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Publication numberUS2008167 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 16, 1935
Filing dateNov 19, 1930
Priority dateNov 19, 1930
Publication numberUS 2008167 A, US 2008167A, US-A-2008167, US2008167 A, US2008167A
InventorsSamuel Bergstein
Original AssigneeSamuel Bergstein
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Moistureproof package
US 2008167 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1935. s. BERGS TEIN MOISTUREPROOF PACKAGE Filed Nov. 19, 1950 INVENTOR. SAMUEL BERGS TE/N.

ATTORNEYS.

Patented July 16, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 5 Claims.

My invention relates to packages having a covering of transparent and moisture-proof material such as cellulosic material.

It is an object of my invention to produce cellulosic material tubes from continuous webs of material which may be either cut as produced or re-rolled to be out later. Cartons may be enclosed in the tubeduring their production, the tube may be cut, and the carton opened within the' tube. The carton may then be filled with merchandise, the ends closed, the transparent moisture-proof cover closed at the ends, and the product made ready for shipment. I

Tubes of cardboard with one side covered by the transparent cellulosic material may be produced in various lengths or in continuous rolls to be cut as needed.

In the art there has been considerable development in the use of transparent flexible material, such as cellulosicmaterial, which has often been employed in very thin sheets to completely enclose cartons Pl'lfl'PfiCkflQ'ES, so that the contents of the package will be preserved in a moisture-proof condition.

Ordinarily the carton is prepared and the contents of the package are inserted within the carton. The flaps are then closed in and the sheet of cellulosic material or other flexiblematerial is then wrapped around the carton and overlapped and the edges are folded over and sealed to form a closure which makes substantially a moistureproof package. As the sheets of transparent flexible material must, because of the cost, be made so thin and flimsy, the problem of wrapping the transparent material about the package is one which requires hand labor, and even when carefully done is apt to result in an untidy looking package.

Broadly it is the object of my invention to provide a package in which the transparent outer wrapper has been secured in position about the varton which is folded flat before the carton has been opened out so that in packing goods into the container, all that is necessary is to square the carton, and this automatically squares or opens up the wrapper. The contents of the package may thenbe inserted and the closure flaps folded down, and at the same time or later, the ends of the transparent wrapper which extend beyond the ends of the carton are folded over and sealed. Such a combination permits the folding operation of both the closure flaps of the carton or container and the closure flaps oi the moisture-proof wrapper to be accomplished substantially at the same time.

Such a carton may be made by a method in which the flexible transparent material, such as cellulosic material, is moved along in a web and the previously formed cartons are positioned in spaced position on the web so that when the flexible material is formed into a tube and cut inthe desired lengths, all that is necessary is for edges of the flexible material to be overlapped and sealed together, and the container is ready for shipment to the user of the package.

Referring to the drawing:

Figure l is plan view of my improved packageforming unit in flat condition as it comes from the machine which has folded a tube of cellulosic or like material around the carton and secured the material in its tubular shape, the carton being without flaps.

Figure 2 is an end view of the same'after it has been set up from its flattened'condition into rectangular cross-sectional form. Figure 3 is a perspective view of the same after having been set up as shown in Figure 2.

Figure 4 is. a plan view similar to Figure 1,

except that the enclosed carton has flaps at both ends.

Figure 5 is an end view of the same after it has been set up into tubular form.

Figure 6 is a perspective view of the same in the set up tubular form of Figure 5.

As shown in the example of Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the carton, of any suitable carton stock, is made of rectangular blank scored at I, 2, 3 and I and folded on the score lines'to form narrow opposite walls 5 and 6, and wider opposite walls 'I and 8. wall 6 by means of a narrow flap formed on the wall 6 by folding at score line 4; this flap la being adhesively secured to the edge portion of wall 8. Such tubes may be made at a rapid rate on machines of known construction. Preferably one of the walls, as the other wide wall I, has an opening through which the contents of the package will be visible when the carton has been enclosed in the cellulosic material, which will stretch across this opening 9. This cellulosic material is also a tube, which may be formed on a suitable machine from a long web, which web is folded at H), II, l2 and I3 when the carton is set up; the alternate folds II and I3 being formed by the machine, to make of the material a flat tube. The edges of the material are adhesively joined at ll. The adhesive may be any suitable glue or the like, or the edge portions of the cellulosic strip-may have been previously made adhesive with a coating of spi it gum, al-

The wide wall 8 is secured to the narrow lowed to dry, and then having an acetate solution applied to it to soften it, by suitable mechanism in conjunction with the mechanism that. folds the material and brings the edge portions together at I4. This or other adhesive may be used to cause the cellulosic material to adhere to the enclosed carton, either at the joint l4 or the machine, are introduced into the folding strip, and bysuitable further folding means and pressure applying means, the cartons may be assembled in the cellulosic strip very rapidly, as well as accurately. By suitable timed mecha-' nism, the cellulosic strip, after complete folding and securing at I4, is cut to uniform lengths, in

which there are substantialextensions Hi and N5 of the cellulosic material past the ends of the carton. The package-forming unit will then appear as shown in Fig. 1, ready to be set up as shown in Figs. 2 and 3.

