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Publication numberUS20090000217 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/203,825
Publication dateJan 1, 2009
Filing dateSep 3, 2008
Priority dateJun 29, 2007
Publication number12203825, 203825, US 2009/0000217 A1, US 2009/000217 A1, US 20090000217 A1, US 20090000217A1, US 2009000217 A1, US 2009000217A1, US-A1-20090000217, US-A1-2009000217, US2009/0000217A1, US2009/000217A1, US20090000217 A1, US20090000217A1, US2009000217 A1, US2009000217A1
InventorsNeal R. Verfuerth, Donald C. Heimerman
Original AssigneeOrion Energy Systems, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lighting device with anti bird-perch system
US 20090000217 A1
Abstract
An anti bird-perch lighting system for use with a facility that includes a plurality of dome-shaped light collectors disposed on a rooftop of the facility, with a projection extending from an apex of the light collector, and at least one filament extending from substantially all of the projections so that each projection is connected to two or more of the other projections to define a filament network disposed above the roof and proximate a top of the plurality of light collectors.
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Claims(18)
1. An anti bird-perch lighting system for use with a facility, the system comprising:
a plurality of light pipes, each having a substantially dome-shaped light collector;
a projection extending from the light collector; and
at least one filament extending between two or more of the projections to define a filament network.
2. The system of claim 1, wherein the projection extends from an apex of the light collector.
3. The system of claim 2, wherein the light collectors are disposed on a roof of the facility.
4. The system of claim 3, wherein the filament comprises a substantially clear monofilament material.
5. The system of claim 3, wherein each projection is connected to at least two other projections by the filament.
6. The system of claim 5, wherein each projection is connected to each of the other projections by the filament.
7. The system of claim 6, wherein the filament is a continuous filament.
8. The system of claim 1, further comprising a tensioning device configured to maintain a desired taughtness of the filament network.
9. The system of claim 1, wherein the filament network comprises a contoured topography.
10. An anti bird-perch lighting system for use with a facility, the system comprising:
a plurality of dome-shaped light collectors disposed on a rooftop of the facility;
a projection extending from an apex of the light collector; and
at least one substantially clear filament connected to two or more of the projections to define a filament network disposed above the rooftop and proximate a top of the plurality of light collectors.
11. The system of claim 10, wherein the filament network comprises a topography that is substantially planar.
12. The system of claim 10, wherein the filament network defines a pattern of filaments that is asymmetric.
13. The system of claim 10, further comprising one or more objects suspended from a filament at a location between two light collectors.
14. An anti bird-perch lighting system for use with a facility having a rooftop, the system comprising:
a plurality of light collectors disposed on the rooftop of the facility and configured to collect sunlight;
a projection extending from each of the light collectors; and
a filament interconnecting the projections on the light collectors to define a filament network disposed above the rooftop and proximate a top of the plurality of light collectors.
15. The system of claim 14, wherein the light collectors comprise dome-shaped covers for a light pipe device.
16. The system of claim 14, wherein the projections comprise a retention feature configured to retain the filament in connection with the projection.
17. The system of claim 14, wherein the filament comprises a substantially transparent material.
18. The system of claim 14, wherein the filament network comprises a non-planar topography.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present Application claims the benefit of priority as a continuation-in-part of co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/771,317 titled “Method and System for Controlling a Lighting System” filed on Jun. 29, 2007, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

FIELD

The field of the disclosure relates generally to natural lighting systems. More specifically, the disclosure relates to natural lighting systems that include light pipes. More particularly, the disclosure relates to a light pipe device having an anti-bird perch system to discourage birds from perching, nesting or roosting on or around the light pipes on the rooftop of a building.

BACKGROUND

This section is intended to provide a background or context to the invention recited in the claims. The description herein may include concepts that could be pursued, but are not necessarily ones that have been previously conceived or pursued. Therefore, unless otherwise indicated herein, what is described in this section is not prior art to the description and claims in this application and is not admitted to be prior art by inclusion in this section.

