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Publication numberUS20090104883 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/124,228
Publication dateApr 23, 2009
Filing dateMay 21, 2008
Priority dateMay 25, 2007
Also published asCA2632062A1, CA2632087A1, EP1998440A2, EP1998440A3, EP1998441A2, EP1998441A3, US20090004990
Publication number12124228, 124228, US 2009/0104883 A1, US 2009/104883 A1, US 20090104883 A1, US 20090104883A1, US 2009104883 A1, US 2009104883A1, US-A1-20090104883, US-A1-2009104883, US2009/0104883A1, US2009/104883A1, US20090104883 A1, US20090104883A1, US2009104883 A1, US2009104883A1
InventorsAlain Renard, Estelle Kirby
Original AssigneeThales
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic gain control locked on to the received power probability density
US 20090104883 A1
Abstract
The invention relates to a radio receiver, notably for applications of satellite positioning, that must operate in an environment in which the interference is dense, notably when it involves pulses transmitted by DME beacons. The effective processing of the interference assumes having an unbiased noise reference. According to the invention, the latter is generated by a signal power probability function analysis in its portion essentially comprising low-power signals.
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Claims(17)
1. A device for receiving a radio signal comprising a module for estimating a characteristic magnitude of said signal chosen from the group amplitude, power, an automatic gain control module of the receiver, a module for analyzing the probability density function of said characteristic magnitude whose parameters can be adjusted to supply inputs to the automatic gain control module which ensure a substantially optimal gain of the receiver, a module for filtering said estimated magnitude, wherein the probability density function analysis module supplies an innovation to the automatic gain control module computed based on signal samples split by a chosen comparison point in two segments whose lower segment is enriched in samples of characteristic magnitude lower than its value at the comparison point.
2. The reception device of claim 1, wherein said enrichment takes place by weighting with a heavy weight of the negative residues of a substraction of the samples for which said characteristic magnitude is greater at the chosen comparison point and with a light weight the positive residues of said substraction.
3. The reception device of claim 1, wherein the chosen comparison point is that which splits the signal samples in approximately 10% of lower probability and approximately 90% of higher probability.
4. The reception device of claim 3, wherein the probability of the AGC is adjusted to approximately 0.886.
5. The reception device of claim 1, wherein the chosen comparison point is that which splits the signal samples into approximately 25% of lower probability and approximately 75% of higher probability.
6. The reception device of claim 5, wherein the probability of the AGC is adjusted to approximately 0.9408.
7. The reception device of claim 2, wherein the probability density function analysis module produces successively several weightings with a heavy weight of the negative residues of substractions of series of samples for which the characteristic magnitude is higher at several chosen comparison points and generates an innovation of the AGC by a chosen combination of said weightings.
8. The reception device of claim 7, wherein three comparison points are chosen, one substantially at the estimated noise power, the second substantially at 90% of said power and the third substantially at 80% of said power.
9. The reception device of claim 1, further comprising an interfering signal processing module at the output of the probability density function analysis module.
10. The reception device of claim 9, wherein the interfering signal processing module carries out a blanking whose threshold is calculated by reference to the noise estimated by the probability density function analysis module.
11. The reception device of claim 3, wherein the blanking threshold is chosen at a value substantially equal to 8 dB.
12. The reception device of claim 5, wherein the blanking threshold is chosen at a value substantially equal to 2 dB.
13. The reception device of claim 9, wherein the interfering signal processing module carries out several blankings in frequency subbands of the signal, each blanking threshold being computed by reference to the noise estimated by the probability density function analysis module.
14. The reception device of claim 9, wherein the interfering signal processing module carries out an inversion of a characteristic magnitude of the chosen signal in the group amplitude, power based on the output of the estimation module.
15. A method for processing a radio signal comprising a step of estimating a characteristic magnitude of said chosen signal in the group amplitude, power, a step of controlling automatically the gain of the receiver, a step of analyzing the probability density function of said characteristic magnitude whose parameters can be adjusted to supply inputs to the automatic gain control step which ensure a substantially optimal gain of the receiver and a step of filtering said estimated magnitude, wherein the probability density function analysis step receives as an input signal samples shared by a chosen comparison point in two segments of which the lower segment is enriched with samples of characteristic magnitude lower than its value at the comparison point.
16. The reception device of claim 10, wherein the blanking threshold is chosen at a value substantially equal to 8 dB.
17. The reception device of claim 10, wherein the blanking threshold is chosen at a value substantially equal to 2 dB.
Description
RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present application is based on, and claims priority from, French Application Number 07 03735, filed May 25, 2007, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

