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Publication numberUS20090265275 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/495,030
Publication dateOct 22, 2009
Filing dateJun 30, 2009
Priority dateMar 25, 2002
Also published asUS7899753, US20090271853
Publication number12495030, 495030, US 2009/0265275 A1, US 2009/265275 A1, US 20090265275 A1, US 20090265275A1, US 2009265275 A1, US 2009265275A1, US-A1-20090265275, US-A1-2009265275, US2009/0265275A1, US2009/265275A1, US20090265275 A1, US20090265275A1, US2009265275 A1, US2009265275A1
InventorsGlenn Cobourm EVERHART
Original AssigneeBank One, Delaware, National Association
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Systems and methods for time variable financial authentication
US 20090265275 A1
Abstract
The systems and methods of the invention provide a technique for authenticating a finance related transaction. The method may include providing a token which contains a token counter, the token counter periodically advancing to generate a changing token value, the token counter being synchronized to a base counter that generates an authenticating value; transforming the token value into a token output sequence using logic; and outputting at least part of the token output sequence to an authenticating authority, the authenticating authority having access to the authenticating value. Further, the method includes the authenticating authority verifying the validity of the transaction based on the token output sequence and the authenticating value, from which the authenticating authority obtains a verification sequence using the logic, the verifying the validity including the authenticating authority comparing the token output sequence to the verification sequence to determine if there is a match between the token output sequence and the verification sequence.
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Claims(14)
1-29. (canceled)
30. A system comprising:
a credit card providing a dynamically generated number for authenticating a financial transaction; and
a device for reading the dynamically generated number from the credit card and transmitting the dynamically generated number to an authenticating authority for authenticating the financial transaction.
31. The system of claim 30, further comprising:
a token counter, the token counter periodically advancing to generate a changing token value, the token counter being synchronized to a base counter that generates an authenticating value, wherein the dynamically generated number is based at least in part on the token value.
32. The system of claim 30, further comprising communicating the dynamically generated number wirelessly to the device.
33. The system of claim 30, further comprising communicating the dynamically generated number to the device via a magnetic stripe of the credit card.
34. The system of claim 30, wherein the credit card comprises a battery.
35. The system of claim 30, wherein the credit card comprises a processor for providing the dynamically generated number.
36. The system of claim 30, wherein the dynamically generated number comprises at least a portion of a credit card number.
37. The system of claim 30, wherein the dynamically generated number comprises an authentication code
38. The system of claim 30, wherein the credit card comprises a clock, the clock used to enable generation of the dynamically generated number.
39. The system of claim 38, wherein the clock is synchronized with a clock of the authenticating authority.
40. The system of claim 30, wherein the credit card further comprises a manual switch.
41. A method comprising:
providing on a payment card a dynamically generated number;
displaying on a display of the payment card the dynamically generated number; and
a device for reading the dynamically generated number from the credit card and transmitting the dynamically generated number to an authenticating authority for authenticating a transaction.
42. A machine readable medium, executable by a machine, that includes program logic imprinted thereon for performing the method comprising:
providing on a payment card a dynamically generated number;
displaying on a display of the payment card the dynamically generated number; and
a device for reading the dynamically generated number from the credit card and transmitting the dynamically generated number to an authenticating authority for authenticating a transaction.
Description

This application is a continuation-in-part application (CIP) of U.S. application Ser. No. 10/105,471 filed Mar. 25, 2002, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to systems and methods to perform authentication of a transaction between a requesting entity, in particular a customer, and an authenticating authority.

Since the ancient invention of money, problems of counterfeiting have existed. These problems have led to ever more sophisticated measures to make the injection of false tokens, representing value, from successfully being used in a transaction. When in much more recent times credit cards were introduced, such measures were incorporated. For example, in earlier times, only a check digit formed by a secret algorithm was used to validate card numbers, the number space being very sparsely occupied so that the chance of finding a valid card number was relatively low. Then thieves learned how to forge this digit. As a result secret cryptography-based codes were added to the cards and checked by the card issuer when charges to an account were made. These measures have been useful in reducing fraud until recently.

However, with the practice of merchants storing card numbers, including some of the codes, insecurely on the Internet, there have been enough thefts of these numbers so that fraud is becoming an increasingly difficult problem. Such fraud often occurs in cases where the cards are not physically present. Fraud is reduced somewhat where the card is physically present. That is, credit cards contain fraud avoidance devices like holograms which make counterfeiting of physical cards more difficult than counterfeiting numbers off the cards.

