Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20080301979 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/095,864
PCT numberPCT/KR2006/005162
Publication dateDec 11, 2008
Filing dateDec 2, 2006
Priority dateDec 2, 2005
Also published asWO2007064176A1
Publication number095864, 12095864, PCT/2006/5162, PCT/KR/2006/005162, PCT/KR/2006/05162, PCT/KR/6/005162, PCT/KR/6/05162, PCT/KR2006/005162, PCT/KR2006/05162, PCT/KR2006005162, PCT/KR200605162, PCT/KR6/005162, PCT/KR6/05162, PCT/KR6005162, PCT/KR605162, US 2008/0301979 A1, US 2008/301979 A1, US 20080301979 A1, US 20080301979A1, US 2008301979 A1, US 2008301979A1, US-A1-20080301979, US-A1-2008301979, US2008/0301979A1, US2008/301979A1, US20080301979 A1, US20080301979A1, US2008301979 A1, US2008301979A1
InventorsSang-Do Lee
Original AssigneeSang-Do Lee
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insole
US 20080301979 A1
Abstract
Disclosed is a insole arranged on an upper surface of an innersole in a shoe. The insole includes: an intermediate supporting portion 41 coming into close contact with a center portion of a foot sole, including an arch, and having a plurality of elastic protrusions P formed on a lower surface of grids L defining grid-type thru-holes; and a rear supporting portion 42 extending from the rear end of the intermediate supporting portion 11 to a heel of the foot in order to make close contact with a rear portion of the foot sole, and having a plurality of stationary protrusions P′ formed on the lower surface of the rear supporting portion 42 to protrude downward. The insole can improve air permeability through the thru-holes, and in addition always makes close contact with the foot sole through elastic protrusions formed on the lower surface thereof so as to buffer impact on the shoe. Further, the stationary protrusions formed on the lower surface of the insole are stuck in the innersole, thereby preventing movement of the insole inserted in the shoe.
Images(7)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(8)
1. A insole to be stacked on the upper surface of an innersole of the shoe, on the upper surface of an outer sole, or on the upper surface of a slip-sole, the insole comprising:
an intermediate supporting portion 41 coming into close contact with a center portion of a foot sole, including an arch, and having a plurality of elastic protrusions P formed on a lower surface of grids L defining grid-type thru-holes: and
a rear supporting portion 42 extending from a rear end of the intermediate supporting portion 11 to a heel of the foot to make close contact with a rear portion of the foot sole, and having a plurality of stationary protrusions P′ formed on the lower surface of the rear supporting portion 42 to protrude downward.
2. The insole as claimed in claim 1, wherein a thru-hole 11 is formed at a center portion of the rear supporting portion 42.
3. The insole as claimed in claim 1, wherein the elastic protrusions P are longer than the stationary protrusions P′.
4. The insole as claimed in claim 1, wherein the distance between the outermost stationary protrusions P′ and the rear end of the rear supporting portion 42 is about 2040 nm.
5. The insole as claimed in claim 1, wherein the intermediate supporting portion 41, in which the thru-holes h are formed, is thinner than the rear supporting portion 42.
6. The insole as claimed in claim 1, wherein the upper surfaces of the intermediate supporting portion 41 and the rear supporting portion 42 are arranged on the same plane, and the lower surface of the intermediate supporting portion 41, in which the thru-holes h are formed, is higher than the lower surface of the rear supporting portion 42.
7. The insole as claimed in claim 1, wherein an upper cover 43, made of any one selected from EVA resin, leather, and polyurethane, is attached to the entire upper surface of the intermediate supporting portion 41 and the rear supporting portion 42.
8. The insole as claimed in claim 1, wherein a front supporting portion 44 is additionally formed at and extends from a front end of the intermediate supporting portion 41 to form the shape of the foot sole, a plurality of thru-holes h are formed in the front supporting portion 41 and the rear supporting portion 42 to have a grid shape, and a plurality of elastic protrusions P are formed on a lower surface of grids L defining the thru-holes.
Description
TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to a insole stacked on an inner sole of a shoe, and more particularly to a insole which includes an intermediate supporting portion making close contact with and supporting a center portion of the sole of the foot including arch, and a rear supporting portion extending from a rear end of the intermediate supporting portion so as to make close contact with and support a rear portion of the sole of the foot, and wherein the intermediate supporting portion has grids defining a plurality of thru-holes, and the rear supporting portion has a plurality of protrusions protruding from a bottom surface thereof, thereby improving air permeability of the insole and supporting the sole of the foot flexibly and elastically, as well as preventing a change of position of the insole.