Natural lighting devices such as skylights, domed windows, domed light pipes and the like for allowing ambient or natural lighting (e.g. sunlight, etc.) to enter an enclosure such as a building are generally known and have an effectiveness that relies at least partially on an amount of light that can enter through (or be received by) the lighting device. Accordingly, objects that tend to block or reduce the transmission of light from local surroundings into the lighting device will tend to decrease the effectiveness of the lighting device. Among objects that tend to block the light from being received by the lighting device are birds that occasionally roost, perch or nest on the rooftops of buildings and on, or in close proximity to, the lighting device. However, the known anti-bird perch features, such as an array of spines, spikes or the like are generally not desirable as they tend to interfere with transmission of light from local surroundings into the lighting device.

Accordingly, it would be desirable to provide a lighting device with an anti-bird perch system that reduces the tendency of birds to perch, roost or nest on the rooftop of a building near the lighting device, and minimizes any associated reduction in natural light reception by the lighting device.

SUMMARY

In an exemplary embodiment, an anti bird-perch lighting system for use with a facility includes a plurality of light pipes, each having a substantially dome-shaped light collector and a projection extending from the light collector, and at least one filament extending between two or more of the projections to define a filament network.

In another exemplary embodiment, an anti bird-perch lighting system for use with a facility includes a plurality of dome-shaped light collectors disposed on a roof of the facility, with a projection extending from an apex of the light collector, and at least one filament extending from substantially all of the projections so that each projection is connected to two or more of the other projections to define a filament network disposed above the roof and proximate a top of the plurality of light collectors.

In another exemplary embodiment an anti bird-perch lighting system for use with a facility having a roof includes a plurality of light collectors disposed on the roof and configured to collect sunlight, and a projection extending from each of the light collectors, and a filament interconnecting the projections on the light collectors to define a filament network disposed above the roof and proximate a top of the plurality of light collectors.

Other principal features and advantages of the invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon review of the following drawings, the detailed description, and the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Exemplary embodiments of the invention will hereafter be described with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein like numerals denote like elements.

FIG. 1 a depicts a cross sectional side view of a light pipe system providing natural light and including an anti-bird perch feature in accordance with an exemplary embodiment.

FIG. 1 b depicts a detailed side cross sectional view of the mounting between a diffuser and a reflective tube of the light pipe system of FIG. 1 a in accordance with an exemplary embodiment.

FIG. 2 depicts a perspective view of a light collection system of the light pipe system of FIG. 1 a in accordance with an exemplary embodiment.

FIG. 3 depicts an exploded, perspective view of the light collection system of FIG. 2 in accordance with an exemplary embodiment.

FIG. 4 depicts a side view of the light collection system of FIG. 2 in accordance with an exemplary embodiment.

FIG. 5 depicts a perspective view of a flashing of the light collection system of FIG. 2 in accordance with an exemplary embodiment.

FIG. 6 depicts a side view of the flashing of FIG. 5 in accordance with an exemplary embodiment.

FIG. 7 depicts an enlarged, side view of the flashing of FIG. 6 in accordance with an exemplary embodiment.

FIG. 8 a depicts a detailed cross sectional side view of the mounting between a light collection system and the reflective tube of the light pipe system of FIG. 1 a in accordance with an exemplary embodiment.

FIG. 8 b depicts a detailed cross sectional side view of the mounting between a flashing and a mounting flange of the light pipe system of FIG. 1 a in accordance with an exemplary embodiment.

