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Publication numberUS20090054171 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/573,441
PCT numberPCT/KR2005/002589
Publication dateFeb 26, 2009
Filing dateAug 10, 2005
Priority dateAug 26, 2004
Also published asCN101005882A, WO2006022486A1
Publication number11573441, 573441, PCT/2005/2589, PCT/KR/2005/002589, PCT/KR/2005/02589, PCT/KR/5/002589, PCT/KR/5/02589, PCT/KR2005/002589, PCT/KR2005/02589, PCT/KR2005002589, PCT/KR200502589, PCT/KR5/002589, PCT/KR5/02589, PCT/KR5002589, PCT/KR502589, US 2009/0054171 A1, US 2009/054171 A1, US 20090054171 A1, US 20090054171A1, US 2009054171 A1, US 2009054171A1, US-A1-20090054171, US-A1-2009054171, US2009/0054171A1, US2009/054171A1, US20090054171 A1, US20090054171A1, US2009054171 A1, US2009054171A1
InventorsHang-bok Lee
Original AssigneeLee Hang-Bok
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf-bat for centrifugal golf swing
US 20090054171 A1
Abstract
A golf swing practice bat is provided. The bat includes a barrel (10), a stop (20), and a grip portion (30). The barrel (10) is disposed on one end of a stick-shaped body of a predetermined length (a), and has an equal diameter from the end down which narrows in diameter toward its base and a trajectory indicator (11). The stop (20) has a predetermined width to rest an outer edge of a left hand on. The grip portion (30) is disposed between the barrel (10) and the stop (20). When practicing golf swings using the bat, a user benefits from the proper grip positioning structure of the bat, can execute a forceful swing without excessive gripping force for less stiffness in the arms, and can visually check swing trajectory using the trajectory indicator (11) to achieve a powerful, centrifugal, textbook swing.
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Claims(6)
1. A centrifugal golf swing practice bat for practicing a golf grip and a swing position, comprising:
a barrel disposed on one end of a stick-shaped body of a predetermined length, the barrel having an equal diameter from an end thereof downward and narrowing in diameter toward a base thereof;
a stop of an asymmetrical shape at an opposite end of the body having a predetermined width for resting an outer edge of a left hand on; and
a grip portion disposed between the barrel and the stop for a user to grasp with both hands.
2. The bat of claim 1, further comprising a trajectory indicator carved flat on a predetermined upper front surface of the barrel for visually indicating a trajectory of the bat during different stages of a swing.
3. The bat of claim 1, wherein the stop includes:
a left-hand edge rest formed on an upper portion thereof for resting an edge of a left hand thereon;
a left-hand palm rest formed on a left portion of the stop for resting an outer edge of a left palm in an upwardly diagonal direction thereagainst; and
a left-hand finger rest formed from a lower portion to a right side of the stop for resting an lateral edge of a left hand little finger horizontally therealong.
4. The bat of claim 1, wherein the stop includes:
a left-hand palm rest formed on a left portion of the stop for resting an outer edge of a left palm in an upwardly diagonal direction thereagainst; and
a left-hand finger rest formed from a lower portion to a right side of the stop for resting an outer lateral edge of a left hand little finger horizontally therealong.
5. The bat of claim 1, wherein the grip portion has a smaller diameter than the stop, the diameter gradually decreasing from a base of the grip portion and increasing again as the grip portion connects to the barrel.
6. The bat of claim 1 or 5, further comprising:
a left-hand grip line carved flat on a cylindrical surface of the grip portion and in a direction parallel to a longitudinal direction of the bat, the left-hand grip line beginning at a frontal central portion of a juncture of the stop and the grip portion, wherein the left-hand grip portion gradually spirals to a right when progressing towards the barrel, maintaining flatness and a parallel disposition to the longitudinal direction of the bat;
a right-hand grip edge formed a slight distance above an upper end of the left-hand grip line and carved flat for guiding a right-hand grip and positioning a proximal phalanx of a right hand index finger thereabove; and
a right-hand thumb positioner formed at a left upper area of the grip portion directly across from the right-hand grip edge with respect to a central upper line on the grip portion running in the longitudinal direction of the bat.
Description
TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to a bat for practicing a centrifugal golf swing, and more particularly, to a centrifugal golf swing practice bat that helps acquire an understanding of the proper grasping of a grip and tempers an ideal grasping power of the grip for a swing as well as an understanding of a complete trajectory of an ideal swing, in order to acquire a swing comparable to a professional's.

