possess control over distribution and the consumer interaction hinders progress in product differentiation by members of the entertainment industry. Lastly, the intermediate entities have the best abilities to influence the consumption behavior and experience of consumers since they are the closest to the consumers.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Some embodiments are illustrated by way of example and not limitation in the figures of the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 depicts an example system that bundles media together into a dynamic mixed media package.

FIG. 2 depicts an example system that propagates package modifications to media consumers.

FIG. 3 depicts an example of a general structure of a dynamic mixed media package.

FIG. 4 depicts a flowchart of example operations for creating a dynamic mixed media package.

FIG. 5 depicts a flowchart of example operations for querying an entity for a package modification responsive to a query event.

FIG. 6 depicts a flowchart of example operations for handling submissions.

FIG. 7 depicts a flowchart for example operations to search for derivative media.

FIG. 8 depicts a flowchart for example operations for handling a package query for a dynamic mixed media package.

FIG. 9 depicts an example system that maintains package modifications.

FIG. 10 depicts an example implementation of a media query module.

FIG. 11 depicts an example interface for a dynamic mixed media package player.

FIG. 12 depicts a diagrammatic representation of a machine in the example form of a processing system 1200 within which a set of instructions, for causing the machine to perform any of the functionality discussed herein, may be executed.

FIG. 13 depicts a flowchart for example application of a composite set of rules to media that may be performed in block 607 of FIG. 6 or block 709 of FIG. 7.

FIG. 14 depicts an example revenue stream from derivative media.

FIG. 15 depicts an example format of a dynamic mixed media package in accordance with the Multimedia Content Description Interface (“the MPEG 7 standard”).

FIG. 16 depicts an example presentation of media from an example dynamic mixed media package.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Overview

An innovative experience can be provided with a dynamic mixed media package, as well as instituting a media delivery and management model that leverages networks. An encompassing and comprehensive media experience can be presented to the consumer with a package that renders mixed media (e.g. video, additional audio, interviews, lyrics, image artwork, etc.) related to a seed media (e.g. a recording of a particular song), which may be an individual work or a collection of works. The seed media can be associated with supplemental media as a mixed media package (e.g., a file may have pointers to the seed media and the supplemental media, a file may actually contain the seed media and the supplemental media, etc.). Identifying information is generated and associated with the seed media that allows management and tracking of the seed media. Identifying information may be embedded into the seed media (e.g., watermark), derived from the seed media (e.g., a hash value generated, fingerprint data generated, etc.). Identifying information may also be generated and associated with the supplemental media. In addition, a reference to a package query checkpoint is embedded into the package. Accessing the package query checkpoint (or multiple package query checkpoints), such as an IP address of an online network server, allows dynamic modification/updates to be indicated with the dynamic mixed media package.

With a dynamic mixed media package, a user purchases an experience or level of service instead of an individual media file. In addition, the dynamic mixed media package is a product and service with value beyond the individual media files that can expand during the life span of the dynamic mixed media package through the addition of newly released, updated or altered related rich media content. Examples of such expansion include, but are not limited to, additional video clips, music tracks, streaming audio or video, live concert video, music news, editorial reviews, song lyrics, alternate versions of a track or lyric, karaoke versions and lyrics synchronization data, photographic or image art data, ring tones, data usable to categorize and navigate content (e.g., genre, tempo, mood, release year, country of origin, etc.), and user generated content (e.g., user created music videos, user comments, user re-edited videos or altered soundtracks for videos, user remixes of audio tracks, etc.). The delivery of additional dynamic media can be done on a promotional basis, tied to commerce or advertising, by contest with consumer participation, etc. The media assets (i.e., seed media and/or supplemental media) may also be upgraded or downgraded in quality of size, supported software codecs and bit rates, rendering limitations (e.g., audio only, audio and image, audio and video), etc., for various reasons, such as to fit a particular playback device.

The subsequent description includes illustrative systems, methods, techniques, instruction sequences and computing machine program products that embody the present invention. For purposes of explanation, numerous specific details are set forth in the following in order to provide an understanding of various embodiments of the inventive subject matter. It will be evident, however, to one skilled in the art that embodiments of the inventive subject matter may be practiced without these specific details. For instance, examples are described below in the context of being performed on a single machine. Multiple machines, however, may be involved in tracking seed media and collecting package modifications. Furthermore, the term media is used frequently throughout within the context of audio and video. The term media, however, should not be limited to these particular examples of media, and include many other types of media, such as photographic images, art images, literature, streaming media, etc. In general, well-known instruction instances, protocols, structures and techniques have not been shown in detail.

For the purposes of this specification, “processing system” includes a system using one or more processors, microcontrollers and/or digital signal processors having the capability of running a “program”, which is a set of executable machine code. Processing systems include communication and electronic devices such as (but not limited to) cell phones, music players, personal data assistants (PDAs), automotive entertainment systems and consumer electronics products designed for use at home. Processing systems also include computers, or “computing devices” of all forms (desktops, laptops, palmtops, etc.). A “program” as used herein, includes user-level applications as well as system-directed applications or daemons.

FIG. 1 depicts an example system that bundles media together into a dynamic mixed media package. A media owner or creator (e.g., author, recording company, production company, etc.) generates seed media (e.g., video, audio, images, etc.) and transmits the seed media to a media packager 104. The media packager 104 also receives supplemental media 109 and 1 13 from a media service provider 107 and a media publisher 111, respectively. Supplemental media may be previews, lyrics, trailers, reviews, artwork, etc. For example, media service provider 107 may provide advertisements and the media publisher may provide artwork.