Further, rules designed to prohibit storing the secret codes have been ignored, even by large issuers and as a result a new way to prevent fraudulent card use for remote customers is becoming necessary. Smart cards using public key encryption have been introduced, but these have met with little acceptance, due to their need for gadgetry to read them, which is not widely available.

Known techniques in the area of time based codes reach back to ancient times, when the password of the day was common in military camps. The notion of using widely synchronized times to control functions dates at least to the philosophy of Gottfried Liebniz (coinventor of the calculus and a contemporary of Isaac Newton). During World War II, codebooks valid for a particular day were used by both sides. The use of time stamps in computer communication is almost as old as computing. An example of their use in authentication can be found in the Kerberos system (MIT, 1987). Financial transactions have been timestamped to avoid replay problems also.

However, known techniques fail to provide an approach to effectively use the advance of time as an effective authentication mechanism. The present invention addresses the above, as well as other problems, that are present in known techniques.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The systems and methods of the invention provide a technique for authenticating a finance related transaction. The method may include providing a token which contains a token counter, the token counter periodically advancing to generate a changing token value, the token counter being synchronized to a base counter that generates an authenticating value; transforming the token value into a token output sequence using logic; and outputting at least part of the token output sequence to an authenticating authority, the authenticating authority having access to the authenticating value. Further, the method includes the authenticating authority verifying the validity of the transaction based on the token output sequence and the authenticating value, from which the authenticating authority obtains a verification sequence using the logic, the verifying the validity including the authenticating authority comparing the token output sequence to the verification sequence to determine if there is a match between the token output sequence and the verification sequence.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention can be more fully understood by reading the following detailed description together with the accompanying drawings, in which like reference indicators are used to designate like elements, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a diagram showing a token in accordance with one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a block diagram showing a processing system in accordance with one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 3 is a block diagram showing an authenticating authority in accordance with one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 4 is a flowchart showing a “customer initiates transaction” process in accordance with one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 5 is a flowchart showing the “perform authentication process” in accordance with one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 6 is a flowchart showing the “perform verification process on the transaction” step of FIG. 5 in accordance with one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 7 is a flowchart showing the “calculate ‘verification sequence’ based on device number and time of transaction” process of FIG. 6 in accordance with one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 8 is a flowchart showing the “perform alternative processing to further process authorization” step of FIG. 6 in accordance with one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 9 is a diagram showing a token in a flashlight in accordance with one embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 10 is a block diagram showing a token using a twenty-four hour clock in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Hereinafter, features in accordance with various embodiments of the invention will be described. As used herein, any term in the singular may be interpreted to be in the plural, and alternatively, any term in the plural may be interpreted to be in the singular.

The present invention supplies a display on a consumer device, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention. The display displays an authentication code that varies with time. The “time” is synchronized to a known base time. An authenticating authority, such as the issuer for credit cards for example, can determine whether the correct code is being sent to it for a particular consumer device and for a particular transaction time. The time variability is obscured by a secret process on the consumer device to prevent those not in possession of the secret process from figuring out the code sequence. As a result, the authenticating authority can decide whether the requested transaction comes from a valid source. Because the display number is variable, it cannot be recorded on the Internet or elsewhere in a form useful for theft, save for very limited durations. Further such recorded numbers cannot be used to aid in impersonating a holder of a consumer device, e.g., a credit card, for purposes of identity theft. Widespread use of this invention will make telephone, network, or other remote commerce safer for all involved.

The token, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention, may be issued by an authenticating authority. An “authenticating authority” as used herein means either a central authority or a distributed authority, for example. The authenticating authority is capable of deciding whether to authorize transactions where a token is provided as a way to check the validity of authorizations, i.e., to permit them. The authenticating authority possesses authority to perform transactions in the scope of the invention including authority to effect a payment or authorize some other financial or financial-related transaction

In accordance with one embodiment of the invention, the invention uses what might be characterized as a token. The token is used to indicate authority to perform transactions. The token includes a token clock or token counter that can maintain synchronization with a reference clock, i.e., a base counter, during the lifetime of the token. This synchronization might be maintained to within one or a few times the interval between changes of identifier. In accordance with one embodiment of the invention, this might include a counter which “ticks”, i.e., changes value, one or a few times per day, for example.

