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Publication numberUS20090026582 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/181,317
Publication dateJan 29, 2009
Filing dateJul 28, 2008
Priority dateSep 29, 2004
Also published asCN101336478A, CN101336478B, EP1961044A1, US7405465, US7648896, US8030740, US8314477, US8766414, US20060087005, US20100163831, US20120012808, US20130313505, WO2007067448A1
Publication number12181317, 181317, US 2009/0026582 A1, US 2009/026582 A1, US 20090026582 A1, US 20090026582A1, US 2009026582 A1, US 2009026582A1, US-A1-20090026582, US-A1-2009026582, US2009/0026582A1, US2009/026582A1, US20090026582 A1, US20090026582A1, US2009026582 A1, US2009026582A1
InventorsS. Brad Herner
Original AssigneeSandisk 3D Llc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Deposited semiconductor structure to minimize n-type dopant diffusion and method of making
US 20090026582 A1
Abstract
In deposited silicon, n-type dopants such as phosphorus and arsenic tend to seek the surface of the silicon, rising as the layer is deposited. When a second undoped or p-doped silicon layer is deposited on n-doped silicon with no n-type dopant provided, a first thickness of this second silicon layer nonetheless tends to include unwanted n-type dopant which has diffused up from lower levels. This surface-seeking behavior diminishes when germanium is alloyed with the silicon. In some devices, it may not be advantageous for the second layer to have significant germanium content. In the present invention, a first heavily n-doped semiconductor layer (preferably at least 10 at % germanium) is deposited, followed by a silicon-germanium capping layer with little or no n-type dopant, followed by a layer with little or no n-type dopant and less than 10 at % germanium. The germanium in the first layer and the capping layer minimizes diffusion of n-type dopant into the germanium-poor layer above.
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Claims(20)
1. A semiconductor device comprising a layerstack, the layerstack comprising:
a first layer of deposited heavily n-doped semiconductor material above a substrate, the first layer at least about 50 angstroms thick;
a second layer of semiconductor material which is not heavily n-doped, wherein the semiconductor material of the second layer is a silicon-germanium alloy that is at least 10 at % germanium, the second layer at least about 100 angstroms thick, wherein the second layer is above and in contact with the first layer; and
a third layer of deposited semiconductor material which is not heavily n-doped above and in contact with the second layer, wherein the semiconductor material of the third layer is silicon or a silicon-germanium alloy that is less than 10 at % germanium,
wherein the first, second, and third layers reside in a semiconductor device.
2. The semiconductor device of claim 1 wherein the semiconductor material of the second layer is at least 20 at % germanium.
3. The semiconductor device of claim 1 wherein the semiconductor material of the third layer is no more than 5 at % germanium.
4. The semiconductor device of claim 1 wherein the first, second, and third layers are portions of a vertically oriented junction diode.
5. The semiconductor device of claim 4 wherein the diode is a p-i-n diode, and the third layer is undoped or lightly doped.
6. The semiconductor device of claim 4 wherein the first, second, and third layers have been patterned and etched to form a pillar.
7. The semiconductor device of claim 6 wherein the pillar is vertically disposed between a bottom conductor and a top conductor, wherein a nonvolatile memory cell comprises a portion of the bottom conductor, the pillar, and a portion of the top conductor.
8. The semiconductor device of claim 1 wherein the first layer is doped to a dopant concentration of at least about 5×1019 dopant atoms/cm3.
9. The semiconductor device of claim 8 wherein the third layer has a dopant concentration less than about 5×1017 dopant atoms/cm3 of an n-type dopant.
10. A nonvolatile memory cell formed above a substrate, the memory cell comprising:
a portion of a bottom conductor above the substrate;
a portion of a top conductor above the bottom conductor; and
a diode vertically disposed between the bottom conductor and the top conductor,
the diode comprising:
i) a first deposited layer of heavily n-doped semiconductor material;
ii) a second deposited layer of semiconductor material which is not heavily n-doped wherein the semiconductor material of the second layer is a silicon-germanium alloy that is at least 10 at % germanium, the second layer disposed above and in contact with the first layer; and
iii) a third deposited layer of semiconductor material which is not heavily n-doped, wherein the semiconductor material of the third layer is silicon or a silicon-germanium alloy that is less than 10 at % germanium, wherein the third layer is above and in contact with the second layer.
11. The nonvolatile memory cell of claim 10 wherein the semiconductor material of the first layer is a silicon-germanium alloy that is at least 10 at % germanium.
12. The nonvolatile memory cell of claim 10 wherein the first layer is doped to a dopant concentration of at least about 5×1019 dopant atoms/cm3.
13. The nonvolatile memory cell of claim 12 wherein the third layer has a dopant concentration of less than about 5×1017 dopant atoms/cm3 of an n-type dopant.
14. The nonvolatile memory cell of claim 12 wherein the second layer has a dopant concentration of less than about 5×1017 dopant atoms/cm3 of an n-type dopant.
15. The nonvolatile memory cell of claim 10 wherein the semiconductor material of the third layer is silicon or a silicon-germanium alloy that is no more than 5 at % germanium.
16. The nonvolatile memory cell of claim 10 wherein the diode is in the form of a pillar.
17. The nonvolatile memory cell of claim 10 wherein the memory cell further comprises a reversible state-change element, the reversible state-change element disposed between the diode and the bottom conductor or between the diode and the top conductor.
18. The nonvolatile memory cell of claim 17 wherein the reversible state-change element comprises a layer of a resistivity-switching metal oxide or nitride compound selected from the group consisting of NiO, Nb2O5, TiO2, HfO2, Al2O3, CoO, MgOx, CrO2, VO, BN, and AlN.
19. The nonvolatile memory cell of claim 10 wherein the second layer is at least about 100 angstroms thick.
20. A monolithic three dimensional memory array comprising:
a) a first memory level formed above a substrate, the first memory level comprising:
i) a plurality of substantially parallel, substantially coplanar bottom conductors;
ii) a plurality of substantially parallel, substantially coplanar top conductors;
iii) a plurality of semiconductor junction diodes, each diode vertically disposed between one of the bottom conductors and one of the top conductors, wherein each diode comprises a first layer of heavily n-doped semiconductor material, a second layer of lightly n-doped, p-doped, or undoped silicon-germanium alloy wherein the second layer is at least 10 at % germanium, the second layer above the first layer, and a third layer of lightly n-doped, p-doped or undoped silicon or silicon-germanium alloy wherein the third layer is less than 10 at % germanium, the third layer above the second layer; and
b) at least a second memory level monolithically formed above the first memory level.
Description
RELATED APPLICATION