FIELD OF INVENTION

The present invention applies to radio receivers that must receive weak signals in a pulsed interference environment. It is notably the case of positioning receivers that use the signals received from constellations of GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) satellites such as the GPS (Global Positioning System) systems and enhanced GPS, GLONASS (Global Orbiting Navigation Satellite System) and, in the near future, Galileo.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The received signal is typically situated a few tens of dB below the thermal noise of the receiver. The processing of the signal must make it possible to recover one or more carriers and one or more modulation codes of said carriers which comprise information characteristic of the satellite transmitting said carriers. The central portion of the digital processing is a correlation of the received signals with local replicas of said signals. These processes assume a minimum correlation input signal-to-noise ratio of approximately ten dBHz. This minimum is not reached in the presence of interference which saturates the receiver to the point of very substantially corrupting the payload signal. It is typically the case of signals allowing location relative to remarkable points on the ground of the DME (Distance Measuring Equipment) system. The beacons on the ground transmit signals in response to the interrogation signals transmitted by the aircraft. These ground beacons and the onboard interrogators transmit signals of high instantaneous power (of the order of approximately ten kilowatts) in the frequency bands used for the positioning signals (around 1200 MHz).

A known solution to this problem is notably the technique called “blanking” which consists in identifying the interfering signal and deleting subsequent processing of the received signal disturbed by the latter. This solution does not work when the density of interference increases to the point of virtually permanently covering the payload signal. In this case, blanking leads to eliminating any payload signal at the same time as the interfering signal. This type of scenario is likely to occur in a large portion of European air space, notably at an altitude of the order of 40 000 feet where the number of DME beacons seen by an aircraft may be of the order of 60 at times of maximum traffic density. It is possible, in order to enhance the effectiveness of the blanking, to cut the band into several subbands and to carry out the blanking on each of the subbands, which, for given interference, allows a larger part of the payload signal to subsist and therefore enhances the signal-to-noise ratio.

In both cases, it is necessary to have a noise reference that makes it possible to dispense with the thermal noise estimation bias which appears in dense interference scenarios. One solution consists in calibrating a noise reference, but this solution is stable neither in time nor in temperature nor with reference to the dynamic to which the receiver is subjected. The general problem that is not solved by this prior art is to supply an estimate of the thermal noise without having to use calibration. A solution such as that which is disclosed notably by U.S. Pat. No. 5,101,416 is to carry out a locking-on of the automatic gain control of the receiver as a function of the probability density of the signal amplitude. This solution however cannot be adapted to scrambling scenarios that may be variable. The present invention solves this problem.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Accordingly, the present invention proposes a device for receiving a radio signal comprising a module for estimating a characteristic magnitude of said signal chosen from the group amplitude, power, an automatic gain control module of the receiver, a module for analyzing the probability density function of said characteristic magnitude whose parameters can be adjusted to supply inputs to the automatic gain control module which ensure a substantially optimal gain of the receiver, a module for filtering said estimated magnitude, wherein the probability density function analysis module receives as input signal samples split by a chosen comparison point in two segments whose lower segment is enriched in samples of characteristic magnitude lower than its value at the comparison point.

Advantageously, said enrichment takes place by weighting with a heavy weight the negative residues of a substraction of the samples for which said characteristic magnitude is greater at the chosen comparison point and with a light weight the positive residues of said substraction.

Advantageously, the chosen comparison point is that which splits the signal samples into approximately 10% of lower probability and approximately 90% of higher probability.

Advantageously, the probability of the AGC is adjusted to approximately 0.886.

Advantageously, the chosen comparison point is that which splits the signal samples into approximately 25% of lower probability and approximately 75% of higher probability.

