Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20090018904 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/774,671
Publication dateJan 15, 2009
Filing dateJul 9, 2007
Priority dateJul 9, 2007
Also published asCA2693675A1, US20140006154, WO2009009073A1
Publication number11774671, 774671, US 2009/0018904 A1, US 2009/018904 A1, US 20090018904 A1, US 20090018904A1, US 2009018904 A1, US 2009018904A1, US-A1-20090018904, US-A1-2009018904, US2009/0018904A1, US2009/018904A1, US20090018904 A1, US20090018904A1, US2009018904 A1, US2009018904A1
InventorsScott Robert Shipman, Aaron K. Forth
Original AssigneeEbay Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
System and method for contextual advertising and merchandizing based on user configurable preferences
US 20090018904 A1
Abstract
A computer-implemented system and method for contextual advertising and merchandising based on user configurable preferences is disclosed. The system in an example embodiment includes an advertising (ad) preferences service to obtain user preference information related to advertising, enable user configuration of the user preference information related to advertising, and modify the presentation of advertising to the user based upon the user configured preference information.
Images(8)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(27)
1. A method comprising:
obtaining user preference information related to advertising;
enabling user configuration of the user preference information related to advertising; and
modifying the presentation of advertising to the user based upon the user configured preference information.
2. The method as claimed in claim 1 including providing a display object in association with an advertisement to enable user configuration of the user preference information related to advertising.
3. The method as claimed in claim 2 wherein the display object is displayed outside of the advertisement.
4. The method as claimed in claim 2 wherein the display object is displayed overlaid on the advertisement.
5. The method as claimed in claim 1 wherein enabling user configuration of the user preference information related to advertising includes user configuration of an opt-out of advertising parameter.
6. The method as claimed in claim 1 wherein enabling user configuration of the user preference information related to advertising includes user configuration of a user advertising segment parameter.
7. A method comprising:
obtaining user preference information related to advertising, the user preference information having been configured by a user; and
selecting an advertisement for delivery to the user, the selection being based on the user configured user preference information.
8. The method as claimed in claim 7 wherein the user configured user preference information includes an opt-out of advertising parameter.
9. The method as claimed in claim 7 wherein the user configured user preference information includes a user advertising segment parameter.
10. An article of manufacture comprising a machine-readable storage medium having machine executable instructions embedded thereon, which when executed by a machine, cause the machine to:
obtain user preference information related to advertising;
enable user configuration of the user preference information related to advertising; and
modify the presentation of advertising to the user based upon the user configured preference information.
11. The article of manufacture as claimed in claim 10 being operable to provide a display object in association with an advertisement to enable user configuration of the user preference information related to advertising.
12. The article of manufacture as claimed in claim 11 wherein the display object is displayed outside of the advertisement.
13. The article of manufacture as claimed in claim 11 wherein the display object is displayed overlaid on the advertisement.
14. The article of manufacture as claimed in claim 10 being operable to enable user configuration of an opt-out of advertising parameter.
15. The article of manufacture as claimed in claim 10 being operable to enable user configuration of a user advertising segment parameter.
16. An article of manufacture comprising a machine-readable storage medium having machine executable instructions embedded thereon, which when executed by a machine, cause the machine to:
obtain user preference information related to advertising, the user preference information having been configured by a user; and
select an advertisement for delivery to the user, the selection being based on the user configured user preference information.
17. The article of manufacture as claimed in claim 16 wherein the user configured user preference information includes an opt-out of advertising parameter.
18. The article of manufacture as claimed in claim 16 wherein the user configured user preference information includes a user advertising segment parameter.
19. A system comprising:
a processor;
a memory coupled to the processor to store information related to user advertising;
an advertising (ad) preferences service to obtain user preference information related to advertising, enable user configuration of the user preference information related to advertising, and modify the presentation of advertising to the user based upon the user configured preference information.
20. The system as claimed in claim 19 being operable to provide a display object in association with an advertisement to enable user configuration of the user preference information related to advertising.
21. The system as claimed in claim 20 wherein the display object is displayed outside of the advertisement.
22. The system as claimed in claim 20 wherein the display object is displayed overlaid on the advertisement.
23. The system as claimed in claim 19 being operable to enable user configuration of an opt-out of advertising parameter.
24. The system as claimed in claim 19 being operable to enable user configuration of a user advertising segment parameter.