This application is a continuation-in-part of Hemer et al., U.S. application Ser. No. 10/954,577, “Junction Diode Comprising Varying Semiconductor Compositions,” filed Sep. 29, 2004, hereinafter the '577 application and hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to a deposited vertical semiconductor layerstack that serves to minimize surfactant behavior of n-type dopants, and the methods of making the layerstack.

During deposition of silicon, n-type dopants such as phosphorus and arsenic tend to seek the surface, rising through a silicon layer as it is deposited. If it is desired to deposit a layer having little or no n-dopant (an undoped or p-doped layer, for example) immediately above a heavily doped n-type layer, this tendency of n-type dopant atoms to diffuse toward the surface introduces unwanted dopant into the undoped or p-doped layer. This unwanted n-type dopant may adversely affect device behavior.

There is a need, therefore, to limit diffusion of n-type dopants in deposited silicon and silicon alloys.

SUMMARY OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The present invention is defined by the following claims, and nothing in this section should be taken as a limitation on those claims. In general, the invention is directed to a structure and method to limit n-type dopant diffusion in a deposited semiconductor layerstack.

A first aspect of the invention provides for a semiconductor device comprising a layerstack, the layerstack comprising: a first layer of deposited heavily n-doped semiconductor material above a substrate, the first layer at least about 50 angstroms thick; a second layer of semiconductor material which is not heavily n-doped, wherein the semiconductor material of the second layer is a silicon-germanium alloy that is at least 10 at % germanium, the second layer at least about 100 angstroms thick, wherein the second layer is above and in contact with the first layer; and a third layer of deposited semiconductor material which is not heavily n-doped above and in contact with the second layer, wherein the semiconductor material of the third layer is silicon or a silicon-germanium alloy that is less than 10 at % germanium, wherein the first, second, and third layers reside in a semiconductor device.

Another aspect of the invention provides for a nonvolatile memory cell formed above a substrate, the memory cell comprising: a portion of a bottom conductor above the substrate; a portion of a top conductor above the bottom conductor; and a diode vertically disposed between the bottom conductor and the top conductor, the diode comprising: i) a first deposited layer of heavily n-doped semiconductor material; ii) a second deposited layer of semiconductor material which is not heavily n-doped wherein the semiconductor material of the second layer is a silicon-germanium alloy that is at least 10 at % germanium, the second layer disposed above and in contact with the first layer; and iii) a third deposited layer of semiconductor material which is not heavily n-doped, wherein the semiconductor material of the third layer is silicon or a silicon-germanium alloy that is less than 10 at % germanium, wherein the third layer is above and in contact with the second layer.

A preferred embodiment of the invention provides for a method for forming a first memory level above a substrate, the method comprising: depositing a first layer of heavily n-doped semiconductor material; depositing a second layer of lightly n-doped, p-doped, or undoped semiconductor material on and in contact with the first layer, wherein the semiconductor material of the second layer is a silicon-germanium alloy that is at least 10 at % germanium, depositing a third layer of lightly n-doped, p-doped, or undoped semiconductor material on and in contact with the first layer, wherein the semiconductor material of the third layer is silicon or a silicon-germanium alloy that is less than 10 at % germanium; and patterning and etching the first, second, and third layers to form a first plurality of vertically oriented diodes in the form of pillars.

