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Publication numberUS20080286417 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/151,009
Publication dateNov 20, 2008
Filing dateMay 2, 2008
Priority dateMay 18, 2007
Also published asCA2687457A1, WO2008142598A2, WO2008142598A8, WO2008142598A9
Publication number12151009, 151009, US 2008/0286417 A1, US 2008/286417 A1, US 20080286417 A1, US 20080286417A1, US 2008286417 A1, US 2008286417A1, US-A1-20080286417, US-A1-2008286417, US2008/0286417A1, US2008/286417A1, US20080286417 A1, US20080286417A1, US2008286417 A1, US2008286417A1
InventorsRobert David Piotrowski, Steven Jacob Kirkpatrick, Christopher Michael Mickowski
Original AssigneeRobert David Piotrowski, Steven Jacob Kirkpatrick, Christopher Michael Mickowski
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of displaying coffee packages in an array which communicate usage indicia
US 20080286417 A1
Abstract
A method of displaying an array of coffee products to a consumer having the following steps:
    • a. providing a first coffee package having a first coffee product having a first density, a first usage indicia associated therewith the first coffee package, and first package principle indicia having associated therewith the first package;
    • b. providing a second coffee package having a second coffee product having a second density, a second usage indicia associated therewith the second coffee package; and a second package principle indicia having associated therewith the second package;
    • c. shelving the first and second coffee package such that both first and second coffee package and the first and second usage indicia are observable by the consumer;
The first density of the first coffee package and the second density of the second coffee package can be different.
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Claims(12)
1. A method of displaying an array of coffee products to a consumer, the method comprising the steps of:
a. providing a first coffee package comprising
i. a first coffee product comprising a first density;
ii. a first usage indicia associated therewith said first coffee package;
iii. a first package principle indicia having associated therewith said first package;
b. providing a second coffee package comprising
ii. a second coffee product comprising a second density;
iii. a second usage indicia associated therewith said second coffee package;
iv. a second package principle indicia having associated therewith said second package;
c. shelving the first and second coffee package such that both first and second coffee package and the first and second usage indicia are observable by the consumer;
d. wherein said first package principle indicia and said second package principle indicia are the same; and
e. wherein said first density of said first coffee package and said second density of said second coffee package are different.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein said first coffee package comprises a first coffee package lesser indicia and said second coffee package comprises a second coffee package lesser indicia, wherein said first coffee package lesser indicia and said second coffee package lesser indicia are different.
3. The method of claim 2 wherein said first coffee package lesser indicia is a first flavor and said second coffee package lesser indicia is a second flavor, wherein said first flavor and said second flavor are different.
4. The method of claim 1 wherein said first density is from about 0.1873 g/cc to about 0.2718 g/cc bulk density.
5. The method of claim 1 wherein said second density is from about 0.28 g/cc to about 0.45 g/cc bulk density.
6. The method of claim 1 wherein said first density is from about 0.1873 g/cc to about 0.2718 g/cc bulk density and said second density is from about 0.28 g/cc to about 0.45 g/cc bulk density.
7. The method of claim 1 wherein said second density is from about 0.46 g/cc to about 1.05 g/cc tamped density.
8. The method of claim 1 wherein said first density is from about 0.1873 g/cc to about 0.2718 g/cc bulk density and said second density is from about 0.8 g/cc to about 1.05 g/cc tamped density.
9. The method of claim 1 wherein said usage indicia is a measure of cups provided in a product.
10. The method of claim 1 wherein said second package principle indicia is a company name.
11. The method of claim 1 wherein said first coffee package and said second coffee package further comprise a discontinuous element.
12. The method of claim 11 wherein said discontinuous element is a flavor.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority to and the benefit of U.S. Provisional application 60/930,728, filed on May 18, 2007, which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

FIELD

This invention relates to a coffee package array which communicates the amount of usage received from the product contained in the package.

BACKGROUND

Manufacturers of consumer products are successful when they understand how consumers measure what they desire in their products. Understanding this helps a manufacturer design packages which communicate these desirable features and the consumer benefit gained from the product. Not communicating these certain desirable features in a way the consumer can measure can often hinder sales in a competitive market for consumer goods. In the coffee industry, consumers have a need to understand how many uses they can receive from purchasing a product. Providing the consumer this information can allow the consumer to make an informed decision and can provide a competitive advantage for the company.

