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Publication numberUS20090139014 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/313,466
Publication dateJun 4, 2009
Filing dateNov 20, 2008
Priority dateNov 29, 2007
Publication number12313466, 313466, US 2009/0139014 A1, US 2009/139014 A1, US 20090139014 A1, US 20090139014A1, US 2009139014 A1, US 2009139014A1, US-A1-20090139014, US-A1-2009139014, US2009/0139014A1, US2009/139014A1, US20090139014 A1, US20090139014A1, US2009139014 A1, US2009139014A1
InventorsLynn Marie Trochlil-Crist
Original AssigneeLynn Marie Trochlil-Crist
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Open front dual attachment belt
US 20090139014 A1
Abstract
The present invention relates to an adjustable, decorative partial belt that cinches the waistband for the purpose of retaining and supporting pants, skirts or other garments in position upon the body of a wearer in such a way that does not necessarily interfere with the temporary or permanent removal, adjustment or placement of the clothing garment. A one piece elongated strap for partially surrounding the waistband of the clothing garment with an adjustable means for releasably securing the strap to the waistband of the wearer. One terminal end of the belt is laced under the first waistband loop to the right or left of the apparel opening and threaded around the back of the torso to the first waistband loop on the corresponding side without the terminal free ends connecting or intersecting. The two free ends are reversed back over the top of the front belt loops respectively securing them back on themselves in an overlapping fashion. The belt will partially encircle the waistband allowing the front of the clothing to be free and unencumbered, and pants, skirts or other garments may be unbuttoned, released and/or unzipped without disengaging the belting mechanisms.
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Claims(12)
1. An apparel belt assembly used to support clothing to a wearer while allowing the front of the garment to be unencumbered by said belt, the partial belt comprising:
a. A one piece elongated, flat, strap for partially surrounding the waistband of the clothing garment;
b. Said belt having an interior surface contacting the waistband facing the torso and an exterior surface facing away from the torso of the wearer;
b. Opposing first and second distal terminal free end portions and a medial portion;
c. An adjustable means for releasably securing the strap to the waistband of the wearer.
2 An apparel belt as specified in claim 1, wherein the elongated belting material is to be visibly worn on the exterior of a garment and laced generally through a plurality of adjacent belt loops on the torso-encircling waistband.
3. An apparel belt as specified in claim 1, wherein an identical adhering mechanism is securely attached to the exterior surface of said belting material at each terminal free end. The corresponding mate of the adhering mechanism is attached to the external surface of the longitudinal length of the medial portion of said belt in an end to end fashion.
4. An apparel belt as specified in claim 3, wherein the fastening surfaces comprise:
a. hook fasteners securely attached to the external surface of the two terminal free ends approximately 1-10 inches in length;
b. loop fasteners securely attached to the external surface in a linear fashion the full length of the medial portion butted up to the mating attachment on each terminal free end;
c. As an alternative, the location of the fastening mechanisms may be reversed on the terminal free ends and medial portion of the belting material.
5. An apparel belt as specified in claim 3, wherein the fastening surfaces comprise:
a. Snaps, hooks, buttons, magnets, clips and the like are securely attached to the external surface of the two terminal ends approximately 1-10 inches in length;
b. The corresponding mating material is securely attached to the external surface in a linear fashion the full length of the medial portion butted up to the mating attachment on each terminal free end;
c. As an alternative, the location of the fastening mechanisms may be reversed on the terminal free ends and medial portion of the belting material.
6. An apparel belt as specified in claim 1, wherein the fastening surfaces allow said belt to reverse back over the top of the front belt loop securing it to itself by attaching it to the mating mechanisms on the medial portion in an overlapping fashion. Thusly, creating a topside belt portion and an underneath belt portion. Covering and therefore concealing the belt loop elements and hiding the mating attachment running linear on the medial back side of said belting material.
7. An apparel belt as specified in claim 6, wherein said belt terminal free ends are reversed back on itself and pulled so the two front belt loops are being pulled away from each other and cinching the sides and back respectively tightening the waistband of the clothing article securely to the torso of the wearer.
8. An apparel belt as specified in claim 7, wherein both free ends are adjustably secured to the mating attaching materials on the medial portion forming a semi-circle as the belting material partially encircles the waistband and the front of the clothing is free and unencumbered of belting material, allowing the pants, skirt or other garment to be unbuttoned, released and/or unzipped without disengaging the belting mechanisms.