25. A system comprising:
a processor;
a memory coupled to the processor to store information related to user advertising;
an advertising (ad) preferences service to obtain user preference information related to advertising, the user preference information having been configured by a user; and select an advertisement for delivery to the user, the selection being based on the user configured user preference information.
26. The system as claimed in claim 25 wherein the user configured user preference information includes an opt-out of advertising parameter.
27. The system as claimed in claim 25 wherein the user configured user preference information includes a user advertising segment parameter.
Description
    BACKGROUND
  • [0001]
    1. Technical Field
  • [0002]
    This disclosure relates to methods and systems supporting online advertising and online transactions by a user. More particularly, the present disclosure relates to contextual advertising and merchandizing based on user configurable preferences.
  • [0003]
    2. Related Art
  • [0004]
    An increasingly popular way of delivering Internet advertisements is to tie the presentation of advertisements to particular user behaviors and/or user profiles, and/or user demographics. Such user behaviors include user access to a particular web page, user selection (also called mouse-clicking or clicking) of a particular location on a web page, user entry of a particular search string or keyword, and the like. In order to target advertising accurately, advertisers or vendors pay to have their advertisements presented in response to certain kinds of events—that is, their advertisements are presented when particular user behaviors warrant such presentation. If a particular advertisement (ad) leads to some user action, an advertiser may receive remuneration for the ad.
  • [0005]
    Using other systems and processes on the Web, users can search for goods and services via the Internet and shop or make purchases of goods or services over the Internet. Unfortunately, conventional systems have not been able to create an effective way of extracting keywords from web pages and create contextual advertisements that may lead to a user purchase transaction.
  • [0006]
    Some conventional web-based merchants use affiliate programs. In an affiliate program, the merchant itself must track purchase transactions and reward 3rd party affiliates when purchase transactions are completed. This transaction tracking and rewarding process imposes a significant administrative burden on the merchant. Moreover, the tracking/reward functionality must be replicated for each merchant that chooses to use such a system. Current technology does not provide a solution for off-loading this tracking/reward functionality to a 3rd party without risking an increase in fraudulent transactions and a decrease in the time-efficiency of processing purchase transactions.
  • [0007]
    U.S. Pat. No. 5,948,061 discloses methods and apparatuses for targeting the delivery of advertisements over a network such as the Internet. Statistics are compiled on individual users and networks and the use of the advertisements is tracked to permit targeting of the advertisements of individual users. In response to requests from affiliated sites, an advertising server transmits to people accessing the page of a site an appropriate one of the advertisements based upon profiling of users and networks. However, the user is not offered the opportunity to opt-out of the advertising or to configure the preferences or profile that was automatically created based on user activity.
  • [0008]
    Thus, a system and method for contextual advertising and merchandising based on user configurable preferences is needed.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0009]
    Embodiments illustrated by way of example and not limitation in the figures of the accompanying drawings, in which:
  • [0010]
    FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate an example advertisement with the user selectable display object associated with the ad in an example embodiment.
  • [0011]
    FIG. 3 illustrates an example embodiment of a preferences webpage displayed to a user when the user activates the display object.
  • [0012]
    FIG. 4 illustrates an example embodiment of a webpage used to configure user advertising preferences.
  • [0013]
    FIG. 5 illustrates a system architecture for delivering advertising to users in a networked system.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 6 is a processing flow diagram of an example embodiment.
  • [0015]
    FIG. 7 is a block diagram of a network system on which an embodiment may operate.
  • [0016]
    FIGS. 8 and 9 are block diagrams of an example computer system on which an embodiment may operate.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0017]
    A computer-implemented system and method for contextual advertising and merchandising based on user configurable preferences is disclosed. In the following description, numerous specific details are set forth. However, it is understood that embodiments may be practiced without these specific details. In other instances, well-known processes, structures and techniques have not been shown in detail in order not to obscure the clarity of this description.
  • [0018]
    As described further below, according to various example embodiments of the disclosed subject matter described and claimed herein, there is provided a computer-implemented system and method for contextual advertising and merchandizing based on user configurable preferences. The system includes an advertising (ad) preferences service to obtain user preference information related to advertising and to modify the presentation of advertising to the user based upon the user preference information. Various embodiments are described below in connection with the figures provided herein.
  • [0019]
    Typical contextual advertising implementations show advertisements that are textually related to the content that the user is browsing or has browsed. In newer systems, behavioral information and day parting is used to improve upon the contextual advertising. Other systems enhance contextual advertising with user demography gleaned from various sources. In these example embodiments, the advertisements shown are not necessarily related to the context of the content; rather, the advertisements shown can be related to a merchandising opportunity based on a user's automatically determined demographic profile to create a new dimension in contextual advertising. Such a new dimension in contextual advertising leverages user demographic information obtained in previous user interactions unrelated to the current user interaction or behavior.
