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Publication numberUS20080295522 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/126,900
Publication dateDec 4, 2008
Filing dateMay 25, 2008
Priority dateMay 25, 2007
Publication number12126900, 126900, US 2008/0295522 A1, US 2008/295522 A1, US 20080295522 A1, US 20080295522A1, US 2008295522 A1, US 2008295522A1, US-A1-20080295522, US-A1-2008295522, US2008/0295522A1, US2008/295522A1, US20080295522 A1, US20080295522A1, US2008295522 A1, US2008295522A1
InventorsDavid Allen Hubbell, Thorgeir Jonsson, Sturla Jonsson
Original AssigneeDavid Allen Hubbell, Thorgeir Jonsson, Sturla Jonsson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Thermo-energy-management of solid-state devices
US 20080295522 A1
Abstract
The present invention reduces to practice discoveries made by the present inventors during their investigations into present-art-perceived-difficulties in thermal-management applications of solid-state devices.
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Claims(20)
1. A solid-state electronic passive cooling device.
2. A solid-state electronic active cooling device.
3. A device, as in claim 1 and claim 2, comprising of at least one (1) functional solid-state electronic unit whose operation is thermally supported by at least one (1) thermoelectric element; at least (1) solid-state electronic element mounted on the one (1) thermoelectric element, at least one (1) ferrite torus, with all referenced elements within an enclosure having an electrical energy connection.
4. A device as in claim 3, where said enclosure is transmissive to specific light spectrum.
5. A device, as in claim 3, wherein quantity of said specific light spectrum determines the energy directed to said one or more ion-pump-fan(s).
6. A device, as in claim 3, wherein quantity of said specific light spectrum determines the energy directed to said one or more thermoelectric element(s).
7. A device, as in claim 3, wherein quantity of said specific light spectrum determines the energy directed to said one or more said functional electronic unit(s).
8. A device, as in claim 3, wherein said functional electronic unit is one or more light emitting diode(s).
9. The device, as in claim 3, wherein said functional electronic unit is one or more microprocessor(s).
10. A device, as in claim 3, comprising of at least one (1) ion-pump-fan element;
at least one (1) thermoelectric element; and at least (1) solid-state electronic element mounted on the at least (1) thermoelectric element.
11. A device, as in claim 3, comprising of at least one (1) ion-pump-fan element;
at least one (1) thermoelectric element; and at least (1) solid-state electronic light-emitting diode element mounted on the at least (1) thermoelectric element.
12. A device, as in claim 3, wherein the device comprises of a housing; an ion-pump-fan coupled to said housing; a thermoelectric element coupled to said housing, with at least one (1) solid-state light emitting element mounted on said thermoelectric element.
13. The device, as in claim 3, wherein said ion-pump-fan element and said thermoelectric element and said solid-state light-emitting element are supplied with electric power through the same terminal.
14. The device, as in claim 3, wherein the ion-pump-fan element is driven independently.
15. The device, as in claim 3, wherein the thermoelectric element is driven independently.
16. The device, as in claim 3, wherein the solid-state light emitting element is driven independently.
17. The device, as in claim 3, wherein the ion-pump-fan moves fluid-mass thru the thermoelectric element's gaps between said thermoelectric element's N and P sub-elements.
18. The device, as in claim 3, wherein said housing includes an aerodynamic element influencing said ion-pump-fan's fluid-intake's fluid-flow.
19. The device, as in claim 3, wherein said housing includes an aerodynamic element influencing said ion-pump-fan's fluid-flow portals.
20. The device, as in claim 3, wherein said thermoelectric element incorporates passageways thru both the intended hot-side and intended cold-side allowing for the passage of fluid flow encouraged by the ion-pump-fan of fluid-mass from one side of the thermoelectric element to the other side of the thermoelectric element.
Description
DOMESTIC PRIORITY DATA

This application claims benefit of 60/940,336 May 25,2007

INTRODUCTION

The present invention reduces to practice discoveries made by the present inventors during their investigations into present-art-perceived-difficulties in thermal-management applications of solid-state devices. The present invention overcomes said present art problems via alternative composites of ferrite-torus (tori) element(s), thermoelectric(s) element(s), ion-pump-fan(s) element(s), sensor(s) element(s), communication(s) element(s), enclosed or confined within an enclosure resembling a commonly encountered Edison-type incandescent light bulb volume. The present invention provides the utility of the encountered Edison-type incandescent light bulb, including shape, thermal-signature, illumination and use of existing electrical power socket(s).

DISCUSSION OF PRESENT ART

The present invention is exemplified in the novel utilities achieved via non-apparent arrangement of parts shown in the accompanying drawings and described in the following specification and it is more particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

The provision of a thermal-management device and its means and methods of achieving its novel utilities of the character referred to above constitutes the principal object of this invention.

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 2,758,261 issued August 1956, to Armstrong et al. (Armstrong '261), Armstrong '261 teaches that (col. 1, line 26) “ . . . certain plastics, upon setting, have a coefficient of expansion or contraction which is different from the coefficient of expansion or contraction of the semiconductive materials to which they are bonded. This results in stresses being set up within the semiconductors which may cause pushing or pulling of the terminal leads attached to, or in contact with, the junction material and result in the deformation thereof. A sufficient amount of deformation causes the effective barrier resistance between the junction material and the semiconductor undesirably to be reduced to extremely small values and may even result in a short circuit therebetween.” The present invention directly addresses Armstrong '261's identified problems by providing the ability to provide a near constant caloric-density environment of the different materials and thereby eliminating the problems identified by Armstrong '261's reference to coefficient of expansion or contraction of different materials and the resultant, due to temperature change, of “ . . . stresses being set up within the semiconductors.”

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 4,211,955 issued July 1980, to Ray (Ray '955), Ray '955 teaches (col. 1, line 13) “Solid state light sources per se, such as light-emitting diodes, are well known in the prior art, but none of these is suitable as a complete replacement for a standard A.C. or D.C. incandescent lamp.” (col. 1, line 19) “ . . . object of this invention is to provide a novel solid state lamp having a standard incandescent lamp base which can be used with existing incandescent lamp sockets.” (col. 1, line 30) “Still another object of the invention is to provide such a novel solid state lamp wherein the integrated circuit chip contains rectifier and voltage regulator circuits so the lamp can be energized by standard house current of 120 volts or 220 volts A.C.” The present invention incorporates the above teachings of Ray '955.