The media packager 104 generates data for management of the seed media. For example, the media packager 104 generates a watermark, fingerprint (e.g., audio fingerprint, video fingerprint, image fingerprint, tandem fingerprint, etc.), and/or hash (e.g., using the MD5 hash function, a SHA hash function, etc.) with the seed media. The media packager, or another entity, can later use the generated management data to perform various management operations with the data, such as track use of the seed media, identify the seed media in a derivative work, etc. Of course, it is not necessary for the media packager to generate the management data. For instance, the media owner/creator may generate the data and communicate the data and/or location of the data to the media packager 104. The media packager 104 may also generate management data with the supplemental media 109 and 113.

The media packager 104 assembles the seed media 103 and the supplemental media 109 and 113 into a mixed media package 115. The media packager 104 writes into the mixed media package 115, perhaps in a header, management data that has not been incorporated into the media and a reference to the media packager 104 as a package query checkpoint. The media packager 104 also writes structural information and directives for presenting the media into the package header and/or section headers. Instances of the mixed media package 115 are then delivered via a network 102 (e.g., LAN, WAN, Internet, cellular networks, etc.) or through comparable distribution processes for non-network connected devices to media consumers 117 a-117 c, directly or indirectly. For example, the media consumers 117 a-117 c may have purchased a membership from the media packager 104, purchased an instance of the package 115 from the media packager 104, purchased an instance of the package from another entity that receives the instance of the package 115 from the media packager 104 and forwards the instance of the package 115 to a media consumer, etc.

The media consumers 117 a-117 c can then transmit or transfer the instance (or a copy of the instance) to another device. In FIG. 1, the media consumer 117 c transmits the received instance to a portable audio media player 123, a mobile phone 125, and an automobile entertainment device 127. The transfer of the instance to these devices may involve additional operations. For example, the media consumer 117 c may be required to acquire a lower quality version (e.g., more compact, smaller display size, etc.) of certain media in the mixed media package instance for playback on devices with limited resources.

FIG. 2 depicts an example system that propagates package modifications to media consumers. The media creator/owner 101 delivers rules that govern the mixed media package 115 to the media packager 104. The media packager receives a media submission 201 from the media service provider, such as karaoke style lyrics for seed media that is audio. The media packager 104 also receives consumer generated submissions from the media consumers 117 a-117 c. The media consumer 117 a submits artwork 207. The media consumer 117 b submits rating information. The media consumer 117 c submits consumer generated derivative media 205. The consumer 117 c may choose to only share a portion of her consumer generated derivative media. For example, the consumer 117 c may have re-mixed a song and taken digital photos with friends and an artist at a concert. The consumer 117 c may choose to keep the photos private, and submit the re-mixed song as the consumer generated media 205. The media packager 104 processes the submissions and approves or rejects the submissions in accordance with the rules from the media creator/owner 101. The media packager 104 updates a package tracking structure 203 accordingly to reflect the approval or rejection. Content can also be supplied from the author of the seed media, the owner/creator 101 (assuming the author and owner/creator are not the same), and other service providers. Furthermore, the types of package modifications can include enhancements to the content of a mixed media package, modifications to structural information, modifications to presentation directives, etc.

A dynamic mixed media package allows product flexibility, new sources of revenue, the opportunity for product differentiation, and greater consumer involvement. A dynamic mixed media package can be dynamically modified throughout the life of the package, thus providing the capability to modify the package as well as expand the products/services offered with the package. In addition to adding content from an entity such as a record label, movie studio, or production company, consumers can create derivative media from one or more seed media. The derivative media can be incorporated into the dynamic mixed media package. Consumers can also contribute feedback (e.g., commentary, ratings, etc.) and supplemental media that is not derivative media (e.g., artwork for a seed video or seed audio).

The dynamic mixed media package also allows media owners/creators to collect consumer feedback and nimbly react to the consumer feedback to increase attractiveness of a product or service. A media owner/creator can adjust the contents of a package based on feedback, modify services, etc. A media owner/creator can also identify those consumers that generate the most popular media.

The flexibility and capability for expansion and/or change in the dynamic mixed media package also provides new business models and sources of revenue. Business models may spawn to offer various management services for the dynamic mixed media package, such as statistic collection, tracking and storing of package modifications, etc. The dynamic mixed media package will attract consumers and change consumer behavior with respect to purchasing of media online to create new sources of revenue or increase revenue. Consumers will be motivated to purchase this dynamic mixed media package for the enhanced experience it offers that cannot be achieved with the seed media alone. Consumers can also benefit, reputably or monetarily, when they contribute media that becomes popular. For instance, a consumer generated media associated with a seed media may be associated with an advertisement that generates advertisement revenues for the consumer and/or owner of the seed media. In fact, a consumer may create an advertisement that becomes associated with a seed media in a dynamic mixed media package.

FIG. 14 depicts an example revenue stream from derivative media. A media owner/creator 1401 performs operations to generate a mixed media package 1409. The media owner/creator 1401 generates fingerprint data for the seed media 1405. The media owner/creator 1401 may also generate one or more fingerprints for supplemental media 1407. The media owner/creator 1401 stores the fingerprint(s) in a fingerprint and hash database 1403, which may or may not be controlled by the media owner/creator 1401. The media owner/creator 1401 creates the dynamic mixed media package 1409 with the seed media 1405 and the supplemental media 1407. The media owner/creator 1401 then marks instances of the seed media 1405 with watermarks prior to delivery of the instances to media consumers 1411 and 1413. The instance delivered to the media consumer 1411 includes a watermark in the instance of the seed media 1405 that brands it with an indication of the media consumer 1411 (e.g., a customer account number, a username, etc.). Likewise, the instance delivered to the media consumer 1413 includes a watermark that brands the seed media instance with an indication of the media consumer 1413. The media owner/creator 1401 may also apply a hash function to each of the instances prior to delivery. The media owner/creator 1401 then stores the generated hash values into the fingerprint and hash database 1403. Of course, these operations are not necessarily all performed by the media owner/creator 1401. For instance, the media owner/creator 1401 may only generate the fingerprint(s) and leave it to a media packager to embed watermarks and generate hash values.