FIG. 9 depicts a partial perspective view of a facility having a plurality of the light pipes of FIG. 1 a with an anti-bird perch system, in accordance with an exemplary embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

With reference to FIG. 1 a, a light pipe system 102 is shown in accordance with an exemplary embodiment. In an exemplary embodiment, light pipe system 102 is formed of components having a generally circular shape though other shapes may be used without limitation. Light pipe system 102 may include a diffuser 200, a reflective tube 202, and a light collection system 204. Reflective tube 202 is a sheet of highly efficient, reflective material. For example, silver coated aluminum, MIRO®, etc. may be used as known to those skilled in the art. The sheet of reflective material is rolled to form a tube having a wall 206 and joined along an joint 208. In an exemplary embodiment, the joint 208 is joined using rivets 210 though other fastening methods and mechanisms may be used without limitation. Aluminum tape may be placed over the rivets 210. Reflective tube 202 may be formed to have a variety of lengths and to form a tube having a variety of diameters based on the characteristics of diffuser 200, of light collection system 204, of the roofing/wall defining the interior space, and of the interior space to be lit.

Diffuser 200 may be a prismatic diffuser. In the exemplary embodiment of FIG. 2 a, diffuser 200 is mounted within reflective tube 202 so that a concave portion 212 is concave relative to the interior space. With reference to FIG. 2 b, diffuser 200 may include concave portion 212 and a tapered portion 214. Tapered portion 214 extends from concave portion 212 to transition a concave surface of concave portion 212 to form an approximately parallel surface to reflective tube 202. A caulk 216 may be used to seal diffuser 200 within wall 206 of reflective tube 202 to reduce condensation, dust, heat loss, and the build-up of other materials within an interior space formed by wall 206 of reflective tube 202. Caulk 216 may comprise a silicone material. In an exemplary embodiment, no fastener is used to mount diffuser 200 within reflective tube 202. A bead of caulk 216 may be applied to an inner surface of wall 206 of reflective tube 202 near a mounting edge 218. Mounting edge 218 of wall 206 of reflective tube 202 may be positioned over diffuser 200 with concave portion 212 positioned as shown in FIGS. 1 a and 1 b. As wall 206 of reflective tube 202 is positioned adjacent tapered portion 214 of diffuser 200, caulk 216 fills any gap between wall 206 of reflective tube 202 and tapered portion 214 of diffuser 200. As used herein, the term “mount” includes join, unite, connect, associate, insert, hang, hold, affix, attach, fasten, bind, paste, secure, bolt, screw, rivet, solder, weld, and other like terms.

With continuing reference to FIGS. 1 a and 1 b, light pipe system 102 may further include a cone skirt 220 and reflector 222. Cone skirt 220 may be formed of a reflective material. Cone skirt 220 may be mounted to light pipe system 102 or may be mounted to an interior surface of the roofing/wall. Cone skirt 220 directs light toward the interior space to be lit. Reflector 222 may be formed of a white reflective material such as Anolux® manufactured by Anofol S.r.I. of Italy. Reflector 222 may be positioned on an interior surface of reflective tube 202 above or adjacent to or overlapping caulk with 216. In an exemplary embodiment, reflector 222 may have a length of approximately twelve inches. Reflector 222 reduces glare from diffuser 200 without significantly reducing the light output from diffuser 200.

With reference to FIG. 2, light collection system 204 is shown in accordance with an exemplary embodiment. Light collection system 204 may include a light collector 300, a clamp ring 302, a mounting flange 304, and a flashing 306. Flashing 306 is positioned to encircle and to mount to a first portion of reflective tube 202. The first portion of reflective tube 202 is opposite diffuser 200. Flashing 306 is positioned on a surface to which the light pipe system is mounted for use. The surface, for example, may be a roof or an exterior wall of a building. Flashing 306 may be formed of aluminum. Reflective tube 202 extends through the surface to the interior space to allow natural light into the interior space. Mounting flange 304 mounts to a first portion of flashing 306 opposite the surface to which the flashing 306 is mounted.