9. An apparel belts as specified in claim 8, wherein said belt does not necessarily interfere with the temporary or permanent removal, adjustment or placement of the clothing garment on the wearer. Specifically, the said belt does not require adjustment, removal or alteration for the garment to be temporarily or permanently removed, adjusted or placed on the wearer.
10. An apparel belt as specified in claim 1, wherein the length of the belting material is significantly greater than the circumference of the wearer to allow for sufficient overlap in order to maximize the decorative elements, minimize the visibility of the attachment mechanisms and provide a means to adjust the circumference of said belt.
11. An apparel belt as specified in claim 1, wherein the belting material is made of any suitable material such as cloth belted webbing, leather, cotton, polypropylene, vinyl, nylon, plastic and the like.
12. An apparel belt as specified in claim 1, wherein the belt width, thickness and strength can vary depending on the specific application but must be of sufficient width, thickness and strength to easily fit under said belt loops and have the strength to cinch the waistband and adequately support the clothing to the waist of the wearer.
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/004,597, filed on Nov. 29, 2007.
  • STATEMENT OF FEDERALLY SPONSERED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT
  • [0002]
    Not applicable.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    This invention relates to the clothing accessory commonly known as an apparel belt. More specifically, to an improved apparel belt construction that only partially encircles the waistband, dually engages upon itself, and allows the front of the garment to be unencumbered thusly providing a more suitable option for use by children, elderly and those with dexterity disabilities.
  • DESCRIPTION OF PRIOR ART
  • [0004]
  • [0000]
    641,489 January 1900 Bartelstone
    863,716 August 1907 Hunter
    1,607,156 November 1926 Godshaw
    2,562,386 July 1951 McCormick
    2,837,748 June 1958 Manning et al.
    3,001,204 September 1961 Harrison
    4,800,594 January 1989 Young
    4,999,853 March 1991 Tanner
    5,566,397 October 1996 Scott
    5,852,829 December 1998 Relaford
    6,449,815 September 2002 Spiller
    6,671,888 January 2004 Wallace
    6,779,201 August 2004 Pfrommer
    6,954,946 October 2005 Goldfarb et al.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0005]
    This invention relates to an improved apparel belt that provides a novel retaining means for supporting garments around the waist of a user in such a way that once attached to the waistband the said belt does not interfere with the temporary or permanent removal, adjustment or placement of the clothing garment.
  • [0006]
    The most common construction for apparel belts is an end-tab sewn to two free ends of a strap. A first end-tab has a buckle attached to it, and a second end-tab has an aligned plurality of holes. The two end-tabs completely encircle the torso and join together to form a complete loop in front of the clothing by inserting the second end-tab through the buckle's opening. Traditional garment belts use a variety of fastening mechanisms such as buckles, clasps, tied-knot system or snaps. But the one component most conventional apparel belts have in common, is they completely wrap around the torso of the wearer with the two free ends intersecting or joining together to form a complete loop around the waistband of a garment. The prior art referenced above, for this type of traditional belt, includes Wallace, U.S. Pat. No. 6,671,888; Tanner, U.S. Pat. No. 4,999,853; Pfrommer, U.S. Pat. No. 6,779,201 and Goldfarb et al., U.S. Pat. No. 6,954,946. The major drawback of all these traditional belt designs, is they require the wearer to physically detach and separate both free ends of the apparel belt when the clothing garment is altered, adjusted, put on and/or removed. Since pants, skirt or similar garment can not be unbuttoned or released without first disengaging the belt fastening mechanisms, this design can be cumbersome, time consuming, and may require assistance from a third party.