When thus set up, the contents may be inserted from either end of the carton, throughthe open extensions l5 and it, after which these extensions may be folded across the open ends of the carton and folded upon themselves to make a secure closure, either with or without adhesive to secure them and seal them.

In the example of Figs. 4, 5 and 6, the difference from the first example is that the carton has flaps 5a, 6a, la and 811, respectively, at both ends of its walls 5, G, 1 and 8, as is well known in the art of making cartons. The method of manufacture and assembly of the carton and the cellulosic covering is the same as that described above for the first example. In this case, after the contents are inserted, the flaps of the carton may be closed and sealed, and then the extensions I5a. may be folded across the closed flaps. It is possible to avoid sealing the flaps, relying upon the folded-across extensions [5a of cellulosic material to effect the needed closure against moisture and the like. It will of course be understood that the flaps at one end of the carton may be closed before the contents are inserted, as is usual in carton filling.

What 1' claim as new and desire to seure by Letters Patent is: V

1. As an article of manufacture, a knock-down, moisture and dust proof carton, comprising an inner structure self sustained in the form of a flattened tubular carton body frictionally' held inside of a tube of cellulosic material of greater length than the inner carton body in the closed condition of the article.

2. As an article of manufacture, a knock-down,

'moisture and dust proof container, comprising an inner carton body of rectangular shape formed from a cut and scored blank and having a glued flap, said inner body being folded fiat along two of the diagonally opposite score lines, said inner body being entirely enclosed in, and frictionally held in place by a tube of cellulosic material which is of greater length than the said blank.

3. As an article of manufacture, a knock-down, moisture and dust proof container comprising an inner carton body of rectangular shape formed from a cut and scored blank and having a glued flap, said inner body being folded flat along two of the diagonally opposite score lines and having an aperture therein, said inner body being entirely enclosed in, and frictionally held in place by a tube of cellulosic material which is of greater length than said blank, the said cellulosic material cooperating with said aperture to provide a window for the 'visual inspection of the contents.

4. As an article of manufacture, a knock-down, moisture and dust proof container comprising an inner structure self sustained in the form of a flattened tubular carton body having a glued flap, said inner body being frictionally held inside a tube of cellulosic material of greater length than said carton'body in the closed condition of the article.

5. As an article of manufacture, a knock-down, moisture and dust proof container comprising an .inner carton body, saidbody being formed from a cut and scored blank having four parallel longitudinal score lines and a glue flap, said flap serving to hold said carton in tubular form, said carton being folded flatwise along two of the diagonally opposite score lines, said inner body having an aperture in one of its walls and being enclosed in and frictionally held in place in a tube of cellulosic material which is longer than said inner body, said container adai d to be erected for use by extending the twojuxtaposed score lines, inserting therein through an end the merchandise to be packed, the excess length of the cellulosic tube serving to make moistureproof seals at the ends of the container.

SAMUEL BERGSTEI N.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2424406 *Nov 25, 1941Jul 22, 1947Colgate Palmolive Peet CoMethod and apparatus for tightwrap packaging
US2425150 *May 15, 1944Aug 5, 1947Greenway Lewis MPocketbook
US2465841 *Mar 15, 1946Mar 29, 1949Marathon CorpPackage
US2500484 *Apr 29, 1946Mar 14, 1950Wingfoot CorpReinforced edge transparent wall container and blank therefor
US2506057 *Oct 25, 1945May 2, 1950Bergstein SamuelMeans and method for rendering paperboard cartons gastight and packages so produced
US2668403 *Feb 17, 1951Feb 9, 1954Rumsey Jr HerbertMethod of making heat-sealed and heat-shrunk package
US2700459 *May 27, 1949Jan 25, 1955Edgar AnspacherMattress package and method of wrapping
US4765464 *Sep 16, 1986Aug 23, 1988Ristvedt-Johnson, Inc.Wrapped coin roll and method of forming same
US5351851 *Mar 7, 1994Oct 4, 1994Kablooe Products, Inc.Container with insert area
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/164.1, 229/87.6, 493/379
International ClassificationB65D75/38
Cooperative ClassificationB65D75/38
European ClassificationB65D75/38