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Publication numberUS20090109294 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/258,327
Publication dateApr 30, 2009
Filing dateOct 24, 2008
Priority dateOct 26, 2007
Also published asEP2213089A1, EP2213089A4, EP2213089B1, EP2223531A1, EP2223531A4, US8189101, US8223262, US20090109324, US20090109329, WO2009055741A1, WO2009055743A1, WO2009055744A1
Publication number12258327, 258327, US 2009/0109294 A1, US 2009/109294 A1, US 20090109294 A1, US 20090109294A1, US 2009109294 A1, US 2009109294A1, US-A1-20090109294, US-A1-2009109294, US2009/0109294A1, US2009/109294A1, US20090109294 A1, US20090109294A1, US2009109294 A1, US2009109294A1
InventorsGreg Allen Cummings, John Louis Warpakowski Furlan, Alice Jordan, Joseph Nathan Lachoff, Maarten Dinger, Nasahn Adam Sheppard, Jason Edward Short
Original AssigneeGreg Allen Cummings, John Louis Warpakowski Furlan, Alice Jordan, Joseph Nathan Lachoff, Maarten Dinger, Nasahn Adam Sheppard, Jason Edward Short
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
User interface for a portable digital video camera
US 20090109294 A1
Abstract
In one embodiment, a driver determines a current operating mode for a digital video camera and activates a plurality of interface buttons, where each activated interface button includes a visual indication of activation to a user. The driver receives a command to change from the current operating mode to a different operating mode and, in response, deactivates one or more of the interface buttons. Each such deactivated interface button does not include the visual indication of activation to the user. Other embodiments include computer-readable media and systems configured to implement the functionality of the driver described above. Yet other embodiments include a unique interface button configuration physically designed to enhance the ease of use of a digital video camera.
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Claims(71)
1. A method for operating a digital video camera, comprising:
determining a current operating mode for the digital video camera;
activating a plurality of interface buttons based on the first operating mode, wherein each activated interface button includes a visual indication of activation to a user;
receiving a command to change from the current operating mode to a different operating mode for the digital video camera; and
deactivating one or more of the plurality of interface buttons in response to the command, wherein the one or more deactivated interface buttons do not include the visual indication of activation to the user in the different operating mode.
2. The method according to claim 1, wherein the plurality of interface buttons comprises a left button, a right button, an increase button, a decrease button, a play/pause button, and a delete button.
3. The method according to claim 1, wherein the current operating mode comprises a ready mode, and further comprising the step of causing an image corresponding to a scene to be captured by the digital video camera to be displayed on a digital viewfinder.
4. The method according to claim 3, wherein one of the plurality of interface buttons comprises an increase button, and further comprising the steps of receiving a user selection of the increase button, and, in response, causing a magnification factor associated with the image to be increased.
5. The method according to claim 3, wherein one of the plurality of interface buttons comprises a decrease button, and further comprising the steps of receiving a user selection of the decrease button, and, in response, causing a magnification factor associated with the image to be decreased.
6. The method according to claim 1, wherein the different operating mode comprises a record mode, and a composite digital video having a video portion and an audio portion is captured by the digital video camera.
7. The method according to claim 6, wherein the plurality of interface buttons comprises a left button, a right button, a play/pause button, and a delete button, and wherein each of the left button, the right button, the play/pause button, and the delete button is deactivated and does not include the visual indication of activation to the user.
8. The method according to claim 6, wherein a user selection of the increase button causes a magnification factor associated with the composite digital video being captured to be increased, and a user selection of the decrease button causes a magnification factor associated with the composite digital video being captured to be decreased.
9. The method according to claim 1, wherein the different operating mode comprises a playback mode, and a composite digital video file stored with the digital video camera is displayed on a digital viewfinder.
10. The method according to claim 9, wherein one of the plurality of interface buttons comprises an increase button, a decrease button, and a play/pause button, and further comprising the step of receiving a user selection of the play/pause button, and, in response, causing the different operating mode to change to a pause mode.
11. The method according to claim 10, further comprising the step of deactivating the increase button and the decrease button, wherein the increase button and the decrease button do not include the visual indication of activation to the user.
12. The method according to claim 11, further comprising the step of receiving a user selection of the play/pause button, and, in response, causing the different operating mode to change back to the playback mode and resuming playback of the composite digital video file.
13. The method according to claim 9, wherein one of the plurality of interface buttons comprises a left button, and further comprising the step of receiving a user selection of the left button, and, in response, causing a previous frame of the composite digital video file to be displayed to the user on the digital viewfinder.
14. The method according to claim 9, wherein one of the plurality of interface buttons comprises a right button, and further comprising the step of receiving a user selection of the right button, and, in response, causing a subsequent frame of the composite digital video file to be displayed to the user on the digital viewfinder.
15. The method according to claim 9, wherein one of the plurality of interface buttons comprises an increase button, and further comprising the step of receiving a user selection of the increase button, and, in response, causing a volume associated with the composite digital video file to be increased.
16. The method according to claim 9, wherein one of the plurality of interface buttons comprises a decrease button, and further comprising the step of receiving a user selection of the decrease button, and, in response, causing a volume associated with the composite digital video file to be decreased.
17. The method according to claim 1, wherein the plurality of interface buttons comprises an increase button and a decrease button, the different operating mode is a delete mode, each of the increase button and the decrease button is deactivated and does not include the visual indication of activation to the user.
18. The method according to claim 17, further comprising the step of receiving a user selection to delete a currently selected composite digital video file stored with the digital video camera.
19. The method according to claim 17, further comprising the step of receiving a user selection to delete all composite digital video files stored with the digital video camera.
20. The method according to claim 1, wherein a first interface button in the plurality of interface buttons provides a particular function when activated in the current operating mode for the digital video camera, and the first interface button provides no function when deactivated in the different operating mode for the digital video camera.
21. The method according to claim 1, wherein each activated interface button comprises a touch-screen button displayed on a display screen and can be engaged by the user by touching the display screen.
22. The method according to claim 21, wherein the first interface button, when deactivated, is removed from the display screen and not displayed to the user.
23. The method according to claim 21, wherein the first interface button, when deactivated, is visually distinguished from the activated buttons on the display screen.
24. The method according to claim 1, wherein each interface button in the plurality of interface buttons is associated with a different embedded light emitting diode (LED) and can be engaged by the user in an electrically conductive manner, and further comprising the steps of:
causing each embedded LED to be illuminated to reflect the current operating mode for the digital video camera to the user; and
causing the embedded LED associated with the one or more deactivated interface buttons not to be illuminated to reflect the different operating mode to the user.
25. The method according to claim 24, wherein each interface button in the plurality of interface buttons is implemented as a capacitive-touch button.
26. The method according to claim 1, wherein the command is generated based on a user selection.
27. The method according to claim 1, wherein the command is generated by components within the digital video camera is not based on a user selection.
28. A computer-readable medium storing instructions, that when executed by a processor, cause a driver to operate a digital video camera, by performing the steps of:
determining a current operating mode for the digital video camera;
activating a plurality of interface buttons based on the first operating mode, wherein each activated interface button includes a visual indication of activation to a user;
receiving a command to change from the current operating mode to a different operating mode for the digital video camera; and
deactivating one or more of the plurality of interface buttons in response to the command, wherein the one or more deactivated interface buttons do not include the visual indication of activation to the user in the different operating mode.
29. The computer-readable medium according to claim 28, wherein the plurality of interface buttons comprises a left button, a right button, an increase button, a decrease button, a play/pause button, and a delete button.
30. The computer-readable medium according to claim 28, wherein the current operating mode comprises a ready mode, and further comprising the step of causing an image corresponding to a scene to be captured by the digital video camera to be displayed on a digital viewfinder.
31. The computer-readable medium according to claim 30, wherein one of the plurality of interface buttons comprises an increase button, and further comprising the steps of receiving a user selection of the increase button, and, in response, causing a magnification factor associated with the image to be increased.
32. The computer-readable medium according to claim 30, wherein one of the plurality of interface buttons comprises a decrease button, and further comprising the steps of receiving a user selection of the decrease button, and, in response, causing a magnification factor associated with the image to be decreased.