  • [0020]
    By observing search, view, bid, buy, payment and other activities of known user demographics, a host system can use various heuristics to generate associations between user demographic profiles and Item Groups, with associated levels of interest of users of those demographic profiles in that Item Group. Item Groups may represent Products, Services, or other web items. Demographic profiles may be aggregated along one or more dimensions (e.g. age, gender, location, etc.). Item Groups may also be aggregated along one or more dimensions (e.g. category, price, vendor, payment method, etc.). The term Item Group may also represent items for sale as well as web pages/sections, and/or sites.
  • [0021]
    As the description above indicates, targeted advertising has become more complex. However, even the best algorithms for targeting ad content to particular users can produce errant or annoying ad content that may not be considered relevant or useful to the user. As such, it would be beneficial to enable the user to configure the advertising-related parameters or profiles that have been automatically created by various systems that monitor user behaviors, collect demographic information, or otherwise associate users with particular types of ads. The various embodiments described herein enable the user to configure (e.g. edit, modify, select, de-select, enable, disable, etc.) various advertising-related parameters or preference information.
  • [0022]
    An example embodiment is described in the following section. Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, an example advertisement 310 is illustrated. Ad 310 represents a typical ad displayed to an on-line computer user is conventional systems. Such an ad 310 may have been automatically selected for display to a particular user (i.e. targeted) because of the user's previous behavior or demographics. Conventional systems do not provide a way for the user to opt-out of the targeted advertising system. Further, conventional systems do not provide a way for the user to configure advertising parameters to increase the likelihood that subsequent targeted ads will be more relevant for the particular user.
  • [0023]
    Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, an example embodiment includes a display object 320 that enables the user to configure advertising parameters. In one embodiment, display object 320 is a hyperlink that re-directs the user to a separate preferences configuration webpage when the user clicks on the display object 320. In another embodiment, the display object 320 can activate a preferences configuration box when the display object 320 is clicked or activated with a mouseover. In other embodiments, the display object 320 can cause the activation of a set of preferences checkboxes when the display object 320 is selected and right-clicked. Many other alternative implementations can be used to indicate the selection and/or activation of display object 320 thereby activating the enables the functionality of various embodiments to enable a user to configure advertising parameters. In yet other embodiments, the activation of advertising configuration functionality can be offered as part of a tool bar or drop-down menu selection associated with the configuration of other system parameters. In the particular embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the display object 320 is a link that redirects the user to a separate preference configuration webpage when a user clicks on the display object 320. In addition, the particular embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 provides additional information for the user when a user performs a mouseover on the display object 320. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the user has performed a mouseover of display object 320 by position cursor 322 in a proximate position to display object 320. As a result, an information box 324 has been displayed for the user to explain the purpose of display object 320. If the user clicks on the display object 320 while cursor 322 is in a proximate position to display object 320, the user will be redirected to a separate webpage, such as the webpage 410 shown in FIG. 3 and described below.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 1 illustrates and embodiment in which the display object 320 is displayed outside of the borders of the underlying ad 310. In this embodiment, no portion of the ad 310 is obscured by display object 320. An alternative embodiment is shown in FIG. 2. In FIG. 2, the display object 320 is shown overlaid on a portion of the underlying ad 310. In this embodiment, the display object 320 can appear as a watermark on the ad 310. It will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art that either of these particular implementations and equivalent embodiments can be used to enable a user to configure advertising parameters.
  • [0025]
    Referring now to FIG. 3, an example embodiment illustrates a preferences webpage displayed to a user when the user activates the display object 320 using any of the various methods described above. In an example embodiment, preferences page 410 includes a portion 412 (e.g. a link) that enables a user to link to a separate page used to configure advertising preferences. If the user clicks on the portion 412 while the cursor is in a proximate position to portion 412, the user will be redirected to a separate webpage, such as the webpage 510 shown in FIG. 4 and described below. In an alternative embodiment, the user can be linked directly to webpage 510 when the user activates the display object 320 using any of the various methods described above.