A related embodiment provides for a monolithic three dimensional memory array comprising: a) a first memory level formed above a substrate, the first memory level comprising: i) a plurality of substantially parallel, substantially coplanar bottom conductors; ii) a plurality of substantially parallel, substantially coplanar top conductors; iii) a plurality of semiconductorjunction diodes, each diode vertically disposed between one of the bottom conductors and one of the top conductors, wherein each diode comprises a first layer of heavily n-doped semiconductor material, a second layer of lightly n-doped, p-doped, or undoped silicon-germanium alloy wherein the second layer is at least 10 at % germanium, the second layer above the first layer, and a third layer of lightly n-doped, p-doped or undoped silicon or silicon-germanium alloy wherein the third layer is less than 10 at % germanium, the third layer above the second layer; and b) at least a second memory level monolithically formed above the first memory level.

Each of the aspects and embodiments of the invention described herein can be used alone or in combination with one another.

The preferred aspects and embodiments will now be described with reference to the attached drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 a perspective view of a vertically oriented diode which may benefit from use of the structures and methods of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a graph showing phosphorus concentration at depth in a deposited silicon layer.

FIG. 3 is a graph showing phosphorus concentration at depth in a deposited silicon-germanium layer.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of a semiconductor layerstack according to aspects of the present invention.

FIGS. 5 a and 5 b are perspective views of vertically oriented diodes formed according to embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a memory level formed according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIGS. 7 a-7 c are cross-sectional views illustrating stages in formation of a first memory level according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIGS. 8 a-8 c are cross-sectional views illustrating loss of silicon thickness during formation of a vertically oriented diode according to an embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Semiconductor devices are doped with p-type and n-type dopants to enhance conductivity. Most semiconductor devices require sharp transitions in dopant profiles. For example, FIG. 1 shows a vertically oriented p-i-n diode 2, formed of polycrystalline silicon (in this discussion, polycrystalline silicon will be referred to as polysilicon.) The diode is formed between bottom conductor 12 and top conductor 14. Bottom region 4 is heavily doped with an n-type dopant, such as phosphorus or arsenic, middle region 6 is intrinsic polysilicon, which is not intentionally doped, and top region 8 is heavily doped with a p-type dopant such as boron or BF2. (Many other semiconductor devices, including p-n diodes, Zener diodes, thyristors, bipolar transistors, etc., include regions having different doping characteristics. The p-i-n diode 2 of FIG. 1 is presented as an example.) The difference in doping characteristics between these different regions must be maintained for the device to function.

Dopants can be introduced into semiconductor material such as silicon by several methods, including ion implantation or diffusion from a nearby dopant source. If the silicon is deposited, it can be doped in situ, by flowing a gas that will provide the dopant during deposition, so that dopant atoms are incorporated into the silicon as it is deposited.

Most n-type dopants, such as phosphorus and arsenic, exhibit surfactant behavior, a strong preference to be located on the surface of deposited silicon, rather than buried. Referring to FIG. 1, heavily doped n-type region 4 can be formed by flowing SiH4, a typical precursor gas to deposit silicon, along with PH3, which will provide phosphorus. To form intrinsic region 6, the flow of PH3 is stopped, while SiH4 flow continues. The silicon of region 6 is deposited without dopant, but phosphorus from region 4 diffuses into region 6 during deposition. A significant thickness of silicon must be deposited to guarantee that a sufficient thickness of region 6 is formed which includes virtually no n-type dopant. Unwanted dopant diffusion from heavily doped region 4 to intrinsic region 6 makes it difficult to form a sharp junction between these regions, and may force the overall height of the diode 2 to be more than desired.

The surfactant behavior of n-type dopants is less in a silicon-germanium alloy than in silicon, and decreases as the germanium content of the alloy increases. In a silicon-germanium alloy which is at least about 10 at % germanium, preferably at least about 20 at % germanium, the tendency of n-type dopants to seek the surface during in situ deposition is significantly reduced.

FIG. 2 is a graph showing phosphorus concentration in silicon over a depth range, measured in angstroms from the top surface labeled 0 angstroms, to approximately 3500 angstroms, which represents the bottom or initial surface of deposition of an in situ doped deposited layer. In this silicon layer, PH3 was flowed during initial silicon deposition at 3450 angstroms to a depth of 3250 angstroms. At this depth the flow of PH3 was stopped, while SiH4 flow was continued, depositing nominally undoped silicon on top of the heavily n-doped silicon. As shown in FIG. 2, however, the concentration of phosphorus nonetheless remains above 5×1017 atoms/cm3 to a depth of about 2650 angstroms, after an additional 700 angstroms of silicon has been deposited with no dopant provided.

FIG. 3 is a graph showing phosphorus concentration in deposited silicon-germanium. During deposition of this layer, flow of PH3 started at a depth of 4050 angstroms, forming a heavily doped n-type silicon layer, and was stopped at a depth of 3900 angstroms. The concentration of phosphorus drops to about 5×1017 atoms/cm3 at a depth of about 3850 angstroms, after an additional thickness of only about 50 angstroms of silicon-germanium has been deposited.