With reference to FIG. 3, light collector 300 includes a shell 404, a projection 405, and flange 406. Projection 405 is shown for example as a generally cylindrical post located at an uppermost point (e.g. peak, apex, etc.) of the generally dome-shaped shell 404. However, projection 405 may be formed with any suitable shape and at any desired location on the shell. For example, projection 405 may include a retention feature intended to retain a filament in connection with the projection, such as a hook-shape, or formed as a ringlet or as a tab with an eyelet, etc. In an exemplary embodiment, light collector 300 is formed of a sheet of acrylic material using a free forming process that uses air pressure differentials to form shell 404 of light collector 300 without a mold. According to other embodiments, the shell may be formed by a molding process where the projection may be formed as a sprue in the molding process. In an exemplary embodiment, shell 404 has an oblate shape. Products formed using this method generally have improved optical characteristics over those formed using molds. Flange 406 of light collector 300 defines a generally circular opening which is positioned so that shell 404 covers the interior space formed by reflective tube 202.

Clamp ring 302 is positioned over flange 406 of light collector 300. Clamp ring 302 may include first fastener holes 400. Mounting flange 304 may include a flange 408 and a wall 410 which extends from flange 408 at an approximately 90 degree angle though other angles may be used. In an exemplary embodiment, flange 408 and wall 410 extend approximately 1.5 inches. Flange 408 of mounting flange 304 may include second fastener holes 402. In general, first fastener holes 400 are formed in clamp ring 302 to align with second fastener holes 402 of mounting flange 304 so that flange 406 of light collector 300 can be mounted and held between clamp ring 302 and flange 408 of mounting flange 304. Mounting flange 304 and clamp ring 302 may be formed of aluminum.

With reference to FIG. 4, a side view of light collection system 204 is shown in accordance with an exemplary embodiment. In an exemplary embodiment, wall 410 of mounting flange 304 frictionally abuts the first portion of flashing 306. To avoid any water freezing therebetween, there is no gap between wall 410 of mounting flange 304 and the first portion of flashing 306. Flange 408 of mounting flange 304 extends outward away from the interior space formed by reflective tube 202. Flange 406 of light collector 300 is positioned against flange 408 of mounting flange 304. Clamp ring 302 is positioned against flange 406 of light collector 300.

With reference to FIG. 5, flashing 306 is shown in accordance with an exemplary embodiment. In an exemplary embodiment, flashing 306 is formed of a single sheet of spun aluminum with no seams. Flashing 306 may include a wall 600, a transition wall 602, a flange 604, a mounting wall 606, and a peripheral edge 608. Transition wall 602 extends from a first side of wall 600 of flashing 306. Flange 604 of flashing 306 extends from a first side of transition wall 602. The first side of transition wall 602 is opposite wall 600 of flashing 306. Transition wall 602 provides a transitional surface between wall 600 and flange 604 of flashing 306. Mounting wall 606 extends from a second side of wall 600 of flashing 306. The second side of transition wall 602 is opposite the first side of transition wall 602. Peripheral edge 608 forms a generally circular shape along mounting wall 606 opposite the second side of wall 600 of flashing 306. As known to those skilled in the art, roofing or siding materials may be positioned to cover at least a portion of flashing 306 including flange 604, transition wall 602, and/or wall 600.

With reference to FIG. 6, transition wall 602 forms an angle α between wall 600 and flange 604 of flashing 306. In an exemplary embodiment, angle α is greater than 90 degrees. Mounting wall 606 may include a first mounting surface 702, a transition surface 704, and a second mounting surface 706. First mounting surface 702 extends from an edge 700 of wall 600 of flashing 306. Transition surface 704 provides a transition between first mounting surface 702 and second mounting surface 706. Peripheral edge 608 is formed along second mounting surface 706.