Advantageously, the probability of the AGC is adjusted to approximately 0.9408.

Advantageously, the probability density function analysis module produces successively several weightings with a heavy weight of the negative residues of substractions of series of samples for which the characteristic magnitude is higher at several chosen comparison points and generates an innovation of the AGC by a chosen combination of said weightings.

Advantageously, three comparison points are chosen, one substantially at the estimated noise power, the second substantially at 90% of said power and the third substantially at 80% of said power.

Advantageously, the interfering signal processing module carries out a blanking whose threshold is calculated by reference to the noise estimated by the probability density function analysis module.

Advantageously, the interfering signal processing module carries out several blankings in frequency sub-bands of the signal, each blanking threshold being calculated by reference to the noise estimated by the probability density function analysis module.

Advantageously, the blanking threshold is chosen at a value substantially equal to 8 dB.

Advantageously, the blanking threshold is chosen at a value substantially equal to 2 dB.

Advantageously, the interfering signal processing module carries out an inversion of a characteristic magnitude of the chosen signal in the group amplitude, power based on the output of the estimation module.

The invention also discloses a method for processing a radio signal comprising a step of estimating a characteristic magnitude of said chosen signal in the group amplitude, power, a step of controlling automatically the gain of the receiver, a step of analyzing the probability density function of said characteristic magnitude whose parameters can be adjusted to supply inputs to the automatic gain control step which ensure a substantially optimal gain of the receiver and a step of filtering said estimated magnitude, wherein the probability density function analysis step receives as input signal samples split by a chosen comparison point in two segments of which the lower segment is enriched with samples of characteristic magnitude lower than its value at the comparison point.

The invention also has the advantage of allowing a reduction of the dynamic of the signal processing operators because of the gain matching that results therefrom.

Still other objects and advantages of the present invention will become readily apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description, wherein the preferred embodiments of the invention are shown and described, simply by way of illustration of the best mode contemplated of carrying out the invention. As will be realized, the invention is capable of other and different embodiments, and its several details are capable of modifications in various obvious aspects, all without departing from the invention. Accordingly, the drawings and description thereof are to be regarded as illustrative in nature, and not as restrictive.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

The present invention is illustrated by way of example, and not by limitation, in the figures of the accompanying drawings, wherein elements having the same reference numeral designations represent like elements throughout and wherein:

FIG. 1 represents the amplitude as a function of time of the pulsed interference transmitted by a DME beacon;

FIG. 2 represents the histogram of the powers of the pulsed interference transmitters received by an aircraft at the most scrambled point of European airspace as a function of the frequency;

FIG. 3 represents the histogram of power as a function of the signal amplitude with and without interfering pulsed signal in the band E5b of the Galileo signal;

FIG. 4 represents an enlarged view of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 represents the histogram of FIG. 3 in total probability;

FIG. 6 represents an enlarged view of the left portion of the curve of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 represents a schematic diagram of the functional architecture of the portion of a positioning radio receiver using the invention;

FIG. 8 represents the functional architecture of the portion of a positioning radio receiver using the invention in an embodiment with a single comparison point;

FIG. 9 represents the functional architecture of the portion of a positioning radio receiver using the invention in an embodiment with several comparison points.

In the description and the figures, the symbols, acronyms, formulas and abbreviations have the meaning indicated in the table below.

Symbol Meaning
α, β, γ Parameters of the noise comparison functions in the
architecture with several comparison points
Δ Innovation introduced in the estimation of the noise in the
architecture with several comparison points
λ Carrier wavelength
σ Standard noise deviation at the output of the low-pass filter
ADC Analog Digital Converter
AGC Automatic gain control
Alphai AGC adjustment parameters
Blanking Deletion of the payload signal in the presence of
interference
CM Core Module
DME Distance Measuring Equipment
e Received signal
EUROCAE European Organization for Civil Aviation Equipment
f(a) Optimal nonlinear function of Gaussian noise
FDAF Frequency Domain Adaptive Filtering
FIR Finite Impulse Response filter
FPGA Field-Programmable Gate Array
GNSS Global Navigation Satellite System
GPS Global Positioning System
ISWi Input set point parameters of the high portion of the CM
JTIDS Joint Tactical Information Distribution System
LO Local Oscillator
LSB Least Significant Bit
MIDS Multifunctional Information Distribution System
Noise_diff Thermal noise coding difference
OSWi Outputs of the high portion of CM
P01, P02, P03, Noise power at the comparison points of the Gaussian
P(a) Gaussian form noise
Pw1, Pw2, Comparison points of the Gaussian
Pw3,
Pconsi Set point power
Pe Input signal power
Ps Output signal power
TACAN Tactical Air Navigation
UWB Ultra Wide Band
VGA Voltage Gain Amplifier

