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Publication numberUS20090075784 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/206,563
Publication dateMar 19, 2009
Filing dateSep 8, 2008
Priority dateSep 13, 2007
Also published asUS20100204018
Publication number12206563, 206563, US 2009/0075784 A1, US 2009/075784 A1, US 20090075784 A1, US 20090075784A1, US 2009075784 A1, US 2009075784A1, US-A1-20090075784, US-A1-2009075784, US2009/0075784A1, US2009/075784A1, US20090075784 A1, US20090075784A1, US2009075784 A1, US2009075784A1
InventorsDaniel Hunter Hoggan
Original AssigneeDaniel Hunter Hoggan
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Treadmill Cross Training Conversion
US 20090075784 A1
Abstract
This device comprises two upward extending arms and mounting brackets which attach to the handrails of any treadmill and afford the user an opportunity to exercise the upper body in an action similar to cross country skiing.
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Claims(20)
1. A cross training device comprising two upward extending arms with mounting brackets that attach to the handrails of a treadmill whereby a user may experience upper body exercise similar to cross country skiing while using the treadmill.
2. A cross training device of claim 1 wherein said mounting brackets have universal means to attach to existing treadmills or to new treadmills being manufactured.
3. A cross training device of claim 1 wherein the arms and brackets for both handrails are the same, one being merely reversed in position to the other.
4. A cross training device of claim 1 wherein said brackets are mounted to said handrails with bolts, some of which fit within slots in said brackets, whereby the location of the bolts may be adjusted horizontally to fit different sizes and shapes of handrails.
5. A cross training device of claim 4 wherein said bolts are long enough to enable vertical adjustment of the attachment to accommodate different sizes and shapes of handrails.
6. A cross training device of claim 1 wherein said brackets are mounted to said handrails with straps and ratchet type buckles, whereby the attachment mechanisms may be adjusted to fit different sizes and shapes of handrails.
7. A cross training device of claim 1 wherein said brackets are mounted to said handrails with screw-type clamps, whereby the attachment mechanisms may be adjusted to fit different sizes and shapes of handrails.
8. A cross training device of claim 1 wherein said brackets are mounted to said handrails with spring-type clamps, whereby the attachment mechanisms may be adjusted to fit different sizes and shapes of handrails.
9. A cross training device of claim 1 wherein the two mounting brackets are attached to each other to form a strut, whereby providing considerable lateral stability of the brackets.
10. A cross training device of claim 9 wherein said strut formed between two brackets may have bends, whereby greater clearance is provided for movement of a user's knees and legs.
11. A cross training device of claim 1 wherein the two mounting brackets are not attached to each other, whereby each bracket is attached to a handrail independently.
12. A cross training device of claim 1 wherein a horizontal handle is attached to the upper end of each arm.
13. A cross training device of claim 12 wherein said horizontal handle comprises a bolt within a sleeve, said bolt engaged in a threaded hole in said arm.
14. A cross training device of claim 1 wherein said brackets are mounted on the outside of the handrails and said arms have compound bends, whereby the upper ends of said arms are positioned between the handrails of said treadmill in a more natural and comfortable position for the user.
15. A cross training device of claim 1 wherein said brackets are mounted on the side of the handrails toward the center of the treadmill, whereby straight arms, i.e., with no bends, have their upper ends in a natural and comfortable position for a user.
16. A cross training device of claim 1 wherein each arm is bolted to a mounting bracket with a locking nut and two pairs of specially designed flat washers, each washer having a wearing surface on one side and a nub on the other side.
17. A cross training device of claim 16 wherein all of said washers are of the same design, whereby the same washer will fit in all locations.
18. A cross training device of claim 16 wherein said nubs are of predetermined size to fit within recesses of predetermined size in adjoining parts, whereby constraining slippage and wear except at said washer's wearing surfaces.
19. A cross training device of claim 16 wherein said wearing surface is textured or roughened and may have a light lubricant applied, whereby frictional resistance qualities of the parts wearing against each other are enhanced.
20. A cross training device of claim 12 wherein said washers are made of metal or tough, durable plastic, whereby said washers will wear slowly and move smoothly as frictional resistance is increased through compression caused by tightening of the locking nut.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of provisional patent application No. 60/971,919, filed Sep. 13, 2007 by the present inventor.

STATEMENT OF FEDERALLY SPONSORED DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND

1. Field of Invention

This invention relates to sports and exercise equipment, specifically to treadmills.