Further, the token also includes a device or mechanism for performing a secret transform on the clock value. In accordance with one embodiment of the invention, this transformation might also involve some other separately observable attribute of the token, such as the credit card number or a cellular phone number. The token uses the secret transform, which is not available to the token holder, but that is reproducible by an authenticating authority. Further, the secret may be different for every such token so that if one is lost, only its secret is lost and other tokens remain secure. The result of this transform, or part of the result of the transform, is displayed by the token in such a way that the displayed number can be read by a person or device, i.e., whatever might read the token, and transmitted to an authenticating authority. Optionally, such an authority might demand that additional memorized digits or some other identifying indicia be supplied. This other indicia would further preclude use of a stolen token. That is, the token as described herein may be used with any other known authentication technique, as desired.

In accordance with one embodiment of the invention, the invention may be in the form so as to resemble a credit card. In addition to the existing credit card fields, i.e., such as magnetic stripe, for example, the card in accordance with one embodiment of the invention is provided with a small processor and battery. Further, the card includes a display that is visible on the card. The display shows a few digits computed by a secret process on the card. One such implementation might take a secret master key known to the issuer and encrypt the card account number and expiration with this master key. This diversified key then gets stored on the card. Further, it is noted that the diversified key may be different for each card.

As noted above, a clock computes a value that is transformed and then displayed on the token. That is, the token first reads the clock. The clock may be in the form of a counter of some type. For example, the clock for a certain batch of credit cards might advance based on the “hours since midnight on Jan. 1, 2001”. Further, the credit cards might be synchronized when issued. In accordance with one embodiment of the invention, the initial value generated by the clock is encrypted with the diversified key.

Further, only the low three decimal digits of the result are displayed on the display, for example, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention. Of course, it is appreciated that any number of digits or selection of digits may be used, as is desired. Physically, the invention will not pose a problem since there currently exists flexible numeric displays much thinner than credit cards. Should power be limited to drive such a display all the time for a few years, a pushbutton or other switch might be present to conserve power.

When the credit card holder of the token of the invention makes a phone purchase or a net purchase, for example, he or she then reads the display, and possibly recites some other digits she is given to retain or memorize, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention. For example, such other digits might be the fixed CVV code (card validation value) on the back of the credit card. The credit card holder then furnishes such information to a merchant. The merchant then sends the information to the issuer, or some other authenticating authority, for validation.

The authenticating authority receives the card number, timestamp of the transaction, the token value and any added data. The authenticating authority then derives the diversified key from the card number and the master secret the particular card holds and/or reads such information from storage. Further, the authenticating authority checks the timestamp supplied for sanity, i.e., performs a crude reasonableness test, and uses the timestamp to derive the expected on-card clock value. The authenticating authority then encrypts this clock value with the diversified key and compares with the value supplied by the customer.

So as to avoid clock drift problems, the authenticating authority may compare adjacent timeslot values for the comparison operation. The authenticating authority then treats these adjacent timeslot values as matches if one of them produces the same code as was reported. The exact number of these comparisons depends on expected maximum clock drift on card over the card lifetime, i.e., two to three years, for example, and may be varied as desired. For example if it is expected the clock might drift under an hour, and the clock changes value at midnight, then transactions after 11 PM might be compared also with the next day's code, and similarly transactions before 1 AM might be compared with the prior day's code. In this way the card user never sees any effects of the clock changing during his transaction.

In accordance with further aspects of the invention, as noted above, a variety of other values may be supplied to a token holder for use in authenticating transactions. These other values can be recorded by the authenticating authority, or alternatively, can be computed by such an operation as encrypting the card number with a second secret key and using part of such resulting number. This additional number is entered when making a transaction, along with the displayed number, by the cardholder. Such added information makes a token less useful to someone who stole the token, as they would have to guess the correct check digits or digits to fool the authenticating authority.