Therefore, there is a continuing, unaddressed need for communication of a way consumers can measure the consumer benefit particularly for an array of coffee products.

SUMMARY

The present invention is a method of displaying an array of coffee products to a consumer.

The method steps are the following:

    • a. providing a first coffee package having
      • i. a first coffee product having a first density;
      • ii. a first usage indicia associated therewith the first coffee package;
      • iii. a first package principle indicia having associated therewith the first package;
    • b. providing a second coffee package having
      • i. a second coffee product having a second density;
      • ii. a second usage indicia associated therewith the second coffee package; and
      • iii. a second package principle indicia having associated therewith the second package;
    • c. shelving the first and second coffee package such that both first and second coffee package and the first and second usage indicia are observable by the consumer;
      wherein the first package principle indicia and the second package principle indicia are the same; and wherein the first density of the first coffee package and the second density of the second coffee package are different.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

While the specification concludes with claims particularly pointing out and distinctly claiming the subject matter that is regarded as forming the present invention, it is believed that the invention will be better understood from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a view of an array of coffee packages of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a view of an alternative array of coffee packages of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a view of an alternative array of coffee packages of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Section I will provide terms which will assist the reader in best understanding the features of the invention but not to introduce limitations in the terms inconsistent with the context in which they are used in this specification. These definitions are not intended to be limiting. Section II discusses the package array of the present invention. Section III discusses the packages in the package array of the present invention. Section IV discusses the test method. Sections V discusses the process of making reduced density coffee and compact coffee. Section VI contains examples of the present invention.

I. TERMS

The following are terms which will assist the reader in best understanding the features of the invention, but do not introduce limitations in the terms inconsistent with the context in which they are used in this specification. These definitions are not intended to be limiting.

“10.5-ounce coffee”, “11.5-ounce coffee”, “13-ounce coffee” and “16-ounce coffee” are roasted coffee products having tamped densities, after vibratory settlement into package, such that 10.5, 11.5, 13 and 16 ounces (298, 327, 369 and 454 grams) of each product, respectively, has a dry volume of about 1000 cc. The bulk densities are respectfully 0.263 g/cc, 0.288 g/cc, 0.325 g/cc and 0.4 g/cc.

As used herein, the term “compact coffee” relates to roasted coffee which has a tamped density or dosing density of from about 0.46 to 1.05 gm/cc.

As used herein, “consumer product” refers to any product which is typically used by a consumer, such as paper products, laundry products, kitchen products, bathroom products, automotive products, and personal products. Illustrative examples of such “consumer products” include solid laundry detergents (i.e., granules, tablets, powders, pastes, and the like); liquid laundry detergent (including gels, liquid-gels and the like); light duty detergents; unit dose laundry detergents; bleaching compositions; dryer sheets; fabric softening compositions; pretreater compositions; pre-treatment devices; dye trapping sheets; fabric refreshing compositions paper towels; toilet tissue; facial tissue; paper plates; paper cups; writing paper; greaseproof paper; disposable dusting sheets; wrapping paper; feminine hygiene products (such as tampons, pads, adult incontinence products, interlabial products and the like); diapers; disposable wipes; aluminum foil; polymeric kitchen films; dish detergent; sponges; disposable plates; disposable cups; disposable tableware; scouring pads; mops; buckets; automatic dishwashing detergent compositions; automatic dishwashing rinse aids; water filters; water filter cartridges tile cleaners; toilet cleaners; floor cleaners; automotive polish; tire cleaner; automotive air fresheners; car wash; automotive washing systems; hand soap; razors; shaving cream; body wash; shampoo; conditioner; face wash; toothpaste; vitamins; medicaments; deodorant; tooth brushes; makeup; nail polish; lipstick; and makeup remover.

The term “coffee,” as used herein, refers to roasted coffee that has been treated with any form of energy to have generated a “roasted” coffee flavor and has come from the seeds of a coffee plant or tree.

As used herein, “coordinates” refers to a property, such as flavors, color, shape, texture, and the like, which are complimentary or provide a positive and pleasing contrast of one property to another.