Multiple watermarks may be applied to a seed media. A media owner/creator and a media packager (and any other entity in the distribution path of a seed media) may embed one or more different watermarks. There are watermarking techniques that allow tandem watermarking (e.g., embedding multiple watermarks on top of each other). Such tandem watermarking techniques allow for watermarking at multiple stages within the content distribution chain. For example, three different watermarks could be applied to a seed media. A first watermark that contains a generic content identifier (e.g., the ISRC code for a particular recording) can be embedded in a seed media. Then a second watermark that includes a distributor's ID is embedded into the seed media. Finally, a third watermark that includes a customer's ID is embedded into the seed media.

Deployment of a tandem watermarking technique may employ bit stream watermarking algorithms. With these bit stream watermarking algorithms, the watermark is inserted in the encoded/compressed audio or video signal stream, thus avoiding decoding and re-encoding. Although avoiding decoding and re-encoding may be less interesting when the signal is available uncompressed (e.g., at the production stage), it becomes more interesting when the signal is not readily available uncompressed (e.g., at the distribution stage).

The media consumers 1411 and 1413 generate a consumer generated media 1415 based on the seed media 1405 in the mixed media package 1409. The media consumer 1411 first creates a derivative media with the seed media of the mixed media package 1409. For example, the media consumer 1411 creates an audio re-mix with the seed media 1405 and potentially, but not necessarily, with other audio (e.g., consumer created audio, audio from the same artist as the seed media, audio from another artist, etc.). The derivative media is provided to the media consumer 1413. The media consumer 1413 creates a video to accompany the re-mix derivative media to generate the media 1415. For example, the media consumer 1413 creates a video from various animated videos. The media consumers 1411 and 1413 may operate entirely independently, as collaborative partners, as part of a creative community (e.g., an online video sharing community, an online social network community, an online digital image sharing community, etc.), etc. The consumer generated media 1415 is transmitted to a content identifier system 1417, which can entirely or in part reside locally on the consumer's computer or remotely on one or multiple servers.

The content identifier system 1417 processes the media 1415 to determine contribution percentage. The content identifier system 1417 accesses the fingerprint and hash database 1403 to identify content of the consumer generated media 1415. The content identifier system 1417 then computes relative percent contribution from different authors or media owners/creators. The consumer generated media 1415 is then automatically categorized for destination selection and tagged based on the computed percent contribution.

In another embodiment, author attribution is determined based on identifiers, such as watermarks, previously embedded in the media. Using the example illustrated in FIG. 14, the content identifier system 1417 examines the media 1415 to compute relative contribution by authors, whether consumer authors or seed media authors, using techniques such as watermarking. Although the author attribution computation is performed by the content identifier system 1417, a separate system is not necessary for such functionality. Content identification functionality may be implemented with a program proximate to the consumer (e.g., a module or process that works in the background or foreground of the application used by the consumer to mix media, and perhaps generates a watermark to identify media originally created by the consumer), or another third party (e.g., in the media sharing server 1419).

The media 1415 is then provided to a media sharing server 1419, which results in a revenue stream. A media consumer 1421 accesses the consumer generated media 1415. Access of the media 1415 by the consumer 1421 can be considered a revenue generating event. For example, advertisers pay advertising fees for advertising on the web page that presents the media 1415. As the media 1415 increases in popularity, greater advertising fees are generated, assuming the greater exposure leads to more clicks on the advertising links. In another example, consumers pay fees for accessing media hosted by a network including the media sharing server 1419. A portion of these fees are paid to owners/creators of media presented from the network as royalties. Advertising and/or use fees 1423 are paid to the media owner/creator 1401. The media owner/creator 1401 may then pay royalties to the media consumers 1411 and 1413 based on percentage of contribution from the media consumers 1411 and 1413. Such payments to consumers may spur creativity and increase consumer involvement. If the media 1415 includes seed media from another media owner/creator, then the owner of the media sharing server may apportion the payout of fees in accordance with the determined percent contribution. Furthermore, funds may be held in escrow for media contributed by unknown authors. These funds held in escrow may be held indefinitely until the authors are discovered, may be held for a limited period of time and then donated to an artist community, etc.

An entity may also assume accounting responsibilities and act as a clearinghouse for all fees received from media sharing sites and dispense royalties according to the percent contribution to the media owners/creators. For instance, the media packager 104 of FIG. 1 may charge fees to multiple media owners/creators that send their seed media to the media packager 104 for assembly into a dynamic mixed media package. The media packager 104 may charge fees to media consumers for membership in the dynamic mixed media package service. A service may maintain package modifications and propagate the modifications to members, maintain a community of independent artists that generate media (e.g., supplemental media, derivative media, etc.) and provide exposure to the media owner/creators (e.g., producers, publishing companies, other artists, etc.). The media packager 104 may take a percentage of each package purchased by a media consumer. The revenue to the media packager may be flat fee based, variable based, or a hybrid of flat fee and variable fee. Variation in fees may be tied into the number of submissions from consumers, media consumer community activity related to a seed media, etc.

Whatever entity maintains the dynamic mixed media package, the package is created to be flexible to accommodate the management and modification operations discussed above. FIG. 3 depicts an example of a general structure of a dynamic mixed media package. A dynamic mixed media package 301 includes several sections. A first section, which may be referred to as a package header, is a package information section 303. The package information section 303 includes package content and structure information and a reference (e.g., uniform resource locator, internet protocol address, etc.) to a package query checkpoint. The package query checkpoint is a checkpoint location to start querying for package modifications. The package information section 303 may also include one or more references to approved service providers that provide package modifications. The package information section 303 may also include access and authentication information and/or code, directives that govern presentation of content from different sections of the mixed media package 301, service level information, package level information, membership information, etc.

