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Publication numberUS20090101646 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/243,328
Publication dateApr 23, 2009
Filing dateOct 1, 2008
Priority dateOct 23, 2007
Also published asCA2640168A1
Publication number12243328, 243328, US 2009/0101646 A1, US 2009/101646 A1, US 20090101646 A1, US 20090101646A1, US 2009101646 A1, US 2009101646A1, US-A1-20090101646, US-A1-2009101646, US2009/0101646A1, US2009/101646A1, US20090101646 A1, US20090101646A1, US2009101646 A1, US2009101646A1
InventorsJonathan P. Paul, Edmund L. Farmer
Original AssigneeWhitewave Services, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Storage and Dispensing System
US 20090101646 A1
Abstract
According to one embodiment, a liquid storage and dispensing system includes a closure configured with a spout that is releasably coupled to a body. The body has a base integrally formed with a front region, a back region, and two side regions that form a cavity for storage of a substance. For placement of a product label, the front region is relatively flatter than the two side regions and the back region, and the front region slopes inwardly from the base such that the front region faces upwardly when the base is placed on a horizontal surface. Each of the two side regions includes an indentation proximate the opening and aligned with a longitudinal axis passing through the center of body. The indentations form a handle for grasping the body while dispensing the substance. The front region and the indentations form a volume in the upper portion of the body that is less than the lower portion of the body.
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Claims(21)
1. A storage and dispensing system comprising:
a body comprising:
a cavity for storage of a substance; and
an opening for placement and dispensing of the substance in the cavity; and
a closure removably coupled to the opening, the closure comprising:
a closure base;
a spout having an inner perimeter defining an aperture in the closure base, the spout attached to and extending above the closure base;
a cap coupled to the closure base and selectively movable from a closed position over the spout to an open position away from the spout such that the substance may be dispensed from the container;
a protuberance coupled to the cap and having an outer perimeter operable to resiliently engage the inner perimeter of the spout when in the closed position; and
a drip-catching member coupled to the cap inside of the protuberance, the drip-catching member operable to resist leakage of residual product from protuberance when in the open position.
2. The storage and dispensing system of claim 1, wherein the spout comprises an oblong opening with a narrow portion through which the substance is dispensed.
3. The storage and dispensing system of claim 2, wherein the spout comprises a rear opening region opposite the narrow portion that flares outwardly from the closure base.
4. The storage and dispensing system of claim 2, wherein the narrow portion flares outwardly from the closure base.
5. The storage and dispensing system of claim 3, wherein the protuberance is formed of a resilient material that is conformed to the shape of the inner perimeter of the spout when in the closed position.
6. The storage and dispensing system of claim 1, wherein the closure comprises at least one tab that is operable to engage a corresponding at least one tab stop configured on the body.
7. The storage and dispensing system of claim 5, wherein the body comprises at least one anti back-off element that is operable to resist a backward rotation of the closure relative to the body when the closure is coupled to the body.
8. The storage and dispensing system of claim 1, wherein the body has a longitudinal axis passing through the center of the body, the spout being aligned with the longitudinal axis at the center of the closure.
9. The storage and dispensing system of claim 2, wherein the closure base comprises a crab-claw seal integrally formed with the closure base and operable to resiliently press against the opening of the body when the closure is coupled to the body.
10. A storage and dispensing system comprising:
a closure having a spout for dispensing a substance; and
a body having a base, a front region, a back region, two side regions, and a cavity for storage of the substance, the body has an opening that is selectively closed by the closure, the front region being relatively flatter than the two side regions and the back region for placement of a product label, the front region sloping inwardly from the base, each of the two side regions comprising an indentation proximate the opening, the indentations forming a handle for grasping the body while dispensing the substance;
wherein the front region and the indentations form an upwardly converging conical shape such that the substance has a center-of-gravity less than half an overall height of the storage and dispensing system.
11. The storage and dispensing system of claim 10, wherein the substance comprises a liquid food product.
12. The storage and dispensing system of claim 10, wherein the center-of-gravity is less than 34.1 percent of an overall height of the storage and dispensing system.
13. The storage and dispensing system of claim 10, wherein the back region and two side regions include at least one horizontally extending side rib, the front region being free of the at least one horizontally extending side rib.
14. The storage and dispensing system of claim 10, wherein the closure comprises a side wall having a peripheral shape and size that is essentially similar to a peripheral shape and size as an upper edge of the body, the side wall of the closure disposed proximate the upper edge of the body when the closure is coupled to the body.
15. The storage and dispensing system of claim 10, wherein the volumetric capacity of the body in the range of 16 to 32 ounces.
16. A storage and dispensing system comprising:
a generally round body having a longitudinal axis passing through the center of the body, a cavity for storage of a substance, and an opening for placement and dispensing of the substance from the cavity, the body comprising:
a pair of indentations formed opposite one another on a side portion of the body, the indentations forming a handle for grasping the body while dispensing the substance; and
a closure removably coupled to the opening, the closure comprising:
a spout attached to and extending above the closure base, the spout being oblong in shape with a narrow portion through which the substance is dispensed; and
a cap coupled to the closure base and selectively movable from a closed position over the spout to an open position away from the spout such that the substance may be dispensed from the container; and
wherein the closure comprises at least one tab that is operable to engage a corresponding at least one tab stop configured on the body such that the narrow portion of the spout extends outwardly from the longitudinal axis in a direction generally parallel to the pair of indentations when the at least one tab engages the at least one tab stop.
17. The storage and dispensing system of claim 16, wherein the indentations are aligned with the longitudinal axis of the body.
18. The storage and dispensing system of claim 16, wherein the closure comprises a closure base having a crab-claw seal integrally formed with the closure base and operable to resiliently press against the opening of the body when the closure is coupled to the body.
19. The storage and dispensing system of claim 16, wherein the at least one tab stop comprises at least one anti back-off element that is operable to resist a backward rotation of the closure relative to the body when the closure is coupled to the body.
20. The storage and dispensing system of claim 16, wherein the at least one tab comprises a pair of tabs and the at least one tab stops comprise a pair of tab stops, the pair of tab stops being integrally formed on the closure opposite one another about the longitudinal axis.
21. The storage and dispensing system of claim 16, wherein the volumetric capacity of the body is approximately 16 to 32 ounces.
Description
RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/982,052, entitled “CONTAINER,” which was filed on Oct. 23, 2007.