  • [0026]
    Referring now to FIG. 4, an example embodiment of a webpage used to configure user advertising preferences is illustrated. In one embodiment, the user is presented with a webpage 510 upon activation of display object 320 as described above. It will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art that page 510 may equivalently be implemented as a dialog box, a pull-down menu, or other type of user interface for receiving a set of preference selections. In the example embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the user may select or de-select (i.e. enable/activate or disable/deactivate) a set of advertising-related parameters or preferences. These user-configurable advertising-related parameters or preferences can include an opt-out selection 512. The opt-out control allows a user to specify whether or not s/he wants to participate in targeted advertising. If the user selects “opt-out” at selection 512 by clicking and marking the associated shaded box, the user's profile information is not used or provided for use by others for the purpose of targeted advertising. If the user de-selects “opt-out” at selection 512 by clicking and un-marking the associated shaded box, the user's profile information can be used or provided for use by others for the purpose of targeted advertising.
  • [0027]
    In the example embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the user may also select or de-select (i.e. enable/activate or disable/deactivate) a set of advertising-related segment parameters or preferences. Segments can be considered groupings into which a particular user has been automatically placed based on user behavior or demographics. For example, one segment may be based on gender; male users get classified in a male segment and female users get classified in a female segment. Other examples of segments include, age ranges, income ranges, location, marital status, parental status, historical buying habits, etc. It is common in conventional systems to classify particular users into a plurality of segments for the purpose of targeted advertising. Given that a plurality of segments have been created for each particular user, page 510 provides an opportunity for the system to present the pre-defined user segments to the particular user with whom the segments are associated. In this manner, the user is given information defining how the user has been previously classified into a plurality of segments for the purpose of targeted advertising. These user-specific segment classifications can be displayed to the user in page 510 as a list of segments 514. Each segment is configured with a selectable shaded box with which the user may select or de-select (i.e. enable/activate or disable/deactivate) each of the plurality of advertising-related segments previously associated with the user. If the user selects a particular segment at segment options 514 by clicking and marking the associated shaded box, the user's segment classification for that segment can be used or provided for use by others for the purpose of targeted advertising. If the user de-selects a particular segment at segment options 514 by clicking and un-marking the associated shaded box, the user's segment classification for that segment is not used or provided for use by others for the purpose of targeted advertising. Further, a user can add or remove particular individual elements or demographic data to the user's individual profile. For example, a user could specify that s/he is interested in receiving information regarding financial offers. A plurality of profile parameters or preferences can be offered to a user for configuration by the user. In this manner, a user can configure a set of parameters or preferences associated with advertising.
  • [0028]
    FIG. 5 illustrates a system architecture for delivering advertising to users in a networked system. Referring to FIG. 1, a system can provide techniques for manipulating networked content. For example, a publishing system 610 can be used to insert an advertisement (ad) 611 obtained from an advertiser 603 into publisher media 605 at a publisher website 615 (a website is one type of media or networked content). To accomplish this ad insertion, the publisher 610 can insert a piece of code provided by the advertising partner 603 into the publisher website's 615 source code. This code is then rendered when the page is viewed by a viewer 618 to display the publisher media with the advertisement in the location on the page indicated in the inserted code. Should the publisher 610 want to move or modify the ad, the publisher 610 changes the code at the site 615 to effect the change to the ad. The advertiser 603 can employ user ad profile information 604 to target a particular ad for a particular user viewing publisher media 605 via publisher website 615. User ad profile information 604 can be automatically created and updated with user behavior information and user demographics. In addition, the user ad profile information 604 can be used for the storage of the user-configurable set of parameters or preferences associated with advertising as described above. These user configurable preferences can be accessed and used by advertiser 603 when advertiser 603 determines which ad should be served to a particular user fia publisher 610. For example, if the “opt-out of advertising” parameter has been previously selected by a user as described above, the advertiser 603 can offer up an ad to publisher 610 that is not targeted per the selection request of the user. For another example, if the “opt-in to segment 1” parameter has been previously selected by a user as described above, the advertiser 603 can offer up an ad to publisher 610 that is targeted to individuals of segment 1 per the selection request of the user. In this manner, the ads shown to a particular user can be configured by a user by user manipulation of a set of user-configurable parameters or preferences associated with advertising as described above.
  • [0029]
    In an example embodiment described herein and shown by example in FIG. 5, the display object 320 used to enable user configuration of the advertising parameters can be inserted into the ad 611 by advertiser 603 or inserted into the publisher media content with inserted ad 612 by the publisher 610. In either case, the activation of the display object 320 by a user can cause a link to the appropriate host of the user-configurable parameters or preferences associated with advertising as described above.