As used herein, “discontinuous elements” refers to a benefit, property, feature, image, scenario, or the like that is not shared by two or more products. Illustrative examples of discontinuous elements includes flavors, scent, branding, packaging, properties, sound, words, phrases, letters, characters, brand names, company names, company logos or symbols, descriptions, logos, icons, designs, designer names, symbols, motifs, insignias, figures, marks, signals, colors, textures, patent marking statement, shapes, tokens, advertisements, and combinations thereof. An illustrative example would be an array of two consumer products where one of the discontinuous elements is a consumer package having different colors, that is, colors that are not matching and/or contrasting, or the products are different in shape.

The term “density”, as used herein, refers to bulk density, i.e., the overall density of a plurality of particles measured after freely flowing into a container/package of a known volume.

The term “first principle indicia,” as used herein, refers to the first principle indicia selected from trademarked product identifiers, store brands, private label brands, trademarks, trade names, flavors, branding, words, phrases, letters, characters, brand names, company names, company logos or symbols, logos, icons, designs, designer names, symbols, insignias, shapes and combinations thereof.

As used herein, “indicia” refers to scent, branding, packaging, properties, sound, words, phrases, letters, characters, brand names, company names, company logos or symbols, descriptions, logos, icons, designs, designer names, symbols, motifs, insignias, figures, marks, signals, colors, textures, shapes, tokens, advertisements, and combinations thereof.

As used herein, “in association with” means the indicia are either directly printed on the consumer product itself, a container/package itself, or a label attached to the consumer product and/or container/package and/or are presented in a different manner including a brochure, print advertisement, electronic advertisement, and/or verbal communication, so as to communicate the indicia to a consumer.

As used herein, “label” refers to a convenient point-of-purchase site for the principle indicia, lesser indicia, unifying thematic elements, discontinuous elements and the like and combinations thereof. The term “label” is used herein in the broadest sense includes the tangible medium that may optionally contain one or more of the principle indicia, lesser indicia, unifying thematic elements, discontinuous elements and the like and combinations thereof may be optionally expressed including, by way of illustrative example, the placing of principle indicia element directly on to a container/package (e.g., printing or molding), the printing of lesser indicia on a substrate wherein the substrate is placed on the outside surface of the container/package, or packaging such as boxes that enclose the container/package. In one embodiment, an olfactory scent descriptor may also be provided via a label (e.g., packaging). For example, the label itself may be scented, i.e., comprise the scent.

The optional labels of the present invention may generally mimic the shape of the container/package. Illustrative examples of suitable labels include partially wrap-around labels, wrap-around labels, shrink-wrap labels, stickers, in-mold labels hang-tags, labels conveying the name of the product and combinations thereof.

In one optional specific embodiment, the label is a clear substrate such that at least one of principle indicia, lesser indicia, unifying thematic elements, and/or discontinuous elements may be printed on to the label and the container/package or composition. Moreover, the container/package can be transparent/translucent and is substantially visible by the consumer through the label where the print of at least one of the principle indicia, lesser indicia, unifying thematic elements, discontinuous elements is absent. Without wishing to be bound by theory, a clear label may maximize the color of the product or the tint of the container/package in communicating to the consumer.

In another embodiment, the label has a background color to further communicate to the user. For example, if the flavor is chocolate, the label may have a chocolate background color to further communicate this flavor to the user given the visual association of a chocolate color to chocolate flavor. In another non-limiting example, if the coffee is positioned as a premium product, the canister may have a shiny maroon color, the cap may be a gold color, and the label may have a gold background color to further communicate that the coffee is premium to the user given the visual association of a gold color which indicates premium.

In one optional embodiment, the label is “shrink wrapped” on the container/package. In another optional embodiment, the label is adhered to the container/package by an adhesive.

As used herein, “matches” refers to a property, such as a color, shape, texture, and the like, which are substantially the same or similar, more specifically identical or near identical, in two different products. While it is to be understood that the term specifically includes similar or identical colors, it is also understood to include shades, tones, hues and the like, of a color. It is also to be understood that the term “color” not only includes all the colors of the visible spectrum, namely red, orange, yellow, green, blue, teal, brown, purple, lilac, sea green, tan, navy, violet, pink and the like. It also includes all shades, tones, hues and the like such as dark blue, light blue, light green, etc, of these colors, as well as black, white, and grey and all shades, tones, hues and the like of these.