TECHNICAL FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE

This disclosure generally relates to containers, and more particularly, to a storage and dispensing system having a shape and structure for enhanced dispensing of substances, such as food products.

BACKGROUND OF THE DISCLOSURE

Liquid food products and solid food products distributed to consumers are generally stored and transported in containers. These containers are typically made of a thermoplastic material and may be fabricated by injection molding or other manufacturing techniques. These containers may be integrally formed in a one-piece, thin-walled container having various capacities ranging from a few ounces to several gallons, or more.

SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE

According to one embodiment, a liquid storage and dispensing system includes a closure configured with a spout that is releasably coupled to a body. The body has a base integrally formed with a front region, a back region, and two side regions that form a cavity for storage of a food product. For placement of a product label, the front region is relatively flatter than the two side regions and the back region, and the front region slopes inwardly from the base such that the front region faces upwardly when the base is placed on a horizontal surface. Each of the two side regions includes an indentation proximate the opening and aligned with a longitudinal axis passing through the center of body. The indentations form a handle for grasping the body while dispensing the food product. The front region and the indentations form a volume in the upper portion of the body that is less than the lower portion of the body.

Some embodiments of the disclosure may provide numerous technical advantages. For example, one embodiment of the food product storage and dispensing system may provide enhanced display when configured in known display racks that display containers in a declining angle. This example storage and dispensing system incorporates a front region with an upward facing surface that exhibits enhanced visibility when placed on one of these display racks. As another example, the upwardly facing front region along with indentations formed on the two side regions also form a volumetric capacity for the upper portion of cavity that is relatively less than its lower portion for enhanced stability.