  • [0030]
    FIG. 6 illustrates a processing flow for an example embodiment. The example embodiment includes an advertising (ad) preferences service to obtain user preference information related to advertising (processing block 702), enable user configuration of the user preference information related to advertising (processing block 704), and modify the presentation of advertising to the user based upon the user configured preference information (processing block 706).
  • [0031]
    Referring now to FIG. 7, a diagram illustrates a network environment in which various example embodiments may operate. In this conventional network architecture, a server computer system 100 is coupled to a wide-area network 110. Wide-area network 110 includes the Internet, or other proprietary networks, which are well known to those of ordinary skill in the art. Wide-area network 110 may include conventional network backbones, long-haul telephone lines, Internet service providers, various levels of network routers, and other conventional means for routing data between computers. Using conventional network protocols, server 100 may communicate through wide-area network 110 to a plurality of client computer systems 120, 130, 140 connected through wide-area network 110 in various ways. For example, client 140 is connected directly to wide-area network 110 through direct or dial-up telephone or other network transmission line. Alternatively, clients 130 may be connected through wide-area network 110 using a modem pool 114. A conventional modem pool 114 allows a plurality of client systems to connect with a smaller set of modems in modem pool 114 for connection through wide-area network 110. In another alternative network topology, wide-area network 110 is connected to a gateway computer 112. Gateway computer 112 is used to route data to clients 120 through a local area network (LAN) 116. In this manner, clients 120 can communicate with each other through local area network 116 or with server 100 through gateway 112 and wide-area network 110.
  • [0032]
    Using one of a variety of network connection means, server computer 100 can communicate with client computers 150 using conventional means. In a particular implementation of this network configuration, a server computer 100 may operate as a web server if the Internet's World-Wide Web (WWW) is used for wide area network 110. Using the HTTP protocol and the HTML coding language across wide-area network 110, web server 100 may communicate across the World-Wide Web with clients 150. In this configuration, clients 150 use a client application program known as a web browser such as the Internet Explorer™ published by Microsoft Corporation of Redmond, Wash., the user interface of America On-Line™, or the web browser or HTML renderer of any other supplier. Using such conventional browsers and the World-Wide Web, clients 150 may access image, graphical, and textual data provided by web server 100 or they may run Web application software. Conventional means exist by which clients 150 may supply information to web server 100 through the World Wide Web 110 and the web server 100 may return processed data to clients 150.
  • [0033]
    Having briefly described one embodiment of the network environment in which an example embodiment may operate, FIGS. 8 and 9 show an example of a computer system 200 illustrating an exemplary client 150 or server 100 computer system in which the features of an example embodiment may be implemented. Computer system 200 is comprised of a bus or other communications means 214 and 216 for communicating information, and a processing means such as processor 220 coupled with bus 214 for processing information. Computer system 200 further comprises a random access memory (RAM) or other dynamic storage device 222 (commonly referred to as main memory), coupled to bus 214 for storing information and instructions to be executed by processor 220. Main memory 222 also may be used for storing temporary variables or other intermediate information during execution of instructions by processor 220. Computer system 200 also comprises a read only memory (ROM) and/or other static storage device 224 coupled to bus 214 for storing static information and instructions for processor 220.
  • [0034]
    An optional data storage device 228 such as a magnetic disk or optical disk and its corresponding drive may also be coupled to computer system 200 for storing information and instructions. Computer system 200 can also be coupled via bus 216 to a display device 204, such as a cathode ray tube (CRT) or a liquid crystal display (LCD), for displaying information to a computer user. For example, image, textual, video, or graphical depictions of information may be presented to the user on display device 204. Typically, an alphanumeric input device 208, including alphanumeric and other keys is coupled to bus 216 for communicating information and/or command selections to processor 220. Another type of user input device is cursor control device 206, such as a conventional mouse, trackball, or other type of cursor direction keys for communicating direction information and command selection to processor 220 and for controlling cursor movement on display 204.
  • [0035]
    Alternatively, the client 150 can be implemented as a network computer or thin client device. Client 150 may also be a laptop or palm-top computing device, such as the Palm Pilot™. Client 150 could also be implemented in a robust cellular telephone, where such devices are currently being used with Internet micro-browsers. Such a network computer or thin client device does not necessarily include all of the devices and features of the above-described exemplary computer system; however, the functionality of an example embodiment or a subset thereof may nevertheless be implemented with such devices.