  • [0007]
    Other methods, developed to aid in the securing of clothing to the body of a wearer, have addressed some of the problems noted of conventional belts. For example, belts that partially encircle the waistband of the wearer have been created by Hunter, U.S. Pat. No. 863,716; McCormick, U.S. Pat. No. 2,562,386; Manning et al., U.S. Pat. No. 2,837,748; and Harrison, U.S. Pat. No. 3,001,204. These belts do not completely wrap around the torso of the wearer nor do they obstruct the front of the clothing garment. However, the solutions developed with the prior art of these inventors have several important drawbacks. In particular, the partial belt inventions by Hunter, U.S. Pat. No. 863,716; McCormick, U.S. Pat. No. 2,562,386; Manning et al., U.S. Pat. No. 2,837,748; and Harrison, U.S. Pat. No. 3,001,204 attaches the belting mechanism to the inside of the clothing garment typically located on the backside of the wearer. These belts are not intended to be visible so they don't serve a decorative function, the wearer may experience discomfort with the belting material coming into contact with the skin, and the bulge formed from the clothing fabric being cinched and gathered in a small area may look unappealing and also present physical discomfort for the wearer. In addition, some are made with hooks that may ultimately damage the clothing, and they are limited in the ease in which the wearer may make adjustments to accommodate various circumference sizes.
  • [0008]
    Other types of partial belts that have been developed to address the problems associated with traditional fully looped belts, are positioned on the outside of the clothing along a waistband and utilize a plurality of belt loops to attach the belt to the article of clothing. In particular, Godshaw, U.S. Pat. No.1,607,156 and Scott, U.S. Pat. No. 5,566,397. These external partial belt solutions also have limitations because the belting material covers the front portion of the clothing article and uses an adjustable slide, to allow for variations in circumference. This is an important drawback, because the belting article requires some degree of manual dexterity to remove the belt when the wearer removes or alters the clothing garment and therefore restricts the ease to which the wearer is able to adjust, put on or remove clothing.
  • [0009]
    Prior art of both traditional belts and partial belts, that obstruct the front of the clothing, require either one hand or both hands to operate and therefore need some degree of manual dexterity to adjust or release the belting material when the clothing is removed or altered. The level of dexterity needed to use the prior art presents difficulties for young children, the elderly, and those with conditions limiting hand mobility. Young children, who are potty training, frequently need to temporarily adjust and/or remove clothing and traditional belting systems are very difficult if not impossible for many to operate without assistance. Accidents related to the bladder occur because of the urgency required and the time consuming nature of unfastening conventional belts. Older children, who are in school, and need to use the restroom independently may also experience problems with fastening mechanisms that cover the front of the clothing and may not have the dexterity to remove or adjust a belt without assistance from an adult. Likewise, the elderly and those with physical disabilities who have lost dexterity in their hands may experience difficulties removing garments secured by a belt that covers the front of the clothing article. There has been great effort to assist those with disabilities to participate, to the greatest degree possible, in activities that are deemed normal in range. Consequently, the need for a belt design that is simple to operate, has ornamental value and once attached to the waistband does not need to be detached, reattached or altered in any way when temporarily or permanently removing the garment would be of great benefit
  • [0010]
    It is the primary objective of the present invention to provide a novel retaining means for supporting garments around the waist of a user in such a way that does not necessarily interfere with the temporary or permanent removal, adjustment or placement of the clothing garment.
  • [0011]
    Another object of the present invention is to provide an apparel belt that is highly adaptable to various circumference sizes of the wearer.
  • [0012]
    An object of the present invention is to provide an apparel belt that adds an element of ornamental value to enhance the physical appearance of the clothing option of the wearer.
  • [0013]
    A further object of the present invention is to provide a support strap that is simple to use, comfortable to wear and inexpensive to manufacture.
  • [0014]
    Accordingly, several advantages of the present invention are: (a) Parents, young children and/or older children will greatly benefit from the present invention during the process of potty training as it allows the child to remove clothing without needing to unfasten, adjust or remove the belting material every time they use the bathroom. The independence gained can help build confidence and self-esteem. (b) Accidents, related to the bladder, can be greatly reduced because the clothing item can be removed quickly and easily without the interference of a garment supporting strap. (c) Elementary schools, preschools and some daycares require all children to be able to use the restroom independent of any assistance. This belt invention will allow for children and parents to more easily comply with those requirements. (d) Children who are sensitive and/or inclined to have stomach problems often do not like anything constricting in the abdomen region. The present invention allows the abdomen area to be unrestricted and unencumbered with the belting material while the belt cinches the side and back. This allows for a more comfortable design conducive for children with sensory sensitivity. (e) Individuals with factors limiting manual dexterity such as the elderly, those suffering with neurological disorders, use of prosthetics hands, arthritis, and similar debilitating diseases, will more easily be able to operate the present invention in comparison to conventional belts.