Further, it may be desirable for the values, which the token displays, to be related mathematically to some separate observable about the token, e.g., such as a cellular phone number. For example, a second identifier built into the token may be used mathematically for computation of the value displayed by the display on the token. For tokens of the nature of credit cards, the preferred implementation encrypts the card number. For tokens like cell phones, there is a phone ID number which could be used. Such practice would make it harder to forge tokens and will be found to be of particular use for tokens in which the internal state cannot be hidden well from users, i.e., the internal state meaning a cell phone number, for example. In those cases where the internal state cannot be hidden, it may be desired to use other identifiers, in addition to the token value described herein, in order to gain the added protection against fraud.

As described herein, one embodiment of the invention uses a token resembling a credit card. However, any of a wide variety of tokens may be used. Accordingly, as used herein a “token” means a device which is presented or which bears information which is presented by someone to set up a payment or similarly authorize some financial or financial-related transaction. Accordingly, a token of the invention may be in a wide variety of forms including a token in the form of a credit card, or a gasoline-buying “speedpass,” for example. Accordingly, the token in the invention may be in the form of credit card or debit card type device possessing a display to be read by the cardholder, a credit card type device having a magnetic strip, a radio frequency generating device, an infrared signal generating device, an audio signal generating device, a magnetic pattern generating device, and/or other devices for outputting a data signal, i.e., such as a PDA (personal digital assistance) outputting a data signal to a computer or to a cashier, for example.

Further, as described herein, the token of the invention generates a “display.” As used herein, a “display” means whatever sends information off the token for authentication checks. For credit card type tokens, the display might be some visible display. For other types of tokens, the display might be a radio or audio signal, or magnetic patterns, for example. Accordingly, a “display” in a token of the invention may illustratively be an LED (light emitting diode), an LCD (liquid crystal display), a magnetic strip, a radio frequency signal, an infrared signal, an audio signal, a magnetic pattern, any other data signal, or any other technique that may be used to convey information from the token to the merchant, and in turn to the authenticating authority, for example. As is appreciated, interim steps may be needed such as a human cardholder reading the token output sequence and inputting the token output sequence into a computer via a keyboard or to a human merchant verbally, for example.

As described in various examples herein, the token of the invention may be used in an interaction between a customer and a merchant. However, the token of the invention may be used in a variety of other situations between any of a wide variety of entities. For example, the treasurer of a corporation might use the token described herein to validate instructions to a bank, i.e., regarding a desired transaction, for example. Accordingly, the token of the invention might be used in conjunction with transactions between two banks or between any other institutions or entities, for example.

The checking is preferably done off the token, although a central authority's processing might be replaced in some cases by some combination of other processing with perhaps other tokens whose trust is established in other ways, e.g., such as biometrics, for example, to allow local checking of such tokens for authenticity. That is, the token of the invention may well be used in conjunction with other authentication checks, such as simply a credit card number, for example; and the authenticating authority may be made up of separate portions so as to collectively perform the verification process.

Hereinafter, further aspects of the systems and methods of the invention will be described with reference to the drawings. FIG. 1 is a diagram showing a token 100 in accordance with one embodiment of the invention. As shown in FIG. 1, the token 100 includes a device number 110. While the token 100 is shown in FIG. 1 as being similar to a credit card, it is appreciated that the token 100 may be in any of a wide variety of shapes and sizes.

As shown in FIG. 1, the token 100 also includes a magnetic strip 120. Further, the token 100 includes a token output sequence 130, i.e., a number, that is presented by a display 132. The token output sequence 130 is generated by the token 100 based on the progression of a clock, as described above, for example. In order to conserve energy of the token 100, the token output sequence 130 might not be displayed at all times. That is, the holder of the token 100, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention, presses the power display button 140 to display the token output sequence 130. Such action results in a token output sequence being displayed and visible to the holder. As shown in FIG. 1, the token 100 may also include a signature panel 150 to provide further verification of the veracity of the holder.

To explain further, the token output sequence 130 is generated using a token counter 160. The token counter 160 generates a token value. This token value is output within a token 100 to an encryption portion 170. The encryption portion 170 provides logic to process the token value to result in the token output sequence 130. Both the progression of the token counter 160 as well as the logic used in the encryption portion 170 is known and simulated by a verification or authenticating authority so as to verify a transaction by the holder of the token 100.

The embodiment of FIG. 1 utilizes a display 132 to display the token output sequence 130. However, is appreciated that the token output sequence 130 may be displayed using a variety of techniques, as is further described below. For example, the token output sequence 130 might be input into the magnetic strip 120, i.e., so as to be output to a merchant, for example.