33. The computer-readable medium according to claim 28, wherein the different operating mode comprises a record mode, and a composite digital video having a video portion and an audio portion is captured by the digital video camera.
34. The computer-readable medium according to claim 33, wherein the plurality of interface buttons comprises a left button, a right button, a play/pause button, and a delete button, and wherein each of the left button, the right button, the play/pause button, and the delete button is deactivated and does not include the visual indication of activation to the user.
35. The computer-readable medium according to claim 33, wherein a user selection of the increase button causes a magnification factor associated with the composite digital video being captured to be increased, and a user selection of the decrease button causes a magnification factor associated with the composite digital video being captured to be decreased.
36. The computer-readable medium according to claim 28, wherein the different operating mode comprises a playback mode, and a composite digital video file stored with the digital video camera is displayed on a digital viewfinder.
37. The computer-readable medium according to claim 36, wherein one of the plurality of interface buttons comprises an increase button, a decrease button, and a play/pause button, and further comprising the step of receiving a user selection of the play/pause button, and, in response, causing the different operating mode to change to a pause mode.
38. The computer-readable medium according to claim 37, further comprising the step of deactivating the increase button and the decrease button, wherein the increase button and the decrease button do not include the visual indication of activation to the user.
39. The computer-readable medium according to claim 38, further comprising the step of receiving a user selection of the play/pause button, and, in response, causing the different operating mode to change back to the playback mode and resuming playback of the composite digital video file.
40. The computer-readable medium according to claim 36, wherein one of the plurality of interface buttons comprises a left button, and further comprising the step of receiving a user selection of the left button, and, in response, causing a previous frame of the composite digital video file to be displayed to the user on the digital viewfinder.
41. The computer-readable medium according to claim 36, wherein one of the plurality of interface buttons comprises a right button, and further comprising the step of receiving a user selection of the right button, and, in response, causing a subsequent frame of the composite digital video file to be displayed to the user on the digital viewfinder.
42. The computer-readable medium according to claim 36, wherein one of the plurality of interface buttons comprises an increase button, and further comprising the step of receiving a user selection of the increase button, and, in response, causing a volume associated with the composite digital video file to be increased.
43. The computer-readable medium according to claim 36, wherein one of the plurality of interface buttons comprises a decrease button, and further comprising the step of receiving a user selection of the decrease button, and, in response, causing a volume associated with the composite digital video file to be decreased.
44. The computer-readable medium according to claim 28, wherein the plurality of interface buttons comprises an increase button and a decrease button, the different operating mode is a delete mode, each of the increase button and the decrease button is deactivated and does not include the visual indication of activation to the user.
45. The computer-readable medium according to claim 44, further comprising the step of receiving a user selection to delete a currently selected composite digital video file stored with the digital video camera.
46. The computer-readable medium according to claim 44, further comprising the step of receiving a user selection to delete all composite digital video files stored with the digital video camera.
47. The computer-readable medium according to claim 28, wherein a first interface button in the plurality of interface buttons provides a particular function when activated in the current operating mode for the digital video camera, and the first interface button provides no function when deactivated in the different operating mode for the digital video camera.
48. The computer-readable medium according to claim 28, wherein each activated interface button comprises a touch-screen button displayed on a display screen and can be engaged by the user by touching the display screen.
49. The computer-readable medium according to claim 48, wherein the first interface button, when deactivated, is removed from the display screen and not displayed to the user.
50. The computer-readable medium according to claim 48, wherein the first interface button, when deactivated, is visually distinguished from the activated buttons on the display screen.
51. The computer-readable medium according to claim 28, wherein each interface button in the plurality of interface buttons is associated with a different embedded light emitting diode (LED) and can be engaged by the user in an electrically conductive manner, and further comprising the steps of:
causing each embedded LED to be illuminated to reflect the current operating mode for the digital video camera to the user; and
causing the embedded LED associated with the one or more deactivated interface buttons not to be illuminated to reflect the different operating mode to the user.
52. The computer-readable medium according to claim 51, wherein each interface button in the plurality of interface buttons is implemented as a capacitive-touch button.
53. The computer-readable medium according to claim 28, wherein the command is generated based on a user selection.
54. The computer-readable medium according to claim 28, wherein the command is generated by components within the digital video camera is not based on a user selection.
55. A hand-held electronic device, comprising:
a plurality of interface buttons that can be activated or deactivated based on an operating mode for the electronic device;
a processor; and
a memory storing program instructions that, when executed by the processor, configure the processor to:
determine a first operating mode for the electronic device,
activate one or more of the interface buttons based on the first operating mode, wherein each of the one or more activated interface buttons includes a visual indication of activation to a user,
receive a command to change from the first operating mode to a second operating mode for the digital video camera, and
deactivate at least one of the one or more activated interface buttons in response to the command, wherein the at least one deactivated interface button does not include the visual indication of activation to the user in the second operating mode.
56. The hand-held electronic device according to claim 55, wherein each interface button is associated with different embedded light emitting diode (LED) and can be engaged by a user in an electrically conductive manner.
57. The hand-held electronic device according to claim 56, wherein the LED associated with each of the one or more activated interface buttons is illuminated, and the LED associated with the at least one deactivated interface button is not illuminated.
58. The hand-held electronic device according to claim 56, wherein each of the plurality of interface buttons is implemented as a capacitive-touch button.
59. The hand-held electronic device according to claim 55, wherein each of the one or more activated interface button comprises a touch-screen button displayed on a display screen and can be engaged by the user by touching the display screen.
60. The hand-held electronic device according to claim 59, wherein the at least one deactivated interface button is removed from the display screen and not displayed to the user.
61. The hand-held electronic device according to claim 59, wherein the at least one deactivated interface button is visually distinguished from the activated buttons on the display screen.
62. The hand-held electronic device according to claim 55, wherein the hand-held electronic device is a digital video camera.
63. The hand-held electronic device according to claim 62, further comprising a data connector configured to couple the hand-held device to a port associated with a computer system.
64. The hand-held electronic device according to claim 63, wherein the hand-held device and the computer system are each resting on a flat surface and the data connector is coupled to the port.
65. The hand-held electronic device according to claim 64, wherein the data connector is elevated from the flat surface by a distance that is substantially equal to a distance between the flat surface and the port.
66. The hand-held electronic device according to claim 55, wherein the command is generated based on a user selection.
67. The hand-held electronic device according to claim 55, wherein the command is generated by components within the digital video camera is not based on a user selection.
68. A hand-held device for recording digital video, comprising:
a memory;
a display screen for displaying video content;
a lens configured to capture light associated with a scene;
a digital video image sensor configured to receive the captured light from the lens and to convert the captured light into a video sequence;
a processor configured to receive the video sequence, store the video sequence in the memory, and cause the video sequence to be displayed on the display screen;
a first set of interface buttons for receiving user input, wherein each interface button in the first set is substantially co-planar with the display screen; and
a second set of interface buttons for receiving user input, wherein each interface button in the second set is recessed and/or concave with respect to the display screen.
69. The hand-held device according to claim 68, further comprising a data connector configured to couple the hand-held device to a port associated with a computer system.
70. The hand-held device according to claim 69, wherein the hand-held device and the computer system are each resting on a flat surface and the data connector is coupled to the port, and the data connector is elevated from the flat surface by a distance that is substantially equal to a distance between the flat surface and the port.
71. The hand-held device according to claim 68, wherein the first set includes a left button, a right button, an increase button, and a decrease button, and the second set includes a play/pause button, a delete button, and a record button.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the priority benefit of provisional U.S. Patent Application Ser. No. 60/983,121, filed Oct. 26, 2007, the subject matter of which is hereby incorporated by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to hand-held devices and, more specifically, to a user interface for a portable digital video camera.