Another advantage that may be provided is enhanced ergonomic directionality that may serve to reduce spillage caused by improper dispensing of food product with the spout in an incorrect orientation. The front region in conjunction with indentations provide touch points that encourage grasping of the storage and dispensing system in a consistent manner. The storage and dispensing system includes an alignment mechanism that aligns the indentations configured on the body with the spout such that the spout is oriented properly when dispensing food product from the storage and dispensing system.

Some embodiments may benefit from some, none, or all of these advantages. Other technical advantages may be readily ascertained by one of ordinary skill in the art.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

A more complete understanding of embodiments of the disclosure will be apparent from the detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of one embodiment of a food product storage and dispensing system according to the teachings of the present disclosure;

FIG. 2A is a front elevational view of the body of FIG. 1;

FIG. 2B is a side elevational view of the body of FIG. 1;

FIG. 2C is a rear elevational view of the body of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of several food product dispensing systems of FIG. 1 that are disposed on a declining display rack;

FIG. 4A is a perspective view of one embodiment of a closure that may be configured on the body of FIGS. 2A through 2C;

FIG. 4B is a top view of the closure of FIG. 4A;

FIG. 4C is a bottom view of the closure of FIG. 4A; and

FIG. 4D is a partial, elevational view of the closure of FIG. 2A in which the cap is in a relaxed orientation relative to the closure when in the open position.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EXAMPLE EMBODIMENTS

Although an example embodiment of the present disclosure is illustrated and described, the present disclosure may be implemented using any quantity and type of structural variations, whether currently known or in existence. The present disclosure, therefore, should in no way be limited to the example embodiment with its associated drawings illustrated below and described herein. Additionally, the drawings may not be necessarily drawn to scale.

FIG. 1 shows one embodiment of a storage and dispensing system 10 according to the teachings of the present disclosure. Storage and dispensing system 10 includes a body 12 that is removably coupled to a closure 14. Body 12 has a cavity for storage of a substance that may include a liquid substance, such as water, or a solid substance, such as flour. Although the particular embodiment shown is directed to storage and dispensing of a food product, the teachings of the present disclosure may be directed to storage and dispensing of any generally amorphous substance that may be, for example, medicine, juice, or a hygiene product, such as mouthwash.

As will be described in detail below, storage and dispensing system 10 may provide a system for storing and dispensing of a substance having benefits not recognized by other food product storage systems. Storage and dispensing system 10 includes several features that function together in a synergistic fashion to provide a system for storing and dispensing of a substance for reducing spillage and/or leakage of the substance and may be relatively ergonomic to use.

These synergistic effects may enhance consumer acceptance of storage and dispensing system 10, and thus, the marketability of its food product in some embodiments. For example, body 12 has several features that provide an upwardly converging conical shape, such that when filled with a food product, has a relatively low center-of-gravity for enhanced stability. In some embodiments, the relatively low center-of-gravity may provide relatively good stability while displayed on rack designs that display containers at a declining angle. Other examples of enhanced utility provided by storage and dispensing system 10 are described below.

FIGS. 2A through 2C show front, side, and back elevational views of the body 12 of FIG. 1. Body 12 has a base 16, a front region 18, two side regions 20, a back region 22, and an upper edge 24. Body 12 also has an opening 26 for insertion and removal of food product to and from the cavity, respectively. Although opening 26 is configured with threads 30 for removable coupling to closure 14, other embodiments may incorporate other removable coupling mechanisms, such as a structure suitable for providing a snap-on or a press-on fit of closure 14 to body 12.

In one embodiment, body 12 has an overall shape such that the food product stored in body has a center-of-gravity 34 that is maintained generally along a longitudinal axis 36. Indentations 38 provided on side regions 20 provide touch points for body 12 and may form a portion of the generally upwardly converging conical shape of body 12. In another embodiment, indentations 38 are aligned along longitudinal axis 36 such that the supporting fingers of a user may be aligned with longitudinal axis 36 when body 12 is lifted.