FIG. 2 is a block diagram showing a processing system 10 in accordance with one embodiment of the invention. As shown in FIG. 2, the processing system 10 includes a customer token 100. Further, the processing system 10 includes a merchant entity 200 and an authenticating authority 300.

In accordance with one embodiment of the invention, the customer token 100 takes the form of the device shown in FIG. 1. Further, the merchant entity 200 may be in any of a wide variety of forms such as merchant disposed in a physical merchant store, an internet entity, a receiver such as on a toll road device, a telephone entity, as well as a wide variety of other arrangements, as should be appreciated. Further, as shown in FIG. 2, the token 100 may be disposed in a variety of devices, such as in a flashlight, key chain, cellular phone, a personal digital assistant, and/or a watch, for example.

FIG. 3 is a block diagram showing in further detail the authenticating authority 300. The authenticating authority 300 includes a general processing portion 310 and a general memory portion 320. The general processing portion 310 controls overall operations of the various components disposed in the authenticating authority 300. Further, the general memory portion 320 provides a wide variety of memory resources to the authenticating authority 300.

The authenticating authority 300 further includes an input portion 330. The input portion 330 inputs information necessary to verify a transaction performed using the token 100. Illustratively, the input portion 330 inputs a device number from a token, the time the transaction, as well as a token output sequence. The authenticating authority 300 further includes a base counter 350. The base counter 350 outputs an authenticating value based on the transaction time, which is received from the token 100. This authenticating value is created using processing performed in parallel to the token counter 160. Specifically, the base counter 350 simulates the output that the token counter 160 would have generated at the time of the transaction.

Further, the authenticating authority 300 includes an encryption portion 360. The encryption portion 360 calculates a verification sequence in the same secret logic as in the token 100. In the authenticating authority 300, the encryption portion 360 operates in conjunction with the secret logic memory portion 370 to generate the verification sequence. For example, the secret logic memory portion might use the device number to determine which logic to apply to the verification sequence, e.g., using a look-up table, for example.

In accordance with one embodiment of the invention, it is noted that the logic might use the device number in mathematical processing of the authenticating value, or, in the token, the logic might use the device number in mathematical processing of the token value.

Further, the authenticating authority 300 includes a comparison portion 380. The comparison portion 380 uses the verification sequence, which is generated within the authenticating authority 300, and compares such verification sequence with the input “token output sequence,” which is input from the token 100.

FIG. 4 is a flow chart showing a customer process in accordance with one embodiment of the invention. As shown in FIG. 4, the process starts in step 500 in which the customer initiates a transaction. After step 500, the process passes to step 510. In step 510, the customer reads, or in some other manner conveys, the device number to the merchant. Then, in step 520, with reference to the embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 1, the customer presses the power display button. As a result, the token output sequence is displayed for viewing by the customer. Accordingly, in step 530, the customer reads the token output sequence to the merchant. In conjunction with step 530, the customer device, i.e., the token 100, for example, calculates the token output sequence based on a token value generated in the token, i.e., based on the progression of the clock in the token. After step 530 of FIG. 4, the process passes to step 540. In step 540, the customer input to the transaction is completed.

FIG. 5 is a flow chart showing an authenticating authority process in accordance with one embodiment of the invention. As shown in FIG. 5, the process starts in step 600 and passes to step 610. In step 610, the authenticating authority obtains the device number from the customer. Then, in step 620, the authenticating authority obtains the token output sequence number from the customer. After 620, the process passes to step 630. In step 630, the authenticating authority also inputs the time of the transaction, i.e., which may be obtained from the merchant in accordance with one embodiment of the invention. Accordingly, each of the items of information input in steps 610, 620 and 630 are obtained from the customer and/or the merchant and may typically be transmitted from the customer through the merchant so as to be input by the authenticating authority.

Returning to FIG. 5, after step 630, the process passes to step 640. In step 640, the authenticating authority performs a verification process on the transaction. FIG. 6 is a flowchart showing in further detail step 640. After step 640 of FIG. 5, the process passes to step 800. In step 800, the verification process is completed.

As noted above, FIG. 6 is a flowchart showing in further detail the “perform verification process on the transaction.” As shown in FIG. 6, the process starts in step 640 and passes to step 650. In step 650, the process, i.e., performed by the authenticating authority, calculates a “verification sequence” based on the device number and the time of transaction, which has been input. Then, in step 660, the authenticating authority compares the “token output sequence” input from the customer with the “verification sequence”. After step 650, the process passes to step 670.

