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Publication numberUS20080274806 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/838,660
Publication dateNov 6, 2008
Filing dateAug 14, 2007
Priority dateMay 2, 2007
Also published asCA2630284A1, CA2630326A1, CA2630335A1, US7970663, US8401912, US20080274811, US20080275789, US20110213682
Publication number11838660, 838660, US 2008/0274806 A1, US 2008/274806 A1, US 20080274806 A1, US 20080274806A1, US 2008274806 A1, US 2008274806A1, US-A1-20080274806, US-A1-2008274806, US2008/0274806A1, US2008/274806A1, US20080274806 A1, US20080274806A1, US2008274806 A1, US2008274806A1
InventorsHoward Ganz, Karl Joseph Borst
Original AssigneeS.H. Ganz Holdings Inc. And 816877 Ontario Limited
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Character development and exchange
US 20080274806 A1
Abstract
There is provided a character development and exchange system for a virtual environment and related method. A character, such as an animal, human or human-like figure, doll, or other animated or cartoon-like object can be purchased by a user and then registered on a communication network via a unique code. Once registered, a set of attributes can be assigned to the character based on the type and class of the character. Attribute values can be assigned to the attributes by default or by user preferences. The characters can be manipulated within the virtual environment. In particular, the characters can be trained in order to improve their skills and to increase their overall value and worth in the virtual environment. As desired, the characters can be securely traded among users, whereby a traded character is given a new code to transfer all control of the character to the new owner.
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Claims(41)
1. A character development and exchange method comprising:
registering a character for a first user with a communication network by receiving information associated with the character via the communication network;
following registration of the character, assigning a set of attributes to the character based on at least one of a type and a class of the character;
displaying the character on a screen in a virtual environment in a manner based at least in part upon the set of attributes, the class, and the type of the character;
training the character in response to activity by the first user in order to increase a value of at least one of the attributes;
when the character is listed as available for transfer to another user, blocking access to the character at least temporarily during a listing period in order to prevent modification of the character during the listing period; and
transferring the character to the another user by unblocking access to the character for the another user, and preventing the first user from controlling the character.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the registering uses a code and the transferring assigns a new code, where the codes are unique for each character.
3. The method of claim 1, wherein the registering the character by receiving the information unlocks content associated with the class of the character and makes it available and viewable to the first user.
4. The method of claim 1 further comprises giving the first user control of the character within the virtual environment.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein the virtual environment comprises at least one of a game and a virtual reality environment.
6. The method of claim 1 further comprising allocating an attribute value to each attribute of the set of attributes.
7. The method of claim 1 further comprising:
providing a total attribute value for the set of attributes; and
distributing at least a portion of the total attribute value across the set of attributes based upon user preferences.
8. The method of claim 1, wherein the set of attributes comprise core attributes of the character.
9. The method of claim 1 further comprising determining an overall value of the character according to at least two of the following: one or more of the character's attributes, type, class, and experiences; popularity of the character; and demand for the character and/or for similar characters in the virtual environment.
10. The method of claim 9, wherein the determining of the overall value of the character occurs when preparing to make the character available for transfer to the another user.
11. The method of claim 1 further comprising storing a plurality of attributes available for the character according to the at least one of the type and the class of the character.
12. The method of claim 1 further comprising selecting at least one additional attribute for the training, wherein the at least one additional attribute is suitable for the character according to at the least one of the type and the class of the character and is different from attributes already possessed by and/or trained upon the character.
13. The method of claim 1 further comprising allocating an attribute value for each attribute newly associated with the character.
14. The method of claim 13, wherein the attribute value is allocated according to the first user's historical character data.
15. The method of claim 13, wherein the attribute value is predetermined based upon at least one of the following: the type of the character, the class of the character, and at least one other attribute previously associated with the character.
16. The method of claim 13, wherein the attribute value is selected from a range of values based upon at least one of the type and the class of the character.
17. The method of claim 13 further comprising employing a component to automatically determine an optimum attribute value for each attribute newly associated with the character by learning user preferences and making inferences based on at least one of the following: the first user's other characters and their attributes and/or previous attribute value distributions made by the first user.
18. The method of claim 13 further comprising allocating a variable amount of attribute value points for distribution across one or more of the attributes newly associated with the character.
19. The method of claim 1, wherein the training of the character is initiated upon payment and/or redemption of at least one of the following: points, virtual currency, and real currency.
20. The method of claim 19 further comprising earning the at least one of the points, the virtual currency, and the real currency by at least one of the following: playing in the virtual environment with the character, winning, accumulating points that satisfy a threshold, and participating in at least one of games, competitions, and events in the virtual environment.
21. The method of claim 1, wherein the character deemed to be relatively higher-skilled is trained with greater ease and efficiency than a character deemed to be relatively less-skilled.
22. The method of claim 1, wherein the character undergoes the training in a manner that is independent of personal skills of the user who owns and controls the character.
23. The method of claim 1, wherein the character undergoes the training in a manner consistent with the at least one of the class and the type of the character.
24. The method of claim 1, wherein the training of the character on the at least one additional attribute occurs over a period of time, wherein the training comprises one or more tasks and/or exercises to complete.
25. The method of claim 1, wherein the training of the character comprises immediately applying the at least one additional attribute to the character.