Several ribs 42 may be provided for enhancing structural rigidity of body 12. Ribs 42 generally include elongated recessed portions that are integrally formed with body 12 during manufacture. Ribs 42 extend horizontally over at least a portion of its outer periphery and are generally spaced apart equally from one another. Ribs 42 may increase the hoop strength of body 12 for reduced buckling under vertical and/or side load compression forces in some embodiments.

Front region 18 may extend over any portion or over the entirety of the front side of body 12. In the particular embodiment shown, front region 18 extends vertically from an elevational point 40 proximate the lower portion of body 12 to its upper edge 24. Front region 18 may also be free of ribs 42 that extend horizontally around side regions 20 and back region 22. Front region 18 has a relatively flatter contour than side regions 20 and back region 22 for placement of a product label. In one embodiment, the product label may be formed on front region 18 using a cylindrically shaped shrink-wrap material that is placed over body 12 and heated to conform to the shape of body 12. As best shown in FIG. 2B, front region 18 slopes inwardly from the base such that the front region faces upwardly at an angle θi when the base is placed on a horizontal surface. Certain embodiments of front region 18 and its configuration on body 12 may provide an advantage in that, because front region 18 extends to upper edge 24, it may also provide vertical support for other items, such as additional storage and dispensing systems 10 placed on top of closure 14 during display and/or transport.

FIG. 3 shows several storage and dispensing systems 10 that are disposed in a display rack 46. Display rack 46 as shown includes a support platform 48 and one or more rails 50. As an example, display rack 46 may be formed from a plurality of wires that are bent to form support platform 48 and rails 50. Display rack 46, however, may be any suitable structure for display and support of storage and dispensing systems 10, such as those typically found at grocery stores that sell food products. Support platform 48 supports storage and dispensing systems 10 while rails 50 ensure that storage and dispensing systems 10 remain on support platform 48. Support platform 48 is oriented at a declining angle θd such that storage and dispensing systems 10 slide to the front of support platform 48 when one before it is removed. In many cases, the declining angle θd of most display racks is generally in the range of 5 to 20 degrees and most commonly around 15 degrees from horizontal. This declining angle θd, however, may make product labels on known food dispensing systems difficult to read. When disposed in display rack 46 having a declining angle θd of 15 degrees, the inward sloping angle θi of front region 18 decreases the viewing angle θv to approximately 5.59 degrees. Thus, in one embodiment, an inward sloping angle θi of front region 18 may be selected according to the declining angle θd of any display rack that is adapted to support and display storage and dispensing system 10. Thus, the inward sloping angle θi of front region 18 may provide enhanced visualization while disposed in display rack 46.

The inward sloping characteristic of front region 18 in conjunction with indentations 38 may provide a volumetric capacity for the upper portion of cavity that is relatively less than its lower portion for enhanced stability. That is, indentations 38 may reduce the volumetric capacity in the upper portion of body 12 such that the center-of-gravity 34 of a fully filled storage and display system 10 is in the lower portion of body 12. In one embodiment, the center-of-gravity 34 of storage and display system 10 may be selected according to the declining angle θd of most common display racks 46 to ensure stability while disposed on a display rack 46. In another embodiment, the center-of-gravity 34 may be selected for increased stability in a manufacturing line that produces storage and display systems 10. A manufacturing process used to fill storage and display systems 10 with the food product may include various manufacturing devices, such as conveyor belts or rollers, that move bodies 12 from one location to another. A relatively low center-of-gravity 34 may provide increased stability during movement over the various manufacturing mechanisms. In a particular embodiment in which storage and dispensing system 10 is configured to store 32 ounces of product, the overall height of the body 12 coupled with the closure 14 may be approximately 9.75 inches while having a center-of-gravity 34 at approximately 3.327 inches above base 16, which is 34.1 percent of its overall height. A center-of-gravity 34 that is approximately 34.1 percent of its overall height may provide the benefits described above.