In step 670, as shown in FIG. 6, the process determines whether the token output sequence that is input from the customer matches with the verification sequence that is generated within the authenticating authority. If yes, i.e., there is a match, then the process passes to step 672. In step 672, the transaction is authorized. After step 672, the process passes to step 699.

Alternatively, it may be the situation that in step 670, the token output sequence does not match with the verification sequence. As a result, the processes passes from step 670 to step 680. In step 680, an initial determination is made that the transaction is not authorized. However, this is merely an initial determination. That is, after step 680, the process passes to step 690. In step 690, the process performs alternative processing to further consider the authorization. That is, the process performs further processing to ascertain whether the transaction was indeed a valid transaction. FIG. 8 is a flowchart showing in further detail step 690. After 690 of FIG. 6, the process passes to step 699

In step 699, the process may perform a supplemental transaction validation, as is necessary or desired. That is, it is appreciated that there may be other criteria that makes an authenticator decide to allow the transaction or not. For example suppose a transaction is coming supposedly from Seattle and the authenticating authority experienced a transaction, with the same token, from New York 10 minutes ago. The authenticating authority might want to decline this transaction even if the authorization number appeared to be correct. Likewise even if the transaction is not authorized, maybe the issuer will determine the electronics have glitched and he may use other information, ask the merchant for other information, or just warn the merchant and let the merchant decide whether to go ahead anyway, i.e., since the merchant will bear any loss. After step 699, the process passes to step 700. In step 700, the process returns to step 800 of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a flowchart showing in further detail step 650 of FIG. 6 “calculate verification sequence based on device number and time of transaction.” After the sub-process of FIG. 7 starts, the process passes from step 650 to step 652. In step 652, the process determines the “authenticating value” based on the time of transaction. Then, in step 654, the process determines the “secret logic” based on the device number. That is, it is appreciated that different logics may be used for different devices. The device number, or some other identifying indicia that may be associated with a particular device, may be used to determine which logic should be applied by the authenticating authority. After step 654, the process passes to step 656. In step 656, the process proceeds with applying the secret logic to the “authenticating value” to determine, in turn, the “verification sequence”. After step 656, the process passes to step 658. In step 658, the process returns to step 660 of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a flowchart showing in further detail the “perform alternative processing to further process authorization” step 690 of FIG. 6. In particular, the process of FIG. 8 relates to the situation where clock drift has occurred between the clock in the authenticating authority as compared with the clock in the token 100. Such drift between the clocks may result in an initial finding that a transaction is not valid. However, the process of FIG. 8 addresses a potential incorrect finding of an invalid transaction.

To explain, the process of FIG. 8 starts in step 690 and passes to step 692. In step 692, the process determines whether the time of transaction is near the beginning of a clock interval, i.e., is the time of the transaction near the time that the clock in the authenticating authority experienced a change. If yes in step 692, then the process passes to step 693. In step 693, the process recalculates the verification sequence based on the previous base counter setting. After step 693, the process passes to step 697.

Alternatively, in step 692, the process may have determined that the time of the transaction is not at the beginning of a clock interval. As a result, the process passes to step 694. In step 694, the process, as illustratively performed by the authenticating authority, determines whether the time of the transaction is near the end of a clock interval. If yes, then the process passes from step 694 to step 695. In step 695, the process recalculates the “verification sequence” based on the next base counter setting. Then, the process passes to step 697.

In step 697, the process determines whether the token output sequence input by the customer matches with the recalculated verification sequence. That is, step 697 checks whether the previous or the next clock setting of step 693 and step 695, respectively, result in a match between the token output sequence and the verification sequence. If yes, then the process passes to step 698. That is, if there is indeed a match then the transaction is authorized. After step 698, the process passes to step 698′. Alternatively, in step 697, there may still not be a match between the token output sequence input by the customer and the recalculated verification sequence. As a result, the process passes to step 697′ and the transaction is not authorized. After step 697′, the process passes to step 698′.