2. Prior Art

Treadmills used for workouts and fitness are generally equipped with side handrails or horizontal bars which the users can hold on to for support if desired. Recently some treadmills have been marketed that are also equipped with moveable arms which simulate ski poles. These arms permanently attached to the frame of the treadmill afford the user a cross training type of exercise in which the arms are used in an action similar to cross country skiing at the same time that the user is walking or running on the treadmill. Thus, both the upper body and the lower body are exercised.

A number of patents have been granted for upper body exercise devices that supplement lower body exercise equipment. All of these that were found in the prior art are designed to attach to a specific design or model of equipment. This fact differentiates them in a significant way from the device disclosed in this patent application, which has means to attach universally to most models and designs of treadmills. An aerobic and anaerobic treadmill exercise system disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,527,245 to Dalebout, et al (1996) consists of independently moveable arms, an arm lift apparatus, and an overhead pull type apparatus used in conjunction with a treadmill. U.S. Pat. No. 5,803,874 to Wilkenson (1998) has poles mounted to opposite sides of the foot contact surface of a leg exercising unit or to a self contained unit that would fit under various types of leg exercise units. Handrails on treadmills would interfere with the operation of this device. Another device for exercising the upper body simultaneously with the lower body is disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 2004/0204294 A2 to Wilkenson, et al (2004). This device consists of a dual cable system permanently attached to the back end of a treadmill. A cross training device for a pedal and ellipse generator exercise system is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 7,022,049 B2. This device is designed specifically for permanent attachment to this exercise system.

Many treadmills on the market today do not come with a cross training feature. And many treadmills that have been sold in the past of which there are a very large number do not have a cross training feature. It is likely that people who have acquired a traditional treadmill without a cross training feature would benefit from having such a capability added. This invention is a cross training conversion device which attaches to the handrails of most treadmills and provides this capability.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This invention consists of two upward extending arms and mounting brackets which fasten to the two handrails of a treadmill. Each bracket is attached to a handrail near its upper end toward the front of the treadmill. The bracket secures the arm to the handrail and serves as a pivot point about which the arm can be rotated. The upper ends of the arms may be equipped with handle grips that the user can take hold of to push and pull the arms in a motion similar to that used in cross country skiing. Each bracket has means for adjusting the frictional resistance of the arm to rotation thus requiring different levels of exertion and exercise by the user

There are a number of ways that the mounting brackets can be attached to the handrails with universal application including: different bolting arrangements, strap and ratchet type buckles, spring loaded clamps, and screw tightening clamps. The brackets for two handrails may be mounted with an interconnecting strut to provide greater stability or they may be mounted alone without any interconnection.

A rotatable horizontal handle with a grip may be attached at a 90 degree angle to the upper end of each arm. This handle consists of a bolt within a moveable sleeve. The advantage of this embodiment is that it may provide additional comfort for the user. The sleeve will rotate as the arm is moved back and forth thus preventing minor strain on the user's hand and wrist that might otherwise result from holding on to the vertical arm as it is moved backward and forward in an arc.

The main purpose of this device is to provide an attachment that will fit all types and brands of treadmills that do not have a cross training feature and to give them that capability. Of course, new treadmills manufactured in the future could be equipped with cross training arms and brackets that attach to their handrails. Mounting holes or keyways in the handrails of future treadmills for attaching cross training devices could be provided so that this feature could be offered as an optional accessory. In any case, the mounting of cross training capability to handrails of treadmills whether manufactured in the past or in the future is novel with this invention. And all such applications are intended to be covered by this patent.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a side view of a typical treadmill with a cross training conversion device installed.

FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view of the arms and attaching brackets installed on the inside of the handrails, i.e., on the side toward the centerline of the treadmill. This view shows the brackets for the two handrails fastened together with a bolted connection. The connecting members essentially form a strut between the brackets, and the strut has bends to provide additional room for a user's knees and legs when in motion. This is the preferred embodiment.

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view of another embodiment showing one of the arms with its attaching bracket mounted on the outside of the handrail, i.e., on the other side from that indicated in FIG. 2. The arm is shown with compound bends to position the grip of the arm toward the center of the treadmill for ease of use. The arm and attaching bracket for the other handrail (not shown) is exactly the same, merely oriented in an opposite position.

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view of another embodiment in which the mounting bracket is attached with a strap and ratchet type buckle. This figure also shows the top of the arm equipped with a horizontal rotatable handle.

FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view of another embodiment in which the mounting bracket is attached to the handrail with a screw-type clamp.

FIG. 6 is a cross sectional view of another embodiment in which mounting bracket is attached with a spring-type clamp.

FIG. 7 is a cross sectional view of another embodiment in which the mounting bracket is bolted directly to the handrail.

FIG. 8 is a blown-up view of the connection of the arm of the device to the mounting bracket with a bolt, nut, and specially designed resistance washers.