26. The method of claim 1, wherein the at least one additional attribute and the set of attributes comprise at least one of a skill, a talent, a power, a body feature, and a facial feature.
27. The method of claim 1 further comprising:
collecting at least one of statistical data, family heritage data, and trading data;
generating and displaying a portfolio of one or more characters owned and/or trained for the first user; and
storing the portfolio on the communication network.
28. A character development and exchange method comprising:
registering a character with a communication network via receiving a code that is unique to the character in order to provide access to interact with and control of the character in a virtual environment;
upon registration of the character, assigning at least one attribute to the character based on at least one of a type and class of the character;
allocating an attribute value to the at least one attribute at least in part by inferring an optimum attribute value based on the user's historical character data;
training the character on at least one additional attribute, wherein the at least one additional attribute is suitable for the character according to at the least one of the type and the class of the character;
storing the character, the at least one attribute, the at least one additional attribute, and corresponding attribute values on the communication network;
displaying the character in the virtual environment on a display screen;
determining an overall value of the character after the training; and
transferring the control of the character to another user.
29. The method of claim 28, wherein training the character on the at least one additional attribute comprises selecting at least one additional attribute for the character from an attribute database.
30. The method of claim 28 further comprising upon registration of the character, providing access to one or more areas of the virtual environment based on at least one of the type and the class of the character.
31. The method of claim 28, wherein the at least one additional attribute is different from the attributes previously associated with the character.
32. The method of claim 28, wherein the training of the character with the at least one additional attribute is permitted after redeeming a predetermined amount of at least one of the following: points, virtual currency, and real currency.
33. The method of claim 28, wherein the transferring control of the character to the another user comprises disabling the code previously associated with the character and generating a new code for the character.
34. The method of claim 28 further comprises mating at least two characters and passing at least a portion of their combined attributes to any offspring.
35. The method of claim 28 further comprises creating a portfolio for the character to record and view at least one of the following: statistics, tournaments, competitions, games participated in, family heritage, and at least one of previous or current owners of the character.
36. A character development and exchange method comprising:
registering a character for a user with a communication network by receiving a code associated with the character via the communication network, wherein the code yields control of the character in a virtual environment;
following registration of the character, assigning a set of attributes to the character based on at least one of a type and a class of the character;
displaying the character on a screen in the virtual environment in a manner based at least in part upon the set of attributes, the class, and the type of the character;
determining an overall value of the character according to the set of attributes; and
transferring the control of the character in the virtual environment to another user.
37. The method of claim 36, wherein the code is unique for each character.
38. The method of claim 36, wherein the transferring of the control of the character to the another user comprises assigning a new code to the character and disassociating the code previously associated with the character.
39. A character development and exchange system comprising:
a character registration component that registers a character with a communication network by validating a code associated with the character;
an attribute allocation component that assigns a set of attributes to the character based on at least one of a type and a class of the character upon registration of the character;
an interactive manipulation component that manipulates the character within a virtual environment;
a display component that displays the character in the virtual environment on a screen in a manner based at least in part on the set of attributes, the class, and the type of the character; and
a trading component that blocks access to the character at least temporarily during a listing period when the character is made available for a transfer of ownership to another user in order to prevent further modification of the character during the listing period.
40. The system of claim 39 further comprising:
a character analysis component that analyzes the character's set of attributes to determine which level of interaction it can participate in within the virtual environment and to determine what kind of training is available to it; and
a training component that trains the character with at least one additional attribute in order to increase a value of the character in the virtual environment.
41. The system of claim 39, wherein the trading component comprises:
a code verification component that verifies current ownership of the code before blocking access to it during the listing period;
a valuation component that determines a value for the character using at least one of the following: character data, previous completed transfers of similar characters, current and projected popularity of and demand for the character in consideration of its class, type, and/or attributes; and
when the transfer of ownership is confirmed, a transfer component that disassociates the code associated with the character and to each auxiliary item associated with the character and that assigns a new code to the character and to each auxiliary item associated with the character to the another user.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/915,499, entitled CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT AND EXCHANGE and filed on May 2, 2007, the entirety of which is incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This application relates generally to computer-based character development. More specifically, this application relates to a character development and exchange system that facilitates the improvement of character traits and skills and increasing their value as a result of such improvements within a virtual environment.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The Internet has become a common resource for entertainment seekers. Through various entertainment websites, virtual communities have been established that allow users to create a virtual or online reality for themselves. Computer games have also crossed over into the online world, allowing users to play against or along with each other from the comfort of their own personal Internet connections located across town or across the country. When it comes to most online entertainment activities including gaming and virtual communities, a disconnection unfortunately exists between objects in the real world and objects in the online world.