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 4,600,979 issued July 1986 to Fisher et al (Fisher '979), Fisher '979 teaches that (col. 1, line 12) “In diverse environments there are found devices, such as lights, in which a heat generating means is contained within a sealed enclosure. It will be readily appreciated that due to the heat produced within such enclosure by the heat generating means, the temperature in the enclosure can quickly rise to levels sufficient to damage the components internal to the enclosure.” (col. 2, line 49) “In operation, the heat generated by the various lamps within the lamp housing is transmitted to the radial fins of the lamp housing. While the system provided herein functions most efficiently when in the vertical position, which will be described herein, it is to be understood that the principles of the invention obtain regardless of orientation. The heat is transferred by conduction from the hotter lower portions of the fins to the top portions of the fins. Due to the increasingly large area and, hence, presence of cooler air between the annular wall and the top of the enclosure cover, the heat from the tops of the fins is transmitted to the cooler air within such area. This action causes heated air to move radiant outward from the tops of the fins along the top of the enclosure. During this process, the heat contained by the heated air is transmitted to the top cover of the enclosure which allows such heat to be radiated from the large area of the enclosure cover to the cooler surrounding ambient outside the light. As the heat is removed from the air which is present between the annular wall and the top of the enclosure cover, it falls to the area between the lower portion of the cylindrical sidewall and the annular wall. From this point the air is driven through the slots and the is directed toward the heated fins due to the slightly higher pressure caused by the newly heated air being moved into contact with the top of the enclosure cover and filling the outer chamber defined between the enclosure's cover and the outside of the inner annular wall.” The present invention incorporates the above teachings of Fisher '979.

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 4,727,289 issued February 1988 to Uchida (Uchida '289), Uchida '289 teaches that (col. 1, line 12) “Conventional light-emitting diode (LED) lamps use either a 12- or 14-V power source and cannot be connected directly to the general AC outlet power source (100 V). As shown in FIG. 6, a conventional LED lamp of this type has a base 2 attached to one end of a glass bulb 1. A printed circuit board 5 is mounted within the glass bulb 1 through a stem 3 and stays 4. A plurality of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) 6 are mounted on the printed circuit board 5. A current is supplied to the LEDs 6 through a series resistor 7.” (col. 1, line 23) “Since the LED lamp having the above arrangement uses either a 12- or 14-V power source, a low power series resistor 7 can be used and mounted within the glass bulb. However, when a 100-V power source is used, a large, high-power resistor is required, which is quite difficult to incorporate in the glass bulb. For example, when a series resistor is provided immediately under the printed circuit board, heat generated by the resistor degrades the characteristics of the LEDs. In addition, since a 100-V LED circuit is formed within a single glass bulb, the size, shape and number of the means for mounting the series resistor are restricted.” (col. 1, line 38) “The present invention has been made in order to solve the problem that has arisen in the course of an attempt to upgrade the conventional low-voltage LED lamp to a 100-V LED lamp, wherein the characteristics of the LEDs are degraded by heat generated by the series resistor, and to solve the problem of the various restrictions in relation to mounting the series resistor.” (col. 1, line 44) “According to the present invention, as a practical means for solving the above problems, a lamp comprises a printed circuit board which is arranged inside a glass bulb having a base at an end thereof; a stem in said glass bulb; and means for mounting said printed circuit board to said stem. A plurality of LEDs are mounted on the printed circuit board. A current is supplied to the LEDs through a series resistor. The series resistor has an annular shape and is fitted around the stem. Therefore, the LEDs mounted on the printed circuit board are not affected by the heat generated by the series resistor. In addition, since the series resistor has an annular shape, it has a high power handling capacity. Therefore, the resultant LED lamp can be used at a high voltage.” (col. 3, line 3) “As described above, according to the present invention, the series resistor connected inside the LED lamp has an annular shape, so that it can have a large size and a large power handling capacity. Thus, even if a 100-V AC outlet power source is used, sufficient resistance and capacitance can be obtained, so that the LED lamp of the present invention can be used as various illumination lamps and as general ornamental sign lamps.” The present invention incorporates the above teachings of Uchida '289.

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 4,967,330 issued October 1990, to Bell et at. (Bell '330), Bell '330 teaches that the above (col. 1, line 54) “Two U.S. patents issued for LED lamps are representative of those seeking to exploit these features: U.S. Pat. No. 4,211,955 issued to Stephen W. Ray and U.S. Pat. No. 4,727,289 issued to Akio Uchida. The Ray patent describes an area-illuminating solid state lamp having the appearance of a standard incandescent light bulb with LEDs enclosed within a globe of solid translucent plastic. It also illustrates the two features necessary for the utilization of LEDs in this application—a current adjustment element (in this case featuring a rectifier as well as a resistor) and a generally cylindrical base capable of interfacing with standard incandescent light sockets. However, it is seriously restricted in use because of the closed nature of its encasement. The performance of LEDs degrades as temperature (generated by current reducing/control elements) becomes elevated. The closed nature of the Ray device causes the accumulation of waste heat generated by the device. A solution to this problem is attempted by Uchida, who utilizes an annular-shaped resistor fitted around the stem of the lamp as a means of overcoming this problem; however, the solution utilized herein is far simpler, and leads to a device that overcomes the temperature build-up problems of prior patents, is far simpler and less expensive to manufacture, and has numerous additional advantages as set forth below.” (col. 2, line 40) “The objects of this novel design are numerous. First, the open nature of the encasement, particularly of the section of said encasement between the electric contact at its base and the LED(s) enclosed, allows heat generated by the current adjustment element to readily escape. Second, its construction is much simpler than the prior LED lamps described as there is no sealed or closed container to be constructed and its component parts are easily manufactured using simple techniques from readily available materials and parts. Third, it is readily adapted for use and insertion into a wide variety of sockets and, where desirable, for insertion into a socket from the socket's rear, rather than forward side.” The present invention incorporates the above teachings of Bell '330.

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 4,729,076 issued March 1988 to Masami et al. (Masami '076), Masami '076 teaches of an (col. 3, line 12) “ . . . enclosure 12 . . . a compartment or housing for the light source 14, the driver circuit 16 and other components. . . . ” (col. 3, line 38) “According to the invention, the light source 14 comprises an array of semiconductor light emitting diodes (“LED”) 22 which can include laser diodes.” (col. 4, line 11) “To augment the operation of heat sink 26, the portable photocuring device 10 can include a fan 27. The fan 27 is sized to fit inside the housing 12 and run from the power feed 20. The enclosure 12 includes one or more exhaust ports 28 for the exhaust sir from the fan 27. In addition, the enclosure 12 includes an input port 30 to allow the circulation of fresh air. The input port 30 can also be coupled to a compressed air flow 32 which is supplied by the dental console. It will be appreciated that the compressed air flow 32 can eliminate the need for the fan 27.” The present invention incorporates the above teachings of Masami '076.

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 5,404,282 issued April 995 to Klinke et al. (Klinke '282), Klinke '282 teaches that (col. 2, line 61) “LED modules known in the art have attempted to minimize the potential for thermal damage to the LED lamps by constructing the LED leads from materials having a low thermal conductivity, such as steel. Using materials of low thermal conductivity reduces the amount of heat that can be transferred from the solder site to the LED chip itself. However, materials having low thermal conductivity necessarily have a correspondingly low electrical conductivity. Therefore, the methods used in the art to minimize the thermal damage of the LED lamps during the soldering operation has resulted in the construction of a LED module that does not display optimal electrical efficiency. Additionally, LED leads constructed from such low thermal conductivity materials effectively limit the amount of power that the LED can dissipate and remain within reliable operational parameters.” The present invention incorporates the above teachings of Klinke '282.