BACKGROUND ART

Since human being begun walking, shoes initially have functioned to protect user's feet from damage while providing comfort in walking. However, with improvement of living standards and development of technology of manufacturing shoes, various kinds of shoes have been developed for walking, climbing, and correcting purposes.

Recently, as interest in health increases, concern about the health of feet on which the weight of the body concentrates has increased. Hence, necessity for shoes having specific functions as well as a function in protecting feet has increased more and more.

For example, shoes have functions of cushioning for buffering impact on a foot sole, air permeability for ventilating air in uppers enclosing a foot, reinforcement of a specific portion of a shoe depending on the use of the shoes, as well as a function of protecting feet which shoes basically have.

Cushioning is an essential function of decreasing fatigue of feet in which a user's weight concentrates while a user stands, and impact transferring to the brain through the feet. A cushion has been developed to concentrate in an outer sole of a shoe. The cushioning of the conventional shoe will be described in brief.

As shown in FIG. 1, first, the sole of the conventional shoe includes an outer sole 11 having a lower surface contacting with the ground, a slip-sole 12 stacked on the upper surface of the outer sole 11 to provide cushioning, and an innersole 13 stacked on the upper surface of the slip-sole 12 so that the upper surface thereof makes contact with a foot sole.

At this time, the outer sole 11 somewhat has cushioning. However, the outer sole 11 must have abrasion resistance rather than the cushioning in its characteristic. Therefore, the outer sole 11 lacks cushioning. As a result, the sufficient cushioning is provided in the slip-sole 12. The slip-sole 12 is made of synthetic resin material having an excellent elastic restoring force, or is manufactured to have a structure in which an elastic body such as an air pocket or a spring is installed.

The slip-sole 12 of the shoe in which the cushioning is reinforced plays the role of buffering impact on the foot. However, since the slip-sole centered on cushioning is manufactured, irregular prominence and depressions are formed on the upper surface of the slip-sole 12. Further, the slip-sole 12 has a bad appearance. The sole is finished by stacking the innersole 13 on the upper surface of the slip-sole 12.

In other words, the innersole 13 functions as a finishing material for the sole.

However, as being formed to substantially have a flat shape, the conventional innersole 13 cannot make close contact with the foot sole, especially the arch, with small and large bends, and cannot buffer impact on the foot sole. Further, there is a problem in that the conventional innersole 13 causes a flat-foot of the foot sole when a user wears the shoe with the innersole for a long time.

In order to support the arch of the foot sole more stably and to improve the cushioning, as shown in FIG. 2, an improved innersole 21 with a convex portion A has been developed which can make close contact with the arch of the foot sole.

The convex portion A making close contact with the arch as described above has an advantage of buffering impact applied to the foot sole, and especially the arch, so as to relax fatigue of the foot during walking. However, since the innersoles are mass-manufactured with a standardized structure having the convex portion A in a single shape, the arch of the foot sole may not be matched with the convex portion according to users. In accordance with cases, the convex portion can provide pressure to the arch, or cannot support the arch correctly.

Further, the conventional innersole 13 or the improved innersole 21 has degraded cushioning as a user wears the shoe for a long time. Furthermore, the arch-type convex portion is gradually flatted by weight repeatedly applied thereto, so as not to support the arch of the foot sole correctly.

In addition, since the elastic restoring force of the innersole is remarkably degraded, the innersole cannot make close contact with and support the foot sole with small and large bends. As a result, fatigue of the foot increases. Especially, in the case of a person walking for a long time or having a flat-foot, it is impossible to stably supporting the arch using only the innersole.

Therefore, in order to solve the above-mentioned problem, a insole has been developed, which is made of a material with high elasticity and is stacked on the upper surface of the innersole so as to effectively support the arch of the foot sole. As shown in FIG. 3, the insole 30 includes an intermediate supporting portion 31 for supporting a center portion of the foot sole having an arch excepting for a front portion from a front end of the foot sole to the arch, and a rear supporting portion 32 for supporting a rear portion from the arch to the rear end of the foot sole.