  • [0036]
    A communication device 226 is also coupled to bus 216 for accessing remote computers or servers, such as web server 100, or other servers via the Internet, for example. The communication device 226 may include a modem, a network interface card, or other well-known interface devices, such as those used for interfacing with Ethernet, Token-ring, or other types of networks. In any event, in this manner, the computer system 200 may be coupled to a number of servers 100 via a conventional network infrastructure such as the infrastructure illustrated in FIG. 7 and described above.
  • [0037]
    The system of an example embodiment includes software, information processing hardware, and various processing steps, which will be described below. The features and process steps of example embodiments may be embodied in articles of manufacture as machine or computer executable instructions. The instructions can be used to cause a general purpose or special purpose processor, which is programmed with the instructions to perform the steps of an example embodiment. Alternatively, the features or steps may be performed by specific hardware components that contain hard-wired logic for performing the steps, or by any combination of programmed computer components and custom hardware components. While embodiments are described with reference to the Internet, the method and apparatus described herein is equally applicable to other network infrastructures or other data communications systems.
  • [0038]
    Various embodiments are described herein. In particular, the use of embodiments with various types and formats of user interface presentations and/or application programming interfaces may be described. It will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art that alternative embodiments of the implementations described herein can be employed and still fall within the scope of the claimed invention. In the detail herein, various embodiments are described as implemented in computer-implemented processing logic denoted sometimes herein as the “Software”. As described above, however, the claimed invention is not limited to a purely software implementation.
  • [0039]
    Thus, a computer-implemented system and method for contextual advertising and merchandizing based on user configurable preferences is disclosed. While the present invention has been described in terms of several example embodiments, those of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that the present invention is not limited to the embodiments described, but can be practiced with modification and alteration within the spirit and scope of the appended claims. The description herein is thus to be regarded as illustrative instead of limiting.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5948061 *Oct 29, 1996Sep 7, 1999Double Click, Inc.Method of delivery, targeting, and measuring advertising over networks
US6758397 *Mar 31, 2001Jul 6, 2004Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Machine readable label reader system for articles with changeable status
US6868525 *May 26, 2000Mar 15, 2005Alberti Anemometer LlcComputer graphic display visualization system and method
US6907566 *Apr 2, 1999Jun 14, 2005Overture Services, Inc.Method and system for optimum placement of advertisements on a webpage
US6981040 *Jun 20, 2000Dec 27, 2005Utopy, Inc.Automatic, personalized online information and product services
US7089195 *Apr 30, 2001Aug 8, 2006Ari RosenbergSystem and method for the presentation of advertisements
US7107535 *Feb 7, 2001Sep 12, 2006Clickfox, LlcSystem and method for providing customized web pages
US7181438 *May 30, 2000Feb 20, 2007Alberti Anemometer, LlcDatabase access system
US7478089 *Oct 28, 2004Jan 13, 2009Kontera Technologies, Inc.System and method for real-time web page context analysis for the real-time insertion of textual markup objects and dynamic content
US7587357 *Jun 30, 2003Sep 8, 2009Trading Technologies International Inc.Repositioning of market information on trading screens
US7676394 *Apr 27, 2006Mar 9, 2010Jumptap, Inc.Dynamic bidding and expected value
US7822745 *May 31, 2006Oct 26, 2010Yahoo! Inc.Keyword set and target audience profile generalization techniques
US7831586 *Dec 27, 2006Nov 9, 2010Ebay Inc.System and method for application programming interfaces for keyword extraction and contextual advertisement generation
US8001105 *Dec 27, 2006Aug 16, 2011Ebay Inc.System and method for keyword extraction and contextual advertisement generation
US8200662 *Nov 5, 2010Jun 12, 2012Ebay Inc.System and method for application programming interfaces for keyword extraction and contextual advertisement generation