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED AND OTHER EMBODIMENTS

The GNSS systems currently use frequency bands that are very close to the frequencies allocated to the DME radio navigation beacons. The GPS and future GPS frequencies are by band: E6 (1260-1300 MHz), L2 (1216-1240 MHz) and L5/E5a (1164-1188 MHz). The Galileo frequencies are: E6, E5a and E5b (1188-1215 MHz). The DME transmission frequencies are 1025-1150 MHz for an onboard interrogator and the ground beacons transmit in the 962-1213 MHz band (therefore in the GALILEO E5a and E5b and GPS L5 bands). The total band is divided into 126 channels and transmission and reception of a beacon are offset by 63 MHz. The channels are therefore spaced 1 MHz apart. They are pulse pairs, each with a spectral width of 300 kHz that are transmitted by the onboard interrogator. The ground beacons respond to them with a fixed delay of 50 microseconds and the receiver of the onboard interrogator then searches for the pulse pairs in response that have the correct spacing between them. The signal power transmitted by the ground beacons is of the order of 15 kW.

These operating features, schematized in amplitude/time in FIG. 1 explain the very disruptive character of the DME system for satellite navigation, all the more so when the occupancy ratio of the interference may reach 100% in environments that are very dense in beacons such as Northern Europe at high altitude.

FIG. 2 shows the number and power of the DME beacons in the allocated frequency bands that are very close to L5/E5a at the point of maximum density in the Northern European airspace called the “hotspot”. The aircraft gain is, for illustration purposes, fixed at −10 dBi in this figure. The figure also represents: an example of thermal noise level at the input (#−125 dBW), the blanking threshold resulting from the biased estimation of the thermal noise (#−115 dBW) and the optimal blanking threshold (#−122 dBW). The difference of 7 dB is very significant with respect to the performance demanded of the receivers.

A GNSS signal is below the thermal noise. A minimal signal-to-noise ratio is essential for the processing of the signal, based mainly on correlations, where necessary aided, of the received elements and their local replies, to be effective. In particular, if the ADC is saturated by interference, the payload signal at the correlators will be extremely corrupted. This impossibility to achieve the payload signal is clearly illustrated in FIG. 5 which shows the power curves at the filtering output with and without DME interference. The time horizon is approximately 2 μs. Similar situations may occur in the presence of radars or ultra wide band (UWB) pulsed devices.

Currently, GNSS receivers use processes before correlation to process the pulsed interference, for example, the “blanking” method or the “FDAF” method.

Blanking is a simple process consisting in cutting the signal during the interference. The process cannot work when the interference is too dense because the payload signal is then completely lost. The FDAF method is an enhancement of this process. It consists in cutting up the reception band into subbands and in applying the blanking process to each subband.

However, these methods, although they make it possible to detect pulsed interference and eliminate it, assume that the power of the thermal noise is known precisely. For example, if a pulse has an amplitude greater than that of the noise, then it can be said with a low probability of false alarm that a pulse is present and it can be eliminated. This amounts to requiring an “ideal” AGC. In certain cases, it is possible to be mistaken on the knowledge of the power of the noise, without it bringing into question the effectiveness of the overall blanking or blanking by band. This is the case for scenarios in which the pulsed interference is very powerful and therefore easily detectable: the temporal methods work well because the pulses are detected and not taken into account in the estimate of the thermal noise. It is also the case in scenarios in which the pulsed interference is not very numerous and not very powerful: the estimate of the noise level is slightly biased but this does not prevent the working of the receiver, even though the latter is slightly degraded.