The insole 30 includes a convex portion A formed to be convex upwardly and making contact with the arch of the foot sole to support the arch. The convex portion A may be made of a high elastic material which can be deformed elastically, or a material which is hardly deformed elastically, so as to endure user's weight and to support the arch sufficiently. Further, the insole 30 can support the arch to prevent the foot from bearing flat-footed. However, in the characteristic of high elastic material, the insole can feel hard due to lack of flexibility. In addition, the insole has a problem of rather increasing fatigue of the foot sole when a user uses the insole for a long time.

DISCLOSURE OF INVENTION Technical Solution

Accordingly, the present invention has been made to solve the above-mentioned problems occurring in the prior art so as to compensate the defect of shoe sole, and it is an object of the present invention to provide a insole which can effectively support an arch with curvature, and can adjust its elasticity based on a user's weight, as well as improve air permeability, thereby efficiently reducing impact on the foot and fatigue induced by the impact, and preventing the foot from being subjected to force while the shoe is used for a long time.

Advantageous Effects

The insole of the present invention can improve air permeability through the thru-holes formed in the intermediate supporting portion that come into close contact with and support the intermediate portion of the foot sole. In addition, the insole can effectively absorb external impact in such a manner that the bending of the elastic protrusions protruding on the lower surface of the insole is changed. Further, the insole has an advantage in that the stationary protrusions can minimize movement of the insole occurring during the walking.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The above and other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will be more apparent from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view showing the conventional shoe soles;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view showing the conventional shoe innersole;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing the conventional insole;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view showing a insole according to the first embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view showing the insole in a view from the bottom according to the first embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a side view showing the insole according to the first embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 7 is a plan view showing a insole according to the second embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view showing the insole in a view from the bottom according to the second embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view showing a insole according to the third embodiment of the present invention; and

FIG. 10 is a perspective view showing a insole according to the fourth embodiment of the present invention.

MODE FOR THE INVENTION

The object of the present invention will be accomplished by a plurality of thru-holes defined by grids formed at an intermediate supporting portion of an insole supporting the arch of the foot sole, and a plurality of protrusions protruding downward from the bottom surface of the insole including the intermediate supporting portion.

The insole of the present invention makes close contact with the foot sole from the arch to the heel, and includes an intermediate supporting portion coming into close contact with and supporting a center portion of the foot sole including the arch, and a rear supporting portion coming into close contact with and supporting a rear portion of the foot sole from a rear end of the intermediate supporting portion to the heel. The structure and function of each portion will be described below.

The intermediate supporting portion is a portion making close contact with the center portion of the foot sole, including the arch. Especially, the intermediate supporting portion has a plate shape with an upwardly convex portion that makes close contact with the arch of the foot sole.

Meanwhile, the convex portion has a plurality of thru-holes formed in grids. These thru-holes are defined by a plurality of grids parallel with and intersecting with one another. Further, the convex portion has a structure in that a plurality of elastic protrusions is formed on the lower surface of the grids. The intermediate supporting portion has elastic force decreased by means of the thru-holes, while having increased flexibility. Hence, it is possible to remove the hard feeling sensed by the arch, and simultaneously to improve air permeability in the shoe.

However, the elastic force of the intermediate supporting portion is reduced, so as to not support the arch appropriately. The elastic protrusions formed on the lower surface of the grids defining the thru-holes function to compensate the reduced elastic force.

Specifically, the lower surface of the upwardly convex portion of the intermediate supporting portion is spaced from the upper surface of the innersole of the shoe, while the upper surface of the convex portion makes close contact with the arch of the foot sole. Since the elastic force of the convex portion is reduced by the thru-holes, the convex portion comes into close contact with the upper surface of the innersole so as to hardly support the arch of the foot sole correctly even though the arch applies a small amount of force to the convex portion. At this time, the convex portion is supported by the elastic protrusions protruding from the lower surface of the grids. At a result, the arch of the foot sole makes close contact with the intermediate supporting portion, and is supported by means of the convex portion.

When force applied to the intermediate supporting portion by means of the arch increases, the elastic protrusions are bent elastically to absorb the force, so that the intermediate supporting portion can support the arch elastically.