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 5,782,555 issued July 1998 to Hochstein (Hochstein '555), Hochstein '555 teaches that (col. 2, line 6) “Obviously, venting the L.E.D. . . . lamp assembly or module into the sealed . . . housing is futile. Rejecting heat into an environment of higher temperature than that of the source is thermodynamically impossible. The key to improving the life of the L.E.D.'s . . . is to reduce the temperature of the L.E.D. environment. Note that little can be done to modify the “ambient” temperature which is the normal surrounding sir temperature.” (col. 2, line 14) “U.S. Pat. No. 4,729,076 to Masami et al strives to lower the temperature of the LED array by attaching a finned heat sink assembly. However, there is a choke or restrictor in the path of the heat from the light emitting diodes to the heat sink: to wit, a resin filler or adhesive which is a very poor heat conductor. The Masami '076 patent recognizes the problem of positioning the heat sink within the traffic signal housing where it must exchange heat with the air within the housing. As noted in the Masami '076 patent, some means of ventilation must be provided by vents, louvers, fans or the like, when the heat sink is within the housing. Such provisions are not particularly effective in hot climates, and they subject the signal to dirt and moisture infiltration.” (col. 3, line 17) “ . . . the invention provides two solutions to the heat dissipation problem which can be utilized in combination or separately to open the restriction or choke of heat flow from the LEDs to the heat sink and/or to extend the heat sink from close proximity to the LEDs to the ambient air forwardly of the lamp assembly, either of which significantly reduces the build up of temperature within the housing and when combined provide heretofore unattainable low operating temperatures within the housing.” The present invention teaches away from Hochstein '555's “passive” cooling regime via “active” cooling or heating with its incorporation of TEs, ion-pump-fan element(s) and other elements.

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 5,785,418 issued July 1998 to Hochstein (Hochstein '418), Hochstein '418 teaches that (col. 3, line 64) “Trying to dissipate heat from an LED . . . module into such a high temperature environment is impossible and, in fact, heat flows in the opposite direction; that is from the elevated ambient surrounding the device into the LED . . . housing. Given the high thermal conductivity housings disclosed in the prior art, the deleterious heat transfer from an elevated ambient into the LED array is actually maximized, thereby overheating the LEDs: dimming them and shortening the life of the devices.” The present invention incorporates Hochstein '418's observations on “ . . . the deleterious heat transfer . . . thereby overheating the LEDs: dimming them and shortening the life of the devices.” The present invention teaches away from Hochstein '418's teaches that of (col. 4, line 23) “ . . . provid(ing) a directionally selective heat sink and dissipater which enhances dissipation of heat from an LED array to the surrounding air, but retards heat flow into the LED array from high temperature sources such as solar heated air or from direct solar radiation.”

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 5,857,767 issued January 1999 to Hochstein (Hochstein '767), Hochstein '767 teaches that (col. 1, line 23) “One aspect of LED technology that is not satisfactorily resolved is the application of LEDs in high temperature environments. LED lamps exhibit a substantial light output sensitivity to temperature, and in fact are permanently degraded by excessive temperature.” (col. 1, line 45) “Permanent thermal degradation of LEDs also occurs during array fabrication, when the LEDs are soldered to the supporting and/or interconnecting circuit board. Typical soldering temperatures (250° C.) can significantly degrade the LED array before it is even put into service. LED manufacturers recommend the use of lead lengths of sufficient length to prevent excessive heat transmission from the soldering operation into the LED die. Of course, the added lead length acts detrimentally during LED operation, as the longer leads increase the thermal resistance and adversely affects the rejection of self generated heat.” The present invention incorporates the above teachings of Hochstein '767.

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 6,045,240 issued April 2000 to Hochstein (Hochstein '240), Hochstein '240 teaches that (col. 3, line 4) “several prior art patents address the question of heat extraction from an LED array, but an essential parameter in the successful implementation of this art has eluded previous investigators. Many technical issues must be carefully considered in the design of reliable LED signals, but among the most important are the thermal properties of the various components that form the heat flow path.” (col. 3, line 31) “The interaction of the thermal properties of . . . materials, in LED arrays, indicates that prior approaches to the problem were not well conceived nor well understood. In fact, studies of existing hardware that embody the technology described by the prior art, show that at least an order of magnitude improvement in performance is attainable by the application of the methods and apparatus of the present invention.” (col. 3, line 41) “Typically, the prior art, as exemplified by Roney, et al. in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,528,474 and 5,632,551, comprise an LED circuit board potted or encapsulated in a filled resin matrix within a metal shell. The intended purpose of the filled resinous encapsultat, which may be a thermally conductive epoxy, is to conduct heat from the LED array into the metal housing which acts as a heat dissipater.” (col. 3, line 47) “The improvement in thermal performance of LED devices that embody the technology taught by Roney, et al. over the apparatus disclosed by Masami, et al. in U.S. Pat. No. 4,729,076 is substantial.” (col. 3, line 52) “Masami's use of unfilled resin and a non thermally coupled insulation sheet greatly diminishes the flow of heat from the LED array to the heat dissipater.” The present invention incorporates the above teachings of Hochstein '240.

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 6,220,722 issued April 2001 to Begemann (Begemann '722), Begemann '722 teaches that (col. 1, line 49) “It has been found that LEDs having a luminous flux of 5 lm or more can only be efficiently used if the lamp comprises heat-dissipating means. Customary incandescent lamps can only be replaced by LED lamps which are provided with LEDs having such a high luminous flux. A particular aspect of the invention resides in that the heat-dissipating means remove the heat, generated during operation of the lamp, from the substrate via the gear column to the lamp cap and the mains supply connected thereto.” (col. 2, line 32) “Yet another embodiment of the LED lamp is characterized in that means are incorporated in the column, which are used to generate an air flow in the lamp. Such means, preferably in the form of a fan, can be used, during operation of the lamp, to generate forced air cooling. In combination with the heat-dissipating means, this measure enables good heat dissipation from the gear column and the substrate.” The present invention incorporates the above teachings of Begemann '722

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 6,274,924 issued August 2001 to Carey et al (Carey '024), Carey '024 teaches that (col. 1, line 9) “Most light emitting devices (LEDs) emit incoherent light. One performance measure of an LED is photometric efficiency, e.g. the conversion of input energy into visible light. Photometric efficiency is inversely proportional to the junction temperature of the LED. A major concern of the LED package designer is keeping the die cool to provide good overall performance.” (col. 1, line 20) “The prior art packages. . . . Because the die, the optical cavity, and the encapsulant have different thermal coefficients, they expand and contract at different rates during operation. This places a high mechanical stress on the LED. In addition, the prior art packages lack thermal isolation between the electrical and the thermal paths because the electrical leads are the primary thermal paths. As a result, the packaged die are subject to thermal stresses from the temperature cycling. . . . ” (col. 1, line 35) “These problems are exacerbated as the die increases in area or input power. Because a device having a larger junction area, . . . requires a larger optical element . . . to provide comparable light extraction efficiency, a large optical cavity is necessary. The mechanical stress applied to the LED increases with the volume of the encapsulant. In addition, the stress increases as the packaged LED is exposed to temperature cycling and high moisture conditions. The accumulated mechanical stresses reduce the overall LED reliability.” (col. 1, line 46) “Since prior art packages use their electrical leads as primary thermal paths, the high thermal resistance of these paths combined with the high thermal resistance of the external system creates high junction temperatures, when power dissipation increases. . . . High junction temperature contributes to accelerating the irreversible loss of photometric efficiency in the LED chip and also accelerates processes that contribute to the failure of mechanical integrity of the LED package.” The present invention incorporates the above teachings of Carey '024, it being noted as significant Carey '024's illumination that the LED “ . . . electrical leads are the primary thermal paths . . . . ” The present invention incorporates Carey '024's observation on electrical leads being the primary thermal paths into the present invention's TM and as vis-a-via other electronic elements as well.

