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Publication numberUS20090293793 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/131,479
Publication dateDec 3, 2009
Filing dateJun 2, 2008
Priority dateJun 2, 2008
Publication number12131479, 131479, US 2009/0293793 A1, US 2009/293793 A1, US 20090293793 A1, US 20090293793A1, US 2009293793 A1, US 2009293793A1, US-A1-20090293793, US-A1-2009293793, US2009/0293793A1, US2009/293793A1, US20090293793 A1, US20090293793A1, US2009293793 A1, US2009293793A1
InventorsCharlie Silver
Original AssigneeCharlie Silver
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Manual Pole Anchoring System
US 20090293793 A1
Abstract
A manual pole anchoring system for a trolling motor at a bow of a watercraft which comprises an elongated conduit assembly; means for securing said elongated conduit assembly in a spaced apart vertical position away from a vertical shaft of the trolling motor; an elongated pole assembly which passes through said conduit assembly; and means for locking said elongated pole assembly in a manually adjusted position within said conduit assembly, wherein said elongated pole assembly can extend down to a given depth into a seafloor to anchor the watercraft at the bow, while another type of device can anchor the watercraft at the stem to best position the watercraft with respect to a desired location while factoring in direction of the wind.
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Claims(7)
1. A manual pole anchoring system for a trolling motor at a bow of a watercraft which comprises:
a) an elongated conduit assembly secured to a vertical shaft of the trolling motor;
b) an elongated pole assembly which passes through said conduit assembly; said elongated pole assembly locking in a manually adjusted position within said conduit assembly, wherein said elongated pole assembly can extend down to a desired depth into a seafloor.
2. The anchoring system as recited in claim 1, wherein said elongated conduit assembly comprises:
a) a sleeve having an internally threaded bottom end and an internally threaded top end;
b) two nylon bushings, wherein each said bushing is inserted into said internally threaded bottom end and into said internally threaded top end of said sleeve;
c) a bottom cap having an externally threaded top shank with a bore extending therethrough, wherein said externally threaded top shank threads into said internally threaded bottom end of said sleeve; and
d) a top cap having an externally threaded bottom shank with a bore extending therethrough, wherein said externally threaded bottom shank threads into said internally threaded top end of said sleeve.
3. The anchoring system as recited in claim 2, wherein said elongated conduit assembly further comprises:
a) two mounting brackets, in which each said mounting bracket has a pair of spaced apart apertures therethrough, wherein said first aperture engages with the vertical shaft of the trolling motor, while said second aperture engages with said sleeve of said elongated conduit assembly; and
b) a plurality of screws, in which said screws hold said mounting brackets in place.
4. The anchoring system as recited in claim 3, wherein said elongated pole assembly comprises:
a) a rod having a top end and a bottom end comprising a pointed tip; and
b) a T handle secured to said top end of said rod, whereby a person can grasp said T handle to lower and raise said rod.
5. The anchoring system as recited in claim 4, wherein said locking means comprises a gimble knob which threads into a side threaded aperture in said top cap to bear against said rod and hold it in place.
6. A trolling motor comprising a trolling motor shaft and an elongated assembly integrated with said trolling motor shaft, and an elongated pole assembly which passes through said conduit assembly; said elongated pole assembly locking in a manually adjusted position within said conduit assembly, wherein said elongated pole assembly can extend down to a desired depth into a seafloor.
7. The manual pole anchoring system of claim 1 further comprising a locking mechanism for locking the pole assembly at a desired position relative to the elongated conduit assembly, the locking mechanism comprising:
a locking sleeve that is situated at a top end of the elongated conduit assembly, the locking sleeve comprising a locking sleeve top end and bottom end, wherein the locking sleeve bottom end is rigidly secured to the elongated assembly and wherein the locking sleeve top end has threads defined thereon;
a channel defined in said locking sleeve through which the pole assembly passes through, said channel comprising a tapered channel portion defined in the top end of the locking sleeve;
a tapered bushing positioned within the tapered channel portion, said tapered bushing comprising a channel defined therein through which the pole assembly passes; and
a twist nut that screws over top of the tapered bushing and onto the threads of locking sleeve top end, wherein tightening the twist nut serves to lock the elongated pole assembly at a desired position.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a boat anchor, and more particularly, a manual pole anchoring system.