As described above, the intermediate supporting portion, which has the elastic force relatively reduced by a plurality of thru-holes formed in a grid shape, has a structure in which the protrusions can change the amount of the elastic deformation of the convex portion according to load or impact applied to the convex portion, or the foot of each user with different bends of the foot sole.

The intermediate supporting portion makes close contact with and supports the center portion of the foot sole elastically in such a manner that the convex portion, having flexibility increased by the thru-holes, is subjected to the first elastic deformation, and the elastic protrusions formed on the lower surface of the intermediate supporting portion are bent and subjected to the second elastic deformation.

The rear supporting portion extending from the rear end of the intermediate supporting portion is a portion supporting the rear portion of the foot sole, i.e. from the arch to the heel of the foot, and has a structure in which a plurality of stationary protrusions having the same shape as that of the elastic protrusions is formed on the lower surface. The lower end of the stationary protrusions tightly presses the upper surface of the innersole, thereby preventing the insole of the present invention from moving in the shoe when a user walks.

At this time, the stationary protrusions are preferably formed at a portion spaced from the rear end of the insole of the present invention toward the front end.

Specifically, as being spaced from the outermost stationary protrusions, the rear end of the insole may be elastically deformed upward and downward by using the outermost stationary protrusions as a point of application, resulting in the improvement of the cushioning of the insole.

The insole of the present invention as described above can be used as a slip-sole stacked on the upper surface of an outer sole, as innersole stacked on the upper surface of the slip-sole, as well as an insole stacked on the upper surface of the innersole of the shoe.

Hereinafter, the preferred embodiments of the present invention will be described in detail with reference to the accompanying drawings.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view showing a insole according to the first embodiment of the present invention, FIG. 5 is a perspective view showing the insole in a view from the bottom according to the first embodiment of the present invention, and FIG. 6 is a side view showing the insole according to the first embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 7 is a plan view showing a insole according to the second embodiment of the present invention, FIG. 8 is a perspective view showing the insole in a view from the bottom according to the second embodiment of the present invention, and FIG. 9 is a perspective view showing a insole according to the third embodiment of the present invention.

As shown in drawings, the insole according to the present invention has an intermediate supporting portion 41 formed in a plate shape corresponding to the foot sole, excepting for a front portion before an arch, which has a convex portion A rising so as to come into close contact with a center portion of the foot sole including the arch, a plurality of thru-holes H defined by grids L, and a plurality of elastic protrusions P protruding downward from a bottom surface of the grids L, and a rear supporting portion 42 extending from the rear end of the intermediate supporting portion 41 to a heel, so as to make close contact with the foot sole and having a plurality of stationary protrusions P′ protruding downward from the bottom surface thereof.

At this time, the intermediate supporting portion 41 and the rear supporting portion 42 have upper surfaces located in the same plan. The intermediate supporting portion 41 has a thickness thinner than that of the rear supporting portion 42, excepting for an edge thereof. Assuming that there are no protrusions, the edge of the intermediate supporting portion 41 and the bottom surface of the rear supporting portion 42 come into contact with the upper surface of the inner sole, but the bottom surface of the intermediate supporting portion 41 excepting the edge is spaced apart from the upper surface of the inner sole.

Further, the bottom surface of the intermediate supporting portion 41 on which the convex portion A rises is spaced from the upper surface of the inner sole to be located at a position higher than that of another bottom surface. Hence, the bottom surface of the intermediate supporting portion 41, especially, the bottom surface of the convex portion A, has great elastic deformation, resulting in an increase of the impact absorption range of the insole.

In this state, the elastic protrusions P, protruding from the bottom surface of the intermediate supporting portion 41, and the stationary protrusions P′, protruding from the bottom surface of the rear supporting portion, make contact with the upper surface of the inner sole. The elastic protrusions P are formed to be longer than the stationary protrusions P′. Among the elastic protrusions P, the elastic protrusions P protruding from the bottom surface of the convex portion A have lengths longer than that of others.

At this time, the stationary protrusions P′ are preferably formed to possibly be short and thick, so as not to be subjected to elastic deformation caused by external force. On the other hand, the elastic protrusions P preferably have lengths enough to be elastically bent by external force.