As used herein, “lesser indicia” is selected from flavor, scent, branding, packaging, properties, sound, words, phrases, letters, characters, brand names, company names, company logos or symbols, descriptions, logos, icons, designs, designer names, symbols, motifs, insignias, figures, marks, signals, colors, textures, shapes, tokens, advertisements and combinations thereof.

As used herein, the term “1-pound coffee can” relates to a coffee container/package which has a volume of about 1000 cc. Historically, one pound (16 oz.) of coffee was sold in this volume container/package. This corresponds to a bulk density of approximately 0.4 g/cc.

As used herein, the term “reduced density coffee” relates to roasted coffee which has a bulk density of from about 0.200 g/cc to 0.38 g/cc.

As used herein, “unifying thematic element” refers to a common benefit, property, feature, image, scenario, or the like that is shared by two or more products. Illustrative examples of unifying thematic elements include flavor, scent, branding, packaging, properties, sound, words, phrases, letters, characters, brand names, company names, company logos or symbols, descriptions, logos, icons, designs, designer names, symbols, motifs, insignias, figures, marks, signals, colors, textures, shapes, tokens, advertisements, and combinations thereof. An illustrative example would be an array of two consumer products where one of the unifying thematic elements is they are both the same color, or share the same package, and the like. The unifying thematic indicia can be in one or more language.

The term “usage indicia,” as used herein, refers to a benefit, property, feature, image, scenario, or the like that is generally recognized by consumers as being beneficial in choosing a product and associates a way of measuring a particular consumer product during use for a consumer.

Illustrative examples of usage indicia include the number of cups provided in a coffee package; the number of loads received from using a detergent package; the number of pumps provided for by a soap package; and the number of uses gained from a shampoo package.

II. ARRAY

The unique combination of elements displayed in the coffee packaging array translates into an immediate consumer impression upon seeing the packages of the array. The package array can be seen in a television advertisement, a print advertisement, a web site, or even arranged in a store display. The store display may be a shelving unit. This shelving unit may be free standing or designed to be placed on existing retail shelving or the like. It may be advantageous for the manufacturer of the consumer products to include such a shelving unit for use at retail, since a custom shelving unit may create a preferred setting for the array of coffee products. In a more specific form, the shelving unit will be sized to fit comfortably within the specific confines of standard retail shelving and will be shaped and colored to emphasize the cohesive nature of the array of coffee products that are placed in the shelf as discussed herein.

A consumer upon seeing the principle indicia and the usage indicia would immediately realize that these products are part of an array of goods and the array as providing information beneficial to the consumer. This almost immediate communication of the important consumer benefit enables savings in labor, time, and reduced, possibly even substantial reduced investment in marketing, advertising and the like, as the consumers upon seeing the array of products already have been educated by the usage indicia which communicates the benefits of the coffee products therein.

FIG. 1 shows one embodiment of a display 8 of the present invention which is configured according to the method of the present invention. As shown in FIG. 1, packaged products of coffee can be placed on a shelf of a retail establishment.

As shown in FIG. 1, a display 8 of the present invention includes at least a first coffee product 10 and a second coffee product 20, the first and second products 10,20 being products sold in a package under the same principle indicia 16,26. For example, as shown in FIG. 1, the first coffee product 10 can be coffee sold under the FOLGERS® brand name and packaged in a first package 12 exhibiting on the first package 12 a first principle indicia 16, for example, the FOLGERS® mark. Likewise, a second coffee product 20 can be coffee sold under the FOLGERS® brand name and packaged in a second package 22 exhibiting on the package a second principle indicia 26, for example, the FOLGERS® mark.

The first coffee product 10 and the second coffee product 20 have different densities. The density of the first coffee product 10 which is the reduced density coffee can be from about 0.1873 g/cc to 0.2718 g/cc. The density of the second coffee product 20 which is the compact coffee can be from about 0.46 g/cc to about 1.05 g/cc.

In addition to the principle indicia associated therewith on each of the first 12 and second 14 packages, each package 12, 14 has a first package usage indicia 18 and a second package usage indicia 24. The first package usage indicia 18 and a second package usage indicia 24 communicate the same message. The usage indicias 18, 24 communicate to a consumer reasons why the consumer might wish to purchase the products and can influence a purchasing decision by the consumer. In the embodiment shown, the usage indicia 18, 24 can be used to communicate the number of cups of coffee in a package. The cups can be measured in any size. In one non-embodiment, the cups are measured by 6 oz. In another non-limiting embodiment, the usage indicia 18, 24 can be used to communicate the servings of a pre-determined cup size in a package. The usage indicia should be visible to the consumer at the point of sale.