The mixed media package can be implemented as one or multiple instances (containing different media related to a particular seed media). A mixed media package may also be implemented as a virtual package. For instance, a link between various media might just consist in one identifier. This identifier can be absolute (e.g., a unique number or a set of numbers, a fingerprint, or a text string, or a combination thereof that is shared across multiple entities and acts as binding element). This identifier can also be recursive. For instance, one media package contains an index that points to a second package, which in turn contains a different index that references a third media package, etc.

The mixed media package 301 also includes a clear media segment information section 305 and a clear media segment 307. A mixed media package does not necessarily include sections for clear media, but clear media sections can accommodate promotional content (e.g., samples, trailers, previews, reviews, etc.), revenue generating content (e.g., advertisements), etc. The clear media segment section 305 includes information about content and structure of the clear media segment 307, and, perhaps, presentation directives. For example, the clear media segment 307 may include various type of content. Presentation directives in the clear media segment information section 305 may restrict presentation of advertisements to every fifth access of the mixed media package, rotate promotional material, present content each time a new host device is encountered, etc. The clear media segment 307 includes unprotected and/or unrestricted media, such as promotional content as already mentioned. Although not protected and/or restricted, the content in the clear media segment 307 may be marked (e.g., with a watermark) or fingerprinted for management purposes, such as collecting statistics.

The dynamic mixed media package 301 includes a seed media segment information section 309 and a seed media segment 311. The content of the seed media segment 311 is protected and/or restricted. The protection mechanism (e.g., digital rights management mechanism) may be implemented completely or partially in the seed media segment information section 309. The seed media segment information section 309 also includes content and structural information about the seed media segment 311. The seed media segment 311 includes seed media, supplemental media, references related to the seed media (e.g., links to review of the seed media, links to an author website, code that loads a page from the author website, pointers to content at a remote or local location different than the dynamic mixed media package, etc.). For example, the seed media segment 311 may include a reference to access streaming media in a different folder, at a remote server, on a network attached storage device, etc. The streaming media may be played immediately, played when accessed, cached for offline playing, etc. The content of the seed media segment 311 may be videos, audio tracks, an audio collection, images, animations, text, games, podcasts, etc. The seed media segment information section 309 may also include code for collecting statistics about the seed media and/or statistics collected about the supplemental media.

The third portion of the dynamic mixed media package 301 includes a consumer generated media segment information section 313 and a consumer generated media segment 315. The consumer generated media segment 315 may include derivative media created by consumers, independent media created by consumers that relate to the seed media, consumer comments about the seed media, references to consumer websites related to the seed media, code that accesses content from other consumer websites related to the seed media, pointers to content at a remote or local location different than the dynamic mixed media package, etc. The consumer generated media segment information section 313 includes content and structural information about the content of the consumer generated media segment 315. The consumer generated media segment information section 313 may identify individual media in the segment 315, indicate percent contribution for a particular media in the segment 315, indicate popularity of media in the segment 315, etc. The media that may be generated by consumers and added to a package covers a wide gamut of media, such as games, videos, audio, animation, lyrics, poems, commentary, re-mixes, alternative lyrics, photos, etc. A consumer will have the option to share their personal media with other media package owners (linked to the same seed media) or to keep their personal media for private consumption only.

Those of ordinary skill in the art should appreciate that the example dynamic mixed media package depicted in FIG. 3 is illustrative and not intended to be limiting upon embodiments. For instance, the package is described as including seed media and supplemental media. An implementation of a dynamic mixed media package does not necessarily literally “include” media. The package may include pointers to content, and the content may be in different locations. There are multiple types of file containers already defined that provide guidelines for implementing pointers to contents in different locations (e.g., MPEG-4 Systems (ISO/IEC 14496-1), MPEG-7 (ISO/IEC 15938), MPEG-21 (ISO/IEC 21000), mxf (Material eXchange Format), and aaf (Advanced Authoring Format)).

The dynamic mixed media package can be implemented in accordance with any of a number of techniques, both standard and proprietary. Although a standard implementation, such as in accordance with an MPEG standard, seems more desirable for wide-spread adoption in the market, a proprietary format may be optimal and/or preferable for other purposes. As a matter of fact, multiple physical formats can conceivably coexist, where conversion prescriptions will allow transitions from one format to another. For instance, a particular format might be suitable for the media exchange across PC platforms, where a significant amount of computational power is available for processing. This format might not be suitable in a more restrained platform environment where the necessity for compact and energy preserving devices might demand a more limited format. FIG. 15 depicts an example format of a dynamic mixed media package in accordance with the Multimedia Content Description Interface standard (“the MPEG-7 standard”). In FIG. 15, a dynamic mixed media package 1500 includes a package header, clear content header, clear content section, seed media header, seed media section, and consumer generated content section. The header may indicate general information about the package, such as creation time, size, access, privileges, etc. The clear content header includes descriptive metadata for the mixed media package 1500. The clear content header also includes a package query checkpoint reference. The clear content section includes preview pages, preview photos, and preview audio. The preview photos include image media 1503 with images compressed in accordance with JPEG and corresponding metadata and identifying data. The preview videos include video media 1505 with flash video and corresponding metadata and identifying data. The seed media header includes an XML experience description. The seed media section includes menus, photos, video, audio, and lyrics that are watermarked and with a digital rights management (DRM) technology applied. The video in the seed media section includes video media 1507 encoded according to FairPlay® DRM technology with corresponding metadata and identifying data. Similarly, the audio in the seed media section includes FairPlay encoded audio media 1509 with metadata and identifying data. The consumer generated section includes consumer generated content and syndicated content via an RSS feed. The consumer generated section includes consumer generated media 1511, examples of which include news, reviews, media from blogs, and feeds from external internet feeds.