On the other hand, for scenarios in which the pulsed interference is numerous and not very powerful (difficult to detect), the estimate of the number of bits on which the noise is coded is greatly biased. The temporal methods are more effective (probability of non-detection very increased). Pulsed interference is detected relative to the estimate of the thermal noise. Since the estimate of the thermal noise is stronger than the thermal noise itself when not very powerful pulses appear and are not detected, the blanking threshold is therefore higher than it should be as illustrated in FIG. 2. Therefore pulsed interference enters into the computation of the AGC. The AGC reacts by reducing the gain of the VGA. Therefore, even more pulsed interference enters into the estimate of the thermal noise and so on. This continues to diverge until the receiver accepts the majority of the pulsed interference and no longer codes the payload signal.

This problem has been treated in prototypes. The idea has been to estimate the absolute thermal noise, to give an absolute blanking threshold and to see to it that the thermal noise does not change during the tests. In order to estimate the absolute thermal noise, the estimate of the gain of the HF chain is carried out by calibration in a laboratory and the estimate of the noise factor by measuring the noise of the chain with the antenna disconnected. This linking of two point-like measurements makes it possible to ascertain exactly the noise in the HF chain at a given moment and to carry out the blanking as a function of this noise estimate. Nevertheless, these devices are not operational because they are not robust in the event of the appearance of a continuous interference, ageing of the components or, notably, repeated thermal variations.

To solve this problem that is unresolved in the prior art, the idea of the invention is to enhance the estimate of the thermal noise and of the continuous interference in the presence of pulsed interference irrespective of its power and its rate of repetition. It is based on the principle that the low-amplitude filtered samples are not very sensitive to pulsed interference and that the characteristic of the thermal noise energy is virtually Gaussian, as shown in FIG. 4.

The aim of the AGC is to seek to detect the left portion of the histogram as represented in FIG. 4 and then extrapolate the command for the VGA. FIG. 5 represents the same data in total probability. In these figures, the choice has been made to represent the power probability function. The analysis of the received signal amplitude probability function could be used in a completely substitutable manner and would give equivalent results.

A close-up is carried out on the first portion of the curve (FIG. 6). The curves are similar but are not perfectly identical.

There are several ways of embodying the invention. The aim in the rest of the description is to describe two main ones thereof. A first mode consists in choosing a comparison point on the curve and in locking in the AGC by using a higher weighting of the samples of lesser amplitude than the chosen point.

A second mode consists in estimating the curve of power filtered by adjustment to a theoretical curve that is programmed over several points, for example three.

In common with both modes, the user seeks to lock in on the chosen comparison point or points by characterizing it or them by the ratio of the left portion and the right portion. One solution is to give more weight to an event of lesser value than those exceeding the chosen point by an appropriate nonlinear function; this makes it possible to considerably reduce the effect of the high values due to the pulses. In practice it is possible to reach this result by using one of the following functions or another which would be comparable:

    • all or nothing nonlinear function: if the event is less at the chosen point, then it assigns thereto a weight k greater than 1, in the contrary case, it remains unchanged; this will lead to a balance such that the relative proportion is the value k; the latter has been chosen to obtain a good value of the average in the presence of noise only;
    • dissymmetric saturated function: the function is similar to the one above but allows a linear operation in stable regime in the vicinity of the chosen point allowing a better stability of the AGC, which culminates in a good residual noise response time compromise.

The component due to the noise is then determined and it is possible to compare its average with the set point value.