In addition to the principle indicia associated therewith on each of the first 12 and second 14 packages, each package 12, 14 can have a distinct and different lesser indicia. Specifically, the first package 12 can have a first package lesser indicia 30. The second package 14 can have a second package lesser indicia 32. That is, in addition to the principle indicia 16, 26 on the separately-packaged first and second packages 12, 14, each of the first 12 and second 14 packages can have exhibited thereon a lesser indicia 30, 32 that is different. For example, for the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, each principle indicia 16, 26 can have associated with it a lesser indicia 30, 32, such as the flavor.

First and second products are separately packaged. By separately packaged is meant that the first and second coffee products are not “bundled” or otherwise joined, attached, wrapped, or provided together for purchase by the consumer. The consumer can remove and/or purchase one or the other of the first or second coffee package from the retail shelf display, without being required to remove or purchase the other package.

By shelving the first and second packaged products having the same principle indicia, same usage indicia, and different densities for the coffee products in close proximity on a store shelf, for example, in the same shelf tray or on the same end-of-aisle display, the consumer is able to see the common principle indicia and usage indicia, and thereby be informed of the usage indicia. By communicating the usage indicia to the consumer, the consumer can make an informed purchase decision.

While the present invention is particularly useful in the product category of coffee it can find equal utility in other categories such as oral care products, baby care products, fabric care products, pet care products, health care products, floor care products, car care products, laundry care products, electronic products. Non-limiting examples can include as first and second products, respectively, toothpaste and mouthwash, diapers and wipes, detergent and fabric softener, toilet tissue and facial tissue, snack foods and beverages, shampoo and conditioner, razor blades and shaving cream, dry mops and floor cleaning compositions, printers and ink cartridges, coffee and coffee filters, electronic gear and batteries, dog food and dog treats, and the like. For each of the above, a product from the same brand names can be identified and paired together with a principle indicia and usage indicia for marketing at the point of sale. To take one example, CREST® toothpaste and SCOPE® mouthwash could be separately packaged and shelved, with each package carrying the same principle indicia of “Procter & Gamble.” The CRESTS toothpaste can have the number of uses for the consumer such as a picture or graphic design of a white tooth with the number of uses inside the graphic design. The SCOPE® mouthwash can have the number of uses exhibited on the package or any other mark communicating teeth cleaning or refreshing taste with the number of uses inside next to the word “sparkle.”

FIG. 2 shows another embodiment of the invention where instead of a shelf tray, first and second packages are displayed on a floor stand 40, which can be an end-of-aisle display. Floor stand 40 can have shelves therein for placing first coffee package 12 and second coffee package 14 thereon. In the example shown in FIG. 2, the first coffee package 12 contains a coffee product and the second coffee package 14 contains a coffee product. The principle indicia of the first and second products shown in FIG. 2 have the same principle indicia 16, 26, namely the word “Folgers.” The principle indicia 16, 26 can be placed on the floor stand by printing directly on the floor stand as shown at the bottom 42 of floor stand 40 or on an additional member attached to the floor stand as shown at the top of floor stand 40.

FIG. 3, is an illustrative example of a retail display 8 of the array of coffee products. The array of consumer products is arranged on a shelf 22 in a store. The retail display 8 may be on a single shelf as illustrated and include an optional podium, 28. The podium 28 may be used to highlight or draw a consumer's attention to one or more packages of the coffee product array 36, in this case the third coffee package 15. Alternatively, the podium 28 may be used to arrange the array of consumer products 36 in such as fashion so that all of the coffee packages 12, 14, 15 appear to be the same height or that the principle indicia 16, 26, 38 and/or the usage indicia 18, 24, 25 is at the same level. Additionally, but not illustrated in the figures, the optional podium 28 may include one or more of the principle indicia 16, 26, 38.