More recently, however, entertainment websites have been developed in which the website content is directly tied to a product that is purchased by a user. For example, as disclosed in United States Patent Application Publication No. 2005/0192864 to Ganz, incorporated herein by reference, a user purchases a toy that includes a secret code provided in the toy packaging. Access to a certain interactive content on the website provided by the manufacturer of the toy is restricted to users who purchase a toy. When the user carries out a registration process on the manufacturer's website, which involves entering the secret code, a virtual world is presented to the user. The virtual world includes a virtual toy corresponding to the toy purchased by the user. The user can participate in various interactive activities involving the virtual toy. The user may then purchase additional toys and enter the secret codes provided with those toys to add additional virtual toys to the virtual world. These virtual toys can interact with each other, thereby enhancing the user's entertainment experiences. Despite the popularity of such websites, consumers continue to demand more interactive capabilities and more flexibility with respect to their online or virtual reality products.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The subject application relates to a system(s) and/or methodology that facilitate character development and exchange. In particular, there is provided a character development and exchange method comprising registering a character for a user with a communication network by receiving a code associated with the character via the communication network; following registration of the character, assigning a set of attributes to the character based on at least one of a type and a class of the character; displaying the character on a screen in a virtual environment in a manner based at least in part upon the set of attributes, the class, and the type of the character; training the character in response to activity by the user in order to increase a value of the character in the virtual environment; when the character is listed as available for transfer to another user, blocking access to the character at least temporarily during a listing period in order to prevent modification of the character during the listing period; and when the character is transferred to the another user, associating a new code to the character, unblocking access to the character for the another user, and disassociating the code from the character to prevent a previous user from controlling the character.

