Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20080276520 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/151,863
Publication dateNov 13, 2008
Filing dateMay 9, 2008
Priority dateMay 11, 2007
Also published asUS20080276519
Publication number12151863, 151863, US 2008/0276520 A1, US 2008/276520 A1, US 20080276520 A1, US 20080276520A1, US 2008276520 A1, US 2008276520A1, US-A1-20080276520, US-A1-2008276520, US2008/0276520A1, US2008/276520A1, US20080276520 A1, US20080276520A1, US2008276520 A1, US2008276520A1
InventorsMarlin Daniel Ballard
Original AssigneeMarlin Daniel Ballard
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Aperture sighting device
US 20080276520 A1
Abstract
A sighting device includes an aperture body having a sighting aperture therein. The sighting aperture includes four intersecting sides that jointly define horizontally opposing corners. A horizontal reference axis of the aperture body extends through the horizontally opposing corners such that a first pair of the sides are entirely above the horizontal reference axis and a second pair of the sides are entirely below the horizontal reference axis. The first pair of the sides define a corner vertically offset above the horizontal reference axis and equidistant between the horizontally opposing corners. The first pair of the sides are of approximately equal length.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(23)
1. A sighting device, comprising:
an aperture body having a sighting aperture therein, wherein the sighting aperture includes four intersecting sides that jointly define horizontally opposing corners, wherein a horizontal reference axis of the aperture body extends through said horizontally opposing corners such that a first pair of said sides are entirely above the horizontal reference axis and a second pair of said sides are entirely below the horizontal reference axis, wherein the first pair of said sides define a corner vertically offset above the horizontal reference axis and equidistant between said horizontally opposing corners and wherein the first pair of said sides are of approximately equal length.
2. The sighting device of claim 1, further comprising:
side posts extending outwardly from respective peripheral edge portions of the aperture body, wherein said side posts extend from the aperture body along the horizontal reference axis that extends through said horizontally opposing corners of the sighting aperture.
3. The sighting device of claim 2, further comprising:
a top post extending upwardly from a respective peripheral edge portion of the aperture body, wherein the top post extends from the aperture body along a vertical reference axis extending through said vertically offset corner.
4. The sighting device of claim 1 wherein:
the aperture body has a front surface and a rear surface; and
the sighting aperture extends therebetween.
5. The sighting device of claim 4 wherein:
edges defining the sighting aperture at the front surface are each a first length; and
edges defining the sighting aperture at the rear surface are each a second length different than the first length.
6. The sighting device of claim 31, further comprising:
a mounting structure having a first attachment portion configured for being attached to a mounting structure of an apparatus requiring precision aiming and a second attachment portion having the aperture body pivotably attached thereto, wherein the aperture body is pivotable about a pivot axis extending substantially perpendicular to a vertical reference axis extending through said vertically offset corner whereby the aperture body is pivotable to a first position such that the sighting aperture is in a use orientation with respect to the mounting structure and to a second position such that the sighting aperture is in a non-use orientation with respect to the mounting structure.
7. The sighting device of claim 6, further comprising:
a shade cover attached to at least one of the mounting structure and the aperture body, wherein the shade cover extends at least partially over the aperture body and wherein the shade cover and the mounting structure are jointly configured for providing an unobstructed line of sight through the sighting aperture when the sighting aperture is in the use orientation.
8. The sighting device of claim 7, further comprising:
side posts extending outwardly from respective peripheral edge portions of the aperture body, wherein said side posts extend from the aperture body along the horizontal reference axis thereof; and
a top post extending upwardly from a respective peripheral edge portion of the aperture body, wherein the top post extends from the aperture body along the vertical reference axis.
9. The sighting device of claim 7, further comprising:
a mounting structure having a first attachment portion configured for being attached to a mounting structure of an apparatus requiring precision aiming and a second attachment portion having the aperture body attached thereto in a manner allowing the sighting device aperture to be retained in a use orientation with respect to the mounting structure; and
a shade cover attached to at least one of the mounting structure and the aperture body, wherein the shade cover extends at least partially over the aperture body and wherein the shade cover and the mounting structure are jointly configured for providing an unobstructed line of sight through the sighting aperture when the sighting aperture is in the use orientation.
10. A sighting device, comprising:
an aperture body including a plurality of elongated members interconnected at end portions thereof to define a sighting aperture, wherein the sighting aperture includes horizontally opposing corners, wherein a horizontal reference axis of the aperture body extends through said horizontally opposing corners such that a first pair of said elongated members are entirely above the horizontal reference axis and a second pair of said elongated members are entirely below the horizontal reference axis, wherein the first pair of said elongated members define a corner vertically offset above the horizontal reference axis and equidistant between said horizontally opposing corners and wherein the first pair of said elongated members are of approximately equal length.
11. The sighting device of claim 10, further comprising:
side posts extending outwardly from respective peripheral edge portions of the aperture body, wherein said side posts extend from the aperture body along the horizontal reference axis.
12. The sighting device of claim 11, further comprising:
a top post extending upwardly from a respective peripheral edge portion of the aperture body, wherein the top post extends from the aperture body along a vertical reference axis extending through said vertically offset corner.