With reference to FIG. 7, wall 600 of flashing 306 extends a height B from flange 604 of flashing 306 to edge 700. In an exemplary embodiment, height B is approximately six inches for a light pipe including a diffuser having a diameter of 22.25 inches. First mounting surface 702 extends a height C from edge 700 to transition surface 704. In an exemplary embodiment, height C is approximately 1.5 inches for a light pipe including a diffuser having a diameter of 22.25 inches. First mounting surface 702 extends in a generally perpendicular direction relative to a horizontal surface 800. Transition surface 704 extends in a generally parallel direction relative to horizontal surface 800. Second mounting surface 706 extends a height D from transition surface 704 to peripheral edge 608. In an exemplary embodiment, height D is approximately one inch for a light pipe including a diffuser having a diameter of 22.25 inches. Second mounting surface 706 extends in a generally perpendicular direction relative to horizontal surface 800. In an exemplary embodiment, flange 604 of flashing 306 is parallel to or extends down from horizontal surface 800. In general, horizontal surface 800 extends in the direction of the surface to which the light pipe system is mounted. Flange 604 of flashing 306 extends a length E from transition wall 602. In an exemplary embodiment, length E is approximately three inches for a light pipe including a diffuser having a diameter of 22.25 inches.

With reference to FIG. 8 a, a detailed cross sectional side view of the mounting between light collection system 204 and reflective tube 202 is shown in accordance with an exemplary embodiment. Wall 410 of mounting flange 304 frictionally abuts first mounting surface 702 of flashing 306 to maintain light collector 300 in position relative to flashing 306. A fastener 900 extends through a first fastener hole of the first fastener holes 400 and through a first fastener hole of the second fastener holes 402 to mount clamp ring 302 to flange 408 of mounting flange 304. Clamp ring 302 and flange 408 of mounting flange 304 extend further than flange 406 of light collector 300 so that fastener 900 does not extend through flange 406 of light collector 300. In an exemplary embodiment, clamp ring 302 extends approximately 1.5 inches. Fastener 900 clamps flange 406 of light collector 300 between clamp ring 302 and flange 408 of mounting flange 304. In an exemplary embodiment, flange 406 of light collector 300 extends approximately 0.375 inches from shell 404. In the exemplary embodiment of FIG. 8 a, fastener 900 includes a screw 902, a nut 904, and a washer 906. In an exemplary embodiment, screw 902 is a one inch screw formed of aluminum. In an exemplary embodiment, nut 904 is a nylon locking hex nut formed of aluminum. In an exemplary embodiment, washer 906 is formed of aluminum.

In an alternative embodiment, a different fastening mechanism may be used to connect the components of light pipe system 102. For example, a question mark fastener comprising a band clamp or a barrel clamp type of fastener may be used with a T-bolt or straight hex bolt to close the clamp. Flange 408 of mounting flange 304 and flange 406 of light collector 300 are positioned within an open upper end of the question mark section of the question mark fastener. The clamp may replace fastener 900 and clamp ring 302. A V-section clamp may also be used with bolt anchor points added to a V section of the V-section clamp.

A first gasket 908 may be positioned between first mounting surface 702 of flashing 306 and wall 206 of reflective tube 202 to abut against transition surface 704 of mounting wall 606. In an exemplary embodiment, first gasket 908 is a horsehair gasket. A second gasket 910 may be positioned between shell 404 of light collector 300 and second mounting surface 706 of flashing 306. In an exemplary embodiment, second gasket 910 is a horsehair gasket. First gasket 908 and second gasket 910 reduce airflow and keep contaminants from entering light pipe system 102. Fewer or additional gaskets may be included. In an exemplary embodiment, silicone may be applied between flashing 306 and reflective tube 202 to reduce airflow and keep contaminants from entering light pipe system 102. A second fastener 912 extends through a first fastener hole in second mounting surface 706 of flashing 306 and through a first fastener hole of wall 206 of reflective tube 202 to mount flashing 306 to reflective tube 202. Second fastener 912 extends into the interior space formed by reflective tube 202. Second fastener 912 is positioned above flange 406 of light collector 300 along shell 404 of light collector 300. In an exemplary embodiment, second fastener 912 is a sheet metal screw formed of stainless steel. Clamp ring 302 may be formed of a plurality of sections which may overlap to form various size rings.