According to another aspect, there is provided a character development and exchange method comprising registering a character with a communication network via receiving a code that is unique to the character in order to provide access to interact with and control of the character in a virtual environment; upon registration of the character, assigning at least one attribute to the character based on at least one of a type and class of the character; allocating an attribute value to the at least one attribute at least in part by inferring an optimum attribute value based on the user's historical character data; training the character on at least one additional attribute, wherein the at least one additional attribute is suitable for the character according to at the least one of the type and the class of the character; storing the character, the at least one attribute, the at least one additional attribute, and corresponding attribute values on the communication network; displaying the character in the virtual environment on a display screen; determining an overall value of the character after the training; and transferring the control of the character to another user.

Also provided is a character development and exchange method that includes registering a character for a user with a communication network by receiving a code associated with the character via the communication network, wherein the code yields control of the character in a virtual environment; following registration of the character, assigning a set of attributes to the character based on at least one of a type and a class of the character; displaying the character on a screen in the virtual environment in a manner based at least in part upon the set of attributes, the class, and the type of the character; determining an overall value of the character according to the set of attributes; and transferring the control of the character in the virtual environment to another user.

Further provided is a character development and exchange system that includes a character registration component that registers a character with a communication network by validating a code associated with the character; an attribute allocation component that assigns a set of attributes to the character based on at least one of a type and a class of the character upon registration of the character; an interactive manipulation component that manipulates the character within a virtual environment; a display component that displays the character in the virtual environment on a screen in a manner based at least in part on the set of attributes, the class, and the type of the character; and a trading component that blocks access to the character at least temporarily during a listing period when the character is made available for a transfer of ownership to another user in order to prevent further modification of the character during the listing period.

The above summary presents a simplified summary in order to provide a basic understanding of some aspects of the systems and/or methods discussed herein. This summary is not an extensive overview of the systems and/or methods discussed herein. It is not intended to identify key/critical elements or to delineate the scope of such systems and/or methods. Its sole purpose is to present some concepts in a simplified form as a prelude to the more detailed description that is presented later.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, certain illustrative aspects of the invention are described herein in connection with the following description and the annexed drawings. These aspects are indicative, however, of but a few of the various ways in which the principles of the invention may be employed and the subject invention is intended to include all such aspects and their equivalents. Other advantages and novel features of the invention may become apparent from the following detailed description of the invention when considered in conjunction with the drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a character development system that facilitates allocating attributes to a character and developing those attributes and/or new attributes to enhance interactive play of the character in a game environment.

FIG. 2 is a block diagram of a character development and exchange system that facilitates allocating attributes to a character as well as training the character with new attributes in order to increase the value of the character for selling and/or trading purposes.

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of an attribute allocation aspect of the character development system of FIG. 1 that allows for automatic or user-designated allocation based on a type or class of character.

FIG. 4 is a block diagram of an attribute training aspect of the character development system of FIG. 1 that allows for training the character with additional attributes based on existing attributes of the character.

FIG. 5 is a block diagram of a trading aspect of the character development and exchange system of FIG. 2 that facilitates selling and/or trading the character to another user.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The subject application as described in further detail below relates to a character development and/or exchange system in which a user can, through codes attached to or otherwise associated with a physical product and/or computer-based image of the product (as represented on a computer display), obtain virtual characters or images of characters within a virtual world. The characters can be comprised of various features such as core attributes, potential skills, optional and/or inherent powers, and specific classifications. It is intended herein that the term ‘attributes’ includes skills, traits, and characteristics of the character. In an embodiment, characters are initially purchased (from a vendor or retailer) in a similar initial state having a core set of characteristics or attributes for all users. Each character has the potential to improve and/or mature beyond their initial state. This can be accomplished in part by playing with the character within the virtual world (e.g., games, adventures, and/or challenges), winning events, dedicated training of the character, and obtaining additional feature codes attached to auxiliary products for the character, all of which can earn points for the character. The accumulated points can then be used to train and/or develop the character with additional attributes.

Characters are available in different types and classes. Examples of different types of characters include but are not limited to sports players, soldiers/fighters, firemen, students, animals, etc. Sports players and animals can be further divided into different types of animals and different types of sports players. Characters of a similar type can be divided into different classes. Examples of different classes of animals include but are not limited to mutts (or mixed-breed), pure-bred, award-winner, and the like. Ownership of a character in any one class unlocks content that is available only to that class. As additional characters are obtained from different types and classes, additional content is opened up and made available and viewable to the user. Thus, additional areas of the virtual environment become accessible by the user as the user collects more characters of different types and in different classes.

In a similar manner, character training can also be limited by or based upon the type or class of the character. For example, a baseball playing character cannot be trained with a football playing skill or a fighting skill. Similarly, a ninja-assassin class of character cannot be trained with a skill from a different ninja class, such as a ninja-jumper class. However, some classes of characters can be promoted to an upper sub-class based on the accumulated attributes. For example, a rookie (sub-class) sports player character can be promoted to a professional (sub-class) sports player once a particular attribute or skills level is reached. By training and developing the character to have more or better skills, talents, and/or powers, the overall value of the character increases. The trained character may be traded to other users. Hence, this training imparts a value to the character that can be monetized by a user through the training process.

The combination of the character's total calculated value and its perceived value (including the value of the auxiliary items) assigned or associated with the character creates this real-world monetary value of the character. As an example, a first user develops a highly skilled pitcher. The first user can make the pitcher available for exchange to someone else. A second user who is building up a baseball team of characters may want to acquire a trained pitcher. Through the direct mechanism for buying, selling, trading, auctioning, or otherwise exchanging characters and their associated items between users as provided herein, the second user can buy the pitcher from the first user.