13. The sighting device of claim 10 wherein:
the aperture body has a front surface and a rear surface; and
the sighting aperture extends therebetween.
14. The sighting device of claim 13 wherein:
edges defining the sighting aperture at the front surface are each a first length; and
edges defining the sighting aperture at the rear surface are each a second length different than the first length.
15. The sighting device of claim 10, further comprising:
a mounting structure having a first attachment portion configured for being attached to a mounting structure of an apparatus requiring precision aiming and a second attachment portion having the aperture body pivotably attached thereto, wherein the aperture body is pivotable about a pivot axis extending substantially perpendicular to a vertical reference axis extending through said vertically offset corner whereby the aperture body is pivotable to a first position such that the sighting aperture is in a use orientation with respect to the mounting structure and to a second position such that the sighting aperture is in a non-use orientation with respect to the mounting structure.
16. The sighting device of claim 15, further comprising:
a shade cover attached to at least one of the mounting structure and the aperture body, wherein the shade cover extends at least partially over the aperture body and wherein the shade cover and the mounting structure are jointly configured for providing an unobstructed line of sight through the sighting aperture when the sighting aperture is in the use orientation.
17. The sighting device of claim 16, further comprising:
side posts extending outwardly from respective peripheral edge portions of the aperture body, wherein said side posts extend from the aperture body along the horizontal reference axis; and
a top post extending upwardly from a respective peripheral edge portion of the aperture body, wherein the top post extends from the aperture body along a vertical reference axis extending through said vertically offset corner.
18. The sighting device of claim 16, further comprising:
a mounting structure having a first attachment portion configured for being attached to a mounting structure of an apparatus requiring precision aiming and a second attachment portion having the aperture body attached thereto in a manner allowing the sighting device aperture to be retained in a use orientation with respect to the mounting structure; and
a shade cover attached to at least one of the mounting structure and the aperture body, wherein the shade cover extends at least partially over the aperture body and wherein the shade cover and the mounting structure are jointly configured for providing an unobstructed line of sight through the sighting aperture when the sighting aperture is in the use orientation.
19. A sighting device assembly, comprising:
an aperture body having a plurality of aperture carrying legs, wherein each one of said aperture carrying legs has a sighting aperture therein, wherein each one of sighting apertures includes four intersecting sides that jointly define horizontally opposing corners, wherein each one of said aperture carrying legs has a respective horizontal reference axis that extends through said horizontally opposing corners thereof such that a first pair of said sides of the respective sighting aperture are entirely above the respective horizontal reference axis and a second pair of said sides of the respective sighting aperture are entirely below the respective horizontal reference axis, wherein the first pair of said sides of each one of said sighting apertures define a respective corner vertically offset above the respective horizontal reference axis, wherein the first pair of said sides of each sighting aperture are of a respective approximate equal length and wherein each sighting aperture is oriented such that said vertically offset corner thereof has a respective radial reference axis of the aperture body extending therethrough; and
a mounting structure having a first attachment portion configured for being attached to a mounting structure of an apparatus requiring precision aiming and a second attachment portion having the aperture body pivotably attached thereto, wherein the aperture body is pivotable about a pivot axis extending substantially perpendicular to the vertical reference axis of the aperture body whereby the sighting device is pivotable to a first position such that a first one of said aperture carrying legs is in a respective use orientation and to a second position such that a second one of said aperture carrying legs is in a respective use position.
20. The sighting device of claim 19, further comprising:
side posts extending outwardly from respective peripheral edge portions of each one of said aperture carrying legs, wherein said side posts extend from each one of said aperture carrying legs along the respective horizontal reference axis thereof.
21. The sighting device of claim 20, further comprising:
a top post extending upwardly from a respective peripheral edge portion of each one of said aperture carrying legs, wherein the top post extends from each one of said the aperture carrying legs along the respective radial reference axis thereof.
22. The sighting device of claim 19, further comprising:
a shade cover attached to at least one of the mounting structure and the aperture body, wherein the shade cover extends at least partially over the aperture body and wherein the shade cover and the mounting structure are jointly configured for providing an unobstructed line of sight through the sighting aperture when either one of said aperture carrying legs is in the respective use orientation.
23. The sighting device of claim 22, further comprising:
side posts extending outwardly from respective peripheral edge portions of each one of said aperture carrying legs, wherein said side posts extend from each one of said aperture carrying legs along the respective horizontal reference axis thereof; and
a top post extending upwardly from a respective peripheral edge portion of each one of said aperture carrying legs, wherein the top post extends from each one of said the aperture carrying legs along the respective radial reference axis thereof.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This patent application claims priority to co-pending U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/928,681 filed May, 11, 2007, entitled “Improved Configuration for Rear Sights of Firearms” and having a common applicant herewith, which is incorporated herein in its entirety by reference.

FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE

The disclosures made herein relate generally to devices used for facilitating aiming of an apparatus and, more particularly, to aperture-type mechanical sighting devices for firearms, weapons and the like.

BACKGROUND

A variety of sighting devices are known for orienting devices that need to be aimed. Although embodiments of the present invention are applicable to a variety of applications and uses, the ensuing discussions and disclosures made herein will be directed primarily to the problem of aiming firearms and similar weapons. However, a skilled person will appreciate that such embodiments of the present invention are in no way unduly limited to firearms and weapons that require aiming.

In general, firearms and the other types of weapons requiring aiming typically have two sights that are spaced from one another along a line extending coincidentally with a path along which a projectile will be discharged by the weapon. A shooter holds the weapon manually so as to view over and/or through the two spaced sights toward the target, before discharging the weapon. The object in using such sights is to align a weapon accurately to the target by viewing along a line to the target and holding the weapon along that line as defined by alignment of the spaced apart sights. Preferably, many types of sights allow adjustments to be made mechanically or manually on the sight by the shooter to adjust the sight relative to a projectile fired therefrom and/or to compensate for conditions such as, for example, windage and elevation.

Known types of sighting devices include iron sights, peep sights and optical devices such as a scope. A typical iron sight is by far the most commonly used for handguns and rifles. Typically, an iron sight has a front sight comprising a blade member at the extreme front or muzzle end of the weapon. The blade member comprises an opaque fin that is often rectangular in cross section and appears to the shooter as a thin solid block on the top surface of the barrel in line with a longitudinal axis of the barrel. The rear sight of an iron sight is disposed toward the rear of the weapon, and typically comprises a planar member having an open rectangular notch extending downward from a horizontal edge at the top periphery of the planar member or, optionally, an aperture-style peep sight. The rear sight can be along the barrel or over the chamber portion of the weapon, proximate to the shooter.

To aim the weapon using an iron sight, a shooter aligns the blade member of the front sight with the notch or aperture of the rear sight. The weapon is adjusted (i.e., spatially orientated) as to elevation by setting the top edge of the front sight blade even with the top of the rear sight notch or in the center of the aperture and is adjusted laterally by centering the blade in the notch or aperture. Such adjustment is facilitated such that the intended target (i.e., desired location of projectile impact) appears just against the top of the front blade or in the center of the aperture. The front and rear sights are dimensioned to place the discharged projectile on the target viewed in this manner at a certain range, provided the correct sight alignment is achieved.