Thus if the diode 2 of FIG. 1 is formed of a silicon-germanium alloy, for example Si0.8Ge0.2, diffusion of dopant from n-doped region 4 to intrinsic region 6 will be significantly curtailed, and a sharp junction between these regions can be formed.

Germanium has a smaller band gap than silicon, however, and increasing the germanium content of intrinsic region 6 causes the diode to have a relatively high leakage current under reverse bias. A diode is used for its rectifying behavior—its tendency to conduct more readily in one direction than in the opposite direction—and leakage current in the reverse direction is generally undesirable.

In short, when the diode is formed of silicon, unwanted n-type dopant in intrinsic region 6 causes increased reverse leakage current. This dopant diffusion due to surfactant behavior can be reduced by forming the diode of a silicon-germanium alloy, but this alternative is also unsatisfactory, since the smaller band gap of this material also leads to higher leakage current.

This problem is addressed in the present invention by varying the germanium content within the layerstack. Turning to FIG. 4, in the present invention, in a deposited semiconductor layerstack, a first layer 20 of semiconductor material is heavily doped with an n-type dopant, such as phosphorus or arsenic, for example having a dopant concentration of at least about 5×1019 dopant atoms/cm3. Layer 20 may have been doped in situ during deposition or by ion implantation. Next a thin capping layer 21 of silicon-germanium which is at least about 10 at % germanium, preferably at least about 20 at % germanium, is deposited immediately on and in contact with the first layer 20. Capping layer 21 has a very low concentration of n-type dopant. It is undoped or very lightly doped with n-type dopant, having an n-type dopant concentration no more than about 5×1017 dopant atoms/cm3; capping layer 21 may be doped with a p-type dopant. Capping layer 21 is relatively thin, for example about 100 and or 200 angstroms, preferably no more than about 300 to about 500 angstroms thick. A second layer 22 of silicon or a silicon-germanium alloy which is poor in germanium, for example less than 10 at % germanium, preferably less than 5 at % germanium, preferably no germanium, is deposited above and in contact with the capping layer. Second layer 22 is undoped or very lightly doped with an n-type dopant, having an n-type dopant concentration no more than about 5×1017 dopant atoms/cm3. Second layer 22 may be doped with a p-type dopant. The entire layerstack, layers 20, 21, and 22, is deposited semiconductor material. Depending on deposition conditions, the layerstack may be amorphous or polycrystalline as deposited, or portions of the layerstack may be amorphous while other portions are polycrystalline.

Silicon-germanium capping layer 21 has a very low n-type dopant concentration, and a germanium content high enough to ensure that very little n-type dopant from heavily doped layer 20 migrates through it. Thus the top surface of silicon-germanium capping layer 21, upon which germanium-poor second layer 22 is deposited, will have virtually no n-type dopant atoms, and a sharp transition in dopant profile can be achieved.

In preferred embodiments, layer 20 is a silicon-germanium alloy which is at least 10 at % germanium, preferably at least 20 at % germanium. Higher germanium content layer 20 tends to further reduce surfactant behavior. Fabrication of the layerstack is simplified if layers 20 and 21 are the same silicon-germanium alloy. If desired, however, layer 20 could be silicon, a silicon-germanium alloy which is less than 10 at % germanium, or some other semiconductor material.

Turning to FIG. 5 a, in a first embodiment, using methods of the present invention, a low-leakage, vertically oriented p-i-n diode can be formed. Heavily doped layer 4 is heavily doped with an n-type dopant, for example by in situ doping or ion implantation. Heavily doped layer 4 is preferably a silicon-germanium alloy which is at least 10 at % germanium, preferably at least 20 at % germanium. Some germanium content in heavily doped layer 4 is advantageous, limiting surfactant behavior and providing a better electrical contact to an adjacent conductor. In less preferred embodiments, however, heavily doped layer 4 may be silicon, a silicon-germanium alloy which is less than 10 at % germanium, or some other semiconductor material. Capping layer 5 is a silicon-germanium alloy which is at least 10 at %, preferably at least 20 at % germanium, and is undoped or lightly doped with an n-type dopant, having a dopant concentration less than about 5×1017 atoms/cm3. Intrinsic layer 6 is silicon or a germanium-poor silicon-germanium alloy, no more than about 10 at % germanium, preferably no more than about 5 at % germanium, most preferably with substantially no germanium. A top layer 8 of heavily doped p-type semiconductor material, preferably silicon, can be formed above intrinsic layer 6, for example by ion implantation, to complete the diode. In the completed device, layers 4, 5, 6, and 8 are preferably polycrystalline.

Turning to FIG. 5 b, in another embodiment, methods of the present invention can be used to form a vertically oriented p-n diode having a sharp dopant transition. Heavily doped layer 4 is a semiconductor material and is heavily doped with an n-type dopant, for example by in situ doping or by ion implantation. As in the diode of FIG. 5 a, this layer is preferably a silicon-germanium alloy which is at least 10 at % germanium, preferably at least 20 at % germanium, though in less preferred embodiments it may be some other semiconductor material, for example silicon or a silicon-germanium alloy which is less than 10 at % germanium. Capping layer 5 is a silicon-germanium alloy which is at least 10 at % germanium, preferably at least 20 at % germanium, and is undoped, or lightly doped with an n-type dopant, having a dopant concentration less than about 5×1017 atoms/cm3, or is heavily doped with a p-type dopant. Top layer 8 of heavily doped p-type silicon or a germanium-poor silicon-germanium alloy, no more than about 10 at % germanium, preferably no more than about 5 at % germanium, most preferably with substantially no germanium, and is formed above capping layer 5 to complete the diode. In the completed device, layers 4, 5, and 8 are preferably polycrystalline.