An embodiment performs the transaction in a secure manner using the character's code. The embodiment uses characters as well as their items which are linked to unique codes. When a character, for example, is made available for sale, auction, or trade, the item is in effect “escrowed,” tolling the ability to interact with and manipulate the character. This is done to prevent further development or changes to the character during the “on-sale” period. Therefore, the owner of the character is restricted from modifying the character. The owner may still withdraw the character from sale, auction, or trade. When the transfer is confirmed, the current code is disabled or deleted. A new code is generated and/or assigned to the character and given to the new owner/user of such character. The new owner can then add the character to his/her account and interact with it as desired. Thus, the previous owner/user transfers ownership and control of the character to the new owner, and the new owner assumes exclusive control of the character and its items. Since the new code is not given to the previous owner/user, the previous owner has no way of retaining or regaining control over the character.

The subject application will now be described in further detail with reference to FIGS. 1-5.

FIG. 1 shows a general block diagram of a character development system 100. The system 100 includes a character registration component 110 that registers the character with a communication network via a code. The code can be unique to the particular character and can provide various features associated with the character to the user. For example, the user may purchase the character and/or another product that includes the character (e.g., game). Upon such purchase, the code is provided to the user (e.g., associated with product packaging). The character registration component 110 receives and processes the code in order to give the user control of the character within the virtual environment (e.g., game or virtual reality environment).

Following registration, an attribute allocation component 120 can allocate a set of attributes to the character. This set of attributes is based on the type and/or class of the character. For example, if the character is a baseball player, then the attributes may include pitching, running, hitting, catching, and fielding skills. Initially, the character may be granted a basic or core set of attributes and attribute values (e.g., pitching=2, running=2, hitting=2, catching=2, and fielding=2). In many cases, the value of each attribute may be relatively low, leaving potential for the character to improve through training. For instance, the attribute value can be based on a 10-point scale, where 0 indicates no skill and 10 indicates the highest attainable skill. Initially, for example, the attributes can be allocated in a preset or standard manner so that each attribute is given a value of 2 as shown above. This standard value can differ according to the type of character as well as its class. That is, the attribute values may be based on a different value scale depending on the type of character and class of character.

Alternatively, the character acquired can be more specialized, such as a pitcher baseball player character. In this case, the initial set of attribute values may be initially distributed across the basic set of attributes as follows: pitching=4, running=2, hitting=2, catching=2, and fielding=2. Higher attribute value may represent an untrained skill level for certain characters. Again, it should be appreciated that this allocation of attribute values is merely exemplary and many other allocations are possible.

The system 100 also includes a character analysis component 130 that analyzes the character's attributes to determine which level of play it can participate in and to determine what kind of training is available to it. Thereafter, the character can be manipulated by an interactive manipulation component 140, which earns points for the character, or can be trained by a training component 150. It should be appreciated that when the character is undergoing training, it is not subjected to the interactive manipulation component 140.

Training a character involves using or trading in points for specific improvements to the character. Points can be earned or purchased using real or virtual currency. Improvements can vary in cost depending on the importance to the character, to the game or environment associated with the character, and the level of improvement achieved.

An alternative training procedure can involve performing certain exercises or tasks with the character in order to add the particular skill or attribute to the character's list of attributes. For example, practicing pitching may increase the pitching attribute. Alternatively, specific powers can be immediately applied to the character upon redemption of a required amount of points or when a certain overall attribute level is reached. For example, when the character has reached the highest attainable skill level for its type and class of character, a specific power can be assigned to it (e.g., baseball playing character: a power to always hit a home run when at bat; or fairy character: a magical power to turn spiders into flowers).

In FIG. 2, there is a block diagram of a character development and exchange system 200 that facilitates allocating attributes to a character as well as training the character with additional attributes in order to increase the value of the character for selling and/or trading purposes. The system 200 is similar to the character development system 100 discussed in FIG. 1 but includes a character trading component 210. The character trading component 210 locks the unique code associated with the character and its auxiliary items (e.g., equipment, clothing, furnishings, land, territory, property, weapons, etc.) so that the current owner of the character can no longer change or otherwise alter the status of the character and its items during the “offer” time period. To complete a transfer transaction and to transfer the character to a new owner, the character trading component 210 also generates and/or assigns new unique codes for the character and its items. As a result, the previous owner no longer has control of the character and is prevented from hijacking and re-claiming control of the character after it has been purchased by another user.