With reference to FIG. 8 b, a detailed cross sectional side view of a mounting between flashing 306 and mounting flange 304 is shown in accordance with an exemplary embodiment. Wall 410 of mounting flange 304 frictionally abuts first mounting surface 702 of flashing 306 to maintain light collector 300 in position relative to flashing 306. To provide additional stability over the frictional fitting, a joint 914 may be formed between wall 410 of mounting flange 304 and first mounting surface 702 of flashing 306. For example, joint 914 may be formed using a Tog-L-Loc® sheet metal joining system such as that developed by BTM Corporation of Marysville, Mich. A sealant also may be applied between wall 410 of mounting flange 304 and first mounting surface 702 of flashing 306 to minimize any airflow or water leakage between wall 410 of mounting flange 304 and first mounting surface 702 of flashing 306.

In an exemplary embodiment, an insulation sleeve may be positioned between flashing 306 and reflective tube 202 to reduce airflow and keep contaminants from entering light pipe system 102 and to reduce heat loss from light pipe system 102. The insulation sleeve may be formed of a fiberglass material. The insulation sleeve may be taped to an inside surface of flashing 306 and may extend from approximately adjacent first gasket 908 to the roofing/wall or 2-3 inches below/into the roofing/wall. A counter flashing may be positioned between mounting flange 304 and an exterior surface of the roofing/wall to deflect moisture away from light pipe system 102. The counter flashing may be mounted to mounting flange 304 using first fastener holes 400 and second fastener holes 402. Additionally, in an alternative embodiment, a plurality of rods (not shown) may mount to mounting flange 304 extending upward toward shell 404. A filament may be extended between the plurality of rods to discourage birds from roosting on light pipe system 102.

With reference to FIG. 9, an anti-bird perch system for use with a plurality of light pipes in a lighting system provided on a rooftop of a building or facility is shown according to an exemplary embodiment. Each of the light pipes 102 are shown to include a light collector 300 having a projection 405. A filament 110 (e.g. line, wire, string, etc.) is extended (e.g. run, strung, wrapped, wound, stretched, drawn, etc.) between several or all of the plurality of projections in any one of a variety of suitable patterns to create a filament network 112 (e.g. mesh, net, web, etc.). According to one embodiment, filament 110 may be a monofilament material (e.g. such as fishing line or the like). Filament network 112 is intended to create an obstruction that creates minimal interference with light reception by the light collectors, but discourages birds from flying in close proximity to light pipes 102 and minimizes the likelihood that birds, after encountering or becoming aware of the filament network, will roost or perch on the rooftop or near the light pipes.

The Applicants believe that a substantially clear or transparent filament tends to be more effective because it is less readily detectable (and thus not easily circumvented) by birds and thus constitutes more of a potential hazard that, once the birds are familiar with the network (i.e. after a suitable “learning period”) and develop a certain “discomfort” with the network, they tend to avoid. Whereas, when the filament network is readily visible or detectable, it is more readily noticed and circumvented by birds, and tends to be less effective in discouraging the birds from perching, nesting or roosting on the rooftop in the vicinity of the network and lighting devices. The Applicants currently believe that the effectiveness of the filament network is attributable (at least in part) to the creation and presence of a potential hazard that birds become aware of over time, but have difficulty detecting and circumventing; rather than the formation of a physical barrier (e.g. in the manner of a screen of the like). Accordingly, the filament network is more effective in discouraging birds from perching, roosting or nesting not only on the individual collectors 300, but also over the broader rooftop area of the building (unlike conventional spikes or the like which are effective only on the particular object from which the spikes extend).

According to one embodiment the network comprises a geometrically symmetric pattern; according to other embodiments, the network comprises geometrically asymmetric patterns, depending on the number and arrangement of light pipes, obstructions (if any) between the light pipes, or other factors. The Applicants believe that asymmetric patterns that have a more “random” structure may also tend to create a certain discomfort for birds because the randomness tend to creates more difficulty for the birds to circumvent. The filament(s) may also be coupled to other structures on the roof, such as stacks, utility supports, ventilation hoods or equipment and the like.