In addition, the stationary protrusions P′ have rigidity necessary for functioning as an anchor, so that the lower end of each protrusion p′ comes into close contact with the upper surface of the inner sole to prevent the insole of the present invention from moving in the shoe. On the other hand, the elastic protrusions P preferably have a protrusion structure as described above in order to elastically support the intermediate supporting portion 41, which is thin and has a small rigidity, i.e. elasticity due to a plurality of thru-holes H.

At this time, the stationary protrusions P′ are preferably formed on a lower surface of the rear supporting portion 42, which is spaced by 2040 mm apart from the rear end of the rear supporting portion 42, rather than the lower surface of the rear end of the rear supporting portion 42. This causes the rear end, extending from the insole where the outermost stationary protrusions P′ are located, to be elastically flexible using the outermost stationary protrusions P′ as point of application. Such elastic deformation of the rear end induces the improvement of cushioning of the insole.

However, when a distance d between the outermost stationary protrusions P′ and the rear end is shorter than 20 mm, it is difficult to induce the elastic deformation of the rear end. Further, it cannot be expected to improve cushioning of the insole because of the amount of the elastic deformation of the rear end. On the other hand, when a distance d between the outermost stationary protrusions P′ and the rear end exceeds 40 mm, the rear end extending from the outermost stationary protrusions P′ has an unnecessarily longer length causing the degradation of the elasticity, thereby reducing the cushioning property. Hence, it is impossible to obtain an effect on improvement of the appropriate cushioning property.

It is preferred to form the elastic protrusions P on grids L defining thru-holes h and lower surfaces of the intersections between the grids L, in view of supporting the intermediate supporting portion 41. The rear supporting portion 12 is a portion which makes contact with a rear portion of the foot sole, and is subjected to the largest pressure. Therefore, it is preferred to form a thru-hole H penetrating the center of the rear supporting portion 12 from the upper surface to the lower surface of the insole, as shown in FIG. 7. This causes the rear portion of the foot sole to come into direct contact with the upper surface of the inner sole through the thru-hole H, thereby improving the air permeability of the rear portion of the shoe, and simultaneously increasing the cushioning property in the rear portion of the foot sole.

At this time, as shown in FIG. 8, it is preferred to form the stationary protrusions P′ on the lower surface of the rear supporting portion 42 to be adjacent to the thru-holes H. This causes the stationary protrusions P′ to endure a greater load, thereby minimizing movement of the rear supporting portion 42.

As described above, the insole according to the present invention is preferably made of a material with high elasticity in order to maintain elastic contact with the foot sole. If the insole is made of a highly elastic material having a relatively solid surface and suitable rigidity, the foot sole can feel stiff, i.e. uncomfortable.

Therefore, in order to solve the above-mentioned disadvantage, as shown in FIG. 9, it also is preferred to attach an upper cover 43 made of a soft and good cushioning material such as EVA resin, leather, or polyurethane on an upper surface of the insole of the present invention.

At this time, the upper cover 43 may be made of a material, such as cotton fabrics or cotton blends, which has an excellent absorbency.

As shown in FIG. 10, the insole of the present invention may be made such that a front supporting portion 44 extends from a front end of the intermediate supporting portion 41. Hence, the insole may have a shape similar to that of the foot sole.

At this time, the grid-type thru-holes h are preferably formed in the front supporting portion 44 and the rear supporting portion 42, as well as the intermediate supporting portion 41. In addition, a plurality of elastic protrusions P are formed on the lower surface of the grids defining the thru-holes h, so that the insole has the structure of supporting the entire foot sole.

If the insole is formed to have the above-mentioned structure, the entire foot sole makes contact with the insole, thereby making it possible to improve air permeability, and further, to uniformly buffer impact on the entire foot sole through the elastic protrusions P.

Although a preferred embodiment of the present invention has been described for illustrative purposes, those skilled in the art will appreciate that various modifications, additions and substitutions are possible, without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention as disclosed in the accompanying claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US20110247235 *Mar 14, 2011Oct 13, 2011Sara Lee/De N.V.Insole for footwear
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/3.00B, 36/44, 36/3.00R
International ClassificationA43B7/06, A43B13/38
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/141, A43B17/02, A43B17/08
European ClassificationA43B7/14A10, A43B17/08, A43B17/02