2. Description of the Related Art

Digital video camera (DVC) technology has developed rapidly over the past decade. A broad variety of DVCs are now available to meet the diverse needs of a wide spectrum of consumers. DVC technology provides a user with a convenient device that records video and audio and also provides the ability to transfer the recorded video and audio to a computer-readable medium. The computer-readable medium may be, for example, a Digital Video Disc (DVD) or a computer memory.

A DVC user typically records video and audio by activating a recording mode of the DVC and pointing the lens of the DVC towards an area of interest to record the subject matter in that area. Other operating modes include, without limitation, replaying recorded video, deleting saved videos, increasing the volume of the audio, and zooming in or out. The DVC user typically selects the different modes by manipulating a set of interface buttons located on the DVC. The interface buttons typically corresponds to a graphical user interface (GUI) that is displayed on a view screen.

Once video and audio data is recorded on the DVC, the data may be transferred to a computer memory via a cord or connector that couples the DVC to a computer or output to a television (TV). Common types of connectors provided with DVCs are universal serial bus (USB) connectors, firewire connectors, High-Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) connectors, proprietary connectors, or other types of connectors that may be used to transfer data. Some DVCs may include a cord that connects the DVC to the computer; whereas, other DVCs may include a connector that protrudes from the DVC and can be plugged directly into a computer.

One problem often encountered by DVC users involves navigating the various features that are accessible to the user via the various interface buttons. Most DVC interfaces are fairly “non-intuitive,” requiring a user to have specific knowledge about the functions and operation of the DVC in order to effectively or efficiently interact with the GUI and the interface button layout. Oftentimes, the user has to first become skilled at manipulating the interface buttons and GUI before reasonable video recording can take place. Some users even resort to carrying the DVC manual with them when recording videos in order to be able to operate the DVC properly. These types of issues make recording video and audio more difficult and time-consuming and end up ruining the user experience.

A second problem encountered by users involves transferring video and audio data from the DVC to a computer and/or outputting the video and audio to a TV. External cords are often too short or too long to be used easily. Also, having an additional external cord reduces the portability of the DVC. Integrated connectors, while eliminating the external cord, generally cause the DVC to dangle precariously from the computer or the TV to which the DVC is connected, which can place damaging stress on the integrated connector.

Accordingly, there remains a need in the art for a digital video camera that provides a simple way to record digital video and audio and to transfer the recorded data to a computer.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

One embodiment of the invention provides a method for operating a digital video camera. The method includes determining a current operating mode for the digital video camera activating a plurality of interface buttons based on the first operating mode, where each activated interface button includes a visual indication of activation to a user, receiving a command to change from the current operating mode to a different operating mode for the digital video camera, and deactivating one or more of the plurality of interface buttons in response to the command, where the one or more deactivated interface buttons do not include the visual indication of activation to the user in the different operating mode.

Other embodiments of the invention include a computer-readable medium that stores instructions that can configure a processing unit to implement one or more variations of the above method as well as an electronic device having a memory that stores instructions for implementing one or more variations of the above method.

Yet other embodiments of the invention include a digital video camera having a first set of interface buttons that are substantially co-planar with a display screen associated with the digital video camera and a second set of interface buttons that are recessed and/or concave with respect to the display screen.