FIG. 3 shows a block diagram of an attribute allocation aspect of the character development system 100 of FIG. 1 that allows for automatic or user-designated allocation based on a type or class of character. When a new character is acquired by a user, an attribute selection component 310 can select one or more attributes from an attribute database 320. The particular attribute database and/or selection therefrom can be based on the type or class of character acquired. For instance, a football player character has a set of available attributes that are substantially different from a warrior-fighter character's set of available attributes. Attributes can also have sub-attributes. Take for example a baseball player's running attribute. There can also be a running-slide sub-attribute as well as a running-stealing sub-attribute.

As previously mentioned, the attributes selected can differ based on the type or class of character. For example, a ninja-assassin character can have attributes which are different from those available to a ninja-warrior character—in order to maintain some distinction between different classes of ninjas. For example, a ninja assassin character may have the following core attributes: skill=3; speed=1; hide in shadow; and back stab. The ninja-warrior character may have core attributes such as one-on-one combat=3; camouflage=2; acrobatic combat=3. The ninja assassin can also be limited to the following maximum attribute values for strength (8) and energy (8); whereas a ninja-warrior can have a strength limit and an energy limit set at 10 along with different skill and speed attribute values. As an alternative to hard limits on attribute values, it may become more difficult to train above those attribute values. For example, it may become 100× more difficult to train the ninja assassin to strength values above 8.

The allocation of attribute values can be performed in a standard manner by an attribute value allocation component 330 and be based in part upon user input and/or in part according to the user's other characters. When allocated in a standard manner, the attribute values are assigned in the same distribution for each user for that particular character. That is, all baseball player characters, for example, are automatically assigned pitching=3, catching=3, running=4, hitting=5, and fielding=3.

Alternatively, the user can be given a set number (e.g., 20) of attribute value points to distribute across the initial set of attributes for the character based on user preferences. Additionally, one or more particular attributes can be set by the attribute value allocation component 330 and the user can assign the remaining value points to the other attributes. For instance, the hitting attribute can be set to 5, leaving 15 value points to be distributed by the user among the remaining four attributes.

The attribute value allocation component 330 can also allocate the attribute values based on an analysis by an AI (artificial intelligence) component 340. The AI component 340 can learn from the characters currently and/or previously owned by the user (via a character database 350) and determine an optimum distribution of the available attribute value points. In particular, the AI component 340 can learn from the user's character history and previous attribute value distributions made by the user. By doing so, the allocation of value points is automatic yet based on the user's current characters and preferences as indicated by previous attribute value distributions and/or other relevant historical data.

FIG. 4 illustrates a block diagram of an attribute training aspect of the character development system 100 of FIG. 1 that allows for training the character with additional attributes based on existing attributes of the character. Before actual training is performed, a character analysis component 410 can evaluate the current status of the character to determine a current list of its attributes, which may include any or all of skills, talents, powers, and characteristics, as well as the character's class and/or type. Based on the foregoing, an attribute selection component 420 can select one or more attributes from an attribute database 430, and can also total a cost, if any, for those skills. However, the attribute selection component 420 can be programmed so that it is not permitted to select attributes that exceed the currency or point balance of the user.

Points can be earned by involving the character in games, adventures, challenges and the like in the virtual environment associated with the character. Points can also be earned by winning or performing certain tasks or can be purchased using virtual or real currency. Training of character-specific attributes can also be earned as a reward for winning designated challenges or competitions or by completing certain adventures.

The training of characters is performed by a training component 440 according to a fluctuating or graduated basis. In particular, higher level or more advanced characters are easier to train than lower level or less advanced characters. Training a character can be time-consuming and difficult and may not always end in success for the character. However, training is not completely user-dependent but rather is at least partially character-dependent. That is, the actual character contributes to or plays a part in the training so that the overall skill level achieved by a character is not solely dependent on the personal skills of the respective user who controls the character. Users are not required to possess exceptional skills in order to excel in creating a valuable or well-trained character. For example, for characters initially having higher core attribute values, the training exercises or tasks that must be performed by the user may be made easier so that less manual dexterity and timing is required to successfully complete the exercise or task or so that each training item product effect on the attribute value. By contrast, for characters initially having lower core attribute values, the exercises or tasks can be made more difficult, meaning that more time is needed for each training exercise or that each exercise has less increase on the numerical score or value. Furthermore, limits can be placed on specific attribute values of certain characters, so that these characters will never be able to reach attribute values as high as other characters. This arrangement provides the appearance that particular characters have more natural or inherent talent than others.