Front region 18, two side regions 20, and back region 22 below point 40 (FIG. 2B) generally refers to a lower portion of body 12 that may be generally cylindrical in shape. The generally cylindrical shape may provide enhanced stability of storage and dispensing system 10 while disposed on display rack 46 and/or during a manufacturing process in which numerous bodies 12 are bundled together on a manufacturing mechanism, such as a conveyor line that manipulates bodies 12 during a product filling process. The generally cylindrical shape may also provide storage for an enhanced mass of product that may in turn, provide a relatively low center-of-gravity 34.

Body 12 may be formed of any suitable material. In one embodiment, body 12 is formed of a thermoplastic material, such as a high density polyethylene (HDPE) plastic material, which is generally “food safe”, for storage of human consumable liquids. However, body 12 may formed from any suitable plastic material appropriate for the type of substance it is adapted to contain. Body 12 may be manufactured using conventional blow molding techniques that are well known to those skilled in the art, or other suitable technique. The body 12 as disclosed is configured to store approximately 16 fluid ounces of product; it will be understood however, that a container having other capacities could be constructed using the teachings of this disclosure.

FIGS. 4A through 4D show various views of one embodiment of a closure 14 that may be used with the body 12 of FIGS. 2A through 2C. Closure 14 generally includes a closure base 54 having a spout 56 that is hingedly coupled to a cap 58 having a inwardly directed protuberance 60 and a drip-catching member 74. Closure 14 is removably coupled to body 12 using any suitable removable coupling mechanism as described above. As best shown in the present embodiment of FIG. 4D, closure 14 is removably coupled to body 12 using screw-type threads 62 that engage complementary threads 30 configured on body 12. Closure base 54, spout 56, cap 58, and protuberance 60 may be integrally formed from one piece of thermoplastic material, such as high density polyethylene (HDPE) using an injection molding process. In another embodiment, closure base 54 and spout 56 may be fabricated independently of cap 58 and protuberance 60 such that cap 58 may be removed from closure base 54 without a pivoting action. Closure base 54 may also include a crab-claw seal 64 for sealing the cavity against the closure 14 when coupled to body 12. Crab-claw seal 64 generally includes an annular ring that is integrally formed with closure base 54 and sufficiently resilient to deform slightly when pressed against the top of opening 26.

Cap 58 is selectively movable from a closed position over spout 56 to an open position away from the spout 56. When in the closed position, the food product stored in body 12 is isolated from the environment. When in the open position, spout 56 is exposed for dispensing of the food product from cavity. In one embodiment, cap 58 is hingedly attached to closure base 54. In this manner, the cap 58 may be pivoted from the closed position as shown in FIG. 1 to the open position as shown in FIGS. 4A through 4D.

Again referring to FIG. 4D, the upper surface of cap 58 is generally flat in shape. This generally flat shape may provide a surface for placement of a label or other suitable indicia describing the contents of the storage and dispensing system 10. Labeling on the upper surface of cap 58 may incorporate embossed or debossed indicia formed on cap 58 during manufacture.

Closure base 54 is generally cylindrical in shape having a lower end 66 that is disposed proximate upper edge 24 when coupled to body 12. This arrangement may operate in conjunction with the generally flat front region 18 to maintain its shape under a vertical top-load compression force. That is, closure base 54 and upper edge 24 along with front region 18 are configured to transfer downward directed forces placed on closure 14, such as the weight of other storage and dispensing systems 10 to base 16 in a structurally stable manner.