Preview and seed media of a mixed media package may be implemented as a single media and not necessarily as separate media. The previews associated with a seed media can be implemented using scalable coding techniques, such as those defined in the MPEG-2 and MPEG-4 standards. The media content is coded in multiple layers, where each layer adds perceptual quality to the decoded/reconstructed signal. It is thus possible to decode only the basic layer of an audio signal and obtain AM quality monaural audio. Decoding the second layer will yield high quality audio with some (inaudible) artifacts, while decoding a third layer will allow the perfect (lossless) reconstruction of the original studio recording itself. This allows the encryption/protection of only a part of the content bit stream, while the first layer will be made available unencrypted as a pre-listening sample.

A similar approach can be taken with spatial information for audio. While the stereo signal might be made available unprotected for public consumption, multi-channel rendering information might be available in a protected format that can be unlocked upon acquisition of the necessary rights.

Though it is technically simpler to keep these different layers of content data in one bit stream format for synchronization upon reconstruction, for distribution purposes, it might be desirable to keep them in separate packages (i.e., the multi-channel information might only be available at a later point in time, after the release of the original media item).

The particular technique used to create a dynamic mixed media package will vary with the type of digital rights management utilized, the desired degree of flexibility for the package, etc. Regardless the specific details of encoding, protection, metadata, etc., the dynamic mixed media package begins with seed media.

FIG. 4 depicts a flowchart of example operations for creating a dynamic mixed media package. At block 401, seed media is received, which may be one or more files. Of course, if the media owner/creator is creating the dynamic mixed media package, then block 401 can be skipped. At block 403, management data is generated for the seed media. Management of the seed media may utilize layering of multiple types of data. For example, fingerprinting data and a hash value are generated for the seed media. In addition, the seed media is marked with digital watermarking data. The hash value can be used to quickly identify the media. The fingerprinting data can be utilized to identify a portion or all of the media when combined with other media. The watermarking can be used to track the media and filter user generated media. Although the hash value provides expediency, this operation may be skipped. Furthermore, the fingerprinting may be done at a later time. Also, multiple fingerprinting algorithms can be deployed that each fulfill different robustness and fingerprint data size requirements. For example, one fingerprint format might be highly robust against even drastic changes in the signal (e.g., equalization, pitch shifting, time stretching, dynamic compression, perceptual coding), while another format will be significantly more compact (e.g., the amount of fingerprint data extracted for a certain duration of audio or video content is smaller). A more compact format may be more suitable for transmission through channels with bandwidth limitations. At block 405, it is determined whether there is supplemental media. If there is no supplemental media, then control flows to block 407. If there is supplemental media, then control flows to block 409.

At block 407, a dynamic mixed media package is generated with the seed media. Control flows to block 411 from block 407.

At block 409, a dynamic mixed media package is generated with the seed media and the supplemental media. At block 411, management data and/or management code (e.g., statistic collection code) is embedded into the generated package. At block 413, it is determined whether data from a service provider is available. If a service provider has provided data (e.g., supplemental media, reviews, advertisements, etc.), then control flows to block 415. If not, then control flows to block 417.

At block 415, the data from the service provider is written into the package. At block 417, information about the package is written into the package. For example, structural and content information is written into the package header, clear content header, and/or seed media header. At block 419, a reference to a package query checkpoint is written into the package, as well as any references to service providers that provide package modifications, if any.

After creation of a dynamic mixed media package and delivery of an instance of the dynamic mixed media package, the package can be modified. Modifications to the package can include various media generated by any one of owners, authors, controllers, consumers, and service providers. A modification to a package may be an upgrade, or even a downgrade, in quality of certain package content. For example, video may be enhanced (or higher quality video added to the package) for presentation over a home theatre system, or downgraded for presentation over a compact mobile device. This may not only affect the size of the rendered image or audio resolution, but also the compactness of the encoded media to a point where actual recoding into a different compression scheme might be necessary, because the original codec is not supported in the mobile device. A package modification may replace content, modify content, transcode content, or be added to the package. Since package modifications can be generated by any of a variety of sources at various times during the life span of a dynamic media package, a service may aggregate, review, and distribute the modifications for efficient maintenance of the package modifications.

FIG. 9 depicts an example system that maintains package modifications. A rules database 911 hosts rules that govern packages that are associated with particular seed media. For example, a rule may require automatic acceptance of any submission from the corresponding media owner/creator. Another rule may reject any encoding submission that modifies the protective measures of a package unless created by a particular author. The rule database 911 is accessed by a submission handler module 901 and a derivative media search module 903. The modules 901 and 903 are implemented in one or more machines, and may or may not be implemented at a same physical entity or location. When the submission handler module 901 receives a submission, the submission handler module 901 evaluates the submission against corresponding rules in the rules database 911. The corresponding rules may be determined by examining a submission for identifying data, such as a hash value(s), watermark, and/or fingerprint data. The submission handler module 901 indicates a result from evaluation of the submission against the appropriate rule(s) in an evaluation structure 907. Maintaining indications of evaluation results allows for expedient dispensation of previously evaluated submissions. If the submission handler module 901 approves a submission, then the submission is indicated in a package tracking structure 905 that tracks approved submissions. If approved, the submission and/or a reference to the submission are stored in an approved media database 909. It is not necessary to discard rejected submissions, however. A rejected submission may be stored in the same or a separate database for various reasons, such as archiving, comparison purposes, gathering of statistical data etc.

In addition to being submitted, package modifications may be discovered on the Internet. The derivative search module 903 searches a network (e.g., the Internet, a LAN, a particular online community, etc.) for consumer generated media derived from seed media. For example, the search module 903 may search using fingerprint data, hash values, etc., of seed media. The search module 903 evaluates discovered derivative media against appropriate rules in the rules database 911. Similar to the submission handler module 901, the search module 903 updates the structures 907 and 905 and the database 909 in accordance with evaluations. Whether rejected or approved, an indication of an evaluation result for a particular discovered derivative media is recorded in the evaluation structure 907. If approved, the approval is indicated in the package tracking structure and the discovered derivative media and/or a reference thereto is stored in the approved media database 909. Indication of approval of a submission may also be accompanied by tracking information, such as a package version or date of approval, when distributing the approved submission.