The architecture elements common to these two embodiments are represented in FIG. 7. The device works advantageously in baseband. This makes it possible to have access to the instantaneous power of the pulses. The various functions represented in the figure are advantageously implemented in one and the same FPGA circuit. The first operator 10 is a conventional power estimation function of the I2+Q2 type, (alternatively root amplitude (I2+Q2) or |I|+|Q|). The receiver conventionally comprises an AGC module 20. The function 40 carries out the filtering of the estimate to obtain the average of the amplitude probability density. This filtering is carried out on an appropriate time horizon, for example 2.2 μs in E5b, which represents a sample of 128 points. The estimate is advantageously carried out on a standard deviation representing 10% of the average. Advantageously, the zeroes of the amplitude/power estimate (“zero” function) are not taken into account in the sliding average. Therefore, the outband pulses above the point of compression are neutralized. In a command module 30, one or more nonlinear functions are then applied to the outputs of the filter and they will generate an innovation based on optimality parameters that depend on the context of use. If the noise has a form P(a), the optimal nonlinear function is given by the formula


f(a)=(dP(a)/da)/P(a)

f(a) is a linear function when there are no pulses. In the presence of pulses, the linear function is retained in the left portion of the distribution which is, on the other hand, completely modified in its right portion. It is also possible to use a derivative of f(a).

The innovation is then introduced into the AGC. Finally, the noise processing parameters are determined. The device will of course be different depending on the chosen noise processing mode. Three processing modes will be described in the rest of the description. These modes form as many variants of the modes of locking in the AGC.

This device makes it possible to maintain the pursuit in code or in carrier of a GNSS receiver for air navigation on the E5a/E5b/L5 frequencies, notably in the European and American hot spots (pulsed interference). It operates in the presence of continuous interference. It is not sensitive to the change of temperature of the electronics. It also makes it possible to process pulsed interference of the radar type such as UWB. The FPGA implementation is low cost. In addition, the AGC is robust irrespective of the pulsed interference scenario.

The lock-on modes are first of all described in greater detail.

The mode with a single comparison point is more precisely described in FIG. 8. In the rest of the description, the chosen comparison point is that which shares the samples at 10% lower probability of amplitude and 90% higher probability. Another distribution is possible and the adjustment of the control circuit may be carried out to produce a fine matching to the profile of particular interference. This distribution is called “Alpha” in the digital examples commented on below.

Other parameters “Alpha1”, “Alpha2” and “Alpha3” must also be chosen to ensure a substantially optimal gain of the receiver which minimizes the bias affecting the blanking threshold.

“Alpha1” is the probability of the AGC which is calculated as indicated in the rest of the description. “Alpha2” is the weighting of saturation and “Alpha3” is the blanking threshold adjustment parameter.
It is desired to establish the control of the AGC by observing the “Alpha”% samples whose amplitude is lowest.

A command containing (1-“Alpha”) % is subtracted from the samples to center the histogram with “Alpha”% of the samples below 0 and (1-“Alpha”) % of the samples above 0. Then the residues are very greatly saturated. The negative residues are weighted with a weight (1-“Alpha2”), for example 0.9, and the positive residues with a weight “Alpha2”, in this case 0.1. The lock-in of the AGC loop therefore has an equilibrium point when this residue is 0.

“Alpha2” is associated with the filtering of the power before the calculation of the AGC command and has the form of the noise Gaussian. In this case, the filtering is carried out on 128 samples (˜2 μs) therefore the standard deviation of the thermal noise is diminished. When the adjustment is around a few percent, the Gaussian changes greatly, hence “Alpha 2” must be small.

This makes it possible to take account of the occurrences and not the amplitudes of the probability function for the major differences and retains a small linear range allowing the filtering of the residual noise of the power estimate.

The “Alpha3” blanking threshold set for example in these applications at a value lying between 0 and 16.

“Alpha 1” is calculated as follows:

I and Q are Gaussian variables corresponding to the samples of the baseband receiver


E[I]=E[Q]=0, E[I 2 ]=E[Q 2]=22*(Nb out+Noise diff)2

−I2 +Q 2 have an average of 22*(Nb out+Noise diff)+1 and a standard deviation of 22*(Nb out+Noise diff)+1