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 6,517,218 issued February 2003 to Hochstein (Hochstein '218), Hochstein '218 teaches that (col. 1, line 13) “Assemblies in the prior art include a light emitting diode (LED) with first and second electrical leads for conducting electricity to and from said light emitting diode, and a heat sink.” The present invention incorporates Hochstein '218's teachings of utilizing a heat-sink as part of the electrical circuitry for energizing an assembly's LED(s).

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 6,561,680 issued May 2003 to Shih (Shih '680), Shih '680 teaches that (col. 1, line 15) “recent developments in making high temperature and high brightness LEDs have expanded the use of LEDs. . . . Even with new high-temperature LED technology, however, LEDs still exhibit a substantial decrease in light output when the temperature of the LED junction increases. For example, an increase of 75° C. at the junction temperature may cause the level of luminous flux to be reduced to one-half of its room temperature value. This phenomenon limits the amount of output from conventional LEDs.” The present invention teaches away from Shih '680 by providing “active” TM which allows for the capture and utilization of Shih '680's referenced “ . . . one-half . . . ” reduction in light-output due to high operating temperature.

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 6,634,771 issued October 2003 to Cao (Cao '771), Cao '771 teaches of (col. 10, line 7) “a thermoelectric cooler located on said heat sink, said thermoelectric cooler experiencing a decrease in temperature when exposed to a voltage, an air entrance, an air exit, and an interior airflow path through said secondary heat sink, said airflow path permitting air to enter said heat sink through said air entrance, absorb heat from said secondary heat sink and exit said heat sink through said air exit, air located within said enclosure, a fan within said enclosure for bringing air into said air entrance and forcing air through said airflow path and through said air exit.” The present invention improves on Cao '771 with the novel application of the present invention's “active” sensor feedback, ion-pump-fan, ferrite-torus, the other elements and said elements multiple roles in the present invention's TM.

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 7,140,753 issued November 2006 to Wang et al. (Wang '753), Wang '753 teaches that (col. 1, line 29) “A conventional method for dissipating heat from modulized LEDs is to enlarge a heat dissipating plate. This increases the direct contact area between the modulized LEDs and the heat dissipation plate. Further, a fan providing an air-cooling function can be added. In addition to incurring further costs, significant heat still remains thereby reducing luminance. Hence, an improvement over the prior art is required to overcome these disadvantages.” The present invention directly addresses Wang '753's identified problems with the present art.

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 7,178,941 issued February 2007 to Roberge et al (Roberge '941), Roberge '941 teaches that (col. 67, line 65) “8. A method of claim 1, further comprising providing a fan for circulating air within the housing to dissipate heat from the light sources and the power facility.” (col. 68, line 1) “9. A method of claim 8, further comprising providing a thermal sensor wherein the fan operates in response to a temperature condition sensed by the thermal sensor.” The present invention teaches away from Roberge '941 by ignoring the “thermal” condition of the overall device and, rather, measuring light-output as the controller of the present invention's TM.

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 7,188,984 issued March 2007 to Sayers et al (Sayers '984), Sayers '984 teaches that (col. 1, line 35) “Incandescent lights . . . ” (col. 1, line 45) “Most of the electrical energy they consume is wasted in the form of heat while less than 7% of the energy they consume is typically radiated as visible light.” (col. 1, line 64) “Moreover, the illuminance of an incandescent light source depreciates over time. It is very common for a filament type light source . . . to loose more than 25% of its output when compared to the initial output of the bulb.” (col. 2, line 1) “Very long life halogen bulbs may loose up to 50% of their output over their useful life.” The present invention directly addresses the problem of present art incandescent and halogen light sources as both experience significant degradation in serviceable light output over their service life. Thru its “active” TM regime, the present invention provides the ability to maintain an initial illumination level throughout the present invention's service life, this facet being a direct improvement over the present art incandescent (Sayers '984), the halogen and the present art LED illumination products commercially available.

In reference to U.S. Pat. No. 7,210,832 issued May 2007 to Huang (Huang '832), Huang '832 teaches that (col. 1, line 41) “As a high-power or high-brightness illumination apparatus of light emitting diodes concerned, such as above 30-100 W (watt), it is hard to design an effective heat dissipation means for the LED illumination apparatus without fans. A traditional method of solving the heat dissipation problem is adapting a plurality of cooling fins attached on a base of the illumination apparatus and the heat generated from the light emitting diodes is conducted to the cooling fins via the base, then using an electric fan to blow the heat away, and thereby the heat is dissipated away. As the above-mentioned descriptions the traditional method of heat dissipation usually requires a large space for setting up the plurality of cooling fins near the illumination apparatus and further needs to install an electric fan, that causes noise and reliability problems when it was used outdoors.” The present invention recognizes Huang '832 problem statement with the use of fans in the present art which “ . . . causes noise and reliability problems . . . ” and overcomes the present art's use of fans by the novel application of ion-pump-fan configuration(s) which do not cause noise and having no moving parts, directly addresses the inherent reliability problems as taught by Huang '832 with present art fans in applications of thermal-management of LED devices.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention reduces to practice discoveries made by the present inventors during their investigations into present-art-perceived-difficulties in thermal-management applications of solid-state devices.

The present invention provides means and methods of integrating light-emitting-diodes (LED), other solid-state elements, or other solid-state end-use elements providing sensing, broadcasting or interacting with other electrical elements, into a thermal-energy-management configurations utilizing commonly encountered present art electrical socket(s) and electrical service(s) such as standard metal incandescent light bulb sockets and electrical service(s) such as 110 v. or 220 v. AC.

Specifically, the present invention incorporates ferrite-based torus (tori), thermoelectric(s), ion-pump-fan(s) and in some embodiments, sensing of desired output(s) of solid-state devices and/or wireless communication to said solid-state devices, with support solid-state elements, in novel ways, to achieve commercially viable thermal-management (TM) of said solid-state devices for the purposes of enhancing the performance and utility of said solid-state devices.

For the purpose of this discussion the term light-emitting-diodes (LED) may be assumed to be interchangeable with other thermally-sensitive solid-state devices such as but not limited to microprocessors, electro-illuminators, liquid-crystal-displays (LCD), nano-devices and similar devices.

An example of an embodiment of the present invention configures ferrite-based torus (tori), thermoelectric(s) and ion-pump-fan(s) with LEDs for use in usually encountered present art incandescent electric light bulb socketry with AC electrical service and dispensing with any additional modifications required of said existing incandescent electric light infrastructure. That is, the present invention incorporates the present inventors' discoveries, in novel ways, into a device similar in outward appearance to the typical present art incandescent light bulb or Edison-type light bulb (E-bulb) thereby providing solid-state advantages of lower energy consumption for a given unit of light output, longer service-life-expectancy; greater reliability, in a manner not apparent to the public or taught by the present art.