When the shooter is aiming the weapon at the target and focusing on the target, the front and rear sights are in the line of sight between the shooter's eye and the target. The rear sight is closer to the shooter's eye than is the front sight, and the target is typically a substantially greater distance away. Thus, it is necessary for the shooter to choose where to focus his or her eye(s) while aiming at and tracking the target. If the shooter focuses on the target, the sights will appear blurred. If the shooter focuses on one of the sights, the target will appear blurred. Accordingly, a deficiency of current rear iron sights is that there is necessarily a certain amount of visual blurring of the sight during aiming. As discussed above, this blurriness is due to the fact that while the shooter's eye is focused on the target, the eye cannot also be simultaneously focused on the front and rear sights as well. This problem is further aggravated by shooting in low light conditions because of pupillary dilation and the consequent loss of depth of field by the eye, as well as the loss of contrast between the sight and the target, which is caused by poor lighting.

Shooters are typically trained to focus on the target and let their eye incidentally and simultaneously (i.e., without taking focus off of the target) align the sights with respect to the target while they focus on the target. In this manner, such incidental alignment of the sights can be accomplished without taking focus off of the target. However, blurriness of the rear sight resulting from the relatively close proximity of the rear sight to the shooter's eye while aiming a weapon can make such aiming less accurate than desirable or necessary. Therefore, a sighting device that overcomes the deficiencies of conventional mechanical sighting devices that lead to such conventional sights being blurry while focusing on a target that is being aimed at would be advantageous, desirable and useful.

SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE

Embodiments of the present invention relate to rear sights for devices that require precision aiming (e.g., firearms). More specifically, such embodiments provide for implementation of a rear sighting device (e.g., a traditional peep sight) in a manner that overcomes deficiencies of conventional mechanical rear sights that lead to such conventional sighting devices being blurry while focusing on a target that is being aimed at. As will be appreciated from the ensuing disclosure, the present invention provides for such advantageous functionality by providing a uniquely shaped aperture (i.e., rhombus or kite shaped), by providing a uniquely shaped structure defining such a uniquely shaped aperture and/or by providing geometric structures adjacent to the aperture.

The present invention addresses the problem of visual blurring of convention mechanical sighting devices while focusing on a target while tracking and/or aiming at such target by a user of the sighting device. Such blurring is due to the fact that while the user's eye is focused on the target, the eye cannot also be simultaneously focused on the front sighting device and the rear sighting device of the firearm. This problem is further aggravated by shooting in low light conditions because of pupillary dilation and the consequent loss of depth of field by the eye, as well as the loss of contrast between the sight and the target, which is caused by poor lighting. Embodiments of the present invention address this problem by changing the shape of the aperture to a geometric shape which, when the eye views it as a blurry shape, the eye can still easily find the center of the blurry shape. This task is made easier by providing a shape which, when blurred, still gives the eye some specific reference points by which to line up the front sight with the center of the rear sight. In general, this is accomplished by providing an aperture shape which allows the eye to easily triangulate between the 9 o'clock, 12 o'clock, and 3 o'clock points within the rear sight aperture such that precision horizontal and vertical alignment can be achieved with a corresponding front sight of the apparatus requiring aiming.

In one embodiment of the present invention, a sighting device comprising an aperture body having a sighting aperture therein. The sighting aperture includes four intersecting sides that jointly define horizontally opposing corners. A horizontal reference axis of the aperture body extends through the horizontally opposing corners such that a first pair of the sides are entirely above the horizontal reference axis and a second pair of the sides are entirely below the horizontal reference axis. The first pair of the sides define a corner vertically offset above the horizontal reference axis and equidistant between the horizontally opposing corners. The first pair of the sides are of approximately equal length.

In another embodiment of the present invention, a sighting device comprises an aperture body including a plurality of elongated members interconnected at end portions thereof to define a sighting aperture that includes horizontally opposing corners. A horizontal reference axis of the aperture body extends through the horizontally opposing corners such that a first pair of the elongated members are entirely above the horizontal reference axis and a second pair of the elongated members are entirely below the horizontal reference axis. The first pair of the elongated members define a corner vertically offset above the horizontal reference axis and equidistant between the horizontally opposing corners. The first pair of the elongated members are of approximately equal length.