According to other embodiments, the filaments may be provided with visual indicators to further establish the presence of the network. Such visual indicators may include coloring (e.g. monochrome or multi-colored) of the filament itself, or suspension of objects (e.g. tags, flags, markers, etc.—which may be stationary or movable, such as by wind or other source) from the filament, or the filament may have a light-reflective surface configured to reflect light from the sun or other sources to enhance visual perception of the presence of the network.

Although the light pipes are shown by way of example as installed on a substantially planar rooftop with a correspondingly planar filament network, the anti-bird perch system is equally adaptable for use with light pipes (or other suitable lighting devices) installed on a sloped, contoured, or multi-level rooftops where the filaments, as extended from one light pipe to the next, tend to follow the contour of the rooftop. According to a further embodiment, the filaments may be provided with one or more tensioning device(s) 12 (e.g. springs, mass-pulley, etc.) intended to maintain a desired tension on the filaments during various weather conditions (e.g. hot, cold, wet, dry, wind, etc.) and to accommodate creep or stretch of the filament material, so that the filament network retains a desired tension or taughtness so that the filament network extends over the plurality of light pipes on the facility. According to other embodiments, a certain level of “sag” or “droop” of the network is permitted and tensioning devices may be omitted. According to one embodiment, network 112 is intended to appear as a “floating” web or filament network extending along at an elevation at, or slightly above, the top of the collectors 300 of the light pipes on the rooftop of the building. The Applicants believe that the network positioned at such an elevation tends to be most effective at discouraging the presence of birds on the rooftop in the vicinity of the light pipes, and is usually sufficiently high to avoid being covered by snow during the winter months or in cold climates, yet is sufficiently low and unobtrusive to avoid being an unsightly detraction from the building's aesthetic appearance.

Each segment of the filament network 112 may be a separate segment connected at each end to a projection 405 on an associated light collector 300. According to another embodiment, the segments of the filament network may be provided by one or more multi-segmented filaments that are coupled to their associated projections 405, or a single filament may be used for the entire network. The filament(s) may be coupled to the projections by tying, wrapping, routing through an aperture, or any other suitable manner intended to secure the filament(s) to the projection to create the filament network. According to a further embodiment, one or more posts may be provided to elevate certain portions of the filament network to create a filament network with a contoured topography.

According to any exemplary embodiment, an anti bird-perch system provides a network of filaments (which may be substantially clear) suspended from a top of the light collectors on light pipes disposed on the rooftop of a building, in order to discourage birds from populating the area of a rooftop around the location of the light pipes.

The word “exemplary” is used herein to mean serving as an example, instance, or illustration. Any aspect or design described herein as “exemplary” is not necessarily to be construed as preferred or advantageous over other aspects or designs. Further, for the purposes of this disclosure and unless otherwise specified, “a” or “an” means “one or more”.

The foregoing description of exemplary embodiments of the invention have been presented for purposes of illustration and of description. It is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise form disclosed, and modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teachings or may be acquired from practice of the invention. The functionality described may be distributed among modules that differ in number and distribution of functionality from those described herein. Additionally, the order of execution of the functions may be changed depending on the embodiment. The embodiments were chosen and described in order to explain the principles of the invention and as practical applications of the invention to enable one skilled in the art to utilize the invention in various embodiments and with various modifications as suited to the particular use contemplated. It is intended that the scope of the invention be defined by the claims appended hereto and their equivalents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8376583Jul 9, 2010Feb 19, 2013Orion Energy Systems, Inc.Lighting system with customized intensity and profile
US8604701Nov 14, 2011Dec 10, 2013Neal R. VerfuerthSystems and method for lighting aisles
US8764237Feb 18, 2013Jul 1, 2014Orion Energy Systems, Inc.Lighting system with customized intensity and profile
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/101, 52/200
International ClassificationE04D13/03
Cooperative ClassificationE04D2013/0345, E04D13/0335, E04D13/0315, E04D13/004
European ClassificationE04D13/03G, E04D13/03A4, E04D13/00B
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