The non-apparent nature of the present invention, when applied as an incandescent electric light bulb substitute thru the use of thermally-sensitive LED(s), where both its outward appearance and usage are closely similar to that of the standard incandescent electric light bulb provides important economic viability characteristics. For example, the present invention, via its thermal-management (TM) means and methods, provides a heat signature similar to present art incandescent light bulbs.

Another example of the present thermal-management (TM) invention providing an appearance similar to the present art incandescent light bulb is its use of a structural element supporting the present invention's ion-pump-fan which is generally located in the center of the bulb and providing an appearance similar to the typically encountered illumination filament or stem found in present art incandescent light bulb.

A central aspect of the present invention, relating to the above example(s), is the use of one (1) or more torus (tori) in multiple roles of: a) transformer of AC to DC (or DC to AC) current, b) thermal-mass heat-sink, c) structural support for attachment of solid-state elements and said solid-state elements' physical structural support(s), d) physical protection from impact shock for said solid-state elements and electronic/electrical wiring from/to said solid-state elements, e) a central element of intended thermal energy flow-path structure, f) structural attachment to standard, present art, electrical light bulb socket, i.e. screw-in-bulb-metal-base, g) torus' hollow center providing a protected, armored, conduit for electric power service to said light-source and/or available use for locating heat-pipe type feature(s) or function(s) which are not inclusive of the present invention, and h) a conduit for fluid moved by the action of the present invention's ion-pump-fan(s). This invention's multi-use of a ferrite-based torus advances the present art in novel, non-apparent, ways.

Another central aspect of the present invention, relating to the above example(s), is the use of one (1) or more ion-pump-fan(s) in multiple roles of: 1) imparting movement on a fluid originating external from the present invention, said fluid passing by said electronic elements, thru and/or around said torus hollow and exiting out of said present invention, 2) providing an appearance similar to an incandescent bulb filament or stem, and 3) enhancing the thermal signature of the bulb enclosure in mimicking that of an incandescent light bulb. Inclusion of multi-pin or multiple ion-pump-fan(s) needles is anticipated by the present invention.

Yet another central aspect of the present invention is the multiple roles played by the present invention's faux-illumination-filament or stem, wherein the stem provides: i) said mimic filament, ii) a physical structural support for referenced ion-pump-fan(s), iii) influence on fluid-flow caused by either referenced ion-pump-fan's movement of said fluid or convection or both, and iv) structural support for one or more light-sensors, in the present invention's embodiment's use of a light-sensor, to control the thermal-management-affects on light output, (or in the TM of a microprocessor, the flip count), v) where said sensor or sensors are employed, the stem provides structural support for antenna(s) for use of wireless communication with said sensor or sensors to modify the sensitivity and/or setting of elements which can modify the present invention's thermal-management, and vi) in other embodiment(s) providing structural integrity to the present invention's physical manifestation by providing a physical and/or thermal load path from electrical socket to the crown of the bulb structure when said stem is structurally attached to said bulb structure crown.

Still another central aspect of the present invention is the multiple roles performed by the present invention's screw-base. In addition to the use of such screw-base allowing utilization of existing incandescent bulb sockets and electrical power supply and providing structural support, some of the present invention's embodiments utilize portions of said screw-base for the construction and electrifying the capacitor(s) for driving the present invention's ion-pump-fan(s).

Another central aspect of the present invention, relating to the above example(s), is the use of a standard incandescent electric light's glass bulb shape in multiple roles of: α) lightweight, transparent/translucent, physically protecting the overall device's solid-state elements, β) non-electrically-conductive enclosure, γ) high, selective, thermal conductivity characteristics providing for thermal transport directly away from thermal source(s) of solid-state element generated waste heat, δ) heat-spreader, ε) unrestricted air-mass flow past heat-spreader features, ξ) selected rough-surface-areas (near and/or on “top” or “crown” portion of bulb structure) of enhanced surface-areas to projected surface area for enhanced transfer of transferred waste-heat to passing air-mass. Said multi-facetted substitute of an incandescent electric light's glass bulb is preferably made of transparent/translucent polycarbonate (PC) and/or polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and/or reinforced polymer composite(s) (FRCs) including but not limited to compositions of thermally conductive carbon fibers and/or nano-fibers.

OBJECT OF THE INVENTION

The objects of this novel design are numerous.

The invention is exemplified in the combination and arrangement of parts shown in the accompanying drawings and described in the following specification and it is more particularly pointed out in the appended claims. Any one of these characteristics alone will aid in enhancing the performance of thermally sensitive solid-state devices and will make possible better control of said thermally sensitive solid-state devices performance, and a complete solution of the difficulties associated with thermally sensitive solid-state devices is readily possible by employing an two or more of these characteristics in combination.

The invention has for its object the provision of thermal-management (TM) which is more convenient and flexible in its application than TM schemes heretofore devised, which is economical to integrate with existing thermally sensitive solid-state devices, to manufacture, convenient to install, and which will permit higher desired-output to energy-input ratio(s) for said thermally sensitive solid-state devices such as LED light-output than was heretofore possible.

A further object of the invention is to provide a method for reducing the intensity of mechanical stresses exerted on semiconductive devices by the material in which they are encased by providing a thermally stable micro-environment.

Still another object of the invention is to provide such novel TM that can be energized by standard electrical current of 120 volts or 220 volts A.C.″

Another object of the present invention is to provide a TM/LED lamp that generates the desired spectrum in a bright and substantially uniform pattern so that the light therefrom may be observed from a distance over a wide range of viewing angles.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an improved TM/LED lamp construction that readily and more efficiently replaces existing incandescent bulbs heretofore in use.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide an improved TM/LED lamp construction that can be economically manufactured and made adaptable for use in a wide variety of household, commercial and industrial lighting applications.

It is a general object of this invention to provide a TM/LED lighting system which is automatic in operation. The provision of a TM/LED lighting device of the character referred to above constitutes a principal object of this invention.

This invention relates generally to semiconductor devices and more particularly to protecting the junctions of such thermally sensitive devices.

The main stimulant behind development of the present invention's thermal-management (TM) means and methods has been its use to radically improve the efficiency of incandescent lamp alternatives based on light-emitting-diodes. Up to the present time this scheme has not been commercially successful because the known present art TM has not addressed the numerous inherent limitations of thermoelectric devices, moving-part-fans, and failure to directly address the intended, desired, output and the controlling aspect of the TM chosen. Numerous efforts have been made to provide an LED lighting fixture whereby the waste-heat generated in the fixture would be prevented from causing deterioration. While certain of the present art schemes offer solutions to the heat transfer problems, none has provided a satisfactory degree of thermal-management.

PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

The present invention's preferred embodiment is as a replacement/substitution for a commonly encountered incandescent light bulb, as described herein and best described and presented as shown in the accompanying FIGS. 26, 32, 34, 35, 36 & 37, and as described in the description of said FIGURES below. Specifically, the preferred embodiment incorporates a common semiconductive layer or plate with the thermally-sensitive solid-state device to be thermally-managed and a first thermoelectric/heat-sink and a second common semiconductive layer or plate with a second thermoelectric/heat-sink and support electric/electronic devices, with said above first couple and said above second couple sandwiching a ferrite-torus AC-to-DC element. Said sandwich is generally within the confines of a double-shell outwardly apparent standard Edison-type incandescent light bulb screw-to-socket-configuration, with said volume defined by said double-shell utilized for fluid-flow channeling and for high-voltage capacitor(s) used to drive above referenced ion-pump-fan(s). Said fluid-flow, actuated via said ion-pump-fan(s) and thermal-gradient, moving thru and between that referenced above, and pictured in the drawings and descriptions of said drawings, elements of the composite thermal-management structure. Said thermal-management effectuated via sensor(s) and manipulated via wireless communications.

DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

The reader should note, lower case italic letters, on drawings, reference identical elements of the design from drawing to drawing, while superscript Arabic numbers on said lower case italic letters reference FIGURE Nos., and stand alone Arabic numbers are references to cross-sectional aspects from drawing to drawing. The sequence of FIGURES, beginning with FIG. 1, which shows, as an example, an initial platform of a solid-state light source or light sources structurally attached, or an integral part of, one or more semi-electrical surfaces, is intended to show a build-up of discrete elements and/or functions for the present invention's thermal-management (TM). While the said sequence is a presented method, of the present invention, it is intended that such sequence is but one of many possible sequences to achieve the presentation of the objects of the present invention to the reader.

FIG. 1, is a top view, wherein α1 designates one or more solid-state light source(s), and b1 designates one or more semi-electrically conductive surface(s) of one or more semi-conductive material(s) composition(s) configuration(s) sheet(s) or plate(s) and utility(ies).

FIG. 2, is a cross-sectional view taken along line 1-1 of FIG. 1, wherein α2 designates one or more solid-state light source(s), b2 designates one or more semi-electrically conductive surface(s) of one or more semi-conductive material(s), composition(s), configuration(s), sheet(s) or plate(s) and utility(ies).

FIG. 3, is an alternative configuration utilizing one or more rectangular (or square) semi-electrically conductive surface(s) of one or more semi-conductive material(s), composition(s), configuration(s), and utility(ies), wherein α3 designates one or more solid-state light source(s), and b3 designates one or more semi-electrically conductive surface(s) of semi-conductive material(s), composition(s), configuration(s), sheet(s) or plate(s) and utility(ies).

FIG. 4, is a cross-sectional view taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 3, wherein α4 designates one or more solid-state light source(s), b4 designates one or more semi-electrically conductive surface(s) of semi-conductive material(s), composition(s), configuration(s), sheet(s) or plate(s) and utility(ies). FIGS. 3 & 4 provide configuration for gaps between the semi-conductive sheet(s) or plate(s) and the standard “circular” screw-in socket of the commonly encountered light bulb. Such gaps between the “square” semi-conductive sheet(s) or plate(s) and the socket casing provides means for easy applications of, such as but not limited to, additional electrical wiring, additional micro-sensors, additional thermal-flow and/or fluid-flow pathways, and/or attachments of structural elements.

FIG. 5 is as FIG. 1, which is a top view, wherein α5 designates one or more solid-state light source(s), and b5 designates a semi-electrically conductive surface of one or more semi-conductive material(s), composition(s), configuration(s), sheet(s) or plate(s) and utility(ies). FIG. 5 is provided so as to better show cross-section 3-3, which provides reference for FIG. 6.

FIG. 6, is a cross-sectional view taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 5, wherein α6 designates one or more solid-state light source(s), b6 designates a semi-electrically conductive surface(s) of semi-conductive material(s), composition(s), configuration(s), and utility(ies), and c6 designates one or more thermoelectric devices,

FIG. 7 is as FIG. 1, which is a top view, wherein α7 designates one or more solid-state light source(s), and b7 designates a semi-electrically conductive surface of one or more semi-conductive material(s), composition(s), configuration(s), sheet(s) or plate(s) and utility(ies). FIG. 7 is provided so as to better show cross-section 4-4, which provides reference for FIG. 8.

FIG. 8, is a cross-sectional view taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 7, wherein α8 designates one or more solid-state light source(s), b8 designates a semi-electrically conductive surface(s) of semi-conductive material(s), composition(s), configuration(s), and utility(ies), c8 designates one or more thermoelectric devices. FIG. 8 shows α8 solid-state light source(s) sharing a common structure of semi-conductive material(s), sheet(s), and/or plate(s), said common structure, noted as α8, providing both the utility(ies) of b8 for solid-state light source(s) α8 and the utility(ies) of electrically non-conductivity of such structures incorporated into thermoelectric devices.

FIG. 9 is as FIG. 1, which is a top view, wherein α9 designates one or more solid-state light source(s), and b9 designates a semi-electrically conductive surface of one or more semi-conductive material(s) composition(s), configuration(s), sheet(s) or plate(s) and utility(ies). FIG. 9 is provided so as to better show cross-section 5-5, which provides reference for FIG. 10.

FIG. 10, is a cross-sectional view taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 9, wherein α10 designates one or more solid-state light source(s), b10 designates a semi-electrically conductive surface(s) of semi-conductive material(s), composition(s), configuration(s) and utility(ies), c10 designates one or more thermoelectric devices. FIG. 10 shows α10 solid-state light source(s) sharing a common structure of semi-conductive material(s), sheet(s) and/or plate(s), said common structure, noted as d10, providing both the utility(ies) of b10 for solid-state light source(s) α10 and the utility(ies) of electrically non-conductivity of such structures incorporated into thermoelectric devices. In thermo-contact with thermoelectric device c10, shown in cross-section, is/are electrically energized ferrite-torus or tori, designated as e10, said torus/tori is/are provided with non-electrically conductive enclosure ƒ10.

FIG. 11, is a side view, showing said ell torus/tori as though the non-electrically conductive enclosure ƒ11 were transparent.

FIG. 12 is as FIG. 1, which is a top view, wherein α12 designates one or more solid-state light source(s), and b12 designates a semi-electrically conductive surface of one or more semi-conductive material(s), composition(s), configuration(s), sheet(s) or plate(s) and utility(ies). FIG. 12 is provided so as to better show cross-section 6-6, which provides reference for FIG. 13.

FIG. 13, is a cross-sectional view taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 12, wherein α13 designates one or more solid-state light source(s), b13 designates a semi-electrically conductive surface(s) of semi-conductive material(s), composition(s), configuration(s) and utility(ies), c13 designates one or more thermoelectric devices.

FIG. 13 shows α13 solid-state light source(s) sharing a common structure of semi-conductive material(s), sheet(s) and/or plate(s), said common structure, noted as d13, providing both the utility(ies) of b13 for solid-state light source(s) α13 and the utility(ies) of electrically non-conductivity of such structures incorporated into thermoelectric devices. In thermo-contact with thermoelectric device(s) c13, shown in cross-section, is/are electrically energized torus or tori, designated as e13, said torus/tori provided with non-electrically conductive enclosure ƒ13. Said torus/tori, e13, is sandwiched between first mentioned thermoelectric device(s) c13, and one (1) or more thermoelectric devices designated here as g13.