BACKGROUND

Fishing continues to grow in popularity as a competitive sport. This growth has prompted the invention of many fishing aids designed to assist the fisherman. When fishing in shallow waters, fishermen frequently need to maintain the position of their boat with the trolling motor. Wind and currents generally cause the boat to drift away from the desired position, demanding the fisherman's constant attention to boat position. Additionally, in certain types of fishing, such as “flipping and pitching” or “salt water flats fishing,” fisherman work their way along the bank, stopping momentarily in a location, then moving their boat a short distance up the bank and stopping again to fish. Presently, fishermen maintain the position of their boat with constant maneuvering of the trolling motor. As a result, fishermen have a need to be able to quickly anchor, release, and re-anchor their boat over and over while fishing without being distracted from their fishing activities. The ability to quickly anchor, release and re-anchor would be helpful to all fishermen, but particularly those involved in competitive fishing.

A trolling motor is the most common means of navigating in shallow or hazardous water at a slow speed but fails to provide any provisions for stopping the boat. If a boat is taken near the shoreline for fishing, the trolling motor makes the boat sail, often into the shoreline damaging the boat or quickly through schools of fish. Stumps often provide the most hazardous damage to boats and are capable of damaging the trolling motor as well.

Poles are sometimes used to manually propel a flats fishing boat (e.g., when trying to approach fish that would be spooked by the sound of an engine). In these cases, the fisherman may provide some sort of pole-retaining hardware (e.g., a vertically disposed pipe having two open ends and a diameter substantially greater than that of the pole may be fastened to the boat hull) to hold the boat to the pole after the pole is thrust more or less vertically into the bottom. Such arrangements fix the position of the boat much more securely, and cause substantially less damage to sea grass beds than does anchoring. This approach is not widely used, as poling is slow and laborious, and the great majority of flats fishermen do not carry or use poles.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,626,887 issued on Dec. 14, 1971, to Schutt et al. teaches a trolling attachment for boats that comprises a mounting bracket for attachment to one side of a boat and having a tubular support sleeve within which is rotatably and slideably accommodated a rod at the lower of which is secured a flat, substantially planer blade. The blade may be so oriented to the longitudinal axis of the boat as to impede forward progress thereof or to deter lateral drift of the boat. The blade is adjustable vertically to positions either above or below the boat keel. The supporting sleeve is adjustable relative to the mounting bracket so as to enable the blade supporting rod to be positioned in a vertical plane, regardless of the configuration of the boat.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,041,730 issued on Mar. 28, 2000, to Oliverio et al. teaches a shallow water anchoring mechanism for a vessel that drives an upper arm between a raised position, in which the lower end of a pole is above the bottom of the hull and a lowered position, in which the lower end of the pole extends downward below the vessel so as to engage the bottom of a shallow body of water. This provides a shallow-water anchoring arrangement for a boat that does a minimum amount of damage to sea life, including oysters, and grasses or other vegetation growing on the bottom of the water, and allows a boater to anchor in shallow water and to leave the anchorage without bringing mud, grasses, or other debris into the boat. A manual disconnect arrangement allows the boater to pull the pole out of the water in the event of actuator or power supply failure.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,220,197 issued on Apr. 24, 2001, to Pohlman teaches a device for operating and anchoring a watercraft in congested and hazardous water areas is provided with a spud assembly for easy operation. A pole is provided for moving a watercraft in shallow water. The pole functions through an operating cylinder connected to a maneuvering ring. The spud assembly has a locking device for locking the maneuvering ring and the operating cylinder against movement in order to anchor the watercraft with the pole.

It is apparent now that different watercraft anchoring devices are present in the prior art that are adequate for various purposes. However, the aforementioned references do not disclose the elements of embodiments of the present invention and fail to contemplate the unique and advantageous aspects of various embodiments of the invention.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Certain embodiments of the present invention provide a manual pole anchoring system that is mounted to a trolling motor and is simple to use.

One embodiment of the present invention provides a manual pole anchoring system for a trolling motor at a bow of a watercraft which comprises an elongated conduit assembly; means for securing said elongated conduit assembly in a spaced apart vertical position away from a vertical shaft of the trolling motor; an elongated pole assembly which passes through the conduit assembly; and a mechanism for locking the elongated pole assembly in a manually adjusted position within the conduit assembly, wherein the elongated pole assembly can extend down to a given depth into a seafloor to anchor the watercraft at the bow, while another type of device can anchor the watercraft at the stern to best position the watercraft with respect to a desired location while factoring in direction of the wind.