BACKGROUND ART

Having recently grown popular among many people, golf is a sport that provides a unique enjoyment and exercise benefits, and involves striking a stationary ball with a driver, iron, putter, or other club towards a hole cup that is a certain distance away.

In order to enjoy golf and elevate the level of one's game, it is necessary to have a proper grip that forms the basis for an accurate swing and to learn to use one's entire body and acquire a sense of balance for an adequately powerful and centrifugal stroke. To accomplish this, one must read theory and instruction manuals, and invest countless hours of practice. This applies to beginners as well as those of an intermediate level who wish to maintain a learned golfing stance and stroke or improve thereupon.

A golf grip consists of joining the left and right hands together to overlap, interlock, form a baseball grip, etc., depending on the preference of a player. An ideal swing involves both hands moving as one, with a precise grip and grip pressure unwavering throughout the swing, and transferring the force from a pivotal movement of a body to a fast, swinging motion of a club head. When a user does not grip a club properly, it detracts from the golfer's concentration during a swing, and leads the golfer to try to execute the swing with the hands and arms. This is a problem common among amateurs, which often remains uncorrected during a lifetime. A golfer should, in reality, not even think about the grip during a swing. Points that require concentration are pivoting the torso quickly and executing a balanced stroke. The shoulders and arms should not be stiff, rotation of the torso should be smooth and supple, and the hands at the ends of the arms should function as firm anchors to secure the club during the swing. A point to note here is that concentration should not dwell on the grip, which is only possible with a complete understanding of the function of each gripping portion of the hands.

A golf swing consists of a back swing, a transition, a downswing, a follow-through, and a finish. The swing is an action that involves an integrated and dynamic rotation of the lower and upper torsos from a balanced stance, so that an axis at the center of the torso can be perceived, the axis being the centripetal locus of the torso. When a swing is executed with the centripetal locus in mind, the trajectory of the club head at the tip of the swing path moves in a circular arc with an even trajectory, and thereby forms an ideal swing.

In order for the body to grow accustomed to this type of swing or for a beginner to improve to an intermediate level, devices for practicing gripping and swinging are used. Professional golfers regard practice devices as indispensable tools for fostering muscle memory and muscular development.

Conventional gripping practice devices include devices for guiding proper hand placement only, or in some cases, devices that foster completely improper hand placement while claiming to be practice devices for learning a proper grip. These devices, which focus on only an outwardly proper placement of the hands or a grip feel, fail to consider the most intricate and difficult aspect of attaining a proper grip, which is that without an understanding of the function of each gripping part of the hands, the learning of a proper grip can be adversely affected. Similarly, conventional grip practice devices lead to a vague sense of hand positioning that inhibits the understanding of the function of each gripping part of the hands.

Along with the importance of understanding the function of each gripping part of the hands, the most important aspect of a good grip is that gripping pressure of the two hands should remain adequate and unchanging throughout a swing. Conventional grip practice devices do not foster learning of an adequate and unchanging gripping pressure by two hands throughout a swing. Therefore, many golfers need a practice device for mastering a grip with an unwavering gripping force. Such a device has actually been proposed, but the results have been unsatisfactory. One such device in question uses a sensor on the grip to emit a sonic alert if the grip pressure should change during a swing. However, this device only outlines the outer form of the grip, and fails to provide an understanding of each grasping portion and the relationship between the torso and the arms during a swing, and can therefore be discounted as a valid practice device for improving a swing.

Other conventional practice devices that are weighted focus on muscular development for power or practicing a specific swing trajectory. However, such devices require a firmer gripping force, and condition a user to exert varying gripping force during a swing, leading to swing execution that relies heavily on the hands and arms so that a centrifugal swing is eluded. This is like torching a house to catch a bedbug.

Also, conventional swing practice devices do not easily allow the checking of a swing trajectory during the stages of the swing, thereby leading to constant doubt regarding the swing plane. Even if there are devices for changing one's swing trajectory, these are reliant upon practice using partial strokes, versus normal full-speed swings, so that when a real swing is executed, it seldom resembles the practiced strokes. In addition, many amateurs fail to realize that a faulty back swing leads to many other problems.