One advantage of the disclosed embodiments is that activating and illuminating different interface button configurations simplifies operation of the digital video camera for the user because the user is not distracted by irrelevant user interface information or extraneous operating options. Another advantage is that the combination of “flat” interface buttons and “recessed and/or concave” interface buttons reduces the likelihood that a user will mistakenly cause a critical function, such as deleting a composite video file, to be performed. Also, implementing primary interface buttons as concave interface buttons allows the user to easily locate and use these interface buttons in a low-light situation (e.g., in the dark) or without looking at the back of the digital video camera.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

So that the manner in which the above recited features of the invention can be understood in detail, a more particular description of the invention, briefly summarized above, may be had by reference to embodiments, some of which are illustrated in the appended drawings. It is to be noted, however, that the appended drawings illustrate only typical embodiments of this invention and are therefore not to be considered limiting of its scope, for the invention may admit to other equally effective embodiments.

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a hand-held device configured to implement one or more aspects of the invention.

FIG. 2A is an isometric view of the hand-held device, according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2B is a front view of the hand-held device, according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2C is a back view of the hand-held device, according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2D is a left-side view of the hand-held device, according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2E is a right-side view of the hand-held device, according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2F is a top view of the hand-held device, according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2G is a bottom view of the hand-held device, according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIGS. 3A-3C illustrate different illumination patterns for the capacitive-touch buttons of the hand-held device of FIGS. 2A-2G, according to various embodiments of the invention.

FIG. 4 is a flow diagram of method steps for operating a digital video camera, according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIGS. 5A-5B are conceptual illustrations of the hand-held device implemented with a touch-screen interface, according to various alternative embodiments of the invention.

FIGS. 6A-6B are conceptual illustrations of how the hand-held device of FIGS. 2A-2G may be coupled to a laptop computer, according to one embodiment of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

In the following description, numerous specific details are set forth to provide a more thorough understanding of the invention. However, it will be apparent to one of skill in the art that the invention may be practiced without one or more of these specific details. In other instances, well-known features have not been described in order to avoid obscuring the invention.

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a hand-held device (HHD) 100 configured to implement one or more aspects of the invention. As shown, the HHD 100 includes, without limitation, a data connector 102, a speaker 104, a microphone 106, status indicators 108, a power supply 110, optical components 112, a digital video image sensor 114, a central processing unit (CPU) 116, a digital viewfinder 118, interface buttons 120, and an internal memory 138. In one embodiment, the HHD 100 is a digital video camera.

The data connector 102 is an integrated mechanism that allows the HHD 100 to be connected with a separate TV or computer system, such as laptop or a desktop computer, and to transfer data to and from the computer system and/or output video and audio to the TV. The data connector 102 may be a universal serial bus (USB) connector, a firewire connector, a HDMI connector, a serial connector, or another type of connector that is capable of connecting the HHD 100 with the TV or the computer system.

The status indicators 108 visually indicate the current mode of operation of the HHD 100. The status indicators 108 include light emitting diodes (LEDs) that can be “ON,” blinking, or “OFF,” depending on the current operating mode of the HHD 100. The operating modes of the HHD 100 include, among others, a record mode and a playback mode. When in the record mode, the HHD 100 is configured to capture video and audio of a particular scene through the optical components 112 and the microphone 106, respectively. When in the playback mode, the HHD 100 is configured to play digital videos that are stored in the internal memory 138. The digital videos stored in the internal memory 138 may be videos captured with the HHD 100 or videos transferred to the HHD 100, but not captured by the HHD 110, including videos downloaded from the Internet. In one embodiment, the digital videos may be displayed on the digital viewfinder 118, and the audio may be output through the speaker 104. In alternative embodiments, the digital video and audio may be output to the TV or to the computer system for playback.

The power supply 110 provides power to the HHD 100. The power may be provided by a battery or an external power source (e.g., an AC outlet). In one embodiment, the battery is a rechargeable battery that is not removable from the HHD 100. In alternative embodiments, the battery may include one or more removable and/or replaceable batteries. The optical components 112, which may include one or more lenses, capture the scene and direct light associated with the scene onto the digital video image sensor 114. The digital video image sensor 114 converts the captured image into digital video data and then transmits the digital video data to the CPU 116 for further processing.

The microphone 106, similarly, captures the sound in the scene. In one embodiment, the microphone includes hardware and/or software configured to convert the captured sound to digital audio data and to transmit the digital audio data to the CPU 116 for further processing. In alternative embodiments, the microphone may transmit raw analog data to the CPU without any pre-processing.

The CPU 116 communicates with the various components within the HHD 100 to control the operations of the HHD 100. The CPU may be implemented as a single chip or as a combination of multiple chips. The CPU 116 also processes inputs from the interface buttons 120. For example, when the HHD 100 is in record mode, the CPU 116 transmits the digital video data received from the digital video image sensor 114 to the digital viewfinder 118 for display. In one embodiment, the CPU 116 combines the digital audio data received from the microphone 106 and the digital video data received from the digital video image sensor 114 to create a composite video file. The composite video file may then be transmitted to the internal memory 138 for storage. When the HHD 100 is in playback mode, the CPU 116 retrieves the composite video file from the internal memory 138 and transmits the video portion of the composite video file to the digital viewfinder 118 and the audio portion of the composite video file to the speakers 104. In alternative embodiments, the digital audio data received from the microphone 106 and the digital video data received from the digital video image sensor 114 may be stored separately in the internal memory 138.

The digital viewfinder 118 may be configured to display composite video files stored on the HHD 100. The digital viewfinder 118 may also be configured to display an image of the scene being captured while the corresponding composite video file is being recorded. The digital viewfinder 118 is preferably a liquid crystal display (LCD).

The interface buttons 120 may include mechanical buttons, such as a power button 122 and a record button 124. The power button 112 is configured to turn the HHD 100 on and off. The record button 124, when selected, begins and ends the recording of video and audio of a particular scene. Additionally, the record button 124, when selected in navigate mode (described in greater detail below), causes the HHD 100 to enter navigate mode (also described in greater detail below).