US20020123928 *Aug 10, 2001Sep 5, 2002Eldering Charles A.Targeting ads to subscribers based on privacy-protected subscriber profiles
US20020128925 *Dec 11, 2001Sep 12, 2002Patrick Angelessystem and method for detecting and reporting online activity using real-time content-based network monitoring
US20020174174 *Apr 13, 2001Nov 21, 2002Anupriya RamrajSystem and method for monitoring execution time of a transaction
US20030001880 *Aug 1, 2002Jan 2, 2003Parkervision, Inc.Method, system, and computer program product for producing and distributing enhanced media
US20030001887 *Jun 27, 2001Jan 2, 2003Smith James E.Method and system for communicating user specific infromation
US20030110131 *Feb 12, 2002Jun 12, 2003Secretseal Inc.Method and architecture for providing pervasive security to digital assets
US20040024981 *Jul 4, 2002Feb 5, 2004Takeshi IwatsuRecording device, recoding method, storage medium, program, and communication device
US20040083133 *Jun 6, 2003Apr 29, 2004Nicholas Frank C.Method and system for providing network based target advertising and encapsulation
US20040143465 *Dec 18, 2003Jul 22, 2004Kouji ImanishiConsolidated air cargo management system
US20040249816 *Jun 2, 2004Dec 9, 2004Pioneer CorporationInformation communication apparatus, information communication method, and information recorded medium
US20050004903 *Jul 22, 2004Jan 6, 2005Fujitsu LimitedRegional information retrieving method and regional information retrieval apparatus
US20050096980 *Dec 31, 2003May 5, 2005Ross KoningsteinSystem and method for delivering internet advertisements that change between textual and graphical ads on demand by a user
US20050229224 *Aug 26, 2004Oct 13, 2005Hitachi, Ltd.Information processing device and information processing system
US20060020596 *Jun 2, 2005Jan 26, 2006Yahoo! Inc.Content-management system for user behavior targeting
US20060111971 *Nov 24, 2004May 25, 2006Microsoft CorporationSystem and method for on-line and off-line advertising in content delivered to a display screen
US20060242243 *May 17, 2004Oct 26, 2006Fumiaki MatsumotoCommunication device having function for automaticaly determining unsolicited e-mails
US20060271438 *May 24, 2006Nov 30, 2006Andrew ShotlandAdvertising systems and methods
US20070061837 *Sep 14, 2005Mar 15, 2007Shay DadushSystem and method for software driven advertising
US20070079326 *Jun 13, 2006Apr 5, 2007Sony Computer Entertainment America Inc.Display of user selected advertising content in a digital environment
US20070094081 *Oct 25, 2006Apr 26, 2007Podbridge, Inc.Resolution of rules for association of advertising and content in a time and space shifted media network
US20070146812 *Dec 1, 2006Jun 28, 2007Lawton Scott SReader editable advertising
US20070157227 *Feb 21, 2006Jul 5, 2007Microsoft CorporationAdvertising services architecture
US20070265979 *May 12, 2006Nov 15, 2007Musicstrands, Inc.User programmed media delivery service
US20070288431 *Dec 27, 2006Dec 13, 2007Ebay Inc.System and method for application programming interfaces for keyword extraction and contextual advertisement generation
US20070288454 *Dec 27, 2006Dec 13, 2007Ebay Inc.System and method for keyword extraction and contextual advertisement generation
US20070288514 *Dec 27, 2006Dec 13, 2007Ebay Inc.System and method for keyword extraction
US20080022300 *Jul 10, 2006Jan 24, 2008Verizon Services Corp.System and methods for real-time access to movie information
US20080040218 *Jul 5, 2007Feb 14, 2008Van Dijk BobSystem and method for category-based contextual advertisement generation and management
US20080059258 *Jun 23, 2005Mar 6, 2008Nhn CorporationMethod and System for Selecting Search List Table in Internet Search Engine in Response to Search Request
US20080189169 *Jan 30, 2008Aug 7, 2008Enliven Marketing Technologies CorporationSystem and method for implementing advertising in an online social network
US20080221987 *May 25, 2007Sep 11, 2008Ebay Inc.System and method for contextual advertisement and merchandizing based on an automatically generated user demographic profile
US20080250452 *Aug 17, 2005Oct 9, 2008Kota IwamotoContent-Related Information Acquisition Device, Content-Related Information Acquisition Method, and Content-Related Information Acquisition Program
US20080259906 *Apr 17, 2007Oct 23, 2008Almondnet, Inc.Targeted television advertisements based on online behavior
US20090177531 *Dec 31, 2008Jul 9, 2009Dijk Bob VanSystem and method for category-based contextual advertisement generation and management
US20090177546 *Dec 31, 2008Jul 9, 2009Dijk Bob VanSystem and method for category-based contextual advertisement generation and management