FIG. 14, is a side view of FIG. 13.

FIG. 15 is as FIG. 1, which is a top view, wherein α15 designates one or more solid-state light source(s), and b15 designates a semi-electrically conductive surface of one or more semi-conductive material(s), composition(s), configuration(s), sheet(s) or plate(s) and utility(ies). FIG. 15 is provided so as to better show cross-section 7-7, which provides reference for FIG. 16.

FIG. 16, is a cross-sectional view taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 15, wherein α16 designates one or more solid-state light source(s), b16 designates a semi-electrically conductive surface(s) of semi-conductive material(s), composition(s), configuration(s) and utility(ies), c16 designates one (1) or more thermoelectric devices. FIG. 16 shows α16 solid-state light source(s) sharing a common structure of semi-conductive material(s) sheet(s) and/or plate(s), said common structure, noted as d16, providing both the utility(ies) of b16 for solid-state light source(s) α16 and the utility(ies) of electrically non-conductivity of such structures incorporated into thermoelectric devices. In thermo-contact with thermoelectric device(s) c16, shown in cross-section, is/are electrically energized torus or tori, designated as e16, said torus/tori provided with non-electrically conductive enclosure ƒ16. Said torus/tori, e16, is sandwiched between first mentioned thermoelectric device(s) c16, and one (1) or more thermoelectric devices designated here as g16. FIG. 16 shows inclusion of one (1) or more electric devices on the opposite side of the one (1) or more thermoelectric devices, identified as g16, from the torus/tori e16. Said electric/electronic devices may include items such as transistor(s), shown here, as examples as two (2) transistors, h16, and capacitor(s), shown here as three (3) capacitors, i16. Included in this figure is also an electrical contact, j16, intended to be compatible with commonly encountered electrical power supply sockets or attachments such as 110 volt or 220 volt AC. Not shown but available is the sharing of a common structure of semi-conductive material(s) sheet(s) and/or plate(s), with thermoelectric devices, identified as g16 and solid-state devices utilizing similar such semi-conductive material(s) as in the manner presented in FIG. 13.

FIG. 17, is a side view.

FIG. 18 shows a present invention's construction, utilizing that of FIG. 16 as an example, situated within the confines of a commonly encountered incandescent electric light bulb socket, shown, in cross-section, as k18. Also shown, as l18, are thermally non-conductive and/or thermally and electrically non-conductive structure isolating either or both thermoelectric elements designated herein as c18 and/or g18. Thermal pathways are provided from the outer surface of the torus/tori, e18, via a surrounding high thermally conductive medium, m18, a medium which can be transparent and/or translucent and/or opaque, of plastic and/or metal and/or other high thermally conductive material, which geometrically transforms and/or narrows into stalk-like substructures rising past the solid-state light source, upward in reference to the FIG. 18, said stalk-like substructures, designated herein as n18, which in turn, geometrically transforming into thin, large surface area to volume ratio substructure, designated herein as o18.

FIG. 19 shows a top view of the construction which FIG. 18 is a cross-section of, where m19 is a medium which can be transparent and/or translucent and/or opaque, of plastic and/or metal and/or other high thermally conductive material, which geometrically transforms and/or narrows into stalk-like substructures rising past the solid-state light source, upward in reference to the FIG. 18, said stalk-like substructures, designated herein as n19, which in turn, geometrically transforming into thin, large surface area to volume ratio substructure, designated herein as o19.

FIG. 20 is FIG. 18 with the addition of a commonly encountered incandescent electric light bulb shaped enclosure, p20, structurally attached to standard socket shaped fixture, k20, said bulb shaped enclosure, p20, preferably being of a transparent and/or translucent, with optionally opaque areas or regions, character. The bulb shaped enclosure, p20, is preferably of a high thermo energy conductive material or materials. The bulb shaped enclosure's, p20, surface, either the exterior surface and/or the interior surface, is preferably of a high-surface-area to projected surface area geometry. The bulb shaped enclosure's, p20, surface or surfaces may be of a hydrophilic and/or hydrophobic surface(s) geometry/nature. The interior, q20, of the said bulb shaped enclosure may be of a man-made quality vacuum, or filled with a transparent and/or translucent, with optionally opaque regions, material(s), of a solid and/or liquid and/or gaseous phase for the operational design temperatures, of a high thermo energy conductive nature or a combination of said material(s) and vacuum.

FIG. 21 is FIG. 20 with the addition of structure(s), r21, which serves as structural reinforcement if, q21, is a solid, and/or r21 has a light reflector and/or light retro-reflective nature, and/or r21, is an incandescent electric element and/or fluorescent material, and/or r21 contains solid-state light sources such as, but not limited to, electroluminescence. FIG. 21 includes alternate a21 configuration s21showing two (2) or more light emitting diodes within an enclosure.

FIG. 22 is a top view of bulb shaped enclosure's, p22, surface, referencing FIG. 21.

FIG. 23 is another view of bulb shaped enclosure's, p22, surface.

FIG. 24 is top view of bulb shaped enclosure's, p22, surface, showing cross-section reference 9-9 which relates to FIG. 26.

FIG. 25 is a side view showing only the external surface.

FIG. 26 is FIG. 24's 9-9 cross-section from the top of the bulb surface, p26, down to line indicate 10-10, below line indicate 10-10, the view is of the internal surface exposed when the socket, k26, is cut away. Some elements not shown, for illumination purposes only, refer to FIG. 21.

FIG. 27 shows pulse of, cc27, one or more solid-state light source(s), said pulse can be singly, or parallel if more than one solid-state light source, or within the pulse, serially in sequence to individual solid-state light sources if more than one. When solid-state light source(s) are between energizing pulse, the dd27, one or more thermoelectric element(s) is/are energized, said pulse can be singly, or parallel if more than one solid-state light source, or within the pulse, serially in sequence to individual solid-state light sources if more than one.

FIG. 28 shows, as example, pulse to h28 &/or i28, one or more electric devices(s), said pulse can be singly, or parallel if more than one electric device, or within the pulse, serially in sequence to individual electric device if more than one. When electric device(s) are between energizing pulse, one or more thermoelectric element(s), such as g28 is/are energized, said pulse can be singly, or parallel if more than one electric device, or within the pulse, serially in sequence to individual electric devices if more than one.

FIG. 29 shows simplified graph of pulse relationship expressed in FIGS. 27 & 28.