In a preferred embodiment, the other interface buttons, including a left button 126, a right button 134, a increase button 120, a decrease button 136, a play/pause button 132, and a delete button 130 are implemented as capacitive-touch buttons. In alternative embodiments, these other interface buttons may be implemented as induction buttons, analog-resistive buttons, or any other technically feasible button type that can be engaged by the user in an electrically conductive manner. The left button 126 and the right button 134 may be used to scroll through composite video files stored in the internal memory 138 or to navigate menu options. The increase button 128 and the decrease button 136 provide various functions depending on the current operating mode of the HHD 100, including increasing/decreasing a magnification factor (e.g., a zoom factor), increasing/decreasing an audio volume, or incrementing/decrementing input values in various menu options such as date and/or time setup. For example, when the HHD 100 is in playback mode, the increase button 128 is used to increase the audio volume. In other modes, the increase button 128 is used to increase the magnification of an image being captured or viewed on the digital viewfinder 118. Similarly, the decrease button 136 is used to decrease the audio volume in playback mode. In other modes, the decrease button 136 is used to decrease the magnification of an image being captured or viewed on the digital viewfinder 118. Similarly, the play/pause button 132 provides various functions depending on the current operating mode of the HHD 100, including playing a composite video file stored on the HHD 100, pausing the playback of a composite video file, and accepting a menu option, among others. The delete button 120, when selected, causes data to be deleted from the internal memory 138. The functions provided by the different interface buttons in the various operating modes of the HHD 100 are described in greater detail below in conjunction with FIGS. 2A-2G and FIGS. 3A-3C.

The internal memory 138 stores the composite video files as well as firmware that is executed by the CPU 116 to control the operations of the HHD 100. The internal memory 138 comprises either volatile memory, such as dynamic random access memory (DRAM), or non-volatile memory, such as a hard disk or a flash memory module, or a combination of both volatile and non-volatile memory. The internal memory 138 also stores a software driver 140 implemented as a set of program instructions configured to coordinate operation between the interface buttons 120 and the other components of the HHD 100, as described in greater detail herein. For example, the program instructions that constitute the driver 140 may be executed by the CPU 116 to cause different capacitive-touch buttons to be illuminated when the HHD 100 is in different operating modes.

FIG. 2A is an isometric view of the HHD 100 of FIG. 1, according to one embodiment of the invention. As shown, the HHD 100 includes a front side 202, the data connector 102, a catch mechanism 240, the microphone 106, optical components 112, and a connector release 236. The data connector 102 may be in an extended position, as shown in FIG. 2A, or may be in a retracted position and contained within the HHD 100. When the data connector 102 is extended, the catch mechanism 240 is in an open state, as shown in FIG. 2A. FIG. 2B is a front view of the HHD 100, according to one embodiment of the invention. This view of the HHD 100 includes several of the components illustrated in FIG. 2A, including the front side 202, the microphone 106, and the optical components 112.

FIG. 2C is a back view of the HHD 100, according to one embodiment of the invention. A shown, the HHD 100 includes a back side 204, speakers 104, the digital viewfinder 118, the record button 124, as well as the set of capacitive-touch (CT) buttons 126, 128, 130, 132, 134, 136 embedded within the back side 204. The CT buttons include the left button 126, the right button 134, the increase button 128, the decrease button 136, the play/pause button 132, and the delete button 130.

Each CT button comprises an electronic switch that has no moving parts, contrary to a physical or mechanical button, like the record button 124. A CT button may be engaged when an electrically conductive medium, such as a user's finger, is placed on or near the surface of the CT button. The electrically conductive medium completes a circuit, thereby engaging the CT button. Advantageously, the user does not have to apply an actual force to the CT buttons; rather, the user only needs to lightly touch a CT button with a thumb or finger to engage that button.

In one embodiment, each of the CT buttons is substantially co-planar with the back side 204 of the HHD 100. In alternative embodiments, the region of the back side that covers the play/pause button 132 and the delete button 130 may be slightly concave and/or recessed so that the user may receive tactile feedback while manipulating these particular CT buttons. Additionally, the outer edges of the mechanical record button 124 may be in the same plane as the back side of the HHD 100, but the button itself may be slightly concave and/or recessed. The record button 124, the play/pause button 132, and the delete button 130, collectively, may be considered the “primary” interface buttons 120; whereas, the remaining interface buttons 120 may be considered “secondary.” The secondary interface buttons 120 are “flat” CT buttons that lie in the same plane as the back side of the HHD 110. By contrast, the primary interface buttons 120 may be slightly recessed from back surface of the HHD 110 (and/or concave relative to the back surface of the HHD 100) so that the user can easily locate and use these buttons in a low-light situation (e.g., in the dark) or without looking at the back of the HHD 110. For example, a user that is currently recording a video can easily locate a recessed and/or concave record button 124 to stop the recording by sliding a thumb or finger against the back side of the device, without having to look directly at the HHD 100 to locate the record button 124.

Additionally, the recessed and/or concave nature of the primary interface buttons 120 makes these buttons more difficult for a user to engage accidentally or unknowingly. For example, accidentally engaging the delete button 130 could result in one or more of the composite video files stored on the HHD 110 to be deleted, which is an event that should be avoided, if at all possible. Because the delete button 130 is recessed and/or concave and, thus, can be more easily recognized by the user, the user is less likely to engage this button accidentally or unknowingly. Furthermore, as described in greater detail herein, when the user actually wants to delete a video, the user first engages the delete button 130, which is a recessed and/or concave button, to enter a delete operating mode. The user then engages either the left button 126 and/or the right button 134 to select an option to delete the current video or all videos, and then confirms the selection by engaging the play/pause button 132, which is also a recessed and/or concave button. Because the user must engage at least two different recessed and/or concave buttons to delete a composite video file from the HHD 100, the user is even less likely delete one of these files by mistake.

FIG. 2D is a left-side view of the HHD 100, according to one embodiment of the invention. As shown, the HHD 100 includes a left side 210 that includes the power button 122 that is used to power the HHD 100 on and off. FIG. 2E is a right-side view of the HHD 100, according to one embodiment of the invention. As shown, the HHD 100 includes a right side 212 that includes a connector release 236 and a TV out port 238. The connector release 236 is used to release the data connector 120 into an extended position. For example, in one embodiment, the data connector 120 is spring-loaded such that when the user presses the data connector release 236 downwards, the data connector 102 is released into the extended position. The TV out port 238 is used to connect the HHD 110 to a TV with a cable (not shown) to allow composite video files stored in the HHD 100 to be displayed on the TV. In some embodiments, the TV out port 238 is implemented as a HDMI port or any other technically feasible type of output port.

FIG. 2F is a top view of the HHD 100, according to one embodiment of the invention. As shown, the HHD 100 has a top side 206 that includes one side of the data connector 102 and one side of the catch mechanism 240. When the data connector 102 is retracted, the catch mechanism 240 conceals the male portion of the data connector 102 (i.e., the portion of the data connector 102 that actually plugs into the TV or the computer system), thereby maintaining the sleek look and feel of the HHD 100.