The novel features which are considered characteristics of certain embodiments of the present invention are set forth in the appended claims. Embodiments of the invention relating to construction and method of operation embodiments, together with additional advantages thereof, will be best understood from the following description of the specific embodiments when read and understood in connection with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The figures of the drawings are briefly described as follows:

FIG. 1 a-c shows is a side perspective view 1 a of a fishing boat showing an embodiment of the present invention vertically attached to a trolling motor, a side perspective view 1 b of an embodiment in an upright position and a perspective view 1 c of an embodiment in a folded position;

FIG. 2 is a is an enlarged perspective view of the present invention and a portion of the trolling motor shaft;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view taken in the direction of arrow 3 in FIG. 2 showing the outer tube in greater detail;

FIG. 4 is a top view taken in the direction of arrow 4 in FIG. 2 showing one of the mounting brackets in greater detail;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of one of the bushings shown in phantom in FIG. 2 in greater detail;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged perspective view of the bottom cap taken in the direction of arrow 6 in FIG. 2;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged perspective view of the top cap with the gimble knob taken in the direction of arrow 7 in FIG. 2;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged perspective view of the rod taken in the direction of arrow 8 In FIG. 2; and

FIG. 9 is a front elevational view taken in the direction of arrow 9 in FIG. 2 showing the T handle in greater detail.

FIG. 10 is a side view of a portion of an alternative locking mechanism embodiment.

FIG. 11 is a see-through side view of the alternative locking mechanism shown in FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 shows a side-view of a section of an alternative embodiment of the invention.

Reference Numerals Utilized in the Drawings

  • 10 manual pole anchoring system
  • 12 trolling motor
  • 14 bow of watercraft 16
  • 16 watercraft
  • 18 elongated conduit assembly of anchoring system 10
  • 20 securing mechanism of anchoring system 10
  • 22 vertical shaft of trolling motor 12
  • 24 elongated pole assembly of anchoring system 10
  • 26 locking mechanism of anchoring system 10
  • 28 another type of anchor device
  • 30 stem of watercraft 16
  • 32 aluminum sleeve of elongated conduit assembly 18
  • 34 internally threaded bottom end of sleeve 32
  • 36 internally threaded top end of sleeve 32
  • 38 nylon bushing of elongated conduit assembly 18
  • 40 aluminum bottom cap of elongated conduit assembly 18
  • 42 externally threaded top shank of bottom cap 40
  • 44 bore in bottom cap 40
  • 46 aluminum top cap of elongated conduit assembly 18
  • 48 externally threaded bottom shank of top cap 46
  • 50 bore in top cap 40
  • 52 mounting bracket of securing mechanism 20
  • 54 first aperture in mounting bracket 52
  • 56 second aperture in mounting bracket 52
  • 58 stainless steel screw of securing mechanism 20
  • 60 fiberglass rod of elongated pole assembly 24
  • 62 bottom pointed tip of rod 60
  • 64 internally threaded top end of rod 60
  • 66 plastic T handle of elongated pole assembly 24
  • 68 stainless steel externally threaded post of T handle 66
  • 70 stainless steel gimble knob for locking mechanism 28
  • 72 side threaded aperture in top cap 46
DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Referring now to the figures, in which like numerals indicate like parts, and particularly to FIGS. 1 through 9, which are a side perspective view of a fishing boat showing an embodiment of the present invention vertically attached to a trolling motor; an enlarged perspective view of the present invention and a portion of the trolling motor shaft; a perspective view taken in the direction of arrow 3 in FIG. 2 showing the outer tube in greater detail; a top view taken in the direction of arrow 4 in FIG. 2 showing one of the mounting brackets in greater detail; a perspective view of one of the bushings shown in phantom in FIG. 2 in greater detail; an enlarged perspective view of the bottom cap taken in the direction of arrow 6 in FIG. 2; an enlarged perspective view of the top cap with the gimble knob taken in the direction of arrow 7 in FIG. 2; an enlarged perspective view of the rod taken in the direction of arrow 8 in FIG. 2; and a front elevational view taken in the direction of arrow 9 in FIG. 2 showing the T handle in greater detail, and as such, will be discussed with reference thereto.

According to an embodiment, the present invention pertains to a manual pole anchoring system 10 for a trolling motor 12 at a bow 14 of a watercraft 16 which comprises an elongated conduit assembly 18; a mechanism 20 for securing the elongated conduit assembly 18 in a vertical position alongside a vertical shaft 22 of the trolling motor 12; an elongated pole assembly 24 which passes through the conduit assembly 18; and a mechanism 26 for locking the elongated pole assembly 24 in a manually adjusted position within the conduit assembly 18. The elongated pole assembly 24 can extend down to a given depth into a seafloor to anchor the watercraft 16 at the bow 14, while another type of device 28 can anchor the watercraft 16 at a stem 30 to best position the watercraft 16 with respect to a desired location while factoring in direction of the wind. FIG. 1 b and c, show a close up view of the system 10 in an upright position and a folded position, respectively.