  • [0015]
    Further objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent from a consideration of the drawings and ensuing description.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING
  • [0016]
    In the drawings, Velcro (trademark) is used as the attachment mechanism and should be regarded as merely illustrative:
  • [0017]
    FIG. 1 is a close up view of the construction of the exterior surface of the strap using Velcro (trademark) as the adhering mechanism.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 2 is a close up view of the construction of the interior surface of the strap with a decorative heart graphic as the ornamental material.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 3 is a front view of the present belt assembly in open condition.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 4 is a typical embodiment of the belt invention as it overlaps onto itself.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 5 is a typical embodiment of the belt invention in completed assembly in a closed position.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0022]
    Referring to FIG. 1 and FIG. 2, the present invention is an elongated, flat, strap 102 made of any suitable material with an exterior surface 103, an interior surface 104 a terminal first end portion 111, an opposing second terminal end portion 111 and an elongated medial portion 112. The belt 102 is intended to be visible and worn on the exterior of a garment for use with trousers, skirts, dresses or like garment that contains a plurality of external belt loops 101 around the waistband 106. Both opposing terminal free ends 111 of said belt 102 have identical methods for attachment 109 such as Velcro (trademark) hooks, clips, snaps, magnets, buttons, etc. or like engaging elements attached lengthwise approximately 1-10 inches in length to the exterior surface 103. The exterior surface 103, is defined as the side of the belting material that is facing away from the waistband 106 of the garment 105. The corresponding mate to the terminal free ends adhesive material (108) is attached lengthwise to the exterior surface 103 on the medial portion 112 and is adjacent or butted up to the mating attachment on both free ends 109 in an end-to-end fashion. As an alternative, the adhesive mating material attached to the terminal free ends 109 and medial portion 108 of the belt may be reversed in placement. To best illustrate the present invention, Velcro (trademark) as the attachment mechanism will be described. However any method of attachment such as snaps, magnets, buttons, hooks, clips and the like may be used.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 2 illustrates the interior surface 104 of said belt 102. The interior surface of said belt may be a solid color, decorated on its surface and/or covered with an ornamental material. The belting material may also be developed with particular features, including for example, decorative designs, sequence, and jewels. For illustrative purposes only, FIG. 2 is shown with a heart shaped graphic 110.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 3. is a perspective taken from the user's front view of the belt 102 as it is being used in the open position in accordance with the principles of this invention. The said belt 102 partially encircles the torso by placing one terminal free end 111 of the belt 102 with the attachment mechanisms 108 facing away from the waistband 106 under the first waistband loop 100 to the right or left of the apparel opening 107. Said belt (102) is then threaded around the back of the torso placing the belting material 102 under each adjacent waistband loop 101 until it reaches the first waistband loop 100 on the corresponding side of the apparel opening 107. Both opposing terminal free ends 111 do not connect, engage or intersect. The opposing two terminal free ends 111 of said belt 102 extend out from the front two belt loops 100 allowing the front of the clothing article to be unencumbered and free of said belting 102. The front of the garment 107, is defined as the location where the garment covers the abdomen region and/or where the pants or skirt open up and a button or snap and zipper area are located. The belt partially encircles the waist on the back and sides of the wearer but does not interfere with the front of the garment 107 and said belt 102 does not form a closed loop. Exemplary use of the belt is to loop the belting material through all adjacent belt loops 101 along the waistband 106 of the garment. However, the belt 102 will still function properly if loops are missed and the belting material 102 is not laced under all adjacent loops 101.
  • [0025]
    FIG. 4 and FIG. 5 illustrate how the belt reverses back onto itself in an overlapping fashion and is removably secured allowing the front of the garment to remain unencumbered with said belt. With the right hand, the wearer or caretaker engages the right side terminal free end 111 and reverses it back over the top of the front belt loop 100 securing it onto itself by attaching it to the right side of the medial portion 112 in an overlapping fashion. Thusly, creating a topside belt portion 114 and an underneath belt portion 115. Respectively, the wearer or caretaker will take the left side terminal free end portion 111, in one hand, and reverse it over the front left belt loop 100 and attach it to itself on the left side of the medial portion 112 in an overlapping fashion and again creating a topside belt portion 114 and an underneath belt portion 115. The two terminal free ends 111 are reversed back pulling the front two belt loops 100 away from each other, causing the garment to cinch on the sides and back respectively tightening the waistband 106 of the clothing article until the desired circumference of the waistband 106 is obtained. The belting material 102 that is reversed onto itself may be placed above the belt loops 101 or threaded back under the adjacent loops 101.