In another embodiment of the present invention, a sighting device assembly comprises an aperture body and a mounting structure. The aperture body having a plurality of aperture carrying legs. Each one of the aperture carrying legs has a sighting aperture therein and each one of sighting apertures includes four intersecting sides that jointly define horizontally opposing corners. Each one of the aperture carrying legs has a respective horizontal reference axis that extends through the horizontally opposing corners thereof such that a first pair of the sides of the respective sighting aperture are entirely above the respective horizontal reference axis and a second pair of the sides of the respective sighting aperture are entirely below the respective horizontal reference axis. The first pair of the sides of each one of the sighting apertures define a respective corner vertically offset above the respective horizontal reference axis and the first pair of the sides of each sighting aperture are of a respective approximate equal length. Each sighting aperture is oriented such that the vertically offset corner thereof has a respective radial reference axis of the aperture body extending therethrough. The mounting structure has a first attachment portion configured for being attached to a mounting structure of an apparatus requiring precision aiming and a second attachment portion having the aperture body pivotably attached thereto. The aperture body is pivotable about a pivot axis extending substantially perpendicular to the vertical reference axis of the aperture body whereby the sighting device is pivotable to a first position such that a first one of the aperture carrying legs is in a respective use orientation and to a second position such that a second one of the aperture carrying legs is in a respective use position.

These and other objects, embodiments, advantages and/or distinctions of the present invention will become readily apparent upon further review of the following specification, associated drawings and appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an illustrative view of a shooter aiming a weapon using a flip-up rear sighting device in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary view showing a line of sight view of the flip-up rear sighting device of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3A is a front perspective view of the flip-up rear sighting device of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3B is an enlarged fragmentary view showing the first sighting aperture of the flip-up rear sighting device of FIG. 1

FIG. 4 is a side view of the flip-up rear sighting device of FIG. 1 showing the aperture body in a first pivotable orientation;

FIG. 5 is a side view of the flip-up rear sighting device of FIG. 1 showing the aperture body in a second pivotable orientation and showing aiming and stowed orientations of the flip-up rear sighting device;

FIG. 6 is a front perspective view showing a fixed sighting device in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 7 shows an embodiment of a pentagon shaped sighting aperture in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention; and

FIG. 8 shows a sighting aperture in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention that is tapered along a line of sight thereof.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIGURES

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, a weapon 100 has mounted thereon a flip-up rear sighting device 105 in accordance with the present invention and a front sighting device 110. A shooter 115 uses rear sighting device 105 and the front sighting device 110 to aim the weapon 100 at an intended target. More specifically, as shown in FIG. 2, the shooter 115 visually aligns a top portion of a sighting post 120 of the front sighting device 110 with a center portion of an in-use sighting aperture 125 of the rear sighting device 105.

Still referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, were it not for the advantageous configuration of the rear sighting device 105, the close proximity of the rear sighting device 105 to an eye 130 of a shooter 115 would otherwise cause blurring of the in-use sighting aperture 125 to adversely impact vision of the shooter 115 to the point where aiming the weapon 100 in a precise and ready manner would not be possible. The rear sighting device 105 aids in shooter's eye 130 precisely find the center of the in-use sighting aperture 125, in part, by reducing blurriness of the in-use sighting aperture 125 and, in part, by providing the shooter's eye 130 with reference points on at the periphery of the in-use sighting aperture 125. In short, a sighting device in accordance with the present invention provides the shooter's eye 130 with reference points (i.e., corners of the in-use sighting aperture 125) that are sufficiently distinct and visible so that the shooter's eye 130 can properly utilize such reference points even when they are blurry because of their close proximity to the shooter's eye 130 while the shooter's eye 130 is focused with a target at a distance.

In view of the foregoing disclosure, a skilled person will appreciate that a sighting device in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention includes a sighting aperture that has horizontally opposing corners in addition to either vertically opposing corners or a single vertically offset corner (i.e., vertically offset above the horizontal reference axis). Examples of shaped that provide such an aperture configuration in accordance with the present invention include a rhombus, a kite and a pentagon. Corners of the aperture are defined by sharp angles that allow an eye of a user (e.g., the shooter 115) of an apparatus that needs to be precisely aimed (e.g., the weapon 100) to divide up an overall area of a blurry-appearing aperture in such a way that the eye can precisely locate the center of the aperture. In this manner, the user can precisely align the sighting device in accordance with the present invention with a corresponding front sighting device even through the in-use sighting aperture of the rear sight in blurry. Conventional shaped apertures such as, for example, round do not provide the eye with reference points that allow the eye to precisely locate the center of such a conventional shaped aperture. In contrast, the corners of a sighting aperture of a sighting device in accordance with the present invention allow, in effect, the eye to draw imaginary crosshairs within the sighting aperture.