The vertically oriented diodes shown in FIGS. 5 a and 5 b are examples; the methods of the present invention can be used in other semiconductor devices requiring a sharp transition in dopant profile from a deposited heavily n-doped layer to a layer that is not heavily doped with an n-type dopant deposited above it; specifically in devices in which it is preferred that the layer which is not heavily n-doped has little or no germanium.

Herner et al., U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/955,549, “Nonvolatile Memory Cell Without a Dielectric Antifuse Having High- and Low-Impedance States,” filed Sep. 29, 2004, hereinafter the '549 application and hereby incorporated by reference, describes a monolithic three dimensional memory array including vertically oriented p-i-n diodes like diode 2 of FIG. 1. As formed, the polysilicon of the p-i-n diode is in a high-resistance state. Application of a programming voltage permanently changes the nature of the polysilicon, rendering it low-resistance. It is believed the change is caused by an increase in the degree of order in the polysilicon, as described more fully in Herner et al., U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/148,530, “Nonvolatile Memory Cell Operating by Increasing Order in Polycrystalline Semiconductor Material,” filed Jun. 8, 2005, hereinafter the '530 application and hereby incorporated by reference. This change in resistance is stable and readily detectable, and thus can record a data state, allowing the device to operate as a memory cell. A first memory level is formed above the substrate, and additional memory levels may be formed above it. These memories may benefit from use of the methods and structures according to embodiments of the present invention.

A related memory is described in Herner et al., U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/015,824, “Nonvolatile Memory Cell Comprising a Reduced Height Vertical Diode,” filed Dec. 17, 2004, hereinafter the '824 application and hereby incorporated by reference. As described in the '824 application, it may be advantageous to reduce the height of the p-i-n diode. A shorter diode requires a lower programming voltage and decreases the aspect ratio of the gaps between adjacent diodes. Very high-aspect ratio gaps are difficult to fill without voids. A thickness of at least 600 angstroms is preferred for the intrinsic region to reduce current leakage in reverse bias of the diode. Forming a diode having a silicon-poor intrinsic layer above a heavily n-doped layer, the two separated by a thin intrinsic capping layer of silicon-gernanium, according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention, will allow for sharper transitions in the dopant profile, and thus reduce overall diode height.

Embodiments of the present invention prove particularly useful in formation of a monolithic three dimensional memory array. A monolithic three dimensional memory array is one in which multiple memory levels are formed above a single substrate, such as a wafer, with no intervening substrates. The layers forming one memory level are deposited or grown directly over the layers of an existing level or levels. In contrast, stacked memories have been constructed by forming memory levels on separate substrates and adhering the memory levels atop each other, as in Leedy, U.S. Pat. No. 5,915,167, “Three dimensional structure memory.” The substrates may be thinned or removed from the memory levels before bonding, but as the memory levels are initially formed over separate substrates, such memories are not true monolithic three dimensional memory arrays.

FIG. 6 shows a portion of a memory level of exemplary memory cells formed according to an embodiment of the present invention, including bottom conductors 200, pillars 300 (each pillar 300 comprising a diode), and top conductors 400. Fabrication of such a memory level, including vertically oriented diodes, each having a bottom silicon-germanium heavily n-doped region, an undoped silicon-germanium capping layer, and an intrinsic region formed of silicon or a germanium-poor silicon-germanium alloy, will be described in detail. More detailed information regarding fabrication of a similar memory level is provided in the '549 and '824 applications, previously incorporated. More information on fabrication of related memories is provided in Herner et al., U.S. Pat. No. 6,952,030, “High-Density Three-Dimensional Memory Cell,” owned by the assignee of the present invention and hereby incorporated by reference. To avoid obscuring the invention, not all of this detail will be included in this description, but no teaching of these or other incorporated patents or applications is intended to be excluded. It will be understood that this example is non-limiting, and that the details provided herein can be modified, omitted, or augmented while the results fall within the scope of the invention.

EXAMPLE

Fabrication of a single memory level will be described in detail. Additional memory levels can be stacked, each monolithically formed above the one below it.

Turning to FIG. 7 a, formation of the memory begins with a substrate 100. This substrate 100 can be any semiconducting substrate as known in the art, such as monocrystalline silicon, IV-IV compounds like silicon-germanium or silicon-germanium-carbon, III-V compounds, II-VII compounds, epitaxial layers over such substrates, or any other semiconducting material. The substrate may include integrated circuits fabricated therein.