Finally, conventional swing practice devices lack an accompanying manual that is detailed, so that the effects of use are unclear. Specifically, because most practice devices lack user manuals, there is little feedback pertaining to the method of use initially envisioned by the developer and the results of that use. Such devices are therefore explored by a handful of users and abandoned before they can become widespread. The latter is a very important point because golf practice devices should always come with a manual explaining its use, the theoretical results that can be derived from using the device, and a detailed explanation. Many users have ignored this necessity for a long time. A manual should be based on sound golf theory, which directly relates to the applicability and value of the enclosed practice device.

DISCLOSURE Technical Problem

An object of the present invention is to provide a practice bat for a golf swing that allows a user to practice a secure gripping position that aids in understanding the function of each gripping portion with respect to a two-handed swing.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a practice bat for a golf swing that familiarizes a user with the skill of grasping a grip with both hands using an adequate and unchanging force.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a practice bat for a golf swing that allows a user to check the trajectory of a swing in stages thereof.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide a practice bat for a golf swing that allows a user to understand a method of utilizing a centripetal locus of the body to grow naturally accustomed to a powerful, centrifugal swing using the locus as a rotational pivot.

Technical Solution

In order to achieve the objects of the present invention, a centrifugal golf swing practice bat for practicing a golf grip and a swing position includes: a barrel on one end of a stick-shaped body of a predetermined length, the barrel having a trajectory indicator and an equal diameter from the end down and narrowing in diameter toward a base thereof, a stop of an asymmetrical shape at an opposite end of the body having a predetermined width for resting an outer edge of a left hand on, and a grip portion disposed between the barrel and the stop for a user to grasp with both hands.

Advantageous Effects

The above-mentioned bat for practicing a golf grip and a swinging position includes a barrel, a stop, and a grip portion. The barrel is a predetermined length and is disposed on one end of a stick-shaped body, and has a trajectory indicator and an equal diameter from the end down and narrows in diameter toward its base. The stop, with an asymmetrical shape at an opposite end of the body, has a predetermined width to rest an outer edge of a left hand on. The grip portion is disposed between the barrel and the stop for a user to grasp with both hands. The golf bat of the present invention allows a user to visually check swing trajectory during the stages of a swing using the trajectory indicator to acquire an ideal swing trajectory. In a two-handed swing, the bat allows a user to understand the function of each part of the grasping hands by providing a secure gripping position that lets the user maintain an adequate and unwavering grip strength. A centripetal locus of the body can thus be perceived, so that a powerful, centrifugal swing can be naturally acquired to produce a better golf game.

DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a practice bat of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of a practice bat of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is detailed perspective view of the grip portion of a practice bat of the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the grip portion of a practice bat of the present invention while the bat is being used;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a practice bat according to another embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of a practice bat according to yet another embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a practice bat according to a further embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 8 is a detailed plan view of a grip portion of a bat according to an embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a method of gripping the practice bat; and

FIG. 9 is a perspective view illustrating a method of using a practice bat according to an embodiment of the present invention.

BEST MODE FOR CARRYING OUT THE INVENTION

Hereinafter, preferred embodiments of the present invention will be described in detail with reference to accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a practice bat of the present invention. FIG. 2 is a plan view of a practice bat of the present invention. FIG. 3 is detailed perspective view of the grip portion of a practice bat of the present invention. FIG. 4 is a plan view of the grip portion of a practice bat of the present invention while the bat is being used. FIG. 5 is a plan view of a practice bat according to another embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 6 is a plan view of a practice bat according to yet another embodiment of the present invention, where the trajectory indicator and the overall length of the bat is enlarged; and FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a practice bat according to a further embodiment of the present invention, where the structure of the stop and the grip portion has been altered.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, a practice bat for a golf swing according to the present invention includes: a body (a) with a barrel 10 forming one end thereof, an asymmetrical and circular stop 20 formed at the opposite end of the body (a), and a grip portion 30 formed between the barrel 10 and the stop 20.

The barrel 10 has a larger diameter than the grip portion 30 or the stop 20, the diameter being uniform until it gradually tapers and narrows toward its bottom. A trajectory indicator 11 is formed on a surface of the barrel 10. The trajectory indicator 11, as with the carved surface forming the left-hand gripping edge 31 beginning at the juncture of the stop 20 and the grip portion 30, is aligned at the dead center in the frontal portion of the bat (A). A certain portion of the front of the barrel 10 is carved flat, as shown in the diagrams, so that a swing trajectory can be easily verified visually.