Additionally the free standing retail display 8 may optionally comprise a banner having in association therewith information about the individual coffee packages 12, 14, 15 and/or the array 8 as a whole. The banner may also optionally have in association therewith the first, second, and third principle indicia 16, 26, 38 and the usage indicia 18, 24, 25.

III. PACKAGE OF THE PRESENT INVENTION

The first coffee package may be different from the second coffee package. This difference may take any form such as size, shape, foot print, volume, material, texture, opaque, transparent/translucent, waste soluble, water insoluble, and is specifically a difference that can be ascertained by a consumer or a user of the product, for example, by sight, touch and the like and combinations thereof.

The packages, when present, may be of any size, shape, volume, material, texture, opaque, transparent/translucent, waste soluble, water insoluble, and the like. In one optional embodiment the first container/package is an opaque container/package. This opaque container/package more specifically comprises a first color and more specifically releasably contains a coffee product contained therein. In another optional embodiment the second container/package may comprise a translucent/transparent container/package. This translucent/transparent container/package more specifically releasably contains a colored coffee product contained therein, wherein the colored coffee product matches and/or coordinates with the first coffee product.

The containers/packages, when present, may comprise a material, namely the first container/package comprises a first material, independently, the second container/package comprises a second material and independently the third container/package comprises a third material. The first, second, and third material, when present, may be the same or different, and may be selected from: metal, such as aluminum, steel, brass, copper, tin, and the like; wood; laminates, such as wood laminates; polymeric laminates, such as carbon fiber laminates, and the like and combinations thereof; paper; cardboard, such as fiberboard, cardboard and the like and combinations thereof; polymer, such as polypropylene, polyacrylates, synthetic rubbers, natural rubbers, polyethylene, polycarbonate, polyamide, polyethylene terephthalate, polyvinylchloride, polystyrene, high density polyethylene, polymethylmethacrylate, polycarbonate, diethyleneglycol bisarylcarbonate, polyethylene naphthalate, polyvinyl chloride, polyurethane, epoxy resin, polyamide-based resins, low density polyethylene, styrene butadiene copolymers, acrylonitrile, acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer, cellulose acetate butyrate and mixtures thereof; fabric, such as cotton, hemp, nonwoven materials, wool, polyester fabrics, poly cotton blends and the like and combinations thereof; ceramic, such as terracotta, china, “redware”, majolica and the like and combinations thereof; glass, such as Pyrex, safety glass, laminated glass and the like and combinations thereof; film, such as polymeric film laminates, high density polyethylene films, low density polyethylene films, medium density polyethylene films, and the like and combinations thereof; and combinations thereof.

Clear or translucent plastics useful herein include, those that are colored or tinted in such a manner that the light transmission of the plastic is preserved. Polyethylene terephthalate is a preferred plastic. Likewise the materials may be processed in single or multiple layers. Because a variety of different materials may be used in the construction of the containers/packages of the present invention the materials selected will be based on the intended end use and characteristics required of such a container/package.

As noted previously, when present, the first, second, and third containers/packages may be of any shape. In one more specific embodiment the first container/package has a shape selected from cylindrical, tubular, conical, frustum of a cone, spheroidal, cubodial, pyramidoidal, and combinations thereof. In another more specific embodiment the second container/package has a shape selected from cylindrical, tubular, conical, frustum of a cone, spheroidal, cubodial, pyramidoidal, and combinations thereof. In another more specific embodiment the third container/package has a shape selected from cylindrical, tubular, conical, frustum of a cone, spheroidal, cubodial, pyramidoidal, and combinations thereof.

IV. DENSITY TEST METHOD

A. Principle

A fixed weight of coffee sample is allowed to fall freely from a funnel for a fixed distance into a cup of known volume. The excess coffee is removed with a straight edge and the weight of the coffee in the cup obtained. The density is calculated as the weight of the material divided by the volume in which the material is encapsulated.

B. Scope

This method is applicable to the measurement of bulk density of ground or flaked vacuum packed coffee. The precision of the method is based on the reproducibility of the technique used to fill the cup.