THE REFERENCE NUMBERS ARE ASSIGNED AS FOLLOWS

    • 9 Arm of cross training device
    • 10 Mounting bracket for arm on each handrail
    • 11 Bolt that fits in slotted holes in brackets
    • 12 Handrail of treadmill
    • 13 Bolt in round holes that fastens the bracket to the handrail
    • 14 Bolt in slotted holes that fastens the bracket to the handrail
    • 15 Flange
    • 16 Arm with compound bends
    • 17 Bolted connection between arm and bracket
    • 18 Mounting bracket with strap and buckle
    • 19 Ratchet-type strap
    • 20 Ratchet-type tensioning buckle
    • 21 Horizontal handle with grip on sleeve at top of arm
    • 22 Arm with horizontal handle
    • 23 Threaded rod
    • 24 Swivel head on threaded rod
    • 25 Nut
    • 26 Lower flange on bracket
    • 27 Leaf spring
    • 28 Bracket with spring attachment
    • 29 Bolt or bolts
    • 30 Resistance-type washer
    • 31 Resistance-type washer
    • 32 Resistance-type washer
    • 33 Resistance-type washer
    • 34 Locking nut
    • 35 Nub on washer 30
    • 36 Recess in bracket 10
    • 37 Nub on washer 31
    • 38 Recess in arm 9
    • 39 Nub on washer 32
    • 40 Recess in nut 34
    • 41 Nub on washer 33
    • 42 Recess in arm 9
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

This device comprises two arms that are attached, one to each of the two handrails of an exercise treadmill to give the treadmill the cross training capability of simulating exercise of the upper body in cross country skiing. FIG. 1 shows a side view of a typical treadmill with the cross training device attached to the handrails. FIG. 2 shows a cross section of the handrails with the arms attached. The arms and mounting brackets for both handrails are the same, merely reversed in position, so the description which follows refers to only the one on the right. The arm 9 and the mounting bracket 10 are shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. In FIG. 2 the bracket 10 is connected to the other bracket with a bolt 11 forming a strut between the two brackets. This bolt fits within slots in each of the brackets thereby enabling adjustment of the distance between brackets to fit treadmills with different distances between handrails. An alternative design (not shown) of this connection between the two brackets comprises a separate coupling member, which is a flat bar with a long slot. When bolted in place it functions as an adjustable splice between the extended members of the two brackets which are cut short so as not to touch each other within the range of adjustment. Either arrangement in which the two brackets are connected provides considerable lateral stability.

The bracket 10 is bolted to handrail 12 with two bolts 13 and 14. Bolt 13 fits into a round hole in bracket 10 and a similar hole in flange 15. Bolt 14 fits within a slot in bracket 10 and fits within a similar slot in flange 15. These slots enable horizontal adjustment of the attachment to fit different widths or diameters of handrails. Bolts of different lengths are used to adjust vertically for different thicknesses or diameters of handrails. A piece of cloth or soft rubber (not shown) can be placed between the flanges of the bracket and the handrail to protect the handrail when the attachment is bolted tight.

In FIG. 1 arm 9 is shown with a bend. A straight arm without a bend will function satisfactorily as well. In FIG. 2 the arms are shown to be straight from a lateral perspective, which works well when the arms are attached to the inside of the handrails. However, in FIG. 3 showing another embodiment in which the arm 16 is mounted on the outside of the handrail, compound bends are used to position the upper end of the arm toward the center of the treadmill. This is a more natural and comfortable position for a user.

FIGS. 1-3 relate to the embodiment of the invention described above in which the brackets mounted to the two handrails of the treadmill are connected to each other in the form of a strut. There are other embodiments of the invention in which the arm and bracket are attached independently to each of the handrails. One such embodiment (not shown) is exactly like the embodiment shown in FIG. 2 except that the bracket 10 would have no connection with the bracket on the other handrail. In essence the vertical leg of the bracket would be cut off a short distance below the bolted connection 17. There are numerous ways that this cross training device can be attached to the handrails of a treadmill. Another embodiment that would fit all sizes and shapes of handrails is shown in FIG. 4. The bracket 18 is fastened to the handrail with a strap 19 and ratchet type buckle 20. The strap 19 passes through slots in the top of the bracket and around the handrail. The slots are long enough to accommodate different sizes of handrail cross sections. The strap can be cinched up tight so as to hold the bracket and arm securely in place. Bracket 18 shown here mounted independently, could also be modified (modification not shown) to have a strut connecting to the bracket on the other handrail.