An insulating layer 102 is formed over substrate 100. The insulating layer 102 can be silicon oxide, silicon nitride, high-dielectric film, Si—C—O—H film, or any other suitable insulating material.

The first conductors 200 are formed over the substrate and insulator. An adhesion layer 104 may be included between the insulating layer 102 and the conducting layer 106 to help the conducting layer 106 adhere. If the overlying conducting layer is tungsten, titanium nitride is preferred as adhesion layer 104.

The next layer to be deposited is conducting layer 106. Conducting layer 106 can comprise any conducting material known in the art, such as tungsten, or other materials, including tantalum, titanium, copper, cobalt, or alloys thereof.

Once all the layers that will form the conductor rails have been deposited, the layers will be patterned and etched using any suitable masking and etching process to form substantially parallel, substantially coplanar conductors 200, shown in FIG. 7 a in cross-section extending out of the page. In one embodiment, photoresist is deposited, patterned by photolithography and the layers etched, and then the photoresist removed using standard process techniques. Conductors 200 could be formed by a Damascene method instead.

Next a dielectric material 108 is deposited over and between conductor rails 200. Dielectric material 108 can be any known electrically insulating material, such as silicon dioxide, silicon nitride, or silicon oxynitride. In a preferred embodiment, silicon dioxide is used as dielectric material 108.

Finally, excess dielectric material 108 on top of conductor rails 200 is removed, exposing the tops of conductor rails 200 separated by dielectric material 108, and leaving a substantially planar surface 109. The resulting structure is shown in FIG. 7 a. This removal of dielectric overfill to form planar surface 109 can be performed by any process known in the art, such as chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) or etchback. At this stage, a plurality of substantially parallel first conductors have been formed at a first height above substrate 100.

Next, turning to FIG. 7 b, vertical pillars will be formed above completed conductor rails 200. (To save space substrate 100 is not shown in FIG. 7 b and subsequent figures; its presence will be assumed.) Preferably a barrier layer 110 is deposited as the first layer after planarization of the conductor rails. Any suitable material can be used in the barrier layer, including tungsten nitride, tantalum nitride, titanium nitride, or combinations of these materials. In a preferred embodiment, titanium nitride is used as the barrier layer. Where the barrier layer is titanium nitride, it can be deposited in the same manner as the adhesion layer described earlier.

Next semiconductor material that will be patterned into pillars is deposited. In the present embodiment, the pillar comprises a semiconductor junction diode p-i-n diode having a bottom heavily doped n-type region, a capping layer immediately above, a middle intrinsic region, and a top heavily doped p-type region. The term junction diode is used herein to refer to a semiconductor device with the property of conducting current more easily in one direction than the other, having two terminal electrodes, and made of semiconducting material which is p-type at one electrode and n-type at the other.

The semiconductor material that will form bottom heavily doped n-type layer 112 is deposited first. This semiconductor material is preferably a silicon-germanium alloy which is at least 10 at % germanium to minimize the surface-seeking diffusion of the n-type dopant. Preferably a Si0.8Ge0.2 alloy is used. In other embodiments, the germanium content may be higher; for example it may be 25 at %, 30 at %, 50 at %, or more, including 100 at % germanium, with no silicon. In still other embodiments, some other semiconductor material, such as carbon or tin, may be included as a small proportion of the silicon-germanium alloy. Heavily doped layer 112 is preferably doped in situ by flowing an appropriate donor gas which will provide an n-type dopant. Flowing PH3 during deposition will cause phosphorus atoms to be incorporated into layer 112 as it forms. Dopant concentration should be at least about 5×1019 dopant atoms/cm3, for example between about 5×1019 and about 3×1021 dopant atoms/cm3, preferably about 8×1020 dopant atoms/cm3. Heavily doped layer 112 is preferably between about 50 and about 500 angstroms thick, preferably about 200 angstroms thick.

In less preferred embodiments, heavily doped n-type layer 112 is silicon, a silicon-germanium alloy which is less than about 10 at % germanium, or some other semiconductor material.

Unlike silicon, silicon-germanium tends to deposit heterogeneously on barrier layer 110, initially forming islands rather than a continuous layer. To aid homogeneous deposition of silicon-germanium layer 112, it may be preferred to first deposit a thin seed layer of silicon, for example about 30 angstroms thick, before beginning deposition of silicon-germanium. This very thin layer will not significantly alter electrical behavior of the device. Use of a silicon seed layer to aid deposition of a germanium film is described in Herner, U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/159,031, “Method of Depositing Germanium Films,” filed Jun. 22, 2005, and hereby incorporated by reference.

Next capping layer 113 will be deposited immediately on top of heavily doped n-type layer 112. The flow of the donor gas (PH3, for example) is stopped, so that capping layer 113 is undoped. The substrate is not removed from a deposition chamber between deposition of heavily doped layer 112 and capping layer 113. Preferably capping layer 113 is the same silicon-germanium alloy as heavily doped n-type layer 112, for example Si0.8Ge0.2. In other embodiments, capping layer 113 may have a different proportion of germanium, so long as the proportion remains at least 10 at % germanium. For example, the germanium content may drop gradually through capping layer 113. Capping layer 113 is at least about 100 angstroms thick, for example about 200 angstroms thick.