Training of a character is also restricted to the type or profession related to the character. For example, a horse character cannot be trained with baseball playing attributes. Rather, the horse character can only be trained with horse-related attributes to improve its involvement in horse games, adventures, and competitions. Similarly, a baseball playing character can only be trained with baseball related attributes. If the class of baseball player is indicated such as a pitcher, its pitching-related attributes can have a higher maximum value than the other baseball playing attributes (e.g., running, hitting, fielding, etc.).

Characters can also be injured or can become ill as a result of their participation in a game or adventure. When either occurs, training may not be allowed until the character heals or becomes well as indicated by a health indicator. Characters can heal or recover by waiting a pre-determined time period or by visiting a virtual health clinic. Healing or recovery can also be paid for by using points or currency (e.g., real or virtual money). In some cases, forcing the character to train when either injured or ill can reduce one or more attribute values as well as the overall value of the character. In addition or in the alternative, the character's injury or illness can worsen as a result of the forced training.

Through a feedback component (not shown), the characters can provide solicited or unsolicited feedback to their respective users with respect to their training or status. More specifically, each character can communicate using audible speech, text, facial expression or some other type of image-based expression. The feedback can inform the user about how the character is feeling at any given time and the character's opinion on the training that has occurred or that is scheduled to occur. In the latter case, imagine that the user has just completed a process of selecting one or more attributes on which the character is to be trained. Before the user redeems points or currency for such attributes, the character can give their opinion of the selections to mitigate wasting points or wasting training opportunities. In addition, the character can provide feedback during as well as after the training. The feedback can include emotional thoughts or responses to the recent training. For example, the character can inform the user that the training is going well or is too difficult or that it needs training in another skill before it can complete the current training. Feedback received from the character can be stored and used later when determining which attributes to select for the same character or for other characters owned by the same user. Therefore, subsequent attributes can be selected either independently of or dependent upon previously selected attributes.

The characters also maintain a history or background and as a result of training and participating in their individual games, adventures, competitions, or challenges in the virtual environment, the characters individually develop and mature based on such experiences. The maturity of a character can be visualized through physical changes in their appearance. For example, a young horse, as evidenced by size, age, and attributes when initially acquired by a user, can gradually grow to physically appear bigger and even stronger based on its experiences in the virtual environment and based on its training thus far. Its coat may look shinier and its mane longer and sleek compared to when it was initially acquired by the user. It should be appreciated that each character can undergo physical maturation that is appropriate for the type of character. The maturation process can include a maximum growth limit and can depend on at least one of experiences, training, or a combination of both. The outward appearance of a character can readily indicate skill level of the character, which may make assessing the value of the character more efficient.

FIG. 5 shows a block diagram of a trading aspect of the character development and exchange system of FIG. 2 that facilitates selling and/or trading the character as well as control of the character to another user. As shown in the figure, a character can be made available for sale, auction, trade, or exchange. The value of the character can depend on its list of attributes, its type and/or class, as well as its experiences. For instance, a certain class of character can be rated at a higher value based on current demand for the character or based on popularity of the character or of the virtual environment that is associated with the character. If the class is retired or in limited edition where only a fixed number of characters are made available in the class, each character in that class may have an increased value aside from their specific attributes and experiences.

A trading component 500 effectively blocks access to the character by the user (or locks the character) to prevent the current owner-user from modifying the character while it is available for sale or exchange. If the exchange is made, for example, the trading component can disable or delete the code and generate and/or assign a new code to the character. The new owner receives the new code and registers the character via the new code in order to access and exclusively control it in the virtual environment. If the exchange is not made and the user decides to retain ownership of the character, the trading component 500 can unblock the access to the character.

More specifically, the trading component 500 includes a code verification component 510 that verifies current ownership of the code and locks the character associated with it. If the character is transferred to another user, a transfer component 520 disables or deletes the locked code and generates and/or assigns a new code for the character. The same is done for coded-items (e.g., auxiliary products) associated with the character such as the character's weapons, clothing, accessories, furnishings, equipment, etc.