FIG. 4 shows an embodiment of the invention which has a horizontal handle 21 installed at the top of the arm 22. This handle consists of a bolt within a sleeve. The bolt holding the sleeve is attached to a threaded hole in the arm. The sleeve, which may have a soft grip for comfort, is free to rotate on the bolt. The advantage of this embodiment is that as the end of the arm swings back and forth in an arc a user's hand gripping the sleeve will cause the sleeve to rotate thus eliminating any stress that might otherwise be transferred from the vertical arm of the device to the hand and wrist of the user.

Another means for attaching the bracket to a wide range of different handrails comprises a screw-type clamp as shown in FIG. 5. This constitutes another embodiment of the device. A threaded rod 23 with a swivel head 24 similar to the end on a standard U-bolt and a nut 25 is used to apply a compressive force between the lower flange 26 and bottom of the handrail. For installation, the nut 25 is threaded onto the rod 23 and seated on top of flange 26 with the swivel head 24 in position at the base of the handrail. The rod fits within a slot in the lower flange that enables it to be repositioned horizontally to fit different sizes of handrails. When in position, the nut can be turned to exert a compressive force between flange and the bottom of the handrail thus holding the bracket securely in place.

Yet another means for attaching the bracket to a wide range of different handrails comprises a spring-type clamp as shown in FIG. 6, another embodiment of the device. A leaf spring 27 attached to the upper part of the bracket 28 can be forced open to fit different diameters or sizes of handrails. Two different sizes of handrails are depicted in this figure demonstrating how the spring will open up to accommodate different sizes. A small diameter handrail is shown with a solid line and one with a larger diameter is shown with a dashed line.

A major purpose of this device is to provide cross training capability to treadmills already manufactured or treadmills produced in the future that do not have this capability. Another application of this invention is on treadmills that could have cross training attachments permanently mounted to the handrails in the manufacturing process. There are numerous ways that could be accomplished. One of the ways, another embodiment of the device, shown in FIG. 7 is to bolt the mounting bracket directly to the handrail with one or more bolts 29. In this case, holes could be provided in the handrails during the manufacturing process. The cross training device could either be installed at that time or left to be installed later as an optional accessory. The mounting of a cross training device to handrails whether on existing treadmills or in the manufacturing process of new ones is novel and is intended to be covered by this patent application.

In FIG. 2 the arm 9 is shown attached to bracket 10 with a bolt, nut, and specially designed resistance-type washers. This assembly is typical for attachments in all embodiments, and a blown-up detail is shown in FIG. 8. The bolt 17 used to connect the arm to the bracket is similar to a typical carriage bolt which has a short length of square cross section next to the round head. This square part fits into a hole of exactly the same shape in the bracket so that the bolt is restrained from rotating. There are two special washers or wearing plates 30 and 31 between the arm 9 and the bracket 10 and two similar washers 32 and 33 between the arm 9 and the locking nut 34. Each of these washers has a flat wearing surface on one side where the washers come in contact with each other. This surface may be textured or roughened to provide added frictional resistance under a compressive force, and a light lubricant may be applied. The washers may be made of metal or tough, durable plastic that provides smooth frictional resistance as the compression is increased, and will wear slowly with repeated sliding of their surfaces back and forth against each other.

Each washer has on its reverse side a nub which fits into a recess in the part next to it. Nub 35 fits into recess 36 in bracket 10, and the nub 37 fits into recess 38 in arm 9. Nub 39 fits into recess 40 in nut 34 and nub 41 fits into recess 42 in arm 9. When the nut 34 is tightened, the nubs held within the recesses constrain the washers from slipping except at their flat wearing surfaces. The nubs and recesses are merely an example of ways these parts can be keyed together to prevent movement relative to each other. All four washers are of exactly the same design, so the same part fits in all four locations. And, they can be easily removed and replaced after extended wear. In lieu of the specially designed washers described above, frictional resistance pads glued or otherwise attached to both sides of the arm 9 at the location of the washers comprise another embodiment of the device. The purpose of these designs is to provide a mechanism for adjusting the force required to move the arms back and forth as if in cross country skiing. By tightening the nut 34 to various positions, the resistance to movement is changed as is the level of exertion and exercise required by the user of the treadmill.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7951048 *Mar 22, 2010May 31, 2011Hupa International, Inc.Abdominal swiveling exercise machine combined with an elliptical trainer exercise machine, or skate simulation trainer, or exercise bicycle or recumbent bicycle
Classifications
U.S. Classification482/54
International ClassificationA63B22/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63B21/1492, A63B22/0012, A63B21/015, A63B22/02, A63B2022/0041, A63B22/0056, A63B2244/19
European ClassificationA63B22/00P6, A63B21/14M6, A63B22/00A6S