FIG. 2G is a bottom view of the HHD 100, according to one embodiment of the invention. As shown, the HHD 100 has a bottom side 208 that includes a tripod mount 232, which enables the HHD 100 to be mounted on a standard tripod so that a user may capture video and audio footage without actually holding the HHD 100. A reset button 234, which is accessible using a pin or other slender implement, may be located within the tripod mount 232. The user may press the reset button 234 to perform a “hard reset” of the HHD 100 that may restore the original factory settings of the HHD 100.

As described in further detail below in conjunction with FIGS. 3A-3C, the CT buttons each include an embedded light emitting diode (LED) such that the set of LEDs may have a different illumination pattern for different operating modes of the HHD 100. However, the illumination pattern may be the same for some operating modes (e.g., the illumination pattern is the same in record mode and in pause mode). The LED illumination patterns are part of a dynamic visual user interface (DVUI) implemented by the HHD 100.

When the software driver 140 causes the illumination of a particular CT button, that button is active and may be used to implement one or more functionalities available in the current operating mode. When a CT button is not illuminated, that button is deactivated and provides no function. For example, when the HHD 100 is used in record mode, the driver 140 causes the increase button 128 and the decrease button 136 to be illuminated and causes the left button 126, the right button 134, the play/pause button 132, and the delete button 130 to be not illuminated. The increase button 128 and the decrease button 136 may be used to increase and decrease, respectively, the magnification of the video currently being recorded, while the other buttons remain deactivated.

The DVUI provides a more intuitive interface to control the HHD 100, when compared to prior art techniques. Only the CT buttons that are relevant to a particular operating mode are illuminated and activated when the HHD 100 is in that mode. Thus, the user is not presented with irrelevant interface button choices with respect to operating the HHD 100. Constraining the choice of interface buttons in this fashion increases the rate at which a novice user is able to learn how to manipulate the HHD 100, thereby enhancing the ease of use and overall user experience when recording and playing video. The different operating modes and the corresponding CT button illumination patterns of the HHD 100 are set forth below in Table 1.

TABLE 1
CT Buttons
Operating Play/
Mode Left Right Increase Decrease Pause Delete
Ready Enter navigate Enter navigate Zoom in Zoom out Enter playback Enter delete
mode, select mode, select modeand play mode
previous video next video selected video
in Library in library
Record Off Off Zoom in Zoom out Off Off
Navigate Select previous Select next video Increase Decrease Play Enter delete
video in library in library volume volume selected mode
video
Playback Move Advance Increase Decrease Enter pause Enter delete
backward forward volume volume mode; pause mode
playback
Pause Enter navigate Enter navigate Off Off Resume Delete current
mode; select mode; select playback video
previous video next video
in library in library
Delete Move menu Move menu Off Off Select menu Go to navigate
cursor forward cursor back option mode

The top row of Table 1 lists the different CT buttons, while the left column lists the different operating modes of the HHD 100. The various cells of Table 1 describe the function of each CT button when the HHD 100 is in different operating modes. As shown, the CT buttons of the HHD 100 are left, right, increase, decrease, play, and delete. The operating modes of the HHD 100 are ready, record, navigate, playback, pause, and delete. In one embodiment, the HHD 100 may enter/exit the various operating modes based on a user selection that generates a command instructing the HHD 100 to do so. In alternative embodiments, the HHD 100 may enter/exit the various operating modes based on a command that is generated by the HHD 100. For example, when the HHD 100 is in delete mode for a predetermined amount of time without receiving any user selection, then the HHD 100 may automatically enter ready mode without any input from the user.

The HHD 100 enters ready mode when first powered on. In one embodiment, a real-time preview of the content that would be recorded is displayed on the digital viewfinder 118 in ready mode. All of the CT buttons are activated and illuminated. The user may engage the increase button 128 to increase the magnification of the real-time preview or engage the decrease button 136 to decrease the magnification of the real-time preview. The magnification capabilities of the HHD 100 may be limited by certain a certain magnification factor, e.g., 3×. The other CT buttons may be engaged by the user to enter other operating modes. For example, when the user engages the left button 126 or the right button 134, the HHD 100 enters navigate mode. When the user engages the play/pause button 132, the HHD 100 enters playback mode, and the user can select a play back of a composite video file. When the user engages the delete button 130, the HHD 100 enters delete mode, enabling the user to delete a selected composite video file.

By pressing the mechanical record button 124, the user can place the HHD 100 into record mode and can begin to record a composite video file. While the HHD 100 is in record mode, each of the CT buttons, except for the increase button 128 and the decrease button 136, are deactivated and, therefore, are not illuminated. The increase button 128 may be used to increase the magnification factor of the image being recorded, while the decrease button 134 may be used to decrease the magnification factor of the image being recorded. When a maximum recording time is reached, or when the user engages the record button 124 a second time, the recording stops. HHD 100 then automatically reenters ready mode, and the driver 140 causes all of the CT buttons to be illuminated and activated.

In navigate mode, a thumbnail picture of one frame of a selected composite video file stored in the HHD is displayed on the digital viewfinder 118. The driver 140 causes all of the CT buttons to be illuminated and activated when the HHD 100 is in navigate mode. With the left button 126 and the right button 134, the user can scroll through the various composite video files saved in the internal memory 138 of the HHD 110. The HHD 100 enters delete mode when the user engages the delete button 130, where the user may delete a selected composite video file. When the play/pause button 132 is engaged, the HHD 100 enters playback mode and can play back a selected composite video file. The increase button 128 and the decrease button 136 may be used to increase and decrease the audio volume of the selected composite video file when the composite video file is actually played back.

In playback mode, the currently selected composite video file is displayed on the digital viewfinder 118. The currently selected composite video file may be the video that was most recently recorded or may be a video that was selected by the user while the HHD 100 was in navigate mode. The driver 140 causes of the CT buttons to be illuminated and activated when the HHD 100 is operating in playback mode. The increase button 128, the delete button 130, and the decrease button 136 have the same functions in playback mode as they have in navigate mode. The left button 126 and the right button 134 may be used to move backward and advance forward, respectively, in the composite video file currently being played back; whereas, engaging the play/pause button 132 causes the HHD 100 to enter pause mode, thereby pausing the play back of the video.