Because:

avg ( I 2 + Q 2 ) = E [ I 2 + Q 2 ] = E [ I 2 ] + E [ Q 2 ] = 2 * E [ I 2 ] = 2 2 * ( Nb_out + Noise_diff ) + 1 = 2 σ 2 var ( I 2 + Q 2 ) = E [ ( I 2 + Q 2 - 2 σ 2 ) 2 ] = E [ I 4 ] + E [ Q 4 ] + 4 σ 4 + 2 E [ I 2 Q 2 ] - 4 σ 2 E [ I 2 ] - 4 σ 2 E [ Q 2 ] = 3 σ 4 + 3 σ 4 + 4 σ 4 + 2 σ 4 - 4 σ 4 - 4 σ 4 = 4 σ 4

because E[x1x2x3x4]=E[x1x2]E[x3x4]+E[x1x3]E[x2x4]+E[x1x4]E[x2x3])

−I2+Q2 is averaged, in this example, over 128 samples, the average has not changed but the standard deviation becomes:

1 128 * 2 2 * ( Nb_out + Noise_diff ) + 1

Because:

avg ( N ( I 2 + Q 2 ) ) = E [ N ( I 2 + Q 2 ) ] = N E [ I 2 + Q 2 ] = N 2 2 * ( Nb_out + Noise_diff ) + 1 = 2 N σ 2 var ( N ( I 2 + Q 2 ) ) = E [ ( N ( I 2 + Q 2 ) - 2 N σ 2 ) 2 ] = E [ ( N ( ( I 2 + Q 2 ) - 2 σ 2 ) ) 2 ] = var ( N ( ( I 2 + Q 2 ) - 2 σ 2 ) ) = NE [ ( N ( ( I 2 + Q 2 ) - 2 σ 2 ) ) 2 ] = 4 N σ 4

the conventional tables associate with each random value its probability in the case of a centered Gaussian and standard deviation 1. To obtain a probability of 10% for example, the opposite of the value at 90% is taken (−1.29), it is multiplied by the standard deviation and the off-centering of the Gaussian is added. In this example it is therefore place:

- 1.29 1 128 * 2 2 * ( Nb_out + Noise_diff ) + 1 + 2 2 * ( Nb_out + Noise_diff ) + 1

( 1 - 1.29 128 ) 2 2 * ( Nb_out + Noise_diff ) + 1 = 0.8860

The adjustment examples appearing in the table below are given for purely illustration purposes:

Blanking
AGC AGC threshold
adjustment: probability Saturation adjustment
“alpha” “alpha 1” “alpha 2” “alpha 3” AGC type
 6% 0.863 0.06 16
10% 0.886 0.1 8 AGC chosen
for the
DME/TACAN
scenario
17% 0.916 0.1 4
25% 0.9408 0.1 2 AGC chosen
when the
pulse
scenarios are
not clear
33% 0.9346 0.1 1
50% 1 0.5 0 Conventional
AGC

The embodiment with several comparison points is specifically described in FIG. 9. This embodiment uses the characteristic of the power probability function that a sum of a noise and pulsed interference is close to the noise component for values of low amplitude. The choice is typically made to process three different comparison points, which is sufficient. In this option, the innovation combines the results of the three comparison points Pw1, Pw2, Pw3. It is possible to apply or not apply to each comparison point a nonlinear operator as in the case of the operation of a single comparison point.

As an example, it is possible to use as a nonlinear function, the function s=sign(e), where e is the signal received and s may take the values −1, 0 or 1. If σ is the standard deviation of the noise filtered by the low-pass, P0 is the power of the noise that is sought and α, β, γ are three positive parameters, giving the equation system below:

Pw 1 = ( 1 - γ σ ) Po Po 1 = F ( - γ ) Pw 2 = ( 1 - β σ ) Po Po 2 = F ( - β ) Pw 3 = ( 1 - α σ ) Po Po 3 = F ( - α ) where 0 α , β , γ Δ = 1 Po 1 P 1 + 1 Po 2 P 2 + 1 Po 3 P 3

Therefore, by choosing α=0, β=1, γ=2, this gives:


Pw1=0.8Po, Pw2=0.9Po, Pw3=Po


Δ=43.8P1+6.25P2−2P3

In the case of a pure Gaussian noise, Pe=Po; in the case of a Gaussian noise with a pulse, Pe=Po(1−ε). Neglecting ε, an acceptable compromise is made between the error and the residual noise, taking account of the portion of the probability density curve in which one is situated.