  • [0026]
    FIG. 5 is a view of the belt 102 and garment 105 when said belt is fully fastened around the garment and the free terminal ends 111 have folded over themselves and fully engaged themselves to the left and right of the garment opening 107 around the waistband 106.
  • [0027]
    To unfasten the belt 102, the wearer or caretaker will locate the two free ends 111 attached to the exterior surface 103 of the elongated strap. Using both hands, or one hand, the free ends 111 are grasped and pulled away from the waistband 106 to disengage the adhering material 108.
  • [0028]
    The belt 102 may be adjusted tighter or looser to ensure a comfortable fit for the wearer by adjusting the length of the overlap on either one or both free ends 111. A belt 102 of sufficient length is required to partially wrap around the torso of the wearer and allow for the belt to overlap onto itself creating a topside belt portion 114 and an underneath belt portion 115. Therefore, the length of the belt 102 is significantly longer than the circumference of the waistband 106 because of the extensive overlapping feature. In a preferred embodiment, the length of the belt 102 will overlap to at least the next adjacent belt loop but preferably to the next 2 adjacent belt loops to allow for any decorative elements 110 to be exposed and create a more attractive appearance by concealing the adhering material and revealing more of the optional decorative elements 110. This will also allow for maximum flexibility to adjust for circumference size. With respect to the strap 102, it can be made of any material such as cloth belted webbing, leather, cotton, polypropylene, vinyl, nylon, plastic and the like. The belt width, thickness and strength can vary depending on the width of the belt loops and what is most suitable for the specific application. The said belt may be a solid color, decorated on its surface and/or may be in a covering or sleeve of ornamental material. The belting material may also be developed with particular features, including for example, decorative designs, sequence, and jewels.
  • [0029]
    Obviously, numerous variations and modifications can be made without departing from the spirit of the present invention. Therefore, it should be clearly understood that the form of the present invention described above is not limited in its application to the details of construction, use and applications set forth in the descriptions and accompanying drawings. It is illustrative only and is not intended to limit the scope of the present invention.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US405761 *Jan 23, 1889Jun 25, 1889 Hip-belt
US1403974 *Dec 14, 1920Jan 17, 1922William NormanTrousers support and the like
US1607156 *Aug 19, 1925Nov 16, 1926Godshaw Alfred TTrouser belt
US2914070 *Feb 24, 1959Nov 24, 1959KellnerBody encircling garments
US4800594 *Dec 3, 1987Jan 31, 1989Youngstuff, Inc.Pants epaulet and binder
US5566397 *Dec 21, 1994Oct 22, 1996Scott; Alexander R.Shortened stretch belt for garments
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7908677 *Jun 2, 2008Mar 22, 2011Montgomery LatonyaInsert panel for pants
US7937776 *Jun 11, 2007May 10, 2011Anderson Shannon LShort belt for pants
US9339102 *Mar 15, 2013May 17, 2016323, LlcTactical dress belt assembly
US20100306902 *Dec 9, 2010Cheryl Ann BourqueMulti-use decorative accessory strap system
US20110167540 *Jul 14, 2011David Hugh LittleGarment Retention Device and Method of Use Thereof
US20110179554 *Jul 28, 2011Marni BumstedLow profile concealed belt
US20120060263 *Sep 9, 2011Mar 15, 2012Alyson HarberLightweight Decorative Belt
US20120180197 *Jul 15, 2011Jul 19, 2012Colette Gartner CoskyMagnetic closure fashion belt
US20130104292 *Nov 1, 2011May 2, 2013Yung-Fa SUBelt
US20130205476 *Jun 5, 2012Aug 15, 2013Dayna GentileWearer-Friendly Bootsie Garter with Magnetic Bra Strap Slider, Extended Snap Fastener, and Box Barrel Clasp
US20140259300 *Mar 15, 2013Sep 18, 2014David IosilevichTactical Dress Belt Assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/338
International ClassificationA41F9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41F9/002, A41D2300/32
European ClassificationA41F9/00B