When the HHD 100 is in pause mode, the driver 140 deactivates the increase button 128 and the decrease button 136, and those buttons are no longer illuminated. The left button 126, the right button 132, and the delete button 130 remain illuminated and have the same functions in pause mode as they have in ready mode. The user may engage the play/pause button 132 to resume playback of the composite video file.

The HHD 100 enters delete mode from any of the other modes, except for record mode, whenever the user engages the delete button 130. In delete mode, the increase button 128 and the decrease button 136 are deactivated and not illuminated. When in delete mode, a GUI is displayed in the digital viewfinder 118 that asks the user whether the currently selected composite video file should be deleted or whether all of the composite video files currently stored in the internal memory 138 should be deleted. The user can move a cursor to the “delete all” option using the left button 126 and/or the right button 134 and then engage the play/pause button 132 to confirm this selection. Again, to delete the currently selected composite video file, the user can move the cursor to the “delete selected video” option. Once the HHD 100 performs the selected task, the HHD 100 automatically returns to navigate mode.

FIGS. 3A-3C illustrate different illumination patterns for the CT buttons of the HHD 100 of FIGS. 2A-2G, according to various embodiments of the invention. FIG. 3A is a front view 300 of the HHD 100 that illustrates the CT buttons that are illuminated when the HHD 100 operates in ready mode, navigate mode, and playback mode. As set forth above, all of the CT buttons are illuminated when the HHD 100 enters each of these three operating modes, but the different CT buttons may have different functions in each of these operating modes.

FIG. 3B is a front view 302 of the HHD 100 that illustrates the CT buttons that are illuminated when the HHD 100 operates in pause mode and delete mode. Each of the CT buttons is activated and illuminated except for the increase button 128 and the decrease button 136, which are not required to manipulate the HHD 100 while operating in these modes.

FIG. 3C is a front view 304 of the HHD 100 that illustrates the CT buttons that are activated and illuminated when the HHD 100 operates in record mode. While recording video, only the increase button 128 and the decrease button 134 are illuminated and active to implement to the magnification functions, as described above. The other CT buttons are not illuminated and are inactive in this mode.

FIG. 4 is a flow diagram of method steps for operating a hand-held device (HHD), according to one embodiment of the invention. Persons skilled in the art will understand that, even though the method is described in conjunction with the systems of FIGS. 1-3, any system configured to perform the method steps, in any order, is within the scope of the present invention.

As shown, the method 400 begins at step 402, where a driver determines the current operating mode of the HHD. Table 1 above lists available operating modes, including, a ready mode, a record mode, a navigate mode, a playback mode, a pause mode, and a delete mode. At step 404, based on the current operating mode, the driver activates the capacitive-touch buttons associated with the current operating mode, where each capacitive-touch button is associated with a different embedded light emitting diode (LED). As shown in FIG. 3A, the HHD has a set of capacitive-touch (CT) buttons, including the left button 126, the right button 134, the increase button 128, the decrease button 136, the play/pause button 132, and the delete button 130. Once a particular CT button has been activated, the selection of that CT button by the user causes one or more functions to be performed based on the current operating mode. At step 406, the driver causes the embedded LEDs associated with the activated CT buttons to be illuminated to reflect the current operating mode to a user.

At step 408, the driver receives a user selection to change from the current operating mode to a different operating mode. As shown in Table 1, the user can cause the HHD to enter a different operating mode by selecting one or the activated CT buttons. Again, the current operating mode determines which activated CT buttons can be engaged to enter various different operating modes from the current operating mode.

At step 410, the driver activated the CT buttons associated with the different operating mode. As shown in Table 1, when the DVC is in certain operating modes, some of the CT buttons are “OFF,” meaning that those CT buttons are deactivated.

At step 412, the driver causes the embedded LED associated with the activated CT buttons to be illuminated to reflect the different operating mode to the user. As shown in FIGS. 3B and 3C, the LEDs associated with various CT buttons are not illuminated when the HHD is in a certain operating mode.

FIG. 5A is a conceptual illustration of the HHD 100 implemented with a touch-screen interface 502, according to an alternative embodiment of the invention. As shown, the HHD 100 does not include any mechanical or fixed capacitive-touch buttons; rather, the functionality of the interface buttons previously discussed herein is implemented through a combination of different graphical interface buttons. In such an embodiment, the different graphical buttons of the touch-screen interface 502, when engaged by a user, cause the various functions and features of the HHD 100 described herein to be implemented.

In one embodiment, the touch-screen interface 502 is configured to look similar to the back side 204 of the HHD 100, as described in FIG. 2C. The touch-screen interface 502 covers most (i.e., more than half) of the back side 204 of the HHD 100 and includes a display portion 504, a left button 506, a right button 508, an increase button 510, a decrease button 512, a play/pause button 514, a delete button 516 and a record button 518. During operation of the HHD 100, the touch-screen buttons 506, 508, 510, 512, 514, 516, 518 are each displayed on the touch-screen interface 502 and, when engaged by a user, cause the same functionality to be implemented as when the user engages the left button 126, the right button 134, the increase button 128, the decrease button 136, the play/pause button 132, the delete button 130, and the record button 124, respectively. The display portion 504 of the touch-screen interface 502 displays a composite video file, similar to display of the digital viewfinder 118.

In one embodiment, when one or more of the touch-screen buttons 506, 508, 510, 512, 514, 516, 518 are deactivated when the HHD 100 is in a particular operating mode, these one or more touch-screen buttons are not displayed to the user in the touch-screen interface 502. For example, when the HHD 100 is in pause mode or delete mode, touch-screen buttons 510 and 512 are deactivated and, thus, not displayed. When the HHD 100 is record mode, touch-screen buttons 506, 508, 514, and 516 deactivated and, thus, not displayed. In other embodiments, the deactivated touch-screen buttons may be displayed, but are “grayed-out” or otherwise visually distinguished from the activated buttons to indicate to the user that those touch-screen buttons are deactivated and not useful in the current operating mode. Visually distinguishing the deactivated buttons may include, without limitation, changing the color of the button, putting a strike or other mark through the button icon, or changing the icon to a different icon. Additionally, the deactivated buttons may be removed from the display to further emphasize to the user that the buttons have changed and that certain buttons that were active are now deactivated. For example, some an animation may be used to fade-out buttons that become deactivated or to fade-in buttons that become activated. Alternatively, the deactivated buttons may appear to slide off the display screen, indicating that those buttons are now deactivated.