The stop 20 is formed juxtaposed to the grip portion 30, and has a larger diameter than the grip portion 30 to protrude a predetermined distance from the grip portion 30. The stop 20 is divided into three main parts according to function. First, a left-hand edge rest 21 for resting the edge of a left hand is formed on the upper portion of the stop 20. Second, a left-hand palm rest 22 is formed on the left of the stop 20 for guiding the lower portion of a left palm to press against it in a diagonal direction. Finally, a left hand finger rest 23 for parallelly pressing against the edge of a left hand little finger completes the formation of the stop 20. The stop 20 is thus formed by these three elements from its lower top portion to its right side.

The grip portion 30 is formed between the barrel 10 and the stop 20, and like a normal grip of a golf club, is straight. The straight grip portion 30 has a smaller diameter than the stop 20, which gradually narrows from the base to the top and widens again when the grip portion 30 ends and meets the barrel.

The grip portion 30, as shown in FIG. 3, includes a left-hand grip line 31 beginning at the front dead center of the bat (A) at the juncture of the stop 20 and the grip portion 30 and being carved flat into the arcuate surface of the grip portion 30, the flat left-hand grip line 31 gradually twisting to the right as it rises along the grip portion 30 towards the barrel 10. A right-hand grip edge 32 is formed slightly above the upper end of the left-hand grip line 31 (that is, if the left-hand grip line 31 were extended towards the barrel 10, the right-hand grip edge 32 would be along the extension) to be flat and run parallel to the length of the bat (A). With respect to a central longitudinal line of the grip portion 30, a right-hand thumb positioner 33 is formed opposite to the right-hand grip edge 32, and at the upper left portion of the grip.

Also, referring to FIG. 7, the structure of the stop 20 and the grip portion 30 may be partially altered. Specifically, the left-hand edge rest 21 is not formed on the stop 20, but is formed as an extension of the grip portion 30. In this case, most of the centrifugal force during a swing is concentrated on the left-hand finger rest 23, so that the lack of a left-hand edge rest 21 does not result in slippage of the hands or fingers.

As shown in the structure of the above practice bat for a centrifugal golf swing that includes a barrel 10, stop 20, and grip portion 30, the components can be formed in a single piece or can be made capable of disassembly down to a barrel 10, stop 20, grip portion 30, and further pieces. The structure can be made of wood or composite material, and be metallic or non-metallic, etc.

The following explains how the above bat can be used for practicing gripping and swinging a golf club.

First, the fleshy edge of the left hand is positioned over the flat surface at the start of the left hand grip line 31 at the juncture of the stop 20 and the grip portion 30, and the last three fingers are wrapped around to grasp the grip portion 30, so that the edge of the left hand rests against the left-hand edge rest 21 formed at the top of the stop 20. Simultaneously, the bottom portion of the left palm is positioned to rest against the left-hand palm rest 22, and the outer lateral edge of the left hand's little finger is positioned to rest against the left-hand finger rest 23 that spirals upward towards the right from the top of the stop 20. When the left hand grasps the grip portion 30 as described, the outer edge of the left hand fits over the stop 20 like a puzzle, to provide a secure grip.

Here, the left-hand edge rest 21, as described in the embodiments of the present invention, is not a necessary structural component, and can be optionally formed and on the bat. That is, despite the fact that the left-hand edge rest 21 provides a natural rest for the edge of the left hand when present, it is not necessary because most of the centrifugal force during a swing is imparted on the left-hand finger rest 23. A bat without a left-hand edge rest 21 is shown in FIG. 7.

The line along the inside of the left palm extending from the outer edge of the hand to the thumb is pressed along the left-hand grip line 31. Next, the index and middle fingers of the right hand wrap around the grip portion 30, and the base portion of the right hand wraps around the left hand, so that the proximal phalanx of the right index finger presses against the right-hand grip edge 32. For proper hand positioning, the right side of the right thumb should be positioned to rest over the right-hand thumb positioner 33 located opposite to the right-hand grip edge 32.