The trading component 500 also comprises a character analysis component 530 that can examine character data for the particular character including the list of attributes associated with the character, its class, current status, and its experiences. Experiences can include wins, losses, competition participation, and/or game or other manipulation participation. After this data has been collected and evaluated, a valuation component 540 can determine a value for the character using the character data as well as previous completed transfers of similar characters, current and projected popularity of and demand for the character in consideration of its class, type, and/or attribute list. If the current status of the character indicates that the character is injured or ill or has not completely healed or recovered, then the overall value can decrease by a variable amount depending on the extent of the injury or illness.

A processing fee can be charged to the user for each character posted via the trading component (e.g., a fixed fee per transaction or percentage of final sale price).

Alternatively or in addition, the valuation component 520 can analyze the market value of a character without requiring the character to be posted for sale, auction, or trade. A separate fee can be charged for this service. Users can also employ a fee-based advertising component 550 in order to create more interest for their characters and/or for the users who are developing such characters. As a result, other users may target certain users who consistently offer good characters for sale, auction, or trade.

In some cases, a user may wish to sell its account including all characters and their related items. For these instances, the entire account can be evaluated based on the valuation of each character if sold individually or in groups of at least two. This is because some characters may have a higher value when paired with a complimentary counterpart than when considered alone. If desired, the user can indicate how characters are to be grouped when offered for sale or how they must be sold.

The character and development system as discussed throughout FIGS. 1-5 can also catalog a user's collection of characters in order to maintain a history of characters and related items that have been acquired, trained, and/or sold by the user over time. For each character, statistics (e.g., ERA and RBI for baseball playing characters), attributes, experiences, and training can be stored and subsequently retrieved and viewed. If the character is a member of a team, team statistics can also be stored and viewed. As a result, each user can build a portfolio that can be securely viewed and shared with others.

The portfolio can also include any pertinent family history for each character. Characters can be mated or bred to have offspring. As a result, at least a portion of the parent character's attributes can be inherited by the offspring. The inheritance of attributes can be randomly or equally distributed among the offspring. In addition, the number of times or frequency with which characters can mate or breed can be limited in order to prevent diminishing the value of similar characters or of other characters in a similar class. When a character is sold to another user, their family history can be passed along with them so each subsequent owner can track the character's heritage as well.

What has been described above includes examples of the subject system and/or method. It is, of course, not possible to describe every conceivable combination of components or methodologies for purposes of describing the subject system and/or method, but one of ordinary skill in the art may recognize that many further combinations and permutations of the subject system and/or method are possible. Accordingly, the subject system and/or method are intended to embrace all such alterations, modifications, and variations that fall within the spirit and scope of the appended claims. Furthermore, to the extent that the term “includes” is used in either the detailed description or the claims, such term is intended to be inclusive in a manner similar to the term “comprising” as “comprising” is interpreted when employed as a transitional word in a claim.

As used herein, the terms “component” and “system” are intended to refer to a computer-related entity, either hardware, a combination of hardware and software, software, or software in execution. For example, a component may be, but is not limited to being, a process running on a processor, a processor, an object, an executable, a thread of execution, a program, and a computer. By way of illustration, both an application running on a server and the server can be a component. One or more components may reside within a process and/or thread of execution and a component may be localized on one computer and/or distributed between two or more computers.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8651949 *Aug 24, 2011Feb 18, 2014Mattel, Inc.Toy and associated computer game
US20120214589 *Aug 24, 2011Aug 23, 2012Mattel, Inc.Toy and Associated Computer Game
Classifications
U.S. Classification463/31, 463/25, 463/42
International ClassificationA63F9/24
Cooperative ClassificationA63F2300/65, A63F2300/807, A63F2300/575, G06Q30/0641, G06Q30/0623, G06Q30/0643, A63F13/12, G06Q20/3821, A63F2300/532, G06N3/006
European ClassificationG06Q30/0623, G06Q20/3821, G06Q30/0643, G06Q30/0641, A63F13/12, G06N3/00L1
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 21, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: GANZ, AN ONTARIO PARTNERSHIP CONSISTING OF S.H. GA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:GANZ, HOWARD;BORST, KARL JOSEPH;REEL/FRAME:020146/0369
Effective date: 20071120