Referring now to FIGS. 2-4, the sighting device 105 includes an aperture body 150 and a mounting structure 151. The aperture body 150 has a first aperture carrying leg 152 and a second aperture carrying leg 154. The first aperture carrying leg 152 has a first sighting aperture 156 therein and the second aperture carrying leg 154 has a second sighting aperture 158 therein. Each one of the apertures 156, 158 extends between opposing major surfaces of the respective aperture carrying leg 152, 154 (i.e., front surface and rear surface).

It is disclosed herein that one or both of the aperture carrying leg 152, 154 can be constructed so as to appear as a substantially flat plate having an aperture extending between opposing sides thereof. It is also disclosed herein that one or both of the aperture carrying leg 152, 154 can be constructed so as to appear as the respective one of the sighting apertures 156, 158 is defined by elongated members (i.e., at least a portion of the aperture carrying leg has a skeleton or frame appearance). For example, for a single piece aperture body, an aperture carrying leg thereof appears to be constructed from elongated members when a distance between the sides of the aperture and respective peripheral edges of the aperture carrying let is relatively small with respect to the size of the respective sighting aperture and an aperture appears to be disposed within a plate when a distance between the sides of the aperture and respective peripheral edges of the aperture carrying let is relatively large with respect to the size of the respective sighting aperture. Such elongated members are not limited in their cross sectional configuration. Examples of such cross sectional configurations include, but are not limited to, rectangular, round, triangular and the like.

Each sighting aperture 156, 158 includes four intersecting sides 160-166 that jointly define horizontally opposing corners 168, 170 and vertically opposing corners 172, 174. Each one of the aperture carrying legs 152, 154 has a respective horizontal reference axis HA1, HA2 that extends through the respective horizontally opposing corners 168, 170 thereof such that a first pair of the sides of the respective sighting aperture are entirely above the respective horizontal reference axis HA1, HA2 and a second pair of the sides of the respective sighting aperture are entirely below the respective horizontal reference axis HA1, HA2. Each one of the sighting apertures 156, 158 is oriented such that the respective vertically opposing corners 172, 174 thereof have a respective radial reference axis of the aperture body 150 extending therethrough. Each radial reference axis is, in effect, a vertical reference axis for the respective one of the sighting apertures.

The first pair of sides of each sighting apertures 156, 158 are of a respective approximate equal length and the second pair of the sides of each sighting aperture are of a respective approximate equal length. In one embodiment of the present invention, the first and second pairs of sides of one or both of the sighting apertures 156, 158 are all the same length such that the sighting aperture is rhombus shaped. Thus, a rhombus shape is defined herein to be a four-sided polygon with all sides being of equal length. In another embodiment of the present invention, the first pair of sides (i.e., the sides above the respective horizontal reference axis) and the second pair of sides (i.e., the sides below the respective horizontal reference axis) of one or both of the sighting apertures 156, 158 are different lengths such that the sighting aperture is kite shaped. Thus, a kite shape is defined herein to be a four-sided polygon with sides above the respective horizontal reference axis being of a first length and sides below the respective horizontal reference axis being of a second length different than the first length. Accordingly, it is disclosed herein that a sighting aperture in accordance with the present invention can be rhombus shaped or kite shaped, and that the aperture of a first aperture carrying leg of a particular aperture body can be of a first shaped and the aperture of a second aperture carrying leg of the particular aperture body can be of a second shape different than the first shape. Preferably, but not necessarily, a kite shaped or rhombus shaped aperture will be horizontally symmetrical such that the vertically opposing corners are equidistant from each one of the horizontally opposing corners.

It is disclosed herein that sides of a sighting aperture in accordance with the present invention need not be linear (i.e., straight). More specifically, it is disclosed herein that sides of a sighting aperture can be non-linear (e.g., inwardly arcuate, outwardly arcuate, etc). Similarly, it is disclosed herein that peripheral edge portion of an aperture carrying leg of an aperture body in accordance with the present invention need not be linear (i.e., straight). Thus, as is the case with the edges of a sighting aperture in accordance with the present invention, it is disclosed herein that peripheral edge portions sides of an aperture body in accordance with the present invention can be non-linear (e.g., inwardly arcuate, outwardly arcuate, etc). Still further, it is disclosed herein that accentuation of the corners of a rhombus or kite shaped sighting aperture in accordance with the present invention can be accomplished by slightly enlarging the corners (e.g., cutting away the aperture body at the corners of the sighting aperture).