When the bat (A) is gripped in this manner, with the outer lateral edge of the left hand fitting like a puzzle over the stop 20, the grip of only the left hand over the grip portion 30 is secure enough to prevent the bat (A) from coming loose during a swing, so that the gripping of a club with unnecessary tenacity (which is a bad habit of many golfers) can be corrected.

Moreover, by respectively positioning the left and right hands on the left-hand grip line 31 and the right-hand grip edge 32 and the right-hand thumb positioner 33, not only are the two hands overtly joined, but the inner portions of both hands used to form a release line can be easily perceived. That is, the bat allows a user to perceive the gripping functions of each hand, to facilitate the completion of a proper grip.

Although the weight balance of the bat (A) barrel 10 feels the same as a golf club, the actual weight of the bat (A) is heavier than a golf club, to aid in muscular development. Despite its heavier weight than a golf club, the stop 20 allows a user to yield the bat (A) less forcefully. When a suitable gripping pressure is combined with appropriate joining of the two hands, then the grip is finally complete, and a proper setup for a stance without stiffness in the arms and shoulders can be achieved. In addition, a user can experience the proper rhythm and tempo for a swing because (s)he does not have to grasp the bat tightly while swinging. After this process is repeated, the user will be able to concentrate on centering the body (maintaining a centripetal locus) and transfer of body weight while executing a stroke. Specifically, concentrating on grip execution diverts one's attention from maintaining a centripetal locus to use as a rotational axis for a centrifugal swing.

Bodily rotation around a centripetal locus or the relationship between extending one's arms and rotating around the centripetal locus can be better sensed, and the rotational force inherent from that relationship transferred through two hands to the bat (A) is centrifugal force. Accordingly, using the inventive bat provides a scientific and systematic way of learning a centrifugal golf swing that is taught in textbooks.

One of the most difficult skills for amateurs to acquire is the transition from the top of the back swing. A quick method of learning this skill is to understand the function of the two hands, and transferring body weight and bodily rotation while maintaining the same grip pressure through the transition. The practice bat for a centrifugal swing of the present invention addresses this problem.

The trajectory indicator 11 at the upper front portion of the barrel 10 helps to provide an understanding the trajectory of a back swing by stages and a proper top of a back swing, and creating a top of a back swing using the release line formed by two hands positioned in a proper grip. Similarly, the related top of the back swing is called a slot position.

The practice bat for a centrifugal swing of the present invention allows practicing the downswing using maximum power in the swing at anytime, in any location, so that strength training using a proper grip and stance set up with a balanced bodily rotation can be achieved. The bat can thus be effectively utilized, not only by amateurs, but also by professional golfers.

Referring to FIGS. 8 and 9, the practice bat for a golf swing according to the present invention can be used for practicing a swing using only the right hand. That is, when practicing with only the right hand grasping the bat (as shown in FIG. 8), the left-hand finger rest 23 acts as a rest for the fingers of the right hand. Here, the outer edge of the right hand rests against the flat top surface of the stop 20, so that the position of the right hand is the same as when both hands grasp the bat.

The above practice bat for a centrifugal golf swing of the present invention can be made in various sizes and weights. For instance, a body (a) length of 76 cm with a total weight of 800 g is suitable for an average adult male, a length of 68 cm with a weight of 650 g is suitable for an average adult female, and a length of 60 cm with a weight of 500 g is suitable for juniors. Because it is important that the diameter of the grip portion 30 must match a user's finger length and palm size, the diameter should correspond to those of actual golf clubs. This is important for amateurs who may not know what size grip to use. If they practice with a bat (A) using a grip size corresponding to actual clubs, they will know what clubs will fit their hand sizes.

While the present invention has been described and illustrated herein with reference to the preferred embodiments thereof, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications and variations (including a variety of different forms for the barrel 10, stop 20, and the grip portion 30) can be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. Thus, it is intended that the present invention covers the modifications and variations of this invention that come within the scope of the appended claims and their equivalents.

Also, although the above descriptions relating to the left and right hands apply to right-handed users, the present invention is not limited to such usage. For left-handed applications, the descriptions may simply be switched.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7832857Aug 18, 2008Nov 16, 2010Levinson Dennis JMicrobial cellulose contact lens
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/203, 473/257
International ClassificationA63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2071/0627, A63B69/3623, A63B2071/0625, A63B59/00, A63B15/00, A63B2071/0694
European ClassificationA63B15/00, A63B69/36D, A63B59/00