Next intrinsic layer 114 is deposited immediately on top of capping layer 113. Layer 114 is silicon or a silicon-germanium alloy which is less than about 10 at % germanium, for example less than about 5 at % germanium; layer 114 is preferably silicon. In a preferred embodiment heavily doped p-type layer 116 will be formed by ion implantation. Turning to FIG. 8 a, intrinsic layer 114 has a deposited thickness A. As shown in FIG. 8 b, an upcoming planarization step will remove a thickness B, and, in FIG. 8 c, ion implantation to form region 116 will cause a thickness C to be heavily doped. In the finished device intrinsic layer 114 should have thickness D. Thus the thickness A to be deposited is the sum of the ultimate desired thickness D of the intrinsic region 114, the thickness C of heavily doped p-type region 116 to be formed by implantation, and thickness B to be lost during planarization. In the finished device, intrinsic region 114 is preferably between about 600 and about 2000 angstroms, for example about 1600 angstroms. Heavily doped p-type layer 116 is between about 100 and about 1000 angstroms, preferably about 200 angstroms. The amount lost during planarization will most likely be between about 400 and about 800 angstroms, depending on the planarization method used. The thickness to be deposited undoped in this step, then, is between about 1100 and about 3800 angstrom, preferably about 2600 angstroms.

Returning to FIG. 7 b, semiconductor layers 114, 113, and 112 just deposited, along with underlying barrier layer 110, will be patterned and etched to form pillars 300. Pillars 300 should have about the same pitch and about the same width as conductors 200 below, such that each pillar 300 is formed on top of a conductor 200. Some misalignment can be tolerated.

The pillars 300 can be formed using any suitable masking and etching process. For example, photoresist can be deposited, patterned using standard photolithography techniques, and etched, then the photoresist removed. Alternatively, a hard mask of some other material, for example silicon dioxide, can be formed on top of the semiconductor layer stack, with bottom antireflective coating (BARC) on top, then patterned and etched. Similarly, dielectric antireflective coating (DARC) can be used as a hard mask.

The photolithography techniques described in Chen, U.S. application Ser. No. 10/728,436, “Photomask Features with Interior Nonprinting Window Using Alternating Phase Shifting,” filed Dec. 5, 2003; or Chen, U.S. application Ser. No. 10/815,312, Photomask Features with Chromeless Nonprinting Phase Shifting Window,” filed Apr. 1, 2004, both owned by the assignee of the present invention and hereby incorporated by reference, can advantageously be used to perform any photolithography step used in formation of a memory array according to the present invention.

Dielectric material 108 is deposited over and between the semiconductor pillars 300, filling the gaps between them. Dielectric material 108 can be any known electrically insulating material, such as silicon oxide, silicon nitride, or silicon oxynitride. In a preferred embodiment, silicon dioxide is used as the insulating material.

Next the dielectric material on top of the pillars 300 is removed, exposing the tops of pillars 300 separated by dielectric material 108, and leaving a substantially planar surface. This removal of dielectric overfill can be performed by any process known in the art, such as CMP or etchback. After CMP or etchback, ion implantation is performed, forming heavily doped p-type top region 116. The p-type dopant is preferably boron or BF2. The resulting structure is shown in FIG. 7 b.

As described earlier, the incorporated '539 application describes that the resistivity of the semiconductor material of the diode detectably and permanently changes when subjected to a programming voltage. In some embodiments, a dielectric rupture antifuse, which is intact before programming and is ruptured during programming, may be included in the cell to increase the difference between current flow observed when a read voltage is applied to a programmed vs. an unprogrammed cell.

Turning to FIG. 7 c, if optional dielectric rupture antifuse 118 is included, it can be formed by any appropriate method, including thermal oxidation of a portion of heavily doped p-type region 116. Alternatively, this layer can be deposited instead, and may be any appropriate dielectric material. For example, a layer of Al2O3 can be deposited at about 150 degrees C. Other materials may be used. Dielectric rupture anti fuse 118 is preferably between about 20 and about 80 angstroms thick, preferably about 50 angstroms thick. In other embodiments, dielectric rupture antifuse 118 may be omitted.

Top conductors 400 can be formed in the same manner as bottom conductors 200, for example by depositing adhesion layer 120, preferably of titanium nitride, and conductive layer 122, preferably of tungsten. Conductive layer 122 and adhesion layer 120 are then patterned and etched using any suitable masking and etching technique to form substantially parallel, substantially coplanar conductors 400, shown in FIG. 7 c extending left-to-right across the page. In a preferred embodiment, photoresist is deposited, patterned by photolithography and the layers etched, and then the photoresist removed using standard process techniques. Each pillar should be disposed between one of the bottom conductors and one of the top conductors; some misalignment can be tolerated.

Next a dielectric material (not shown) is deposited over and between conductor rails 400. The dielectric material can be any known electrically insulating material, such as silicon dioxide, silicon nitride, or silicon oxynitride. In a preferred embodiment, silicon dioxide is used as this dielectric material.