Referring to FIGS. 4 and 5, it can be seen that the mounting structure 151 includes a pedestal 180 and a base 182. The aperture body 150 is pivotably attached to a first end portion of the pedestal 180, thereby allowing each one of the aperture carrying leg 152, 154 to be moved in a dependent (e.g., linked) manner between a respective non-use position NP1, NP2 and a use position UP (i.e., the use orientation). In this manner, a user can selectively position an aperture of a preferred configuration for use (i.e., in-use sighting aperture) by rotating the corresponding aperture carrying leg 152, 154 to the use position UP. The base 182 is pivotably attached to a second end portion of the pedestal 180, thereby allowing the pedestal 180 to be moved between a stowed position SP and an aiming position AP. The base 180 includes means for allowing attachment to an apparatus requiring aiming (e.g., a picatinny rail thereof).

Referring back to FIGS. 2 and 3, one or both of the aperture carrying legs 152, 154 can include horizontally extending posts 190 and a vertically extending post 192 extending from peripheral edges of respective aperture carrying leg 152, 154. Such posts 190, 192 serve to accentuate the imaginary crosshair effect created by the corners of the respective one of the sighting apertures 156, 158. This effect is a result of the aperture carrying leg 152, 154 surrounding the corresponding one of the sighting apertures 156, 158 creating discrete bright spots at the corners of the sighting aperture, while the corresponding posts 190, 192 create dark spots against the brighter distant background of the target that is being aimed at. A user's eye sees the bright spots as essentially continuing into the dark spots created by posts. The result is that the imaginary crosshair effect is carried further out to the sides of the respective aperture carrying leg (i.e., horizontally) as well as above and below the aperture body 150 (i.e., vertically), thus giving the user's eye a greater ability to easily and quickly locate the exact center of the in-use sighting aperture. In other words, posts in accordance with the present invention (e.g., posts 190, 192) accentuate the imaginary crosshair effect created by the corners of a respective sighting aperture. One reason that the combination of bright spots and dark spots is helpful is because the rear sight on a rifle is placed very close to the shooter's eye when the shooter is aiming to take a shot. It is disclosed herein that spikes, points, or similar protuberances can be used in place of the posts 190, 192 for accomplishing a similar effect.

The reason crosshairs are used in optical scopes is because they are extremely precise as a means of aiming. The reason crosshairs are not used in rear iron sights is because they blur to the point of being either invisible or so close to indivisible that they are useless. The reason optical scopes do not use a circle instead of crosshairs is because a circle would be far less precise in letting the shooter's eye choose a precise point of aim. The ultimate goal of iron sights is to provide an aiming system for the shooter's eye that is as close to crosshairs as possible. In contrast, a sighting aperture in accordance with the present invention, which optionally has protruding posts implemented therewith achieves the goal of allowing more precise aiming via the sights while still allowing a shooter to focus on the intended target.

Referring now to FIG. 6, a fixed sighting device 200 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention is shown. With respect to sighting functionality, the fixed rear sighting device 200 operates in essentially the same manner as the flip-up rear sighting device 105 discussed above. Accordingly, only different features of the rear sighting device 200 will be discussed. The rear sighting device 200 includes a pedestal 280 that is non-movably attached to a base 282 thereof (i.e., jointly a mounting structure). The fixed sighting device 200 further includes upstanding protective wings 290 and a shade cover 292 spanning between the wings 290. The upstanding wings 290 are integral with the pedestal 280 and serve to protect an aperture body 250 of the fixed sighting device 200. The shade cover 292 aids aiming by shading the aperture body 250 for the purpose of keeping it as dark as possible in contrast to the surrounding environment, which allows for maximum speed and accuracy of aiming. The shade cover 292 and the mounting structure are jointly configured for providing an unobstructed line of sight through the in-use sighting aperture 256 when the in-use sighting aperture 256 is in the use position thereof.