FIG. 5B is a conceptual illustration of the hand-held device 100 implemented with a touch-screen interface 502, according to another alternative embodiment of the invention. As shown, the display portion 504 covers substantially the entire touch-screen interface 502, and the touch-screen buttons 506, 508, 510, 512, 514, 516, 518 are superimposed over the display portion 504. Again, one or more of the touch-screen buttons 506, 508, 510, 512, 514, 516, 518 may be deactivated when the HHD 100 is in a particular operating mode, and, therefore, not displayed to the user in the touch-screen interface 502, are “grayed-out,” or otherwise visually distinguished from the active buttons.

Persons having ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the embodiments of the invention described in FIGS. 5A-5B are merely examples of a touch-screen interface configured to implement the various features and functions described herein, and that other configurations are also within the scope of embodiments of the invention. Such alternative embodiments include, without limitation, configurations where the interface buttons are located in a blacked-out or shaded region of a letterbox display and configurations where the display is located on one side of the HHD 100 and the interface buttons are located on the other side.

FIG. 6A is a conceptual illustration of how the HHD 100 of FIGS. 2A-2G may be coupled to a laptop computer 602, according to one embodiment of the invention. As shown, both the HHD 100 and the laptop computer 602 are resting on a flat surface 604. The HHD 100 is oriented on the flat surface 604 so that the back side 204 is in direct contact with the flat surface 604, and the front side 202 is facing away from the flat surface 604. When oriented in this manner, the HHD 100 is highly stable and is not prone to toppling or tipping.

The data connector 102 is extended from the HHD 100 and is directed towards a data port 606 included in the laptop computer 602. The data port 606 may be a universal serial bus (USB) port, a firewire port, a serial port or another type of port that is capable of receiving the data connector 102. The data port 606 is elevated from the flat surface 604 by a vertical distance 610. Conveniently, the data connector 102 is positioned relative to the HHD 100 so that when the HHD 100 is oriented, as shown, the data connector 102 is elevated from the flat surface 604 by a vertical distance 608, which is substantially equal to vertical distance 610. The data connector 102 may then be inserted into the data port 606 by simply sliding the HHD 100 across the flat surface 604 towards the laptop computer 602. The positioning of the data connector 102 relative to the data port 606 provides a simple and stable way to connect the data connector 102 to the data port 606 of the laptop computer 602, providing a more robust connection relative to conventional approaches.

FIG. 6B shows the data connector 102 of the HHD 100 inserted into the data port 606 of the laptop computer 602. As described above in FIG. 6A, the data connector 102 is elevated from the flat surface 604 by a vertical distance 608, which is substantially equal to the vertical distance 610 between the data port 606 and the flat surface 604. When the HHD 100 is coupled with the laptop computer 602, as shown, the connection between the data connector 102 and the data port 606 is highly stable because the HHD 100 is resting on the back side 204 and is not prone to being displaced or toppled. Additionally, the position of the data connector 102 relative to the data port 606 substantially reduces or eliminates torque-related stresses that may be placed on either the data connector 102 or the data port 606 because the weight of the HHD 100 is not being supported by the data connector 102.

One advantage of the systems and methods described herein is that the combination of “flat” interface buttons and “recessed and/or concave” interface buttons reduces the likelihood that a user will mistakenly cause a critical function, such as deleting a composite video file, to be performed. The record button 124, the play/pause button 132, and the delete button 130 may be considered primary interface buttons, associated with more critical functions; whereas, the other interface buttons may be considered secondary. As described above, the record button 124, the play/pause button 132, and the delete button 130 may be slightly recessed and/or concave so that the user may receive tactile feedback while manipulating these interface buttons. The tactile feedback allows the user to more easily identify the primary interface buttons, thereby reducing the likelihood that the user will mistakenly engage the buttons. Also, implementing the primary interface buttons as recessed and/or concave interface buttons allows the user to easily locate and use these interface buttons in a low-light situation (e.g., in the dark) or without looking at the back of the HHD 110.

Another advantage is that activating and illuminating different capacitive-touch button configurations simplifies operation of the HHD 100 for the user. For example, when the HHD 100 is operating in record mode, only the increase button and the decrease button are illuminated. Thus, the user does not have to worry about the functions of the other CT buttons while in this operating mode. In this fashion, the HHD 100 provides a simplified interface that allows a user to learn each operating mode of the HHD 100 more quickly. Further, higher quality videos may be recorded because the user is not distracted by irrelevant user interface information or extraneous operating options.

Yet another advantage is that the back side of the hand-held device is substantially planar such that when the HHD 100 is connected to a computer system via the data connector 102, the data connector 102 does not support the weight of the HHD 100. Such a configuration substantially reduces damaging stresses placed on the data connector 102 that result from prior art connection techniques. Further, since the HHD 100 is in a stable orientation when connected to the computer system, the connection is quite robust, thereby decreasing the likelihood that data transfers between the HHD 100 and the computer will be disrupted.

While the forgoing is directed to embodiments of the present invention, other and further embodiments of the invention may be devised without departing from the basic scope thereof. For example, aspects of the present invention may be implemented in hardware or software or in a combination of hardware and software. One embodiment of the invention may be implemented as a program product for use with a computer system. The program(s) of the program product define functions of the embodiments (including the methods described herein) and can be contained on a variety of computer-readable storage media. Illustrative computer-readable storage media include, but are not limited to: (i) non-writable storage media (e.g., read-only memory devices within a computer such as CD-ROM disks readable by a CD-ROM drive, flash memory, ROM chips or any type of solid-state non-volatile semiconductor memory) on which information is permanently stored; and (ii) writable storage media (e.g., floppy disks within a diskette drive or hard-disk drive or any type of solid-state random-access semiconductor memory) on which alterable information is stored. Such computer-readable storage media, when carrying computer-readable instructions that direct the functions of the present invention, are embodiments of the present invention. Therefore, the scope of the present invention is determined by the claims that follow.

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US8711571 *Aug 17, 2010Apr 29, 2014Shenzhen Netcom Electronics Co., Ltd.Portable multimedia player
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Classifications
U.S. Classification348/207.1, 348/E05.024
International ClassificationH04N5/225
Cooperative ClassificationH04N5/772, H04N5/23216, G03B17/18, H04N21/4325, H04N5/23245, H04N21/4223, H04N5/23203, H04N5/765, H04N21/4113, H04N21/4334
European ClassificationH04N5/765, H04N5/77B, H04N5/232C, G03B17/18, H04N21/4223, H04N21/433R, H04N21/432P, H04N21/41P2, H04N5/232R, H04N5/232G
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