As noted above, in step 694 of FIG. 8, the process determines whether the time of the transaction is near the end of a clock interval. Further, step 692 determined if the transaction is near the beginning of a clock interval. If neither of the situations is present, then the process passes to step 696. In step 696, the process determines that the transaction is indeed not authorized. As a result, the process passes to step 698′. However, it is appreciated that more then the immediately adjacent intervals may be considered. For example if the clock advances relatively quickly, this results in a potential for substantial clock drift. As a result, it may be desired to check three, for example, (or as many as desired) intervals before the initially considered interval, as well as three subsequent intervals, for example.

In step 698′, the process returns to step 699 and then to step 700 of FIG. 6. As noted above, in step 700 of FIG. 6, the process returns to step 800 of FIG. 5 in which the verification process is terminated.

In accordance with a further embodiment of the invention, FIG. 9 is a diagram showing a token 100′ disposed in a flashlight 700. The token 100′ may operate in a similar manner to the token 100, as shown in FIG. 1. The flashlight 700 may include batteries 702. In accordance with one embodiment of the invention, the batteries 702 may power operations of the token 100′. As described above, the token 100′ generates a token output sequence, and transmits the token output sequence to a merchant 200. This transmission may be in a variety of forms, as is shown in FIG. 9. In turn, the merchant 200 outputs the token output sequence, as well as a time stamp and a token device number, which is also obtained from the token, to the authenticating entity 300.

In accordance with a yet further embodiment of the invention, FIG. 10 is a block diagram showing a token 800 that may operate in a similar manner to the token 100. The token 800 includes an encryption portion 870 and a display 880. The encryption portion 870 provides the logic to convert the token value into the token output sequence, as described above. This logic may take on a variety of forms so as to manipulate the token value, as is desired, i.e., such as a mathematical manipulation of the token value, for example. The token counter of the embodiment of FIG. 10 includes a clock 862 and a tick reduction portion 864. The clock may be a standard twenty-four hour clock, but may preferably be a digital clock, i.e., such that a digital output may be output to the tick reduction portion 864.

The tick reduction portion 864 works off the advancement of the clock 862 to generate the token values. However, the tick reduction portion 864 advances at a much slower rate. For example, for every 12 hours that the clock 862 advances, the tick reduction portion 864 may only advance once. As is noted above, such reduced advancement reduces the effects of clock drift between the token and the authenticating authority.

In accordance with further aspects of the invention, it is appreciated that the token value, the token output sequence, the authenticating value, and the verification sequence, for example, may be numbers, letters, symbols, punctuation and/or any other character set, for example. However, the particular composition of the token value, as well as the corresponding authenticating value, should be such that such values may advance in a routine manner.

As described above, the systems and methods of the invention rely upon time stamping in accordance with embodiments of the invention. Accordingly, a variety of techniques may be used to address different time zones. For example, one time zone may be designated as a standard and all time stamps converted to this standard.

As described above, methods and systems are disclosed which permit tokens used for finance to be checked for authenticity by having the tokens display an authentication code that varies with time, yet can be validated by the token validation authority. Because the authentication code changes, such codes may not readily be stored and stolen, as is a problem in existing codes. The invention reduces fraud for all involved where there is risk that a token might be a forgery.

It will be readily understood by those persons skilled in the art that the present invention is susceptible to broad utility and application. Many embodiments and adaptations of the present invention other than those herein described, as well as many variations, modifications and equivalent arrangements, will be apparent from or reasonably suggested by the present invention and foregoing description thereof without departing from the substance or scope of the invention.

Accordingly, while the present invention has been described here in detail in relation to its exemplary embodiments, it is to be understood that this disclosure is only illustrative and exemplary of the present invention and is made to provide an enabling disclosure of the invention. Accordingly, the foregoing disclosure is not intended to be construed or to limit the present invention or otherwise to exclude any other such embodiments, adaptations, variations, modifications and equivalent arrangements.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification705/44
International ClassificationG06Q20/00, G07F7/10
Cooperative ClassificationG06Q20/0855, G06Q20/401, G06Q20/388, G06Q20/382, G07F7/1016, G06Q20/40, G06Q20/40975, G06Q20/3674, G06Q20/341, G07F7/1008
European ClassificationG06Q20/3674, G06Q20/388, G06Q20/341, G06Q20/382, G06Q20/40, G06Q20/40975, G06Q20/401, G06Q20/0855, G07F7/10E, G07F7/10D