C. Apparatus

Weighing Container 1000 ml beaker
Bulk Density Apparatus Ohaus bulk density equipment - Model 86-
38100
Filing hopper and stand (Part NO. 151)
Product Cup Ohaus product cup - 1 pint dry (Part No. 104)
Seedburo Equipment Co., 1022 West Jackson,
Chicago, IL 60607
Leveling Straight Edge 1¾″ × 12′ × 1/32″ stainless steel straight edge
Template 5″ × 5″ square piece of ⅛″ thick plexiglass
with a ¼″ hole drilled in the center
Balance 1000 g capacity or greater, 0.1 g sensitivity
Pipette 5-25 cc pipette recommended

D. Calibration of Product Cup

    • 1. Tare the empty product cup and template on a balance. Once the product cup and template has been tared, remove the template and fill the product cup with distilled water (70±5°).
    • 2. Carefully place the template on top of water filled cup.
    • 3. Using a pipette, pipette additional distilled water through the hole in the template until the water level in the product cup is completely touching the underside of the template.
    • 4. Read directly from the balance for weight (grams).
    • 5. Volume calculation: Weight of distilled water (grams)×1.002=volume of cup
    • 6. The cup is in calibration if the volume is 550 c cc±2.

E. Adjustment of Equipment

    • 1. Set up the equipment following the instruction with the equipment and level it. The leveled bubble is located under the product cup.
    • 2. Carefully set height from the bottom of the funnel to the top of the product cup to one and three quarter inches (1¾″). Tighten the set screws on the bracket that holds the funnel onto the stand. The leveling straight edge can be used to check this distance.

F. Operation Procedures

    • 1. Weigh out 220±2 grams of coffee to be measured into a beaker or suitable container.
    • 2. Close the funnel gate and pour the product into the center of the funnel.
    • 3. Center the funnel over the product cup.
    • 4. Open the funnel gate. This should be carried out with a quick single motion to allow the product to fall freely into the cup in the same manner each time. The cup should overflow. If it does not, the same was mis-weighed or the density is outside the range of this method.
    • 5. Starting at the back of the cup, place the straight edge perpendicular to the rim, draw the blade across the cup in a smooth motion, scraping the excess coffee off the cup. Make sure all the coffee is off the rim before weighing.
    • 6. Pour the product from the leveled cup into a pre-tared container and weigh the product.
    • 7. Density Calculation: weight of product (grams)/Volume of Cup (550.00 cc)=bulk density.
    • 8. Round off to the nearest 0.5 gram.

Tamped densities of coffee represent the densities of “roasted coffee” particles, granules, pellet(s), and coffee non-granules. 300 grams of coffee are vibrated by conventional means in a 1000 ml graduated cylinder for 1 minute. The volume of coffee is then measured to the nearest 5 ml graduation. The tamped density is determined by dividing the weight of the coffee (grams) by the volume (cc's) occupied by the particles in the cylinder after vibrating. In the case of a single pellet it is the weight (g) of the pellet divided by the volume of the pellet (cc).

V. PROCESS FOR MAKING REDUCED DENSITY AND COMPACT COFFEE

Any method which makes reduced density coffee can be used. The reduction in density of the coffee can be accomplished with extremely fast roasting, darker roasting, by reducing particle packing efficiencies and by combinations of these. Pre-drying the coffees (2%-7% moisture prior to roasting) enable them to be roasted extremely fast while producing less bitter burnt notes thereby making the products more acceptable to consumers. One method which may be used to make the reduced density coffee can be found in U.S. Pat. No. 5,160,757. Any method which makes compact coffee can be used. One method which may be used to make compact coffee can be found in U.S. Pat. No. 5,227,188.

VI. EXAMPLES

The following are a listing of examples illustrating various embodiments of the present invention. It would be obvious to those skilled in the art that various other changes and modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

Example A

An array of two coffee products is displayed on a shelf. The first coffee package has a first package principle indicia which is “Folgers;” the first coffee product has a first density of 0.263 g/cc; and a first usage indicia which communicates cups messaging. The second coffee package has a second package principle indicia which is “Folgers;” the second coffee product has a second density of 0.325 g/cc; and a second usage indicia which communicates cups messaging.

Example B

An array of two coffee products is displayed on a shelf. The first coffee package has a first package principle indicia which is “Folgers;” the first coffee product has a first density of 0.288 g/cc; and a first usage indicia which communicates cups messaging. The second coffee package has a second package principle indicia which is “Folgers;” the second coffee product has a second density of 0.263 g/cc; and a second usage indicia which communicates cups messaging. The discontinuous element between the first coffee package and the second coffee package is the flavor. The first coffee package has a Classic Roast flavor and the second coffee package has a Colombian flavor.