FIG. 6 depicts a flowchart of example operations for handling submissions. At block 601, a submission is received. At block 603, it is determined whether the received submission has previously been evaluated. If so, then the submission is discarded at block 604. Otherwise, the corresponding seed media is determined at block 603. At block 605, the author of the submission is determined. If the author is a service provider, then control flows to block 609. If the author is a consumer, then control flows to block 607. If the author is an owner/creator of the seed media, then control flows to block 615.

At block 609, it is determined whether the service provider is pre-approved. For instance, the service provider has an agreement in place with the seed media creator/owner to provide submissions. If the service provider is pre-approved, then control flows to block 615. Otherwise, control flows to block 607.

At block 607, the submission is evaluated against the rules for the corresponding seed media. At block 608, the result of the evaluation is indicated. At block 611, it is determined whether the submission is rejected or approved. If rejected, then the author is notified of the rejection at block 613. If approved, then information is recorded for the approved submission at block 615. For example, information about authorship, rights ownership, creation date, approval date, size, media type, attribution, etc., is recorded. At block 617, the submission and/or a reference to the submission is stored. An author or representative of the author/rights owner may also be notified of approved submissions. A notification of an approved submission may also invite the author/rights owner to participate in a royalty scheme that compensates the author/rights owner based on popularity and percentage contribution.

FIG. 7 depicts a flowchart for example operations to search for derivative media. At block 701, search for new consumer generated derivative media commences. At block 703 it is determined if derivative media has been found. If not, then control returns to block 701. If new derivative media has been found, then the corresponding seed media is determined at block 705. For example, the derivative media is examined for any watermarking, or a fingerprint of the derivative media is generated and compared against a fingerprint database. In another example, the derivative media indicates attribution information in a header segment. At block 707, rules for the corresponding seed media are selected. At block 709, the discovered media is evaluated against the selected rules. At block 710, a result of the evaluation is indicated. At block 711, it is determined whether the discovered derivative media is approved or rejected. If approved, control flows to block 715. If rejected, control flows to block 713.

At block 715, an indication of the discovered media is recorded in a search structure with an approve flag set and indication of the corresponding seed media. For example, a structure is employed to track results of the search to avoid redundant evaluations. Additional information may also be recorded in the search structure to avoid certain network addresses, allow for evaluation of media against new or modified rules, etc. At block 717, the discovered derivative media is indicated in a package tracking structure. Control flows from block 717 to block 719.

At block 713, indication of the discovered derivative media is recorded in the search structure and a rejected flag is set along with indication of the corresponding seed media. The seed media is also indicated in case a submission is allowed for a first seed media, while rejected for a second seed media. Control flows to block 719 from block 713.

At block 719, it is determined whether other seed media correspond to the discovered derivative media. If so, then control flows to block 707. If there are no other corresponding seed media, then control returns to block 701.

As stated above, multiple seed media may correspond to a submission. To conform to various rules for different seed media, a composite of different rules may be applied to media. FIG. 13 depicts a flowchart for example application of a composite set of rules to media that may be performed in block 607 of FIG. 6 or block 709 of FIG. 7. At block 1301, it is determined whether the submitted or discovered media (or accompanying information, such as in a header) includes data identifying different seed media. If the media (or accompanying information) does not include data identifying different seed media, then control flows to block 1321. If the media includes data that identifies different seed media, then control flows to block 1303.

At block 1303, the media is examined to determine attribution to different seeds. At block 1305, the rules for the individual seeds are looked up. At block 1307, it is verified whether the rules are the same. If the rules are the same, then control flows to block 1323. If the rules are not the same, then control flows to block 1309.

At block 1309, it is determined whether the individual rules allow for composite rules. If composite rules are not allowed, then control flows to block 1311. If composite rules are allowed then control flows to block 1313.

At block 1311, the media is rejected. Control flows from block 1311 to block 1317.

At block 1313, a composite of the different rules are generated based on seed attribution. Other factors may also be considered in the generation of composite rules, such as priority, pre-configured conflict resolution policy, etc. At block 1315, the media is evaluated against the composite rules. At block 1317, a result of the evaluation is generated. Control flows to either block 608 or 710 from block 1317.

At block 1321, rules for the seed media are looked up. At block 1323, the media is evaluated against the rules. If the rules were determined to be the same at block 1307, then a rule or one of the sets of rules is selected. Control flows from block 1323 to block 1317.

Using various business models and delivery protocols, approved modifications are made available to media consumers with dynamic mixed media packages. Delivery of dynamic mixed media packages can be implemented in various manners. The entity that maintains package modifications may push all approved package modifications. The entity may prompt media consumers to accept or reject installation of approved package modifications. A query event may be detected at a consumer machine or device that triggers querying of an entity for any package modifications.

FIG. 5 depicts a flowchart of example operations for querying an entity for a package modification responsive to a query event. At block 501, a dynamic mixed media package event is detected for a dynamic mixed media package. At block 503, the dynamic mixed media package is accessed to determine a reference for a package query checkpoint, data that identifies the seed media of the package, and optionally a time of last query. For example, a hash value for the seed media, URL of a media packager, timestamp, and a unique index such as a customer or session identifier are written into a request message. Additional information may also be written into the query that affects the query result, such as consumer service level, community membership, etc. At block 505, the package query checkpoint is queried with the information determined at block 503. A dashed line from block 505 to block 507 represents a lapse of time until a response is received to the query.

FIG. 8 depicts a flowchart for example operations for handling a package query for a dynamic mixed media package. At block 801, a package query is received. At block 803, data identifying a seed media and a previous query timestamp are determined from the query. At block 805, a package tracking structure is accessed with the data determined at block 803 to determine package modifications available since the previous query timestamp. The available package modifications may also be filtered based on consumer service level, privilege, geography, etc. At block 807, it is determined whether any package modifications are available. If package modifications are available, then an indication of the available package modifications is returned to the media consumer with a new query timestamp or other identifier at block 809. For example, a message is returned that includes some new media to be added to the package, and references to other media. If there are no available package modifications, then a null value is returned with a new query timestamp.