It is also possible to lock-in on a ratio criterion of probability relative to a set point. A combined solution between the two above—three comparison points with a convergence criterion on a probability ratio is equally possible. Stability in pursuit is thereby enhanced.

By using these different methods of applying the invention, biases of a few LSB may appear. Nevertheless, this bias is greatly acceptable because the bias is much less than that which appears with a conventional automatic gain control (6 to 7 dB).

Once the noise is known with a reduced bias, the interference is easily isolated. The simple blanking is then carried out by deleting the signal in the temporal range where the interference is present. Those skilled in the art know how to produce the device necessary to carry out this deletion.

To carry out a blanking by subband of the frequency domain, it is possible, for example, to provide a detection filter by subband. If the user has no theoretical knowledge of the characteristics of the interfering signals, he will use standard passband filters. If, on the other hand, the user knows the characteristics of the interfering signals (frequency and form of the pulses), he can use FIRs. Rejection filters then make it possible to chop the signal on the ranges where the interfering signals are present. A noise with reduced bias is estimated in each of the frequency subbands and this noise serves as a reference for deleting the signal received in each of the subbands.

A third mode of processing interference consists in inverting the amplitude or the power of the received signal, the high amplitude/power interference then being peak limited. Amplitude or power inversion consists in multiplying the input signal by the inverse of the estimate of filtered amplitude or power. If the inversion relates to the signal power, the output signal power is equal to the inverse of the input signal power, to within one constant. The receiver gain is given relative to a set point power by the formula:


G=P consi /P e

If the inversion relates to the signal amplitude, the output signal power is equal to the inverse of the square of the input signal power, to within one constant. The receiver gain is given relative to a set point power by the formula:


G=(P consi /P e)2

Power inversion is theoretically optimal. On the other hand, amplitude inversion is less sensitive to the imperfections of implementation. Power inversion may not however be a complete substitute for blanking: when the ADC is saturated by pulsed interference, it is necessary to carry out blanking in order to limit the parasitic frequencies which otherwise would enter into the correlation.

For this reason and to have a reference to fix Pconsi, it is necessary to have an unbiased noise reference. The set point at which the product of the source and inverted signals is locked on is made up of the noise estimate made by the device of the invention. It is possible to carry out an inversion by frequency subband. The latter process is particularly advantageous for BOC (Binary Offset Carrier) signals for which the user carries out the inversion on four frequency bands (two wide bands and two narrow bands).

Other modes of processing noise are possible at the output of the optimal command of the AGC which makes it possible to estimate the thermal noise with a reduced bias. The invention is therefore not limited to the embodiments disclosed in the present description. It will be readily seen by one of ordinary skill in the art that the present invention fulfils all of the objects set forth above. After reading the foregoing specification, one of ordinary skill in the art will be able to affect various changes, substitutions of equivalents and various aspects of the invention as broadly disclosed herein. It is therefore intended that the protection granted hereon be limited only by definition contained in the appended claims and equivalents thereof.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8135054 *May 24, 2008Mar 13, 2012ThalesProcessing of interference on a radiofrequency signal by power inversion
US8514990Dec 12, 2011Aug 20, 2013ThalesAutomatic gain control device for satellite positioning receivers
US8681042 *May 25, 2009Mar 25, 2014ThalesSystem and method for multi-correlation with modulation-adapted filter for the fast acquisition and the tracking of a radio navigation signal in the presence of jamming
US20110254732 *May 25, 2009Oct 20, 2011ThalesSystem and method for multi-correlation with modulation-adapted filter for the fast acquisition and the tracking of a radio navigation signal in the presence of jamming
CN101873152BJul 12, 2010Aug 14, 2013西安电子科技大学Doppler frequency shift estimation method based on optimal bandwidth filtering pretreatment
Classifications
U.S. Classification455/234.1
International ClassificationH04B1/06
Cooperative ClassificationH03G3/3052, H03G3/3078
European ClassificationH03G3/30E5, H03G3/30E
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 11, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: THALES, FRANCE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:RENARD, ALAIN;KIRBY, ESTELLE;REEL/FRAME:021513/0124
Effective date: 20080908