The elongated conduit assembly 18 comprises an aluminum sleeve 32 having an internally threaded bottom end 34 and an internally threaded top end 36; two nylon bushings 38, wherein each bushing 38 is inserted into the internally threaded bottom end 34 and into the internally threaded top end 36 of the sleeve 32; a bottom cap 40 having an externally threaded top shank 42 with a bore 44 extending therethrough, wherein the externally threaded top shank 42 threads into the internally threaded bottom end 34 of the sleeve 32; and a top cap 46 having an externally threaded bottom shank 48 with a bore 50 extending therethrough, wherein the externally threaded bottom shank 48 threads into the internally threaded top end 36 of the sleeve 32.

The securing mechanism 20 comprises two mounting brackets 52, in which each mounting bracket 52 has a pair of spaced apart apertures 54, 56 therethrough, wherein the first aperture 54 engages with the vertical shaft 22 of the trolling motor 12, while the second aperture 56 engages with the sleeve 32 of the elongated conduit assembly 18; and four screws 58, in which the screws 58 hold the mounting brackets 52 in place. In an alternative embodiment, as shown in FIG. 12, the securing mechanism comprises a channel 1212 that is integrated alongside or otherwise within the trolling motor shaft 1210 to thereby produce a trolling motor/conduit assembly 1200. This arrangement supplants the need for brackets that attach to the outside of the trolling motor.

The elongated pole assembly 24 comprises a rod 60 having a bottom pointed tip 62 and an internally threaded top end 64; and a plastic T handle 66 having an externally threaded post 68 which threads into the internally threaded top end 64 of the rod 60, whereby a person can grasp the T handle 66 to lower and raise the rod 60.

The locking mechanism 26 comprises a gimble knob 70 which threads into a side threaded aperture 72 in the top cap 46 to bear against the rod 60 and hold it in place.

It is apparent in view of the teachings herein that embodiments of the invention are particularly useful for utilizing an anchoring system connected to a trolling motor on a watercraft.

According to specific embodiment, as shown in FIG. 10 and 11, the invention pertains to locking mechanism 100 for securing the pole assembly 102 (e.g. push rod or sand spike) to an elongated conduit assembly 106. The locking mechanism 100 comprises a locking sleeve 110 that is situated at a top end 107 of the elongated conduit assembly 106. The locking sleeve 110 has a bottom end 111 rigidly secured to the elongated assembly 106 and a top end 113 that has threads 115 defined thereon. The locking sleeve 110 also has a channel 116 defined therein through which the pole assembly 102 passes through. The top end 113 of the locking sleeve defines a tapered channel portion 117. A tapered bushing 108 sits within the tapered channel portion 117. The tapered bushing 108 also comprises a channel defined therein (not shown) through which the pole assembly 102 passes. A twist nut 104 screws over top of the tapered bushing 108 onto the threads 115. In operation, the locking mechanism 100 engages to the pole assembly 102 via pressure being applied to the tapered bushing 108 by tightening the twist nut 104 onto threads 115. The tapered bushing 108 is urged against the tapered channel portion 117 of the locking sleeve which, in turn, applies pressure thereby causing the tapered bushing 108 to close around the pole assembly 102. The twist nut 104 is turned to apply sufficient pressure to prevent the pole assembly 102 from sliding respective to the elongated conduit assembly 106.

Those skilled in the art will appreciate that in view of the teachings herein there are many suitable materials for making components of the embodiments of the invention. In one embodiment, the brackets of the securing mechanism are made of glass filled nylon and the conduit and pole assemblies are made of fiberglass reinforced plastic. Other suitable materials, such as, but not limited to, metal, wood, and other plastics may be used as materials for the different components.

It will be understood that each of the elements described above, or two or more together, may also find a useful application in other types of constructions differing from the types described above.

While the invention has been illustrated and described as embodiments of a , accordingly it is not limited to the details shown, since it will be understood that various omissions, modifications, substitutions and changes in the forms and details the device illustrated and its operation can be made by those skilled in the art without departing in any way from the sprint of the present invention. The teachings of all of the references cited herein are incorporated by reference to the extent not inconsistent with the teachings herein.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8104418 *Jul 23, 2009Jan 31, 2012Thompson Larry CBoat anchoring system
US8661999Aug 8, 2012Mar 4, 2014Jeffrey Allen BlomShallow water rolling pole anchor
US20140109817 *Oct 19, 2012Apr 24, 2014MAX EDWARD McQUADERetractable shallow water anchor apparatus, and methods of constructing and utilizing same
Classifications
U.S. Classification114/294, 440/36
International ClassificationB63H16/08, B63B21/24, B63H19/08
Cooperative ClassificationB63H20/007, B63B21/26
European ClassificationB63B21/26