Referring again to FIG. 5, an indication of package modifications is received at block 507. At block 509, it is determined if additional media is to be added to the package. If so, control flows to block 511. If there is no additional media, then control flows to block 513.

At block 511, the additional media is added to the package and the package information is updated accordingly. At block 513, it is determined whether the indication of package modifications included a reference(s) and/or data. For example, it is determined whether the response to the query indicated network addresses, a new encoding scheme, ratings data, etc. If so, then control flows to block 515. Otherwise, control flows to block 517.

At block 515, the package is modified in accordance with the reference(s) and/or data. For example, the ratings data is written into the clear content section of the package, a reference is written into a header for the consumer generated media section of the package, etc. At block 517, the new query timestamp is written into the package.

A variety of implementations are possible for querying a checkpoint for modifications. For instance, functionality that detects an event and generates a query may be implemented as a component of a media player, a background process, daemon, plug-in, etc. FIG. 10 depicts an example implementation of a media query module. In FIG. 10, a media player 1003 is separate from a package query module 1005 in a media consumer machine 1007, which may be a mobile device, consumer electronic device, computer, one or more components in an automobile, etc. The media query module 1005 may be a plug-in to the media player 1003, process that runs in the background, etc. The media consumer machine 1007 hosts dynamic mixed media packages 1001 a-1001 h. The media player 1003 loads and activates the dynamic mixed media package 1001 b at a time a. At a time b, the media player 1003 invokes the package query module 1005 or notifies the package query module 1005 of the activation of the dynamic media package 1001 b. In various embodiments a query event is detected differently (e.g., the package query module 1005 monitors the address space occupied by the dynamic mixed media packages 1001 a-1001 h, an inter-process communication mechanism notifies the package query module 1005 when a dynamic mixed media package is accessed, etc.). At a time c, the package query module 1005 gathers query information from the dynamic mixed media package 1001 b. In another embodiment, a registration structure maintains query information for the packages hosted on the media consumer machine 1007, and the package query module accesses the structure based on a package identifier communicated by the media player 1003. At a time d, the package query module generates a query with the gathered information. At a time e, the package query module causes the generated query to be transmitted to the checkpoint indicated for seed media of the dynamic mixed media package 1001 b. At a time f, an indication of a package modification(s) is received and handled by the package query module 1005. The package query module 1005 queues the modification(s) for application to the package 1001 b at time g. At a time h, the media player 1003 applies the queued modification(s) to the package 1001 b. It should be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art that the illustration of FIG. 10 is intended to aid in understanding as one example implementation and not meant to be limiting. For instance, the modification to the package may be applied by the package query module 1005 when the media player 1003 completes a current presentation. In another example, the package query module 1005 modifies the package 1001 b while the media player presents media from a copy of the package 1001 b to be discarded after presentation.

A media player presents media of a dynamic mixed media package as directed by corresponding presentation directives. Directives may direct a player to overlap media, stream media concurrently, enforce a sequence upon media, etc. Some presentation directives may be pre-defined in the package, while others are commands from a user. FIG. 16 depicts an example presentation of media from an example dynamic mixed media package. A mixed media package player 1613 loads and activates a dynamic mixed media package 1621. The mixed media package 1621 includes an advertisement 1603 for an upcoming musical album, synchronized lyrics 1605, seed audio 1607, a consumer generated video, and a consumer generated re-mix 1611 that includes the seed audio 1607. Assume a consumer commands the player 1613 to play the consumer generated video 1609 with lyrics 1605. A presentation directive(s) in the header for the consumer media section directs the player 1613 to play the seed audio 1607 with the consumer generated video 1609. The current play directive causes the player 1613 to overlay the lyrics 1605 onto the video 1609 to create the video 1605 with overlaid lyrics. A directive for the package 1613 directs the player to sequence the advertisement 1603 for presentation after completion of the video 1605. The player 1613 concurrently sends the seed audio 1607 to speaker(s) 1615 and the video 1605 to the display 1613. The directive also directs the player to send the advertisement 1603 to the display 1613 after the video 1605 has completed.

A player may utilize an interface that accommodates video play and a few controls, or a more complicated interface that divides a display area among various content of a dynamic mixed media package. FIG. 11 depicts an example interface for a dynamic mixed media package player. In FIG. 11, a display area of an interface has been divided into 10 regions. A video region 1101 presents video from a mixed media package. A package directory 1103 presents accessible content of a package to user (e.g., in tree hierarchy format, icon format, etc.). A directory of consumer generated media region 1105 presents a directory of consumer generated media that has been added to the package. A seed media owner/creator feed region 1107 streams information from a recording company, publisher, and/or artist. A lyrics and cover art region 1121 presents cover art and lyrics for the seed audio in a double truck layout that can be expanded to allow a consumer to navigate similar to flipping through pages of an album jacket. A concert schedule region 1119 presents a concert schedule for the author of the seed audio of the package, perhaps, as filtered by current geographic information of the machine or device hosting the player. A region 117 presents advertisements for concerts in the area by musicians of the same genre of music. A region 1109 presents music reviews by consumers and critics, depending on the level of service purchased. A region 1111 presents upgrades available for the seed audio, such as richer sound, improved player, etc. A region 1115 presents live media feedback. For example, live comments from consumers in a music community are displayed in the region 1115.

FIG. 11 illustrates just one example of many possible examples. Numerous features and permutations of interfaces are possible with a dynamic mixed media package. For example, when audio from an album is played, a digital representation of an album booklet can be displayed in a double truck layout. Photos can be on one side, with lyrics and credits on the other side. The pages of the booklet can be flipped on a device with a large display area or scrolled through on a device with a constrained display area. Lyrics can be synchronized with audio on the level of individual words, playback of audio may be triggered by clicking on the lyrics, etc.