Closure 14 has a pair of tabs 68 that engage a corresponding pair of tab stops 70 (FIG. 2B) when closure 14 is screwed onto body 12. When tabs 68 engage tab stops 70, the orientation of spout 56 is maintained in a consistent direction relative to the orientation of indentations 38 configured on body 12. In one embodiment, an anti back-off element 72 is provided proximate each tab stop 70 for resisting a backward rotation of closure 14 relative to body 12 when closure 14 is coupled to body 12. Each anti back-off element 72 includes a sloped surface and a vertically oriented surface for engagement of tab 68. The sloped surface of anti back-off element 72 allows relatively free movement of tab 68 when closure 14 is rotated in a clockwise direction relative to body 12. Anti back-off element 72 is disposed a predetermined distance from tab stop 70 such that at least a portion of tab 68 abuts the vertically oriented surface of anti back-off element 72 when tab 68 is engaged with tab stop 70.

The arrangement of tab 68 and the vertically oriented surface of anti back-off element 72 may be selected to provide a desired level of angular force necessary to rotate closure 14 in a counter-clockwise direction. Thus, tabs 68, tab stops 70, and anti back-off elements 72 function to ensure alignment of spout 56 with indentations 38 when closure 14 is coupled to body 12. In one embodiment, anti back-off elements 72 may also serve to maintain a specified level of compression force on crab-claw seal 64 while closure 14 is configured on body 12.

Spout 56 is integrally formed with and extends above closure base 54 when base 16 of body 12 is placed on a generally level surface. Spout 56 is generally oblong in shape having a front edge 76 and a rear edge 78. As best shown in FIG. 4B, front edge 76 is generally V-shaped for directing the flow of the food product when dispensed from body 12. Spout 56 is aligned with the longitudinal axis 36 of body 12 when closure 14 is threadably coupled thereto. In one embodiment, spout 56 has a height H (FIG. 4D) selected according to an anticipated pour angle of the food product from body 12. The pour angle generally refers to an angle in which body 12 is pivoted by a user to dispense the food product. An insufficient pour angle may result in leakage of the food product onto closure base 54, a condition that may decrease customer appeal of the food product. The anticipated pour angle of storage and display system 10 may be selected according to several factors including the fill height of the food product in cavity and the general viscosity of the food product. The height H of spout 56 above closure base 54 may be coordinated with the various factors affecting the pour angle to reduce leakage of the food product onto closure base 54 when dispensed.

Certain embodiments of spout 56 may provide synergistic benefits when incorporated with other features of storage and dispensing system 10. For example, alignment of spout 56 with indentations 38 and front region 18 of body 12 may provide enhanced control over the amount and/or rate of the food product that is dispensed. Alignment of spout 56 with front region 18 and indentations 38 may also provide an ergonomic directionality for improved dispensing of the food product. The shape of body 12 provided by indentations 38 and front region 18 provide an ergonomic design that encourages grasping of body 12 in a consistent manner. Alignment of the V-shaped spout 56 with indentations 38 and front region 18 may, therefore, ensure that V-shaped spout 56 is pointed in the correct direction during a dispensing action. The generally conical shape provided by the inward sloping front region 18 and indentations 38 may also serve to lower the center-of-gravity for further enhancing control over the amount and/or rate of the food product dispensed from the storage and dispensing system 10.

In one embodiment, the front edge 76 and/or the rear edge 78 of spout 56 is flared outwardly. The flared shape of front edge 76 may provide an advantage in that residual food product remaining on the front edge 76 may be reduced following a dispensing action of the food product. The upwardly extending spout 56 may serve to direct dispensed the food product at a distance from the closure base 54 for reducing residual build-up of the food product on closure base 54. The relatively abrupt contour of the front edge 76 may therefore limit drips that may occur due to inherent surface tension properties of water-based materials typical of known food products.