FIG. 30, the following provide background on alternate structure:

  • t30 SILICON
  • u30 PHOSPHORUS LAYER,
  • v30 LED CHIP
  • w30 CATHODE
  • x30 ANODE
  • y30 CERAMIC SUBSTRATE
  • z30 ELECTRIC CONNECTION (LITZ)
  • αα30 ELECTRIC CONNECTION
  • bb30 THERMALLY CONDUCTIVE GLUE

FIG. 31, the following provide background on alternate structure:

  • ee31 SOLID STATE LIGHT SOURCE
  • ƒƒ31 ELECTRICALLY CONDUCTIVE LAYER
  • gg31 CERAMIC SUBSTRATE (COLD SIDE)
  • hh31 THERMOELECTRIC DEVICE (PELTIER EFFECT)
  • ii31 CERAMIC SUBSTRATE (HOT SIDE)
  • jj31 HEAT SINK
  • kk31 TORUS TRANSFORMER
  • ll31 HEAT SINK
  • mm31 CERAMIC SUBSTRATE (HOT SIDE)
  • nn31 THERMOELECTRIC DEVICE (PELTIER EFFECT)
  • oo31 CERAMIC SUBSTRATE (COLD SIDE)
  • pp31 ELECTRICALLY CONDUCTIVE LAYER
  • qq31 ELECTRIC COMPONENTS
  • rr 31 THERMAL INSULATION
  • ss31 THERMAL GRADIENT

FIG. 32 is in reference to FIGS. 23, 24, 25, & in particular FIG. 26.

FIG. 32 is a close-up from said FIGURES highlighting the present invention's mock-filament or stem and showing the present invention's ion-pump-fan(s) wherein tt32 denotes said ion-pump-fan's “barrel” and uu32 denotes said ion-pump-fan's “needle”. Not shown is the present invention's alternative embodiments of multiple, in series, in parallel or side-by-side ion-pump-fans, relative to the intended fluid-flow actuated by said ion-pump-fan(s).

FIG. 33 is in reference to FIG. 32. FIG. 33 discloses one (1) of the present invention's alternative locations for the present invention's sensor(s) vv33 of the solid-state device's or devices' performance(s) (in the case shown, LED(s)) to be modified by the present invention's thermal-management (TM). Said sensor(s) role being the monitoring of intended output of said solid-state device(s) and effectuating said TM to cause a change in said TM to achieve intended performance of said solid-state device(s). FIG. 33 also discloses one of the present invention's alternative locations for the present invention's antenna(s) denoted as . Said antenna(s), xx33, providing one-way or two-way transmission to and/or from a physical embodiment of the present invention for data which may be referenced to affect a change and/or report on the TM and/or performance of the thermally-sensitive solid-state device(s) which is/are the intended requirement of said TM.

FIG. 34 is in reference to FIG. 32. FIG. 34 discloses one of the present invention's alternative locations for the present invention's support structures, yy34 providing alternative physical load(s) and/or thermal load(s) pathways. FIG. 34 also discloses one of the present invention's alternative locations, in the case shown providing a dual role for the support structure yy34 for the present invention's intake port zz34 and/or outflow port zz34 of fluid-flow associated with the present invention's intended thermal-management (TM).

FIG. 35 is in reference to FIGS. 23, 24, 25, & in particular FIG. 26. FIG. 35 discloses one of the present invention's alternative locations, in the case shown providing a dual role for the socket, k35 to include the present invention's intake port zz35 and/or outflow port zz35 of fluid-flow associated with the present invention's intended thermal-management (TM). Said fluid-flow, originating exterior to the present invention, is confined to passageway(s) provides thru and/or around the intended solid-state device(s) to be effectuated by the present invention's TM, thru and/or around the present invention's heat-sink elements, thermoelectric elements, ferrite-torus (tori) elements, ion-pump-fan(s) elements, singly or in any combination with the intention of thermal-management, with the intended intake/outflow ports being included in the present invention's bulb(s) and socket(s) structure. The volume between the inner and outer shells consisting of the socket, k35, is devoted to fluid-flow passageway(s) as referenced above except in an alternative embodiment of the present invention wherein some of the volume defined by the inner and outer shell of socket, k35, is consumed by a capacitor(s), ααα35, structure socket to provide high-voltage for the operation of the present invention's ion-pump-fan(s) and/or other support electronics associated with either the TM or the solid-state device(s) to be influenced by the TM, or both. Such an intended use is better shown in FIG. 36 which is the cross-section denoted in FIG. 35 as 12-12. Said capacitor(s), ααα35, providing both the intended electrical function and the physical structural role of maintaining the physical integrity of the fluid-flow passageway(s) from collapse due to outside applied physical loads.

FIG. 36 is in reference to FIG. 35, which is cross-section 12-12 of FIG. 35, wherein socket, k36, has defined inner shell bbb36, outer shell ccc36, with said capacitor(s), ααα36 and fluid-flow passageway(s), ddd36.

FIG. 37 offers three (3) examples of serial/parallel energizing of three (3) solid-state components of the present invention. For the above-referenced examples, the three (3) discrete solid-state components chosen are: one (1) of the one (1) or more thermoelectric element(s), eee37, included in the thermal-management (TM) which constitutes the central aspect of the present invention, one (1) of the one (1) or more ion-pump-fan(s), ƒƒƒ37, included in the TM which constitutes the central aspect of the present invention, and one (1) of the one (1) or more of solid-state device(s), ggg37, to be influenced by the TM and which, in alternative embodiments of the present invention, the above-referenced sensor(s) (as, for example, see FIG. 33 and specifically that noted as vv33), for this example said influenced solid-sate device(s) is considered to be a light-emitting-device (LED), such as referenced, for example, in FIG. 33. FIG. 37 examples of serial/parallel energizing are represented by graphs with watts of energy, hhh37, on the vertical axis with the horizontal axis representing blocks or specific-lengths of time laps before the serial/parallel energizing is repeated. Not shown is energizing sequence(s) of other elements, either in serial and/or parallel, of the TM, such as but not limited to the present invention alterative embodiments' elements such as the ferrite-torus (tori), sensor(s), antenna(s). It being noted that each of such elements exhibit different initial energizing characteristics which offers TM opportunities which the present invention exploits.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8186852Jun 17, 2010May 29, 2012Elumigen LlcOpto-thermal solution for multi-utility solid state lighting device using conic section geometries
US8192057Jun 29, 2011Jun 5, 2012Elumigen LlcSolid state spot light assembly
US8203274Aug 13, 2010Jun 19, 2012De Castro Erwin LLED and thermal management module for a vehicle headlamp
US8277082Jun 29, 2011Oct 2, 2012Elumigen LlcSolid state light assembly having light redirection elements
US8282250Jun 8, 2012Oct 9, 2012Elumigen LlcSolid state lighting device using heat channels in a housing
US8419218Jun 29, 2011Apr 16, 2013Elumigen LlcSolid state light assembly having light sources in a ring
US8449137Jun 29, 2011May 28, 2013Elumigen LlcSolid state tube light assembly
US8723424Dec 22, 2011May 13, 2014Elumigen LlcLight assembly having light sources and adjacent light tubes
US20120140472 *May 18, 2010Jun 7, 2012Instrument Systems Optische Messtechnik GmbhCalibration Light Source
EP2376835A1 *Oct 29, 2009Oct 19, 2011Bridgelux, Inc.Light emitting diode luminaire
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/3.2
International ClassificationF25B21/02
Cooperative ClassificationF21Y2101/02, F21V29/004, F21V29/2206, F21V29/20, H01L35/30, F25B21/02, F21V29/407, F21K9/00, F21V3/02, F21V3/04
European ClassificationF21V29/22B, F21K9/00, H01L35/30, F21V29/00C2