Formation of a first memory level has been described. This memory level comprises a plurality of memory cells, and in each memory cell a pillar is vertically disposed between a bottom conductor and a top conductor, wherein a nonvolatile memory cell comprises a portion of the bottom conductor, the pillar, and a portion of the top conductor. Additional memory levels can be formed above this first memory level. In some embodiments, conductors can be shared between memory levels; i.e. top conductor 400 would serve as the bottom conductor of the next memory level. In other embodiments, an interlevel dielectric (not shown) is formed above the first memory level of FIG. 7 c, its surface planarized, and construction of a second memory level begins on this planarized interlevel dielectric, with no shared conductors.

The semiconductor material of pillars 300 and in subsequently formed memory levels is preferably crystallized to form polycrystalline diodes. Preferably after all of the diodes have been formed a final crystallizing anneal is performed.

A monolithic three dimensional memory array formed above a substrate comprises at least a first memory level formed at a first height above the substrate and a second memory level formed at a second height different from the first height. Three, four, eight, or indeed any number of memory levels can be formed above the substrate in such a multilevel array.

The methods and structures of the present invention have been described in the context of a monolithic three dimensional memory array which includes vertically oriented diodes in one or more memory levels. In addition to those patents and applications previously incorporated, the methods of the present invention could advantageously be used in related monolithic three dimensional memory arrays, such as those described in Petti et al., U.S. Pat. No. 6,946,719, “Semiconductor Device Including Junction Diode Contacting Contact-Antifuse Unit Comprising Silicide”; in Petti, U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/955,387, “Fuse Memory Cell Comprising a Diode, the Diode Serving as the Fuse Element,” filed Sep. 29, 2004; and in Hemer et al., U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/954,510, “Memory Cell Comprising a Semiconductor Junction Diode Crystallized Adjacent to a Silicide,” filed Sep. 29, 2004.

In embodiments of the memory arrays described in Herner et al., U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/125,939, “Rewriteable Memory Cell Comprising a Diode and a Resistance-Switching Material,” filed May 9, 2005 and hereinafter the '939 application; and in Herner et al., U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11,287,452, “Reversible Resistivity-Switching Metal Oxide or Nitride Layer With Added Metal,” filed Nov. 23, 2005, hereinafter the '452 application, both hereby incorporated by reference, a vertically oriented p-i-n diode (or, in some embodiments, a vertically oriented p-n diode) is paired with a reversible state-change element comprising a resistivity-switching material to form a memory cell. In preferred embodiments the reversible state-change element is formed electrically in series with the diode, vertically disposed between the diode and a top conductor or between the diode and a bottom conductor.

The reversible resistivity-switching material is a resistivity-switching metal oxide or nitride compound, the compound including exactly one metal; for example the resistivity-switching metal oxide or nitride compound may be selected from the group consisting of NiO, Nb2O5, TiO2, HfO2, Al2O3, CoO, MgOx, CrO2, VO, BN, and AlN. In some embodiments the layer of resistivity-switching metal oxide or nitride compound includes an added metal. The layer may include an added metal, as described in the '452 application. These memory cells are rewriteable. The reduced reverse leakage current of a p-i-n diode formed according to the present invention may prove particularly advantageous in writing and erasing memory cells in arrays like those of the '939 and '452 applications.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art, however, that the methods and structures of the present invention may be advantageously employed in any device in which a deposited semiconductor layerstack having a sharp transition in dopant profile above a heavily doped n-type layer is required, particularly if it is preferred that layers deposited on the heavily doped n-type layer have little or no germanium, as when a material having a wider band gap is preferred. The utility of the present invention is in no way limited to vertically oriented diodes, to memory cells, or to monolithic three dimensional memory arrays or structures.

Detailed methods of fabrication have been described herein, but any other methods that form the same structures can be used while the results fall within the scope of the invention.

The foregoing detailed description has described only a few of the many forms that this invention can take. For this reason, this detailed description is intended by way of illustration, and not by way of limitation. It is only the following claims, including all equivalents, which are intended to define the scope of this invention.

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US8772878Jan 31, 2012Jul 8, 2014Globalfoundries Inc.Performance enhancement in PMOS and NMOS transistors on the basis of silicon/carbon material
US20090309140 *Jun 11, 2009Dec 17, 2009Texas Instruments IncorporatedIN-SITU CARBON DOPED e-SiGeCB STACK FOR MOS TRANSISTOR
US20100025771 *May 28, 2009Feb 4, 2010Jan HoentschelPerformance enhancement in pmos and nmos transistors on the basis of silicon/carbon material
US20130121061 *Jan 4, 2013May 16, 2013Sandisk 3D LlcNonvolatile memory cell comprising a diode and a resistance-switching material
Classifications
U.S. Classification257/616, 257/E29.084
International ClassificationH01L29/161
Cooperative ClassificationH01L45/08, H01L29/161, H01L27/24, H01L27/1021, H01L29/165
European ClassificationH01L27/102D, H01L29/165, H01L29/161
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