Protuberance 60 may be included to engage the inner perimeter of spout 56 when in the closed position. In one embodiment, protuberance 60 is generally resilient such that it deforms to the shape of spout 56 when engaged. As best shown in FIG. 4B, protuberance 60 is generally hollow having a continuous wall that is essentially the same shape as spout 56. The wall of protuberance 60 has a thickness such that it is generally resilient when integrally fabricated with the other elements of closure 14. In one embodiment, the outer perimeter of protuberance 60 resiliently engages the inner perimeter of spout 56 when cap 58 is moved to the closed position. In this arrangement, protuberance 60 may provide a wiping action for residual food product remaining on the inner perimeter of spout 56 following a dispensing action of food product from body 12. Particular embodiments incorporating a spout 56 with its front edge 76 and rear edge 78 flared outwardly provides a mating surface for engagement of protuberance 60 that in turn, provides a relatively smooth closing transition of cap 58 onto closure base 54.

Drip-catching member 74 as shown has a generally semi-annular shaped projection formed inside protuberance 60 for trapping residual product. In other embodiments, drip-catching member 74 may have any size or shape that is adapted to trap residual product inside protuberance 60 when cap 58 is moved from the closed position to the open position, or the open position to the closed position. In the particular embodiment shown (FIG. 4D), protuberance 60 is also configured with an additional drip-catching member 76 for trapping residual product. Additional drip-catching member 76 generally includes an inwardly directed, semi-annular ring extending over a portion of the upper edge of protuberance 60.

In many cases, product may be inadvertently deposited within protuberance 60. In a particular example, residual product may be deposited within protuberance 58 by a shaking motion when cap 58 is in the closed position. When opened, this residual product may be trapped within protuberance 60. Drip-catching member 74 and/or drip-catching member 76 may reduce leakage of residual product by trapping it inside protuberance 60. In certain embodiments, drip-catching member 74 or 76 may provide a contour and/or an additional amount surface area for utilizing the surface tension properties of product to enhance its attraction within protuberance 60. This increased attraction may serve to reduce leakage of product from protuberance 60 while cap 58 is in the open position.

A storage and dispensing system 10 has been described having several features that operate together to form benefits over other known food product dispensing systems. For example, leakage of food product may be reduced by generally V-shaped spout 56 having a flared front edge 76 and/or rear edge 78 that directs residual food product back into cavity following a dispensing action. Residual food product may be further reduced by protuberance 60 resiliently engages the inner perimeter of spout 56 when cap 58 is moved to the closed position. As another example, inwardly sloping front region 18 and indentations 38 form a generally upwardly converging conical shape for providing a relatively low center-of-gravity when filled with food product. The shape of front region 18 and indentations 38 may be selected such that the resulting center-of-gravity may provide suitable stability when storage and display system 10 is placed in a display rack 46 having a declining support surface. Additionally, the inclined characteristic of front region 18 may also provide enhanced visualization of its labeling when placed in the declining display rack 46.

Although the present invention has been described with several embodiments, a myriad of changes, variations, alterations, transformations, and modifications may be suggested to one skilled in the art, and it is intended that the present invention encompass such changes, variations, alterations, transformation, and modifications as they fall within the scope of the appended claims.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8267274 *Mar 27, 2008Sep 18, 2012Aptargroup, Inc.Closure having a drip minimizing lid
US8474646Jun 12, 2012Jul 2, 2013Aptargroup, Inc.Closure having a drip minimizing lid
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Classifications
U.S. Classification220/254.4, 220/837, 206/459.5, 220/212, 222/571, 220/288, 220/675
International ClassificationB65D1/14, B65D47/08, B65D25/40
Cooperative ClassificationB65D47/40, B65D47/0809, A47F1/12, A47F7/28, B65D2251/1041
European ClassificationB65D47/40, B65D47/08B1, A47F7/28, A47F1/12
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 5, 2012ASAssignment
Owner name: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT, NO
Effective date: 20121031
Free format text: NOTICE OF GRANT OF SECURITY INTEREST IN PATENTS;ASSIGNOR:WHITEWAVE SERVICES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:029244/0939
Oct 1, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: WHITEWAVE SERVICES, INC., DELAWARE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:PAUL, JONATHAN P.;FARMER, EDMUND L.;REEL/FRAME:021616/0490
Effective date: 20081001