For image media, various functionality is also possible. A slideshow can be generated with all images of a particular artist or label. Consumer photos can be mixed in with musical artist photos and set to the audio of the artist.

In addition to the functionality allowed by dynamic mixed media packages, additional products and services can be spawned. A dynamic mixed media package can define themes for devices. For example, the sounds and display may be configured to comport with a theme as defined for a dynamic mixed media package for a particular album. For instance, the first few notes of the 4 most popular songs of the album may be utilized for 4 different ring/alarm sounds of a phone and the wallpaper for the phone set to cover art for the album. Design tools can be developed to mix media in a dynamic mixed media package. Moreover, new services can be offered that maintain package modifications, review submissions, track statistics, compensate consumers that generate popular media, RSS feeds, blogs, news services, user ratings, etc.

The described embodiments may be provided as a computing machine program product, or software, that may include a machine-readable medium having stored thereon instructions, which may be used to program a processing system (or other electronic devices) to perform a process according to embodiments of the invention, whether presently described or not, since every conceivable variation is not enumerated herein. A machine readable medium includes any mechanism for storing or transmitting information in a form (e.g., software, processing application) readable by a machine (e.g., a computer, a personal data assistant, a cellular phone, a media center, game console, etc.). The machine-readable medium may include, but is not limited to, magnetic storage medium (e.g., floppy diskette); optical storage medium (e.g., CD-ROM); magneto-optical storage medium; read only memory (ROM); random access memory (RAM); erasable programmable memory (e.g., EPROM and EEPROM); flash memory; or other types of medium suitable for storing electronic instructions. In addition, embodiments may be embodied in an electrical, optical, acoustical or other form of propagated signal (e.g., carrier waves, infrared signals, digital signals, etc.), or wireline, wireless, or other communications medium.

FIG. 12 depicts a diagrammatic representation of a machine in the example form of a processing system 1200 within which a set of instructions, for causing the machine to perform any of the functionality discussed herein, may be executed. The machine may operate as a standalone device or may be connected (e.g., networked) to other machines. In a networked deployment, the machine may operate in the capacity of a server or a client machine in server-client network environment, or as a peer machine in a peer-to-peer (or distributed) network environment. The machine may be a server computer, a client computer, a personal computer (PC), a tablet PC, a set-top box (STB), a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA), a cellular telephone, a web appliance, a network router, switch or bridge, or any machine capable of executing a set of instructions (sequential or otherwise) that specify actions to be taken by that machine. Further, while only a single machine is illustrated, the term “machine” shall also be taken to include any collection of machines that individually or jointly execute a set (or multiple sets) of instructions to perform any one or more of the methodologies discussed herein.

The example processing system 1200 includes a processor 1202 (e.g., a central processing unit (CPU) a graphics processing unit (GPU) or both), a main memory 1204 and a static memory 1206, which communicate with each other via a bus 1208. The processing system 1200 may further include a video display unit 1210 (e.g., a liquid crystal display (LCD) or a cathode ray tube (CRT)). The processing system 1200 also includes an alphanumeric input device 1212 (e.g., a keyboard), a cursor control device 1214 (e.g., a mouse), a disk drive unit 1216, a signal generation device 1218 (e.g., a speaker) and a network interface device 1220.

The disk drive unit 1216 includes a machine-readable medium 1222 on which is stored one or more sets of instructions (e.g., software 1224) embodying any one or more of the methodologies or functions described herein. The software 1224 may also reside, completely or at least partially, within the main memory 1204 and/or within the processor 1202 during execution thereof by the processing system 1200, the main memory 1204 and the processor 1202 also constituting machine-readable media.

The software 1224 may further be transmitted or received over a network 1026 via the network interface device 1220.

While the invention(s) is (are) described with reference to various implementations and exploitations, it will be understood that these embodiments are illustrative and that the scope of the invention(s) is not limited to them. In general, techniques for access-based security evaluation of files introduced from a source external to a machine may be implemented with facilities consistent with any hardware system or hardware systems defined herein. Many variations, modifications, additions, and improvements are possible.

Plural instances may be provided for components, operations or structures described herein as a single instance. Finally, boundaries between various components, operations and data stores are somewhat arbitrary, and particular operations are illustrated in the context of specific illustrative configurations. Other allocations of functionality are envisioned and may fall within the scope of the invention(s). In general, structures and functionality presented as separate components in the exemplary configurations may be implemented as a combined structure or component. Similarly, structures and functionality presented as a single component may be implemented as separate components. These and other variations, modifications, additions, and improvements fall within the scope of the invention(s).

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Classifications
U.S. Classification455/3.06
International ClassificationH04H1/00
Cooperative ClassificationG11B27/034, H04N21/8355, G06Q30/02, G11B20/00884, G06Q50/182, H04N21/235, G06Q30/0274, H04N21/8549, H04N21/4316, G06Q40/12, H04N21/8358, H04N21/47202, H04N21/475, H04N21/4348, H04N21/4334, H04N7/17318, H04N21/4367, H04N21/435, H04N21/23614
European ClassificationH04N21/475, H04N21/433R, H04N21/431L3, H04N21/472D, H04N21/235, H04N21/4367, H04N21/8549, H04N21/8358, H04N21/435, H04N21/8355, G11B27/034, H04N21/434W, H04N21/236W, G06Q30/02, G06Q30/0274, G06Q50/182, G06Q40/10, H04N7/173B2
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Owner name: SONY CORPORATION, JAPAN
Aug 8, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: GRACENOTE, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:ROBERTS, DALE T.;CREMER, MARKUS K.;MANTLE, MICHAEL W.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:019666/0073;SIGNING DATES FROM 20070727 TO 20070730