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Publication numberUS2008791 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 23, 1935
Filing dateOct 12, 1933
Priority dateOct 12, 1933
Publication numberUS 2008791 A, US 2008791A, US-A-2008791, US2008791 A, US2008791A
InventorsLawrence T Levy
Original AssigneeLawrence T Levy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary lamp shade
US 2008791 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 23, "1935. 1.. T. LEVY 2,008,791

ROTARY LAMP SHADE Filed Oct. 12, 1953 ATTORNEYS Patented July 23, 1935 UNITED STATES.

PATENT OFFICE I 2,008,791 ROTARY LAMP SHADE Lawrence '1. Levy, Cleveland, Ohio Application October 12, 1933, Serial No. 693,336

2 Claims. (01. 24.0-10.1)

This invention relates to an attachment particularly designed for use with electric lamps, comprising a rotary shade which is mounted on a frame and a disk with vanes which will be rotated by the heated air rising from the bulb.

The object of the invention is to provide an improved device of this kind, with respect to the disk and the shade and the means for supporting the latter upon the former. Also with respect to the spring arm support provided with a pivot on which the disk turns.

The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which l is a vertical section of one form of the device; Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the spring arm support; Fig. 3 is a top view of Fig. 1; Fig. 4 is a vertical section of a modified form; and Fig. 5 is a view in side elevation showing another modified form of shade support secured to a lamp bulb.

In the forms shown, 6 indicates the electric lamp bulb which may be of any suitable shape. Mounted upon this bulb is a support made of a single piece of wire bent to form a pair of fingers 1 which terminate at their lower ends in loops 8 which will fit over the bulge of the bulb, so. that the lamp is clamped between the fingers. These fingers are connected by a coil 9 at the top to which is attached, by soldering or otherwise, a pin l0 which forms the pivot for the disk.

The disk I I is stamped from a piece of sheet metal and has a central hole in which fits a glass bushing l2 of inverted cup shape-and which rests on the pin 10-. The disk is cut to form vanes l3, and at the outer end it has an upturned flange H. The heat rising from the lamp passes through the openings formed by the struck up vanes l3 and by contact with the vanes causes the rotation of the disk and the parts supported thereby.

The shade is indicated at [5 and is preferably made of paper or other translucent material on which pictures, designs, printed matter or the like may appear. This shade is folded at the upper end as indicated at l6, and the flange M of the disk fits between the folds so that the shade is supported by the disk. The shade has a bead I! at its lower edge. The bushing I2 is preferably set in the central hole in the disk at a press fit, the bushing having a'fiange at the bottom, under the disk.

In the modification shown in Fig. 4, the construction is the same, with the addition of an outer cover or shell l9, which slips over the shade itself, the latter in this case being preferably -made plain, and the shell or cover having the pictures or designs printed thereon. In this case shells bearing different pictures may be substituted one for the other so that the device may be made in designs suitable for Christmas or other occasions; or different kinds of advertising matter can be substituted. 5

In Fig. 5 I have disclosed another modified form of shade support which consists of a single piece of wire shaped to provide a coiled lower portion 20 which surrounds and closely embraces the lamp bulb 2| and a pivot pin 22 which is adapted 10 to receive thereover the glass bushing l2 shown in Figs. 1, 3 and 4. The wire is also bent to provide a somewhat resilient coiled portion 23 which is disposed adjacent the pivot pin 22. It is of course to be understood that the shade is rotatl5 ably supported on the pivot pin 22 by means of the glass bushing l2. It will be seen that the conical spiral is disposed coaxial with the bulb and frictionally engages the same throughout the major portion of the conical surface of the bulb 20 and that the lower end of the wire terminates immediately adjacent the largest portion of the bulb whereby to permit the ready removal of the shade support and to prevent tipping thereof. With this construction it is possible to wind the 5 lighting wires on a Christmas tree before the shade support is applied to the bulb. The shade may also be readily removed and applied to another bulb when a bulb is burned out.

The device will be found to be a very useful 30 novelty for decorative purposes and for exhibiting pictures or signs of various kinds, which will be illuminated by the light from the lamp and rotated by the means described. This application is a continuation in part of my application Serial 35 No. 687,672, filed August 31, 1933.

Various modifications may be made within the. scope of the invention.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is: 40 1. In combination with a light bulb having a conical upper end, a rotatable shade having a central pivot bearing, a vaned portion and a bulb enveloping skirt portion; a shade supporting member adapted to be supported by the conical 45 upper end of said bulb and comprising a single piece of wire having an end formed into a shade supporting pivot and having the balance of the wire formed into a conical spiral coaxial therewith, and of such shape and extent as to frictionally engage the major portion of the conical surface .of said bulb when mounted thereon, thus preventing tipping while allowing ready removal from said bulb.

2. In combination with a light bulb having a conical upper end, a rotatable shade having a central pivot bearing, a vaned portion and a bulb enveloping skirt portion; a shade supporting member adapted to be supported by the conical upper end of said bulb and comprising a single piece of wire having an end formed into a shade supporting pivot and having, the balance of the wire formed into a conical spiral coaxial therewith, and of such shape and extent as to frictionally engage the major portion of the conical surface of said bulb when mounted thereon, the lower and of the wire terminating immediately adjacent the largest portion of the bulb whereby to permit the ready removal of the shade support and to prevent tipping thereof.

- LAWRENCE T. LEVY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2521851 *Mar 30, 1948Sep 12, 1950Harry J JohnsonOrnamental lamp
US2644883 *Apr 28, 1950Jul 7, 1953Leonard W SchoenherrSpring-held decorative shade
US2745002 *Jul 9, 1953May 8, 1956Henry K HoffmannLamp shade holder
US3281590 *Apr 23, 1964Oct 25, 1966Albert J KurkerBall joint construction
US4617001 *May 27, 1982Oct 14, 1986Parein Eric WElements of a construction or assembly set, and accessories
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/441, 362/255
International ClassificationF21V17/04
Cooperative ClassificationF21V17/04
European ClassificationF21V17/04