A skilled person will appreciate that the shade cover 292 can be mounted in any number of ways. Examples of such manners by which the shade cover 292 can be mounted include, but are not limited to, being pivotably mounted to one or both of the pedestal 280 (e.g., pivotably spring loaded to the protective wings 290), being mounted over the pedestal (e.g., a flexible protective boot), etc. A reason for pivotably spring-loading the shade cover or for making it out of a very flexible material or making it removable is so that a user can gain instant access with their fingers to enable them to flip a dual aperture body from one aperture position to another, such as flipping between a large and small aperture, between a sighting aperture of a first shape (e.g., rhombus shaped) and a sighting aperture of a second shape (e.g., kite shaped). A spring can bias the shade cover 29 to its static position (shown in FIG. 6).

It is disclosed herein that, in one embodiment of the shade cover 292, the shade cover 292 can extend further back than a rear surface of the protective wings 290, thus adding additional shade coverage to the in-use sighting aperture. In another embodiment of the shade cover 292, the shape cover 292 can also extend further laterally than the outer walls of the protective wings 290, thus adding additional shade coverage to the rear and sides of the in-use sighting aperture.

Referring now to FIG. 7, an aperture body 350 having a pentagon shaped sighting aperture 356 therein is shown. The sighting aperture 356 includes four intersecting sides 360-366 that jointly define horizontally opposing corners 368, 370. A horizontal reference axis HA of the aperture body 350 extends through the horizontally opposing corners 368, 370 such that a first pair of the intersecting sides are entirely above the horizontal reference axis HA and a second pair of the intersecting sides are entirely below the horizontal reference axis HA. The first pair of the sides also define a corner vertically offset above the horizontal reference axis HA (i.e., the vertically offset corner 372) and equidistant between the horizontally opposing corners 368, 370. Preferably, the first pair of sides are of approximately equal length.

It is disclosed herein that the pentagon shaped sighting aperture 356 can be used in place of or in combination with the rhombus and/or kite shaped apertures disclosed above. More specifically, the flip-up sighing device 105 and/or the fixed sighting device 200 can include such a pentagon shaped sighting aperture. Thus, it is disclosed herein that such a pentagon shaped sighting aperture is functionally interchangeable with the rhombus and/or kite shaped apertures discussed above.

To optimize, enhance and/or mitigate lighting considerations, a sighting aperture in accordance with the present invention (e.g., the sighting aperture 156) can have differential sizing along the corresponding line of sight. As shown in FIG. 8, edges defining a sighting aperture 456 at front surface F of an aperture body 450 are each a first length and edges defining the sighting aperture at the rear surface R of the aperture body 450 are each a second length different than the first length. In this manner, the sighting aperture 456 has a linear or arcuate taper between the front surface F and the rear surface R.

Although the aperture body of sighting devices disclosed herein are shown as being pivotable, it is disclosed herein that the aperture body can be fixedly attached to a pedestal thereof. In such implementations, the aperture body will typically have only a single sighting aperture therein.

In the preceding detailed description, reference has been made to the accompanying drawings that form a part hereof, and in which are shown by way of illustration specific embodiments in which the present invention may be practiced. These embodiments, and certain variants thereof, have been described in sufficient detail to enable those skilled in the art to practice embodiments of the present invention. It is to be understood that other suitable embodiments may be utilized and that logical, mechanical, chemical and electrical changes may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of such inventive disclosures. To avoid unnecessary detail, the description omits certain information known to those skilled in the art. The preceding detailed description is, therefore, not intended to be limited to the specific forms set forth herein, but on the contrary, it is intended to cover such alternatives, modifications, and equivalents, as can be reasonably included within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8069607 *Sep 3, 2009Dec 6, 2011Marlin Daniel BallardGun sight configured for providing range estimation and/or bullet drop compensation
US8484882 *Dec 14, 2010Jul 16, 2013Magpul Industries Corp.Forward mounted gun sight with illumination apparatus
US8621775Jun 3, 2011Jan 7, 2014Stephen P. TroyFirearm sight with dual diamond shaped apertures
US20120180368 *Dec 14, 2010Jul 19, 2012Magpul Industries Corp.Forward Mounted Gun Sight with Illumination Apparatus
US20140137457 *Oct 19, 2012May 22, 2014OptiFlow, Inc.Articulating mount for weapon accessory
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/143, 42/111, 42/148
International ClassificationF41G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41G1/08
European ClassificationF41G1/08