Example C

An array of two coffee products is displayed on a shelf. The first coffee package has a first package principle indicia which is “Folgers;” the first coffee product has a first density of 0.263 g/cc; and a first usage indicia which communicates cups messaging. The second coffee package has a second package principle indicia which is “Folgers;” the second coffee product has a second density of 0.288 g/cc; and a second usage indicia which communicates cups messaging. The discontinuous element between the first coffee package and the second coffee package is the flavor. The first coffee package has a French Roast flavor and has a maroon red colored package. The second coffee package has a Classic Roast Decaffeinated flavor and has a green colored package.

Example D

An array of two coffee products is displayed on a shelf. The first coffee package has a first package principle indicia which is “Folgers;” the first coffee product has a first density of 0.263 g/cc; and a first usage indicia which communicates cups messaging. The second coffee package has a second package principle indicia which is “Folgers;” the second coffee product has a second density of 0.225 g/cc; and a second usage indicia which communicates cups messaging. The discontinuous element between the first coffee package and the second coffee package is the package type. The first package is a canister the second package is a bag.

Example E

An array of two coffee products is displayed on a shelf. The first coffee package has a first package principle indicia which is “Folgers;” the first coffee product has a first density of 0.225 g/cc; and a first usage indicia which communicates cups messaging. The second coffee package has a second package principle indicia which is “Folgers”; the second coffee product has a second density of 1.00 g/cc; and a second usage indicia which communicates cups messaging. The discontinuous element between the first coffee package and the second coffee package is the package shape. The first package has a wide large surface area that allows extra area for product messaging and has a large shelf impression for value while the second package is a tubular compact package that minimizes shelf space usage for easy storage at the store and minimal space usage at home.

The dimensions and values disclosed herein are not to be understood as being strictly limited to the exact numerical values recited. Instead, unless otherwise specified, each such dimension is intended to mean both the recited value and a functionally equivalent range surrounding that value. For example, a dimension disclosed as “40 mm” is intended to mean “about 40 mm.”

All documents cited in the Detailed Description of the Invention are, in relevant part, incorporated herein by reference; the citation of any document is not to be construed as an admission that it is prior art with respect to the present invention. To the extent that any meaning or definition of a term in this document conflicts with any meaning or definition of the same term in a document incorporated by reference, the meaning or definition assigned to that term in this document shall govern.

While particular embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated and described, it would be obvious to those skilled in the art that various other changes and modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. It is therefore intended to cover in the appended claims all such changes and modifications that are within the scope of this invention.

Classifications
U.S. Classification426/87
International ClassificationB65D85/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47F7/28
European ClassificationA47F7/28
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 30, 2011ASAssignment
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:FOLGERS COFFEE COMPANY, THE;REEL/FRAME:026833/0171
Owner name: FOLGER COFFEE COMPANY, OHIO
Effective date: 20110430
Owner name: FOLGER COFFEE COMPANY, THE, OHIO
Nov 21, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: EKONOMON, ADAM, ESQ., OHIO
Owner name: FOLGERS COFFEE COMPANY, THE, OHIO
Owner name: KNUDSEN, JEANNETTE L., OHIO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MILLER, STEVEN W. - ASSISTANT SECRETARY ON BEHALF OF THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:021861/0880
Effective date: 20081030
Owner name: EKONOMON, ADAM, ESQ.,OHIO
Owner name: FOLGERS COFFEE COMPANY, THE,OHIO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MILLER, STEVEN W. - ASSISTANT SECRETARY ON BEHALF OF THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100511;REEL/FRAME:21861/880
Owner name: KNUDSEN, JEANNETTE L.,OHIO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MILLER, STEVEN W. - ASSISTANT SECRETARY ON BEHALF OF THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100513;REEL/FRAME:21861/880
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MILLER, STEVEN W. - ASSISTANT SECRETARY ON BEHALF OF THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:21861/880
May 2, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, THE, OHIO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:PIOTROWSKI, ROBERT DAVID;KIRKPATRICK, STEVEN JACOB;MICKOWSKI, CHRISTOPHER MICHAEL;REEL/FRAME:020946/0877
Effective date: 20080407