US20090234711 *Mar 9, 2009Sep 17, 2009Jorey RamerAggregation of behavioral profile data using a monetization platform
US20100076845 *Jul 8, 2009Mar 25, 2010Jorey RamerContextual Mobile Content Placement on a Mobile Communication Facility
US20110015991 *Sep 22, 2010Jan 20, 2011Yahoo! Inc.Keyword set and target audience profile generalization techniques
US20110055195 *Nov 5, 2010Mar 3, 2011Ebay Inc.System and method for application programming interfaces for keyword extraction and contextual advertisement generation
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7831586Dec 27, 2006Nov 9, 2010Ebay Inc.System and method for application programming interfaces for keyword extraction and contextual advertisement generation
US8001105Dec 27, 2006Aug 16, 2011Ebay Inc.System and method for keyword extraction and contextual advertisement generation
US8200662Nov 5, 2010Jun 12, 2012Ebay Inc.System and method for application programming interfaces for keyword extraction and contextual advertisement generation
US8386316 *Jul 15, 2008Feb 26, 2013Vadim DagmanMethod and system to grant remote access to video resources
US8769053Aug 29, 2012Jul 1, 2014Cinsay, Inc.Containerized software for virally copying from one endpoint to another
US8782690Sep 30, 2013Jul 15, 2014Cinsay, Inc.Interactive product placement system and method therefor
US8813132 *Jun 22, 2012Aug 19, 2014Cinsay, Inc.Method and system for generation and playback of supplemented videos
US8893173Nov 26, 2013Nov 18, 2014Cinsay, Inc.Interactive product placement system and method therefor
US9113214May 1, 2009Aug 18, 2015Cinsay, Inc.Method and system for generation and playback of supplemented videos
US9185095 *Mar 13, 2013Nov 10, 2015United Services Automobile Association (Usaa)Behavioral profiling method and system to authenticate a user
US9203860Mar 20, 2012Dec 1, 2015United Services Automobile Association (Usaa)Dynamic risk engine
US9210472Jan 29, 2013Dec 8, 2015Cinsay, Inc.Method and system for generation and playback of supplemented videos
US9332302Jul 24, 2015May 3, 2016Cinsay, Inc.Interactive product placement system and method therefor
US9338499Jul 24, 2015May 10, 2016Cinsay, Inc.Interactive product placement system and method therefor
US9338500Jul 24, 2015May 10, 2016Cinsay, Inc.Interactive product placement system and method therefor
US9344754Jul 24, 2015May 17, 2016Cinsay, Inc.Interactive product placement system and method therefor
US9351032Jul 24, 2015May 24, 2016Cinsay, Inc.Interactive product placement system and method therefor
US9451010May 16, 2014Sep 20, 2016Cinsay, Inc.Containerized software for virally copying from one endpoint to another
US20070288431 *Dec 27, 2006Dec 13, 2007Ebay Inc.System and method for application programming interfaces for keyword extraction and contextual advertisement generation
US20070288454 *Dec 27, 2006Dec 13, 2007Ebay Inc.System and method for keyword extraction and contextual advertisement generation
US20080040218 *Jul 5, 2007Feb 14, 2008Van Dijk BobSystem and method for category-based contextual advertisement generation and management
US20080221987 *May 25, 2007Sep 11, 2008Ebay Inc.System and method for contextual advertisement and merchandizing based on an automatically generated user demographic profile
US20090177546 *Dec 31, 2008Jul 9, 2009Dijk Bob VanSystem and method for category-based contextual advertisement generation and management
US20090281889 *Oct 1, 2008Nov 12, 2009Derosa-Grund H AnthonyDisplaying targeted ads in unused areas of browser windows and using user premisssioned personal private information in connection with weighted display of ads, online search results and search ads
US20100036906 *Aug 5, 2008Feb 11, 2010Google Inc.Advertisements for streaming media
US20120266197 *Jun 22, 2012Oct 18, 2012Andrews Ii James KMethod and system for generation and playback of supplemented videos
US20130325631 *Jul 30, 2013Dec 5, 2013Facebook, Inc.Crowdsourced advertisements sponsored by advertisers in a social networking environment
US20150178772 *Dec 19, 2013Jun 25, 2015Thomson LicensingUser control of targeted advertising
WO2014116510A1 *Jan 17, 2014Jul 31, 2014Silva OsvaldoSystems and methods for providing online advertising utilizing user-centric interaction with companies, products, services and content
Classifications
U.S. Classification705/14.66
International ClassificationG06Q30/00
Cooperative ClassificationG06Q30/0257, G06Q30/0269
European ClassificationG06Q30/0269
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 21, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: EBAY INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:SHIPMAN, SCOTT ROBERT;FORTH, AARON K.;REEL/FRAME:020150/0970;SIGNING DATES FROM 20070723 TO 20070725